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Exam Code: RCDD Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
RCDD Registered Communications Distribution Designer

Number of Questions : 100
Allotted Examination Time : 2.5 Hours

Critical to building infrastructure development, this BICSI flagship program involves design and implementation of telecommunications distribution systems.
Being recognized as a BICSI RCDD has many advantages, including
A positive impact on your professional image
Recognition by the ICT Community as a Subject Matter Expert
New job and promotion opportunities
Higher Salary possibilities
An expanded ICT career field
Those who achieve the RCDD designation have demonstrated their knowledge in the creation, planning, integration, execution and/or detailed-oriented project management of telecommunications and data communications technology.

What you need to know about the RCDD Credential?
- Pinnacle designation in the ICT field
- Recognized by the ICT Community and employers
- Required in bids and job requirements
- Uses the Latest Technologies, Methods and Best Practices
- Opens doors and new opportunities for career growth
- Enhances Credibility
- Recognized Globally
- Built with Your Career in Mind
- Meets the Highest Standards

Dedicated information and communications technology (ICT) professionals such as yourself recognize and understand that holding a BICSI credential makes a difference in your career and the ICT industry. After earning the Registered Communications Distribution Designer® (RCDD®) credential, you will be recognized as an elite professional, knowledgeable and experienced in leading-edge ICT design principles. We appreciate your professional commitment in demonstrating the highest, global standard by acquiring an RCDD certification.
We develop and deliver the highest-quality credentialing programs that validate mastery in the field of ICT and contribute to the continued improvement of individual and organizational performance. We work closely with ICT professionals around the world to ensure that our programs are up-to-date and relevant for todays competitive business environments. This handbook provides an overview of the RCDD credential, including eligibility and recertification requirements. You will find detailed information to help guide you through the entire certification process.

Applicants must meet specific educational and/or work experience criteria at the time they submit their application in order to be eligible to take the RCDD exam. The requirements are outlined below:
Option #1: 2 years of verifiable full-time work experience in ICT design AND a current BICSI certification holder in TECH, RTPM, DCDC or OSP.
Option #2: 2 years of verifiable full-time equivalent work experience in ICT design AND completion of 2 years of higher education course work in ICT. 2 years of higher education course work in ICT may include:
• STEM or Trade school
• Two-year degree
• ICT and industry related programs, apprenticeships or certifications
• Military training equivalent
Option #3: 5 years of verifiable ICT experience
Definitions and Examples
ICT Design related work experience includes the following:
• User requirements and needs analysis
• Site surveys
• Operational requirements, schematics or conceptual drawings
• Coordinate with Architects, Professional Engineers (PE), Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ), vendors, trades, design teams, and/or stakeholders
• Review and comply with standards, codes and AHJ requirements
• Review and/or creation of:
○ Request for Proposal (RFP)
○ Request for Qualification (RFQ)
○ Scope of Work (SOW)
• Detailed design, specifications and drawings including:
○ Structured cabling systems and pathways
○ Rack positioning and layout drawings
○ Grounding and bonding systems
○ Telecommunications spaces
• Project documents, including but not limited to:
○ Design drawings
○ Project specifications
○ Bill of Materials (BOM)
○ Bid documents and pricing
○ Record drawings (as-builts)
• Support and assess the installation process
Evidence of completion of higher education course
work includes:
• Certificates
• Diplomas
• Registrars documentation
• Other bona fide documents

You can expect an RCDD to follow current standards and best practices for improved quality and performance, including standards established and/or contributed to by: BICSI, Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA), American Institute of Architects (AIA) and Construction Specifications Institute (CSI).
RCDDs are required to demonstrate proficiency across a wide range of areas within structured cabling systems, including network, outside plant, wireless and electronic safety and security design, data centers and building automation systems (BAS). This expanded knowledge enables the RCDD to advise the owner/end user of the appropriate IT, AV and security requirements. The RCDD has learned to perform the design tasks related to these systems, including construction drawings and specifications.
The U.S. Courts Design Guide1 requires that pathways and spaces be designed by an RCDD. Both the U.S. Defense Departments Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC)- Telecommunications Building Cabling Systems Planning and Design2 and the Armys Technical Criteria for the Installation Information Infrastructure Architecture3 require an RCDD to provide design services. During the Expansion of the Abu Dhabi International Airport4 in the United Arab Emirates it was required that the Testing Field Supervisor be an RCDD and that cabling installers have an RCDD on staff.

1 Principles of Transmission
2 Electromagnetic Compatibility
3 Telecommunications Spaces
4 Backbone Distribution Systems
5 Horizontal Distribution Systems
6 ITS Cables and Connecting Hardware
7 Firestop Systems
8 Bonding and Grounding (Earthing)
9 Power Distribution
10 Telecommunications Administration
11 Field Testing of Structured Cabling
12 Outside Plant
13 Audiovisual Systems
14 Building Automation Systems
15 Data Networks
16 Wireless Networks
17 Electronic Safety and Security
18 Data Centers
19 Health Care
20 Residential Cabling
21 Business Development and Project Management

1. Maintain a high standard of professional conduct.
2. Protect and enhance the reputation of the BICSI organization, the credentialing program and my credential through my actions.
3. Maintain the confidentiality of privileged information entrusted or known to me by virtue of my profession or position, unless disclosure is required by law or agreement.
4. Be accurate and truthful in my dealings with clients and be careful not to misrepresent the quality, availability or ability of the services I provide.
5. Never, under any circumstances, make a recommendation misrepresenting or misstating any other individuals qualifications, abilities or accomplishments.
6. Provide unbiased, accurate and objective assessments for all safety and operational deficiencies that may be discovered during the performance of my services.
7. Refrain from representing competitors to clients, or the public, by the use of false and misleading statements or malicious actions, but rather work and compete with them in a reasonable and professional manner for the benefit and advancement of our profession.
8. Refrain from using false and misleading statements or malicious actions that might injure another persons reputation or bring harm to their person or property.
9. Respect a clients decision in the selection of competitive services, and continue to offer and provide that client with quality services for as long as is necessary or requested.
10. Serve all members of the public impartially, providing no substandard service based on that individuals age, race, national origin, color, sex, sexual orientation, disability or religious belief.
11. Adhere to all relevant codes, laws, ICT industry standards and BICSI methodologies, where appropriate.
12. Take personal responsibility to ensure that all requirements necessary for the renewal of any BICSI credential that I hold is met on, or before, the expiration date.
13. Be accurate, honest and truthful in the presentation of all educational material or in the preparation of material orders and product availability.
14. I will not misrepresent my BICSI credential nor willingly allow others to do so.

Registered Communications Distribution Designer
BICSI Communications basics
Killexams : BICSI Communications basics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/RCDD Search results Killexams : BICSI Communications basics - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/RCDD https://killexams.com/exam_list/BICSI Killexams : Best Computer Hardware Certifications

Becoming a computer technician is a great point of entry into the IT field. In addition, computer hardware certifications can help demonstrate your knowledge and competency in maintaining computers, mobile devices, printers and more. Below, you’ll find our pick of six computer hardware certifications to help you get your IT career off the ground.

Although we cover our favorite hardware certifications here, the idea that hardware can operate independently of software (or vice versa) isn’t true. If you dig into the curriculum for any specific hardware-related certs in any depth, you’ll quickly realize that software is in control of hardware.

Software comes into play for installation, configuration, maintenance, troubleshooting and just about any other activity you can undertake with hardware. The hardware label simply indicates that devices are involved, not that hardware is all that’s involved.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order, by certification)

Certification SimplyHired Indeed LinkedIn Jobs LinkUp.com Total
A+ (CompTIA) 1,566 2,396 2,282 2,187 8,431
ACMT (Apple) 134 258 196 44 632
BICSI Technician (BICSI) 384 657 30 92 1,163
CCT (Cisco) 473 826 601 722 2,622
RCDD (BICSI) 276 378 377 104 1,135
Server+ (CompTIA) 2,318 3,064 1,250 1,069 7,701

Differing factors, such as specific job role, locality and experience level, may impact salary potential. In general, hardware professionals can expect to earn somewhere in the mid-$60,000s. SimplyHired reports average earnings at $71,946 for IT technicians, with highs reported at almost $116,000. The average national salary for computer hardware technicians ranges from about $31,000 to more than $53,000. However, some certifications command higher salaries. Certification Magazine’s “Annual Salary Survey” (Salary Survey 2018) average salaries for CompTIA Server+ at $98,060 and the A+ credential at $97,730.

CompTIA A+

The CompTIA A+ certification is the granddaddy and best known of all hardware credentials. For anyone serious about working with PCs, laptops, mobile devices, printers or operating systems, the A+ should at least be on their radar, if not in their game plan.

Since the first A+ credential was awarded in March 1993, the program continues to draw active interest and participation. With more than 1 million IT professionals now possessing the A+ credential, it is something of a checkbox item for PC technicians and support professionals. It also appears in a great many job postings or advertisements.

A+ is also ISO 17024 compliant and accredited by ANSI. Thus, this credential must be renewed every three years in keeping with concomitant requirements for continuing education or regular examinations to maintain certification currency. Some 20 continuing education units (CEUs) are required for renewal.

Earning an A+ from CompTIA involves passing two exams: 220-901 and 220-902. test 220-901 focuses on hardware, networking, mobile devices, connectivity and troubleshooting. test 220-902 draws on knowledge of installing and configuring common operating systems (Windows, Linux, OS X, Android and iOS). It also covers issues related to cloud computing, security and operational procedures. Candidates will find a variety of question formats, including standard multiple-choice, drag-and-drop and performance-based questions on these exams.

Candidates who earn the A+ often find themselves in job roles that include technical support specialist, field service technician, IT support technician, IT support administrator or IT support specialist. The A+ is recognized by the U.S. Department of Defense (in DoD Directive 8140/8570.01-M). Also, technology companies, such as Ricoh, Nissan, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Dell, HP and Intel, require staff to earn the A+ certification to fill certain positions.

The A+ certification encompasses broad coverage of PC hardware and software, networking and security in its overall technical scope.

A+ Facts and Figures

Certification name  CompTIA A+
Prerequisites & required courses 9-12 months of experience recommended
Number of exams  Two exams (maximum of 90 questions, 90 minutes): 220-901 and 220-902 (CompTIA Academy Partners use the same numbers)
Cost per exam  $211 per exam. Exams administered by Pearson VUE. test vouchers available at CompTIA
URL  https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/a
Self-study materials CompTIA offers several self-study materials, including test objectives, trial questions and study guides ($178 for the eBook $198 for the print edition), as well as classroom and e-learning training opportunities. Credential seekers may also want to check out the CertMaster online learning tool. Links to CompTIA training materials may be found on the certification webpage.

Recommended books:

CompTIA A+ 220-901 and 220-902 test Cram, 1st Edition, by David L. Prowse, published Jan. 30, 2016, Pearson IT Certifications, test Cram Series, ISBN-10: 0789756315, ISBN-13: 978-0789756312

CompTIA A+ Certification All-in-One test Guide, 9th Edition (Exams 220-901 and 220-902) by Michael Meyers, published Jan. 4, 2016, McGraw-Hill Education, ISBN-10: 1125958951X, ISBN-13: 978-1259589515

ACMT: Apple Certified Macintosh Technician

Given the popularity of Apple products and platforms, and widespread use of Macintosh computers in homes and businesses of all sizes, there’s demand galore for Mac-savvy technicians.

The AppleCare Mac Technician (ACMT) 2018 credential is Apple’s latest hardware-related ACMT certification. (The credential was formerly called the Apple Certified Macintosh Technician or Apple Certified Mac Technician.) Per Apple, the ACMT 2018 “qualifies a technician to repair all the Mac products that were covered by prior ACMT certifications, plus all other Mac products that were produced before April 2018.” Technicians with the ACMT certification who work at an Apple-authorized service facility are allowed to perform service and repairs.

The ACMT’s two required exams are the Apple Service Fundamentals and the ACMT 2018 Mac Service Certification. Service Fundamentals focuses on customer experience skills, ESD and safety, troubleshooting and deductive reasoning, and product knowledge. The Mac Service test covers troubleshooting and repair of Mac hardware (mainly Apple iMac and MacBook Pro systems). Note that the Apple Service Fundamentals test is also required for the Apple Certified iOS Technician (ACiT) 2018 certification.

The ACMT 2018 is a permanent credential and does not require annual recertification. However, as new products are added to the Apple portfolio, AppleCare will make associated courses available through Apple Technical Learning Administration System (ATLAS). You must complete these courses to service new products.

ACMT Facts and Figures

Certification name AppleCare Mac Technician (ACMT) 2017
Prerequisites & required courses AppleCare Technician Training recommended
Number of exams Two exams (must be taken in this order):

Apple Service Fundamentals test (SCV-17A) OR Apple Service

Fundamentals test (SVC-18A)

PLUS

ACMT 2018 Mac Service Certification test (MAC-18A) Each exam: 70 questions, 2 hours, 80 percent passing score

Tests administered by Pearson VUE; Apple Tech ID number required

Cost per exam TBD
URL https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT205332
Self-study materials Self-paced training: Apple Technical Learning Administration System (ATLAS)

AppleCare Technician Training, $299

Instructor-led training courses: LearnQuest

BICSI Technician and Registered Communications Distribution Designer

BICSI is a professional association that supports the information and communications technology (ICT) industry, mainly in the areas of voice, data, audio and video, electronic safety and security, and project management. BICSI offers training, certification and education to its 23,000-plus members, many of who are designers, installers and technicians.

BICSI offers several certifications aimed at ICT professionals, who mainly deal with cabling and related technologies. Two credentials, the BICSI Technician and the BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD) are pertinent (and popular) in this story.

The BICSI Technician recognizes individuals who lead an installation group or team, perform advanced testing and troubleshooting of cable installations, evaluate cabling requirements, recommend solutions based on standards and best practices, and roll out new and retrofit projects. Technicians must be well versed in both copper and fiber cabling.

Candidates need a good deal of knowledge about the hardware, networking devices and communications equipment to which they connect cables.

To earn the credential, candidates must pass a single two-part test consisting of a hands-on practical evaluation and a written exam. In addition, candidates must possess at least three years of verifiable ICT industry installation experience within the past five years. Credentials are valid for three years. Certification holders must earn 18 hours of continuing education credits (CECs) in each three-year credentialing cycle and pay the current renewal fees to maintain this credential.

Interested candidates should also check out other BICSI certifications, such as the Installer 1 (INST1), Installer 2 Copper (INSTC) and Installer 2 Optical Fiber (INSTF).

An advanced credential, the Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD) is so well respected that the Department of Defense Unified Facilities requires RCDD for all telecom-related design projects. The RCDD is geared toward experienced ICT practitioners with at least five years of ICT design experience. Alternatively, candidates who do not have the requisite experience but who possess at least two years of design experience plus three years of knowledge “equivalents” (combination of approved education, certifications or education), may also sit for the exam. All experience must have been within the preceding 10 years.

RCDD candidates should be able to create and prepare system design specifications and plans, as well as recommended best practices for security design requirements, for business automation systems. RCDDs are also well versed in data center, cabling systems and design for wireless, network, and electronic security systems.

To earn the credential, candidates must meet the experience requirements, submit the application plus credentialing fees, along with a current resume. In addition, candidates must submit four letters of reference two of which much be from current or former clients. One reference may be personal while the remaining references must come from the candidate’s employer.

Other advanced BICSI certifications include the  Outside Plant (OSP) Designer, Data Center Design Consultant (DCDC) and Registered Telecommunication Project Manager (RTPM).

BICSI Technician Facts and Figures

Certification name BICSI Technician
Prerequisites & required courses Three or more years of verifiable ICT industry installation experience (must be within past five years to qualify)

Adhere to the BICSI Code of Ethics and Standards of Conduct

Physical requirements: Distinguish between colors, stand for extended periods, lift and carry up to 50 pounds, climb ladders, and possess manual dexterity necessary to perform fine motor tasks

Technician test prereqs: Both the Installer 2, Copper and Installer 2, Optical Fiber credentials OR the Installer 2 credential

Note: There are no additional credentials required for candidates attempting the Technician Skip-Level exam.

Recommended prerequisites:

50 hours review of BICSI Information Technology Systems Installation Methods Manual (ITSIMM)

TE350: BICSI Technician Training course ($2,545)

IN225: Installer 2 Copper Training course ($2,305)

IN250: Installer 2 Optical Fiber Training course ($2,505)

Number of exams One two-part exam, including written test (140 multiple-choice questions*) and hands-on, performance-based test (hands-on performance test delivered last day of TE350 course; written test administered the day after the completion of the TE350 course)

*If the candidate doesn’t have both the Copper and Optical Fiber Installer 2 credentials or an Installer 2 credential, the written Skip Level test will have 170 questions.

Cost per exam $295 (non-refundable application fee must be received by BICSI 15 days prior to exam; retake fee of $130 applies)
Self-study materials Information Technology System Installation Methods Manual, 7th edition electronic download, $220 member/$240 non-member; print and download combo, $260 member/$290 non-member; printed manual, $220 member/$240 non-member, Web-based training through BICSI CONNECT

BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD) Facts and Figures

Certification name BICSI Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD)
Prerequisites & required courses Five or more years of verifiable ICT industry design experience (must be within past 10 years to qualify)

OR

Two or more years of verifiable ICT design experience (must be within the past ten years) plus three additional years of ICT equivalents from approved education, experience, or ICT licenses or certification (CCNA, for example)

Adhere to the BICSI Code of Ethics and Standards of Conduct

Recommended prerequisites:

Minimum of 125-150 hours review of BICSI’s Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual (TDMM)

DD101: Foundations of Telecommunications Distribution Design ($1,030) (BICSI  CONNECT online course)

DD102: Designing Telecommunications Distribution Systems ($2,815)

125-150 hours of TDMM study

TDMM flash cards ($275)

RCDD Test Preparation Course ($925) (BICSI CONNECT online course)

Number of exams One test (100 questions, 2.5 hours)
Cost per exam $495 BICSI member/$725 non-member application fee, (non-refundable application fee must be received by BICSI 15 days prior to exam; retake fee of $225 BISCI member/$340 non-member)
URL https://www.bicsi.org/education-certification/certification/registered-communications-distribution-designer
Self-study materials Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, 13th edition (TDMM) electronic download ($310 member/$380 non-member; print and download combo, $350 member/$435 non-member; printed manual, $310 member/$380 non-member)

Web-based training through BICSI CONNECT

CTT Routing & Switching: Cisco Certified Technician Routing & Switching

Cisco certifications are valued throughout the tech industry. The Cisco Certified Technician, or CCT, certification is an entry-level credential that demonstrates a person’s ability to support and maintain Cisco networking devices at a customer site.

The Routing & Switching credential best fits our list of best computer hardware certifications, and it serves as an essential foundation for supporting Cisco devices and systems in general.

The CCT requires passing a single exam. syllabus include identification of Cisco equipment and related hardware, such as switches and routers, general networking and service knowledge, working with the Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC), and describing Cisco IOS software operating modes. Candidates should also have a working knowledge of Cisco command-line interface (CLI) commands for connecting to and remotely servicing Cisco products.

CCT Routing & Switching Facts and Figures

Certification name Cisco Certified Technician (CCT) Routing & Switching
Prerequisites & required courses None

Recommended training: Supporting Cisco Routing and Switching Network Devices (RSTECH) ($299)

Number of exams One: 640-692 RSTECH (60-70 questions, 90 minutes)
Cost per exam  $125

Exam administered by Pearson VUE.

URL  http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/certifications/entry/cct/rs/index.html
Self-study materials Cisco Study Material page provides links to the course, study groups, test tutorials, and other related content, including test syllabus, training videos and seminars.

CompTIA Server+

CompTIA also offers a server-related certification, which steps up from basic PC hardware, software, and networking syllabus to the more demanding, powerful, and expensive capabilities in the same vein usually associated with server systems.

The CompTIA Server+ credential goes beyond basic syllabus to include coverage of more advanced storage systems, IT environments, virtualization, and disaster recovery and business continuity topics. It also puts a strong emphasis on best practices and procedures for server problem diagnosis and troubleshooting. Although Server+ is vendor-neutral in coverage, organizations such as HP, Dell, Intel, Microsoft, Xerox, Lenovo and HP use Server+ credentialed technicians.

Those who work or want to work in server rooms or data centers, with and around servers on a regular basis, will find the Server+ credential worth studying for and earning. It can also be a steppingstone into vendor-specific server technician training programs at such companies as those mentioned above, or with their authorized resellers and support partners.

Note that the CompTIA Server+ test is still listed on that organization’s website as “good for life,” meaning it does not impose a renewal or continuing education requirement on its holders. The SK0-004 launched on July 31, 2015. Typically, exams are available for at least two years. If CompTIA’s revision history for Server+ is any guide to future updates and revisions, then it’s likely that we’ll see a new test making an appearance sometime before the end of 2019.

Server+ Facts and Figures

Certification name  CompTIA Server+
Prerequisites & required courses  No prerequisites

Recommended experience includes CompTIA A+ certification plus a minimum of 18-24 months IT-related experience

Number of exams  One: SK0-004 (100 questions, 90 minutes, 750 out of 900 passing score)
Cost per exam $302. test administered by Pearson VUE. test vouchers available at CompTIA.
URL  https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/server
Self-study materials CompTIA offers a number of self-study materials, including test objectives, its CertMaster online study tool, trial questions, books and more. Formal training courses are also offered. Links to CompTIA training courses may be found on the certification web page. Additional resources may also be found at the CompTIA Marketplace.

Recommended:

CompTIA Server+ Study Guide: test SK0-004, 1st edition, by Troy McMillan, published June 20, 2016, Sybex, ISBN-10: 1119137829, ISBN-13: 978-1119137825

Beyond the Top 5: More hardware certifications

There are many more hardware-oriented certifications available that you might want to consider. As you get into IT and start to develop a sense of your own interests and observe the hardware systems and solutions around, you’ll be able to dig deeper into this arena.

You can investigate all the major system vendors (including HP, Dell, IBM, and other PC and server makers) as well as networking and infrastructures companies (such as Juniper and Fortinet) to find hardware-related training and certification to occupy you throughout a long and successful career.

Although ExpertRating offers many credentials, we rejected them after viewing several complaints regarding the general quality of the courses. Obviously, such complaints are from disgruntled customers but were enough to make us proceed with caution.

This is also an area where constant change in tools and technology is the norm. That means a course of lifelong learning will be essential to help you stay current on what’s in your working world today and likely to show up on the job soon.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10759-hardware-certifications.html
Killexams : BICSI® brings industry-leading certifications under BICSI ICT Certification Institute umbrella

Commercial Information Communications Technology infrastructure gets elevated, recognition boost from BICSI certified professionals

TAMPA, Fla., Sept. 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- BICSI, the association advancing the information and communications technology (ICT) profession, is launching the BICSI ICT Certification Institute, at this week's 2022 BICSI Fall Conference and Exhibition being held at Mandalay Bay Hotel and Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada on 25-29 September 2022 where thousands of ICT professionals from around the globe are learning and networking during this premier conference. This global institute is the distillation of the ethics, experience and excellence embodied by each BICSI certification.

For nearly 40 years, BICSI has set the global standard for ICT expertise and excellence, developing, and advancing the professions of cable installers, project managers, designers and consultants. BICSI certifications have helped more than 16,000 professionals achieve new competencies that drive personal and professional results. Professionals who obtain and maintain BICSI's ICT Certifications demonstrate to clients, employers, and peers their dedication to the profession and commitment to upholding high standards of integrity and excellence in professional practice.

This institute encompasses BICSI's seven certifications and one certificate:

  • Registered Communications Distribution Designer® (RCDD®)

  • Data Center Design Consultant® (DCDC®)

  • Registered Telecommunications Project Manager® (RTPM®)

  • Outside Plant Designer (OSP™)

  • BICSI Cabling Installation Installer 1® (INST1®), Installer 2, Copper® (INSTC®), Installer 2, Optical Fiber ® (INSTF®), Technician™ (TECH™)

All BICSI certification programs – from entry level to advanced – are thoroughly developed and routinely maintained following accreditation standards led by globally diverse subject matter experts who help ensure the certifications truly reflect emerging practice, advanced technology, real-life case studies and best practices.

"We're proud of the rigor behind BICSI certification programs and the work ethic, experience and excellence embodied by each BICSI certification, from the installer to the RCDD," BICSI Board President Carol Everett Oliver said. "We are giving voice to the ethos of excellence through the BICSI ICT Certification Institute, unifying and elevating our certification portfolio by bringing them together under this new shared identity."

About BICSI: BICSI is a professional association supporting the advancement of the information and communications technology (ICT) profession and currently serves more than 26,000 members and credential holders. BICSI is the preeminent resource for the Connected World. Headquartered in Tampa, Florida, USA, BICSI membership spans nearly 100 countries. www.bicsi.org

Cision

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bicsi-brings-industry-leading-certifications-under-bicsi-ict-certification-institute-umbrella-301634399.html

SOURCE BICSI

Fri, 07 Oct 2022 02:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/bicsi-brings-industry-leading-certifications-150000976.html
Killexams : Basics Of JavaScript SEO For Ecommerce: What You Need To Know

JavaScript (JS) is extremely popular in the ecommerce world because it helps create a seamless and user-friendly experience for shoppers.

Take, for instance, loading items on category pages, or dynamically updating products on the site using JS.

While this is great news for ecommerce sites, JavaScript poses several challenges for SEO pros.

Google is consistently working on improving its search engine, and a big part of its effort is dedicated to making sure its crawlers can access JavaScript content.

But, ensuring that Google seamlessly crawls JS sites isn’t easy.

In this post, I’ll share everything you need to know about JS SEO for ecommerce and how you can Improve your organic performance.

Let’s begin!

How JavaScript Works For Ecommerce Sites

When building an ecommerce site, developers use HTML for content and organization, CSS for design, and JavaScript for interaction with backend servers.

JavaScript plays three prominent roles within ecommerce websites.

1. Adding Interactivity To A Web Page

The objective of adding interactivity is to allow users to see changes based on their actions, like scrolling or filling out forms.

For instance: a product image changes when the shopper hovers the mouse over it. Or hovering the mouse makes the image rotate 360 degrees, allowing the shopper to get a better view of the product.

All of this enhances user experience (UX) and helps buyers decide on their purchases.

JavaScript adds such interactivity to sites, allowing marketers to engage visitors and drive sales.

2. Connecting To Backend Servers

JavaScript allows better backend integration using Asynchronous JavaScript (AJAX) and Extensible Markup Language (XML).

It allows web applications to send and retrieve data from the server asynchronously while upholding UX.

In other words, the process doesn’t interfere with the display or behavior of the page.

Otherwise, if visitors wanted to load another page, they would have to wait for the server to respond with a new page. This is annoying and can cause shoppers to leave the site.

So, JavaScript allows dynamic, backend-supported interactions – like updating an item and seeing it updated in the cart – right away.

Similarly, it powers the ability to drag and drop elements on a web page.

3. Web Tracking And Analytics

JavaScript offers real-time tracking of page views and heatmaps that tell you how far down people are studying your content.

For instance, it can tell you where their mouse is or what they clicked (click tracking).

This is how JS powers tracking user behavior and interaction on webpages.

How Do Search Bots Process JS?

Google processes JS in three stages, namely: crawling, rendering, and indexing.

As you can see in this image, Google’s bots put the pages in the queue for crawling and rendering. During this phase, the bots scan the pages to assess new content.

When a URL is retrieved from the crawl queue by sending an HTTP request, it first accesses your robots.txt file to check if you’ve permitted Google to crawl the page.

If it’s disallowed, the bots will ignore it and not send an HTTP request.

In the second stage, rendering, the HTML, CSS, and JavaScript files are processed and transformed into a format that can be easily indexed by Google.

In the final stage, indexing, the rendered content is added to Google’s index, allowing it to appear in the SERPs.

Common JavaScript SEO Challenges With Ecommerce Sites

JavaScript crawling is a lot more complex than traditional HTML sites.

The process is quicker in the case of the latter.

Check out this quick comparison.

Traditional HTML Site Crawling JavaScript Crawling
1 Bots download the HTML file 1 Bots download the HTML file
2 They extract the links to add them to their crawl queue 2 They find no link in the source code because they are only injected after JS execution
3 They download the CSS files 3 Bots download CSS and JS files
4 They send the downloaded resources to Caffeine, Google’s indexer 4 Bots use the Google Web Rendering Service (WRS) to parse and execute JS
5 Voila! The pages are indexed 5 WRS fetches data from the database and external APIs
6 Content is indexed
7 Bots can finally discover new links and add them to the crawl queue

Thus, with JS-rich ecommerce sites, Google finds it tough to index content or discover links before the page is rendered.

In fact, in a webinar on how to migrate a website to JavaScript, Sofiia Vatulyak, a renowned JS SEO expert, shared,

“Though JavaScript offers several useful features and saves resources for the web server, not all search engines can process it. Google needs time to render and index JS pages. Thus, implementing JS while upholding SEO is challenging.”

Here are the top JS SEO challenges ecommerce marketers should be aware of.

Limited Crawl Budget

Ecommerce websites often have a massive (and growing!) volume of pages that are poorly organized.

These sites have extensive crawl budget requirements, and in the case of JS websites, the crawling process is lengthy.

Also, outdated content, such as orphan and zombie pages, can cause a huge wastage of the crawl budget.

Limited Render Budget

As mentioned earlier, to be able to see the content loaded by JS in the browser, search bots have to render it. But rendering at scale demands time and computational resources.

In other words, like a crawl budget, each website has a render budget. If that budget is spent, the bot will leave, delaying the discovery of content and consuming extra resources.

Google renders JS content in the second round of indexing.

It’s important to show your content within HTML, allowing Google to access it.

Go to the Inspect element on your page and search for some of the content. If you cannot find it there, search engines will have trouble accessing it.

Troubleshooting Issues For JavaScript Websites Is Tough

Most JS websites face crawlability and obtainability issues.

For instance, JS content limits a bot’s ability to navigate pages. This affects its indexability.

Similarly, bots cannot figure out the context of the content on a JS page, thus limiting their ability to rank the page for specific keywords.

Such issues make it tough for ecommerce marketers to determine the rendering status of their web pages.

In such a case, using an advanced crawler or log analyzer can help.

Tools like Semrush Log File Analyzer, Google Search Console Crawl Stats, and JetOctopus, among others, offer a full-suite log management solution, allowing webmasters to better understand how search bots interact with web pages.

JetOctopus, for instance, has JS rendering functionality.

Check out this GIF that shows how the tool views JS pages as a Google bot.

Similarly, Google Search Console Crawl Stats shares a useful overview of your site’s crawl performance.

The crawl stats are sorted into:

  • Kilobytes downloaded per day show the number of kilobytes bots download each time they visit the website.
  • Pages crawled per day shows the number of pages the bots crawl per day (low, average, or high).
  • Time spent downloading a page tells you the amount of time bots take to make an HTTP request for the crawl. Less time taken means faster crawling and indexing.

Client-Side Rendering On Default

Ecommerce sites that are built in JS frameworks like React, Angular, or Vue are, by default, set to client-side rendering (CSR).

With this setting, the bots will not be able to see what’s on the page, thus causing rendering and indexing issues.

Large And Unoptimized JS Files

JS code prevents critical website resources from loading quickly. This negatively affects UX and SEO.

Top Optimization Tactics For JavaScript Ecommerce Sites

1. Check If Your JavaScript Has SEO Issues

Here are three quick tests to run on different page templates of your site, namely the homepage, category or product listing pages, product pages, blog pages, and supplementary pages.

URL Inspection Tool

Access the Inspect URL report in your Google Search Console.

Enter the URL you want to test.

Next, press View Tested Page and move to the screenshot of the page. If you see this section blank (like in this screenshot), Google has issues rendering this page.

Repeat these steps for all of the relevant ecommerce page templates shared earlier.

Run A Google Search

Running a site search will help you determine if the URL is in Google’s index.

First, check the no-index and canonical tags. You want to ensure that your canonicals are self-referencing and there’s no index tag on the page.

Next, go to Google search and enter – Site:yourdomain.com inurl:your url


This screenshot shows that Target’s “About Us” page is indexed by Google.

If there’s some issue with your site’s JS, you’ll either not see this result or get a result that’s similar to this, but Google will not have any meta information or anything readable.

Go For Content Search

At times, Google may index pages, but the content is unreadable. This final test will help you assess if Google can read your content.

Gather a bunch of content from your page templates and enter it on Google to see the results.

Let’s take some content from Macy’s.

Macy's content

Screenshot from Macy’s, September 2022

No problems here!

But check out what happens with this content on Kroger. It’s a nightmare!

Though spotting JavaScript SEO problems is more complex than this, these three tests will help you quickly assess if your ecommerce Javascript has SEO issues.

Follow these tests with a detailed JS website audit using an SEO crawler that can help identify if your website failed when executing JS, and if some code isn’t working properly.

For instance, a few SEO crawlers have a list of features that can help you understand this in detail:

  • The “JavaScript performance” report offers a list of all the errors.
  • The “browser performance events” chart shows the time of lifecycle events when loading JS pages. It helps you identify the page elements that are the slowest to load.
  • The  “load time distribution” report shows the pages that are fast or slow. If you click on these data columns, you can further analyze the slow pages in detail.

2. Implement Dynamic Rendering

How your website renders code impacts how Google will index your JS content. Hence, you need to know how JavaScript rendering occurs.

Server-Side Rendering

In this, the rendered page (rendering of pages happens on the server) is sent to the crawler or the browser (client). Crawling and indexing are similar to HTML pages.

But implementing server-side rendering (SSR) is often challenging for developers and can increase server load.

Further, the Time to First Byte (TTFB) is slow because the server renders pages on the go.

One thing developers should remember when implementing SSR is to refrain from using functions operating directly in the DOM.

Client-Side Rendering

Here, the JavaScript is rendered by the client using the DOM. This causes several computing issues when search bots attempt to crawl, render, and index content.

A viable alternative to SSR and CSR is dynamic rendering that switches between client and server-side rendered content for specific user agents.

It allows developers to deliver the site’s content to users who access it using JS code generated in the browser.

However, it presents only a static version to the bots. Google officially supports implementing dynamic rendering.

To deploy dynamic rendering, you can use tools like Prerender.io or Puppeteer.

These can help you serve a static HTML version of your Javascript website to the crawlers without any negative impact on CX.

Dynamic rendering is a great solution for ecommerce websites that usually hold lots of content that change frequently or rely on social media sharing (containing embeddable social media walls or widgets).

3. Route Your URLs Properly

JavaScript frameworks use a router to map clean URLs. Hence, it is critical to update page URLs when updating content.

For instance, JS frameworks like Angular and Vue generate URLs with a hash (#) like www.example.com/#/about-us

Such URLs are ignored by Google bots during the indexing process. So, it is not advisable to use #.

Instead, use static-looking URLs like http://www.example.com/about-us

4. Adhere To The Internal Linking Protocol

Internal links help Google efficiently crawl the site and highlight the important pages.

A poor linking structure can be harmful to SEO, especially for JS-heavy sites.

One common issue we’ve encountered is when ecommerce sites use JS for links that Google cannot crawl, such as onclick or button-type links.

Check this out:

<a href=”/important-link”onclick=”changePage(‘important-link’)”>Crawl this</a>

If you want Google bots to discover and follow your links, ensure they are plain HTML.

Google recommends interlinking pages using HTML anchor tags with href attributes and asks webmasters to avoid JS event handlers.

5. Use Pagination

Pagination is critical for JS-rich ecommerce websites with thousands of products that retailers often opt to spread across several pages for better UX.

Allowing users to scroll infinitely may be good for UX, but isn’t necessarily SEO-friendly. This is because bots don’t interact with such pages and cannot trigger events to load more content.

Eventually, Google will reach a limit (stop scrolling) and leave. So, most of your content gets ignored, resulting in a poor ranking.

Make sure you use <a href> links to allow Google to see the second page of pagination.

For instance, use this:

<a href=”https://example.com/shoes/”>

6. Lazy Load Images

Though Google supports lazy loading, it doesn’t scroll through content when visiting a page.

It resizes the page’s virtual viewport, making it longer during the crawling process. And because the  “scroll” event listener isn’t triggered, this content isn’t rendered.

Thus, if you have images below the fold, like most ecommerce websites, it’s critical to lazy load them, allowing Google to see all your content.

7. Allow Bots To Crawl JS

This may seem obvious, but on several occasions, we’ve seen ecommerce sites accidentally blocking JavaScript (.js) files from being crawled.

This will cause JS SEO issues, as the bots will not be able to render and index that code.

Check your robots.txt file to see if the JS files are open and available for crawling.

8. Audit Your JS Code

Finally, ensure you audit your JavaScript code to optimize it for the search engines.

Use tools like Google Webmaster Tools, Chrome Dev Tools, and Ahrefs and an SEO crawler like JetOctopus to run a successful JS SEO audit.

Google Search Console

This platform can help you optimize your site and monitor your organic performance. Use GSC to monitor Googlebot and WRS activity.

For JS websites, GSC allows you to see problems in rendering. It reports crawl errors and issues notifications for missing JS elements that have been blocked for crawling.

Chrome Dev Tools

These web developer tools are built into Chrome for ease of use.

The platform lets you inspect rendered HTML (or DOM) and the network activity of your web pages.

From its Network tab, you can easily identify the JS and CSS resources loaded before the DOM.

Ahrefs

Ahrefs allows you to effectively manage backlink-building, content audits, keyword research, and more. It can render web pages at scale and allows you to check for JavaScript redirects.

You can also enable JS in Site Audit crawls to unlock more insights.

The Ahrefs Toolbar supports JavaScript and shows a comparison of HTML to rendered versions of tags.

JetOctopus SEO Crawler And Log Analyzer

JetOctopus is an SEO crawler and log analyzer that allows you to effortlessly audit common ecommerce SEO issues.

Since it can view and render JS as a Google bot, ecommerce marketers can solve JavaScript SEO issues at scale.

Its JS Performance tab offers comprehensive insights into JavaScript execution – First Paint, First Contentful Paint, and page load.

It also shares the time needed to complete all JavaScript requests with the JS errors that need immediate attention.

GSC integration with JetOctopus can help you see the complete dynamics of your site performance.

Ryte UX Tool

Ryte is another tool that’s capable of crawling and checking your javascript pages. It will render the pages and check for errors, helping you troubleshoot issues and check the usability of your dynamic pages.

seoClarity

seoClarity is an enterprise platform with many features. Like the other tools, it features dynamic rendering, letting you check how the javascript on your website performs.

Summing Up

Ecommerce sites are real-world examples of dynamic content injected using JS.

Hence, ecommerce developers rave about how JS lets them create highly interactive ecommerce pages.

On the other hand, many SEO pros dread JS because they’ve experienced declining organic traffic after their site started relying on client-side rendering.

Though both are right, the fact is that JS-reliant websites too can perform well in the SERP.

Follow the tips shared in this guide to get one step closer to leveraging JavaScript in the most effective way possible while upholding your site’s ranking in the SERP.

More resources:


Featured Image: Visual Generation/Shutterstock

Fri, 16 Sep 2022 01:55:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.searchenginejournal.com/basics-of-javascript-seo-for-ecommerce/463663/
Killexams : BICSI Fall Conference & Exhibition 2022

Caesars Entertainment strode into 2022 with its sights set on making the year one of innovation and renovation for the Empire as the company announced a $400 million, Las Vegas-style makeover for its Atlantic City properties. The master plan for the company’s three East Coast properties -- Caesars, Harrah’s, and Tropicana -- involves interior renovations, new celebrity dining concepts, and more to create the ultimate seaside conference destination. 

Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.tsnn.com/events/bicsi-fall-conference-exhibition-2022
Killexams : Unix Basics It Pays To Know

When writing about digital technology, or any topic, is something you do, it takes time to accumulate credibility. Even if you put in the study time up front to know your stuff, building trust takes time.

I’ve been fortunate that, after years expanding my portfolio and the knowledge base under it, people come to me for advice on related subject matter. I’m still not totally comfortable in this position, but I roll with it.

As more professionals put stock in my technical background, I have been exposed to more specialized technical environments and use cases. Friends asking for consumer electronics troubleshooting is worlds apart from professionals looking to overcome a technical hurdle.

This new class of advice I’m prompted to provide has elucidated the challenges that professionals confront. Moreover, when I field the same question multiple times, it hints at a potential gap in computer science training. Naturally, I want to do my part to close it.

To be clear, I’m not putting anyone down. There are plenty of things I don’t know and probably should. I simply want to draw attention to concepts that I’m surprised that competent individuals struggle with. Specifically, what I regard as key Unix principles I’ve found notably missing.

I’m not totally surprised, as a lot of “tech sector” professionals work in levels of abstraction above the OS. But it pays to know these Unix basics considering there is often a Unix/Unix-like OS somewhere in the abstraction hierarchy. If that layer is unsound, the whole edifice risks collapse.

To that end, I want to highlight questions I’ve been asked about Unixy (my substitute for “Unix and Unix-like”) systems, and the fundamentals to grasp to become self-sufficient.

To Run Programs, It’s Best To Stay on the $PATH

While it’s easier than ever for software developers to escape the command line interface, sometimes it’s unavoidable.

If a program comes preinstalled on a Unixy system or can be installed from an official OS repository, it’s usually easy to invoke. But when the CLI program is some executable downloaded from the internet, this can trip people up.

Running it from within its directory is no big deal. Clicking on it in the file browser might even pop open a terminal emulator and run it. But once some (mainly neophyte) developers leave that directory, they’re not sure why the command is inaccessible without giving the absolute or relative path to it.

This has to do with the shell’s PATH environment variable. When you enter a command into a shell like Bash, the shell has to know where it is. In Unix, everything is a file, and every file is somewhere in the file tree (starting at /). But if the system had to search every file, that would take too long.

Instead, your shell only looks in the directories in the PATH variable. If there is no executable file with the name you entered in one of those directories, a Unixy system doesn’t know where that command is.

To see what directories are in your PATH, open a terminal and run echo $PATH. This outputs the value of the PATH variable as it is currently set in the shell.

If you want to add more places for your system to check for executables, just update PATH. Define the PATH variable explicitly in your shell’s configuration file (e.g. for Bash, ~/.bashrc, ~/.bash_profile or something similar). One common practice is to make a directory in the user’s home directory called “bin” and add $HOME/bin to your PATH (HOME being the current user’s home).

Remember, you don’t want to replace your PATH with just the desired directory. That would make it the only place your shell looks. You just want one more place to search. You could copy the output of echo $PATH as is and paste it into your shell config file. The more conventional method is to add this line:

PATH=”PATH:$HOME/bin”

Just as with many common programming languages, this assignment statement works because the right side of the “=” sign is evaluated first and then assigned to the left side. In other words, your current PATH is returned, your new directory is concatenated to the end, and then PATH is set to that.

Set It So Your Shell Won’t Forget It

There’s another property of environment variables I’ve seen developers overlook: how long they persist.

It’s not uncommon for devs to utilize CLI tools that expect certain environment variables. In Unixy systems, you’re free to define any arbitrary environment variable with any arbitrary value. When they need one, I typically see devs run the same environment variable definition every time they launch their terminal.

This is because every time most terminal emulators (and with them, a shell) start for the first time (from not running anywhere on the system), they start a new session. When the last of the shell processes associated with the terminal emulator terminates, so too does the session. Notably, environment variables set via export command only last for the session.

As you probably intuited, we can set our environment variable in our shell config file just as we did with PATH. Just refer to the PATH definition syntax above to see how. Now enjoy all the time you saved.

Always Know Who’s Listening

While I wouldn’t necessarily consider it a core Unix concept, this next trick is so handy that I’m surprised more devs don’t know it.

In the course of managing some Unixy system, eventually you may need to know what network ports are actively listening. Doing so by checking all running services can be cumbersome because, depending on the system’s available tooling, open ports may not appear in the summarized output. It’s easier to skip the service utility and analyze the ports directly.

My preferred approach is to use lsof. This useful command returns all open files. “Wait,” you might say, “I’m looking for ports, not files.” Ah, but remember, in Unix, everything is a file. That includes ports.

Even better, lsof is tailored for this use case (among many others), as its -i flag limits output to files used as part of Internet Protocol communication. By running lsof -i you can see every open port, including listening ones.

You may want to throw in other flags or pipe it through a regular expression filter via grep to narrow down your search, but the above command alone will get you most of the way there.

Just Your Friendly Neighborhood Penguin-Man

What drew me most to the idea for this article was its direct applicability to a whole class of people who need quick, reliable answers. As I invest more into professional dialog with developers, I hope to uncover more areas where I’m able to light the Unix way I’ve grown so fond of.


Suggest a Topic

Is there a Unix tutorial you’d like to see featured?

Please email your ideas to me and I’ll consider them for a future column.

And use the Reader Comments feature below to provide your input!

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.linuxinsider.com/story/unix-basics-it-pays-to-know-176679.html
Killexams : BICSI® brings industry-leading certifications under BICSI ICT Certification Institute umbrella

Commercial Information Communications Technology infrastructure gets elevated, recognition boost from BICSI certified professionals

TAMPA, Fla., Sept. 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- BICSI, the association advancing the information and communications technology (ICT) profession, is launching the BICSI ICT Certification Institute, at this week's 2022 BICSI Fall Conference and Exhibition being held at Mandalay Bay Hotel and Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada on 25-29 September 2022 where thousands of ICT professionals from around the globe are learning and networking during this premier conference. This global institute is the distillation of the ethics, experience and excellence embodied by each BICSI certification.

For nearly 40 years, BICSI has set the global standard for ICT expertise and excellence, developing, and advancing the professions of cable installers, project managers, designers and consultants. BICSI certifications have helped more than 16,000 professionals achieve new competencies that drive personal and professional results. Professionals who obtain and maintain BICSI's ICT Certifications demonstrate to clients, employers, and peers their dedication to the profession and commitment to upholding high standards of integrity and excellence in professional practice.

This institute encompasses BICSI's seven certifications and one certificate:

  • Registered Communications Distribution Designer® (RCDD®)
  • Data Center Design Consultant® (DCDC®)
  • Registered Telecommunications Project Manager® (RTPM®)
  • Outside Plant Designer (OSP™)
  • BICSI Cabling Installation Installer 1® (INST1®), Installer 2, Copper® (INSTC®), Installer 2, Optical Fiber ® (INSTF®), Technician™ (TECH™)

All BICSI certification programs – from entry level to advanced – are thoroughly developed and routinely maintained following accreditation standards led by globally diverse subject matter experts who help ensure the certifications truly reflect emerging practice, advanced technology, real-life case studies and best practices.

"We're proud of the rigor behind BICSI certification programs and the work ethic, experience and excellence embodied by each BICSI certification, from the installer to the RCDD," BICSI Board President Carol Everett Oliver said. "We are giving voice to the ethos of excellence through the BICSI ICT Certification Institute, unifying and elevating our certification portfolio by bringing them together under this new shared identity."

About BICSI: BICSI is a professional association supporting the advancement of the information and communications technology (ICT) profession and currently serves more than 26,000 members and credential holders. BICSI is the preeminent resource for the Connected World. Headquartered in Tampa, Florida, USA, BICSI membership spans nearly 100 countries. www.bicsi.org

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bicsi-brings-industry-leading-certifications-under-bicsi-ict-certification-institute-umbrella-301634399.html

SOURCE BICSI

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Tue, 27 Sep 2022 03:08:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/09/n29034052/bicsi-brings-industry-leading-certifications-under-bicsi-ict-certification-institute-umbrella
Killexams : BICSI® brings industry-leading certifications under BICSI ICT Certification Institute umbrella

Commercial Information Communications Technology infrastructure gets elevated, recognition boost from BICSI certified professionals

TAMPA, Fla., Sept. 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- BICSI, the association advancing the information and communications technology (ICT) profession, is launching the BICSI ICT Certification Institute, at this week's 2022 BICSI Fall Conference and Exhibition being held at Mandalay Bay Hotel and Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada on 25-29 September 2022 where thousands of ICT professionals from around the globe are learning and networking during this premier conference. This global institute is the distillation of the ethics, experience and excellence embodied by each BICSI certification.

For nearly 40 years, BICSI has set the global standard for ICT expertise and excellence, developing, and advancing the professions of cable installers, project managers, designers and consultants. BICSI certifications have helped more than 16,000 professionals achieve new competencies that drive personal and professional results. Professionals who obtain and maintain BICSI's ICT Certifications demonstrate to clients, employers, and peers their dedication to the profession and commitment to upholding high standards of integrity and excellence in professional practice.

This institute encompasses BICSI's seven certifications and one certificate:

  • Registered Communications Distribution Designer® (RCDD®)

  • Data Center Design Consultant® (DCDC®)

  • Registered Telecommunications Project Manager® (RTPM®)

  • Outside Plant Designer (OSP™)

  • BICSI Cabling Installation Installer 1® (INST1®), Installer 2, Copper® (INSTC®), Installer 2, Optical Fiber ® (INSTF®), Technician™ (TECH™)

All BICSI certification programs – from entry level to advanced – are thoroughly developed and routinely maintained following accreditation standards led by globally diverse subject matter experts who help ensure the certifications truly reflect emerging practice, advanced technology, real-life case studies and best practices.

"We're proud of the rigor behind BICSI certification programs and the work ethic, experience and excellence embodied by each BICSI certification, from the installer to the RCDD," BICSI Board President Carol Everett Oliver said. "We are giving voice to the ethos of excellence through the BICSI ICT Certification Institute, unifying and elevating our certification portfolio by bringing them together under this new shared identity."

About BICSI: BICSI is a professional association supporting the advancement of the information and communications technology (ICT) profession and currently serves more than 26,000 members and credential holders. BICSI is the preeminent resource for the Connected World. Headquartered in Tampa, Florida, USA, BICSI membership spans nearly 100 countries. www.bicsi.org

Cision

View original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/bicsi-brings-industry-leading-certifications-under-bicsi-ict-certification-institute-umbrella-301634399.html

SOURCE BICSI

Tue, 27 Sep 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en-AU text/html https://au.finance.yahoo.com/news/bicsi-brings-industry-leading-certifications-150000976.html
RCDD exam dump and training guide direct download
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