Do not miss 500-701 study guide with test questions. Get from killexams.com

IT pros have created killexams.com Cisco Certification Dumps. Many students have complained that there are too many questions in many Cisco Video Infrastructure Design (VID) test prep and Exam Questions and that they are simply too exhausted to take any more. Seeing killexams.com specialists create this comprehensive version of 500-701 study guide while still ensuring that every knowledge is covered after extensive study and analysis is a sight to behold. Everything is designed to make the certification process easier for candidates.

Exam Code: 500-701 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
500-701 Cisco Video Infrastructure Design (VID)

The Cisco Video Infrastructure Design (VID) version 1.0 Cisco® Training on Demand course is designed for individuals that install and support the Cisco Expressway™ video network solution. You will learn how to install, configure, operate, and maintain core visual communication components, including Cisco TelePresence® endpoints, and to integrate on-premises solutions with cloud solutions, meeting solutions, and management software.
You also learn about Cisco Meeting Server and the Cisco Collaboration Meeting Rooms (CMR) Cloud solution and how you can deploy large-scale telepresence conferencing quickly using Cisco TelePresence Management Suite (TMS). Youll be introduced to Cisco WebEx® and Cisco Spark™, and will learn how to administer Cisco Spark and how Cisco Spark integrates with Cisco Expressway. In addition, you gain an understanding of the APIs and automation features of Cisco Meeting Server and Cisco Spark.

Upon completion of this course, you should be able to:
● Define Cisco TelePresence solutions components and architecture
● Understand Cisco TelePresence Video Communication Server (Expressway) for basic and advanced video networks
● Understand Cisco TelePresence Management Suite (TMS)
● Define Cisco Meeting Server features
● Describe the integration of Cisco collaboration on-premises solutions with Cisco Cloud
● Demonstrate how Cisco TelePresence Content Server (TCS) interacts with other products within Ciscos TelePresence solution
Course Prerequisites
The knowledge and skills necessary before attending this course are:
● Basic computer and IP network literacy
● Basic knowledge of video conferencing and streaming fundamentals Course Outline
● Section 1: Cisco Video Network Solutions
● Section 2: Cisco Endpoints Overview
● Section 3: Cisco Expressway Basic Setup
● Section 4: Components of Cisco Expressway Security
● Section 5: Call Control on a Cisco Expressway
● Section 6: Fundamentals of Subzones and Zones on Cisco Expressway
● Section 7: Clustering on the Cisco Expressway
● Section 8: Cisco Meeting Server Features and Capabilities
● Section 9: Cisco Meeting Server API
● Section 10: Cisco Meeting Server Resilient and Scalable Deployments
● Section 11: Additional Features with Cisco Meeting Server
● Section 12: Cisco CMR Cloud, Premises, and Hybrid Products
● Section 13: Cisco TelePresence Server and Cisco TelePresence Conductor
● Section 14: Cisco TMS Solution
● Section 15: Cisco WebEx and Spark Cloud Solutions
● Section 16: Cisco Spark Administration
● Section 17: Cisco Spark Hybrid Services
● Section 18: Cisco Spark APIs and BOTs

Cisco Video Infrastructure Design (VID)
Cisco Infrastructure test
Killexams : Cisco Infrastructure test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/500-701 Search results Killexams : Cisco Infrastructure test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/500-701 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Cisco Killexams : Cisco Systems, Inc. (CSCO) Management Presents at Barclays 2022 Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Call Transcript

Cisco Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ:CSCO) Barclays 2022 Global Technology, Media and Telecommunications Conference Call December 7, 2022 3:10 PM ET

Company Participants

Bill Gartner - Senior Vice President, GM Optical Systems and Optics Group

Conference Call Participants

Tim Long - Barclays

Tim Long

Good. Yeah. Hello, everybody. Thank you for joining us here for this session with Cisco. Tim Long here, IT hardware com equipment analyst at Barclays. Very happy to have Bill Gartner with us, SVP, General Manager, Optical Systems, and Optics Business Unit. Looking forward to the discussion, pretty hot syllabu area for Cisco and for the industry.

So, I think Bill's going to read a safe harbor and then maybe after that if you wouldn't mind just kind of provide us a little overview of your roles and responsibilities at the areas that you're covering …

Bill Gartner

Right. Thanks Tim. First of all, thank you for having me. And before I start, I will be making some forward-looking statements that are subject to risk and uncertainties as outlined in our disclosures. Have I got all that right, Marilyn? Good. Okay.

My name is Bill Gartner and I responsible for two businesses in Cisco that, that are related by the fact that they both rely on optical communications. One is the optics business and the other is the optical systems business. And you can think of the optics business as the trans receivers that we sell with routers and switches that find their home inside a data center or inside a central office or within a campus environment. Those receivers are used typically to send optical signals on a fiber over relatively short distance like 10 kilometers. That's the optics business. And we serve all markets with that, that that includes the campus environments, enterprise, commercial, public sector, service provider and web.

And then the other businesses. Once you have to leave the data center and now send an optical signal across a city or across a country or even between continents, now it's a much more difficult problem to send that optical signal and it requires much more sophisticated solution that is classically chassis based. It's a chassis that we have to sell for an optical system to carry these signals reliably over very long distances. And the other thing that's unique about that world is that in a data center, when you add a new router or switch, you pull new fiber to every port on that router or switch because you're inside. You can do that.

When you leave the data center, now you're talking about crossing the Mississippi or crossing the Rockies, and you basically have to use the fiber that's in the ground. And so we have to put lots and lots of signals on one fiber. So, optical systems are what we use outside the data center or central office and optics what we use inside. That's the two worlds that I have. They're very different businesses, very different business models, but they're related by common technologies.

Question-and-Answer Session

Q - Tim Long

Great. Great. Thank you for that. Good start. So, maybe across the two businesses talk to us a little bit about kind of your priorities, looking out the next few years, obviously you've done the Acacia deal and integrated, you got routed out optical networks. There's just a lot going on, right? So, maybe talk about two or three of your priorities, then we'll dig more into it.

Bill Gartner

So, on the optical system side, we've just introduced a new optical layer platform called the NCS 1010 that offers some very innovative capabilities for customers to simplify operations. It runs IOS XR, which is our routing operating system. So, it's common for customers that have deployed our routers and it supports CNL band. So, massive capacity. That's our -- you can think about as a layer zero solution. We've just launched that.

And the other key thing for the optical systems business that we have under development is leveraging something that Acacia announced, which is a new DSP supporting 1.2 terabytes on a single wavelength, 1.2 terabytes on a single wavelength. And we'll be trialing that in second half of next year and we'll have that available in fourth quarter of next year. Those are two key development areas for the optical systems business.

And then on the optics side, we're I think still early stage on 400 gig deployments. So, a lot of effort in terms of getting 400 gig out there to our customers. We are also very focused on selling Cisco Optics, not only for Cisco routers and switches, but for third-party solutions as well. So, when customers want to consider optics as a buying center and say they want to consolidate their optic spend, we want to be considered as an optic supplier.

And then I think the one thing that's crossing the systems world and the optics world is Acacia has a very significant innovation in something called a 400 gig ZR or ZR Plus, which is effectively taking what was classically delivered in a chassis as part of an optical system and putting that into a plugable form factor. And that is a 400 gig ZR or ZR Plus. And that's part of our routed optical networking architecture. So that's an important thrust for really the optical systems business and the optics business.

And if you provide me a minute here, Tim, I actually brought some show and tell, I'm going to try to make that a little crisp for you because I know you guys don't live in this world. This is is a line card that goes into an optical system. We sell this to all the web players, service providers. This is -- this supports 1.2 terabytes of capacity and it goes plugs into a chassis with a bunch of other line cards that plug into a chassis. So, for 1.2 terabytes, the customer basically can put -- get two trunks, if you will, or wavelengths, and they can combine up to 1200 gig interfaces. So, this 1200 gig ports here, and out comes to 600 gig ports. That's where the 1.2 terabytes comes from. This is part of an optical system.

And what we're doing with ZR pluggable is effectively now using -- taking what's in there, largely speaking and putting it in here. Now it's not quite apples-to-apples. This is a 400 gig plugable, that's 1.2 terabytes. So, you'd need three of these to get to one of those. But from a cost, power, space perspective, this is way, way, way more efficient for customers than that. And so, if you think about it, I own this business, which is part of Acacia. I own this business, which is part of our optical systems. I'm going to cannibalize a part of this business in order to make this business successful. And we're okay with that because we own both businesses, but we think there's more potential for this business over time. Does that help?

Tim Long

Yeah. Yeah. I'm glad you didn't have to take an airplane to get here.

Bill Gartner

By the way, my supply chain lead always is terrified when he sees me walking around carrying his stuff in a shopping bag. But we're not going to plug it into any customer's network.

Tim Long

So, Maybe we'll start with this routed optical networks, ZR, ZR Plus. So, ZR, ZR Plus admittedly has been slow, right? Maybe talk to us a little bit about why it hasn't developed as quickly as most in the industry had expected. Why is that going to be different? And touch on the length power, some of the key issue -- technical issues that need to be tackled or tackled.

Bill Gartner

So, let me disagree with you on one point there, Tim. I think for the web players, ZR and ZR Plus not all the web players, but many of the web players are deploying it in massive volume. And that's characteristic, I think, of the web players. They are quick to adopt new technologies. They don't have a lot of overhead in terms of processes and operations to get in the way. They don't have a lot of legacy. So, when there's a new technology that offers significant benefits in terms of power, space, cost, they can jump on it very quickly. And so, we were at capacity for much of the last year trying to serve that segment of the market with ZR and ZR Plus.

For the service provider market, which is traditionally deploying like chassis-based solutions, there's -- we're on a journey that is not going to happen overnight in part because they've deployed these systems which have a lot of life left in them. And so, they're not going to jump to a new architecture overnight. There's also operations -- some operations differences that they have to accommodate in moving from a world of chassis-based solutions to a world where you plug this into a router. But we're seeing very good traction there. We've deployed to over 20 customers now. I'm very confident that over time -- this is going to be a five-year journey. This isn't going to happen overnight. But over time, this pluggable is going to replace that transponder in many, many applications and service provider markets. So, I don't think the journey has gone any slower than we expected. I think we anticipate that for service providers, it is always a much slower transition to a new architecture. And this is a new architecture. It's not just sort of a new technology. And -- but I think we're on pace with where we expect it to be.

Tim Long

Okay. And part of the architecture is to remove the full optical system from the network?

Bill Gartner

So -- yeah. Let me just outline kind of at a high level what routed optical networking architecture is about -- because there's a lot of [indiscernible] out there that my competitors love to throw out. There's some misinformation on that, too. Part of it is replacing this with this. That's part of routed, and it's a big part of routed optical networking. Some think that's all it is. It's not simply that although this is where a lot of the CapEx and OpEx and power savings arises from this, but routed optical networking really came about when we looked at the scale of routers, what's happening in ASICs that's allowing routers to scale so dramatically. It wasn't too long ago.

When I came to Cisco -- I've been with Cisco 14 years. And when I came to Cisco, we had a 40-gig line card on a router, and it had 14 ASICs. And now we've got one ASIC, one ASIC that does 19 terabits of capacity. And that’s not going to go to 25 to 50 over time, one ASIC instead of 14. Nominally, you can kind of think of it as the cost of an ASIC of the cost of an ASIC. So every time like I take 14 down to seven, down to three, down to two, down to one, I'm getting cost savings, but I'm also packing much more capacity now into that one. So that's driven down the cost per bit on a router very, very dramatically over the last 10 years. It's also driven down the power per bit, because now we have one ASIC rather than a whole bunch of ASICs. So, the cost per bit on a router has come down dramatically over the last 10 years.

When we started building networks with an IP layer and a DWDM layer and sometimes an OTN layer, the motivation for that was that the router was the most expensive resource in the network. It was by far the most expensive thing in the network 20 years ago. And what we did is we -- as an industry is we basically built layers of the network to bypass routers whenever you needed to. So, if you had to go from A to B to C to D to E and you had some demands from A to E, it was very expensive to go through B, C and D to get to E. So, we went around B, C and D with an optical layer using things like ROADMs. And that made sense economically. That really made sense from a technical and an economic perspective. But now the cost of the router has come down so dramatically that it's actually more expensive to go around those routers than it is to go through them.

So that was -- that's one key insight that drove routed optical networking is it's no longer more cost effective to go around the router than it is to go through it. And in fact, what we did as an industry is we built a lot of these bypass wavelengths that have very little capacity on them. So, we can now take advantage of the IP layer, aggregate a whole bunch of demands and basically go through routers rather than around them. And so that simplifies the network in a very significant way because you can simplify the DWDM layer. It doesn't go away. To be clear, the DWDM layer is still there, but it's simpler. It can be much simpler. You can take advantage of these pluggable optics. And if you can take private line services like a T1 service or an OTN service and now put it on the IP layer with something called private line emulation, you can take those private line services that were traditionally served with custom products, put that now on the IP layer. Now you can get down to one layer in the network. Instead of having IP, OTN, DWDM, you can have just the IP layer. And that simplifies operations, it simplifies planning, it simplifies life cycle management. So that all together, it's private line emulation. It's the idea of rethinking how traffic moves through the network. It's pluggable optics, and now it's automating all of that with an automation infrastructure. It's really those things that make up the routed optical networking architecture.

Tim Long

Okay. Great. Great. Maybe sticking on the system side for a little bit. I'd say if you look at Cisco's industry share or anything like that, it's not where it is in routing. Talk a little bit about owning a lot more of the IP and the optical layer. Does that help new products like the NCS 1010. It's real catchy name you got there, that one. Just talk a little bit about kind of that vertical integration and what that can do for you even outside of routed optical networks or the traditional systems business.

Bill Gartner

So, let me say something you probably don't hear a lot out of somebody from Cisco is, I don't aspire to be number one in optical. That's not my goal, to be number one or number two in that market. The optical portfolio for Cisco is more of a portfolio play for Cisco. When customers want to buy optical and routing from one vendor and want basically an integrated solution, we're there for them. That's not to say we don't sell optical standalone because we do, but it's opportunistically that we go after those standalone plays. I don't have an objective to be number one in optical. In fact, as I mentioned earlier, when we do -- when we replace this with this, this is the profit pool in optical.

This is the most profitable part of the optical system. There's other elements like the ROADMs and things like that, that are really common infrastructure that don't go in with high margins. This is where the margins are, and we're going to replace it with this. And when we sell this, we're going to count it as part of our routing sale. So, effectively, I'm going to take down the optical business in support of routing. And we have strength in routing that we're going to leverage. So, this is very much a portfolio play where we're looking -- I'm wearing a Cisco hat and saying it's good for Cisco to leverage our relative market strength in routing. And I may have to cannibalize the optical business in order to do that, and we're willing to do that. And we think that's the right thing for our customers, we think it's the right thing for Cisco.

Tim Long

Okay. Maybe just last on this topic. The optical system vendors that are trying to add routing as a software layer or something, why does that not work as a solution?

Bill Gartner

I will never say never, and I don't discount our competitors. We've got 25 years of investment in routing with a couple of thousand people writing software. Hard won lessons and building very large-scale networks around the world, and it's a hard problem. So, I wish them luck if they're undertaking that.

Tim Long

Yeah. Okay. Good. The -- maybe back to kind of the optics side. You talked about still being relatively early in 400-gig deployments. Kind of talk to us about that evolution and how you see the next timing and scale for the next few versions.

Bill Gartner

Yeah. Well, first -- one thing I would want to be clear about is depending on which market segment we're talking about and even within market segments, different customers, the lifecycle for a given technology can be very, very long. But we're still selling -- we're still selling a ton of 10-gig optics, a ton of 10-gig optics. And 10-gig was around 20 years ago. And so, I think the tail for things like 100-gig and 400-gig is a very, very long tail. And without generalizing too much, what you see is web will adopt a technology like 100-gig very quickly and jump to 400-gig very quickly and then jump to 800-gig, and they'll jump to 1.6T. The service providers are going to be -- to have a much longer timeframe for deploying that technology, easily 10 years for something like 100-gig, easily. And they are going to generally be slower in jumping on a 400-gig bandwagon or an 800-gig bandwagon. They'll be slower jumping on it and then have a much longer time of deployment.

And then when you look at something like enterprise, it's much, much later and much, much longer. So like most of my 10-gig or 1-gig, we still sell a ton of 1-gig is going in enterprise applications. So these technologies have a very, very long tail. And if you ask like what's Google going to do or what's Facebook or Amazon are going to do, you get a very different answer than if you ask what Bank of America might be doing or what AT&T might be doing.

Tim Long

Okay. And then talking about the big hyperscalers what kind of trends are you seeing there? And I'm assuming as capacities go higher, there's got to be optical -- much more optics around -- we know each generation of switch has more optics. So, maybe talk about the trends there and what you think that means for the business.

Bill Gartner

So, let me talk both inside the data center and outside the data center. The -- inside the data center, 400-gig is pretty well being deployed right now by the web players. That's, I would say, entering maturity. It's still relatively early stage, but entering maturity. 800-gig is probably coming in the next couple of years. And 800-gig will be a little different than what we've seen in previous technology jumps in that 800-gig will be on a router port, it will support 800-gig, but the optic itself will likely be 200, 400-gig side-by-side, packaged into one optic. And we do that for technology reasons and cost reasons. So, it will be a longer time before we see 8000gig on the optics side.

It's also an issue of compatibility. If they've got a lot of 400-gig out in their data center and they put an 800-gig optic that has two 400-gig ports effectively on it, they can connect it to an existing 400-gig. So, there's a life cycle management issue there as well. Pretty mature inside the data center for 400-gig, but I'd still say, there's a lot of growth there still ahead of us.

Once you leave the data center, the web guys have metro networks and long-haul and subsea networks. So, those are three very different markets. I think the metro markets for the -- or data center interconnect market for the web players are largely going to go to this. For a couple, they're already there. Like this is exclusively what they're deploying. For others, I think they'll get there. Once you leave the metro area and get into long-haul or subsea, then I think this -- which has higher performance than the pluggable supporting -- this can support many thousand kilometer applications. This was maybe up to 1,000 kilometers today. They'll still deploy something like this, a chassis based solution.

The other thing I would say is we're -- for the last 20 years, the industry has been sort of a game of leapfrog of let's go from 2.5-gig to 10-gig to 25-gig to 40-gig to 100-gig. And every time you do that leapfrog, you get more capacity on the fiber. We are now approaching the point where we're just -- we're hitting what's known as Shannon's limit. We're just going to be out of gas on the fiber. So, we can't play that game anymore. Like our next-generation DSP coming out of Acacia will deliver 1.2-terabit on a wavelength, but the total fiber capacity that can be supported isn't moving that much. So, we can get a little bit better economics with a 1.2-terabit wavelength and maybe a 600 or 800-gig wavelength, but we're not really moving the needle in a significant way in terms of the total capacity. And then if you ask what's beyond that, it's very little incremental gain that we can get in terms of the total capacity you can put on a fiber. So, then we have to turn our attention to things like power or cost and say, look, the game is going to be who can drive to a lower power consumption on these things. It's not necessarily a game of capacity gain.

Tim Long

Interesting. Interesting. One of the priorities you talked about was third-party for optics. How do you go about that? How difficult is that to really start moving the needle on that business?

Bill Gartner

So, I think we've made good -- I think we're early stage in there. We've made very good progress with some very key logos. When a customer -- and now I'm talking primarily about service provider customers, because web is a little bit in a different category. But when a customer decides, for instance, that they want to consolidate their optics spend because the optic looks the same to them for whether they're plugging it into Cisco or Juniper or Nokia, we want to have a seat at the table for that conversation because we put optics through a certification and qualification process that is absolutely unparalleled in the industry. No supplier of optic, no other vendor, whether it's Juniper or Arista or Nokia, does the level of certification on an optic that we do.

So, we can provide our customers very high confidence that when they buy the optic, it will work in any host and it will work under all operating conditions. That means temperature variation, humidity variation, voltage variation, all these different permutations we test for, and we have a diverse supply chain. We make sure that even when we're sourcing the optic ourselves, even when we design and build the optic ourselves, we still have second sources for either all the technologies that go into that or the optic itself. So, we can take that supply chain management issue away from our customer and say, look, we will ensure you that there's diversity in the supply chain. We'll ensure that when there's typhoon in Thailand or an earthquake in Japan that takes down a good part of the optics supply chain, that we've already thought about that. And that gives our customers comfort. So, it's more than just does the optic work because the optics are fundamentally commodity. We make sure that we can ensure it's going to work under all operating conditions and that we can diversify the supply chain on behalf of the customer. So, with that value, I think we have a good selling proposition to customers.

Tim Long

Okay. You mentioned supply chain, I didn't, but now I have a follow-up.

Bill Gartner

Sure.

Tim Long

So, maybe talk a little bit -- it's challenging, it's whack-a-mole and golden screws and all that stuff. So, where are you guys now looking on your business? How are you feeling about supply chain and volumes?

Bill Gartner

So, I would separate -- optics, I think, is in pretty good shape. We're heading down to back to like four-week sort of lead times. There are hot spots. So, we're not there yet, but we're heading there. And for many optics, we are -- we're within four-week lead time right now. Optics has not suffered in general from some of the other areas like the high capacity ASICs, the semiconductor industry has not hit as much in the optics area, and things like power supplies have not been a real constraint for the optics themselves. The optical systems are still on pretty long lead times, like 35, 37 week lead times, but we are seeing those come down as well.

I would characterize it as, I think there's daylight. We see daylight, we see improvement ahead. We're not out of the woods. This is not a mission accomplished statement yet. There is a whack-a-mole issue going on where there are some trouble spots we're still dealing with, and then there are some just pop up randomly that we still have to deal with. So, we're not out of the woods yet, but we're in a far better situation now than we were a year ago.

Tim Long

Okay. Just curious, obviously, you have Acacia and some real base level technology and IP. Could you talk a little bit about the broader Cisco-Silicon One and having silicon capabilities in addition to the optics? How does that better position you relative to maybe some optical or optics pure-play companies?

Bill Gartner

So, one thing, I think from an Acacia perspective, we worked really hard to vertically integrate as much as possible on the design and development side and really own all the key technologies there. And I think we're at a point where we can say that for all the key technologies that go into that optic, we've got ownership of that technology. That gives us control over the design, the performance, ultimately, the cost and it gives us comfort that we can manage those trade-offs between the various pieces in the optic.

I think it was December of 2019 that we made a pretty big announcement that we were going to shift our business model to support a component business model. So, in addition to doing our traditional systems business of selling fully integrated routers and switches with software and hardware and services, we were going to meet our customers where they want to be met. If they want to buy just the optic from us, not buy any of our systems, we'd sell them the optic. They want to buy just the silicon from us, like Silicon One, none of our systems, none of our software, we'd sell Silicon One. If they want to buy just our software or just our hardware platform and put their own software in it, we would do that. Very different business model for Cisco, has supply chain implications, has inventory implications, cash cycle implications. And it's fundamentally a different way we think about managing a business.

I think that, that opened up business for us with the web players, in particular, who were the main target for that whole announcement to say, look, if you want to go build your own, we want to be part of that solution with you. We don't want to be on the outside looking in. So, if you want to use our silicon, we'll be happy to work with you. And we now have customers buying only our silicon, only our optics, only our hardware platform with no software, putting their own software on or putting something like SONiC on it. Every combination you can possibly imagine, we are now to some customer offering. And I think it's opened up a lot of possibilities for us that we don't see many of our competitors being able to match with both silicon and optics.

End of Q&A

Tim Long

Okay. Great. Perfect. End time here, so thank you, everybody. Bill, thank you so much very much. Really appreciate it. Thank you.

Bill Gartner

Tim, thank you very much. Appreciate it. Appreciate you having me. Thanks, everybody.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 12:06:00 -0600 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/article/4563107-cisco-systems-inc-csco-management-presents-barclays-2022-global-technology-media-and
Killexams : Cisco updates SD-WAN to simplify provisioning, management

Cisco is set to unveil a new edition of its SD-WAN software that will extend the system’s reach and include new management capabilities.

Among the most significant enhancements to Cisco SD-WAN release 17.10, expected in December, is the ability to use Cisco SD-WAN Multi Region Fabric (MRF) support with existing Software Defined Cloud Interconnect (SDCI) systems to significantly expand the reach and control of the SD-WAN environment. 

MRF lets customers divide their SD-WAN environments into multiple regional networks that operate distinctly from one another, along with a central core-region network for managing inter-regional traffic, according to Cisco. 

SDCI technology is used to link enterprise resources to a variety of cloud, network, and internet service providers. Cisco customers could use SDCI with their SD-WAN deployments in the past but not MRF.

By combining the two technologies and using the Cloud OnRamp Multicloud Interconnect Gateway in Cisco SD-WAN software, customers can now set network, configuration and security policies across a wide variety of locations from a central site. Cisco’s SD-WAN Cloud OnRamp links branch offices or individual remote users to cloud applications such as Cisco’s Webex, Microsoft 365, AWS, Google, Oracle, Salesforce and more.

Customers can now assign regions and roles to SD-WAN edges deployed within SDCI infrastructure, and they can segment MRF regions into multiple sub-regions and share border routers between these sub-regions, allowing for better redundancy and failover-centric network designs, according to John Joyal, senior manager, product and solutions marketing with Cisco's enterprise SD-WAN and routing group. (Joyal wrote a blog about Cisco's SD-WAN MRF enhancements.)

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 08:42:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.networkworld.com/article/3681657/cisco-updates-sd-wan-to-simplify-provisioning-management.html
Killexams : Cisco shares pop on earnings beat and increased 2023 forecast

A sign bearing the logo for communications and security tech giant Cisco Systems Inc is seen outside one of its offices in San Jose, California, August 11, 2022.

Paresh Dave | Reuters

Cisco reported fiscal first-quarter results on Wednesday that beat analysts' estimates and boosted its guidance for fiscal 2023.

The stock rose about 5% in extended trading.

Here's how the company did:

  • Earnings per share: 86 cents vs. 84 cents expected, according to Refinitiv
  • Revenue: $13.6 billion vs. $13.3 billion expected by analysts, according to Refinitiv

Revenue increased 6% year over year, while net income slid 10% to $2.7 billion. The company now expects sales growth in fiscal 2023 of 4.5% to 6.5%, up from a prior forecast that called for growth of 4% to 6%.

CFO Scott Herren said in a company release that Cisco delivered "strong results" and attributed the company's guidance forecast in part to an "easing supply situation."

While Cisco's numbers topped estimates, the company is still struggling to grow as the technology world rapidly shifts to cloud and subscription software and away from buying physical boxes. Cisco's stock price is down 27% this year, while the Nasdaq has dropped 29%.

Cisco's top business segment, which includes data-center networking switches, delivered $6.68 billion in revenue, up 12% from a year earlier.

Internet for the Future, its second-largest unit, saw revenue drop 5% to $1.3 billion. The division contains routed optical networking hardware the company picked up through its 2021 Acacia Communications acquisition.

Sales in the Collaboration segment, which features Webex, contributed $1.1 billion in revenue, down 2% year over year.

Cisco will hold its quarterly call with investors at 4:30 p.m. ET.

Wed, 16 Nov 2022 07:33:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/11/16/cisco-csco-earnings-q1-2023.html
Killexams : CyberRatings.org Announces Results from First-of-its-Kind Comparative Test on Cloud Network Firewall

Ratings ranged from 'AAA' to 'CC' with security effectiveness scores from 27% to 100%.

AUSTIN, Texas, Dec. 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- CyberRatings.org, the non-profit entity dedicated to providing transparency on cybersecurity product efficacy, has completed an independent test of eight market leading security vendors in its first-ever Cloud Network Firewall comparative evaluation. Forcepoint, Fortinet and Juniper's test reports were published earlier in the year, all with 'AAA' ratings. In this latest release of test reports, Check Point and Versa Networks received a 'AAA' rating. Palo Alto Networks received an 'AA,' Sophos an 'A,' and Cisco 'CC.'

CyberRatings.org Logo (PRNewsfoto/CyberRatings.org)

Security effectiveness scores ranged from 27% to 100% while exploit block rates varied from 88.3% to 100%.

The test covered capabilities considered essential in a firewall including basic routing, access control, SSL / TLS decryption, threat prevention (exploits), evasion, performance, stability and reliability, and management. Amazon Web Services (AWS) was the public cloud service chosen to run the test. Ratings were calculated using a scale from 0 to 800.

Key Findings include:
  • Cloud services assume a shared security model, where cloud providers are responsible for the infrastructure and customers are responsible for securing the applications running on the infrastructure.
  • Roughly 80% of web traffic is encrypted and firewall decryption is not on by default: Firewalls will not see/block attacks delivered via (encrypted) HTTPS unless configured to do so.
  • Security vendors are used to controlling the platform on which their products are installed. In the cloud, they do not have that control; vendors are learning how to operate under these new conditions and there will be challenges.
  • Supply Chain attacks are on the rise. Using the cloud means relying on third parties to maintain software supply chain integrity. APIs, code reuse, open-source libraries, not maintained code, and other shared resources introduce unknown risks.

Security effectiveness scores ranged from 27% to 100%. The security effectiveness tests Verified how effectively the firewall protected control network access, applications, and users while preventing threats (exploits and evasions), blocking malicious traffic while under extended load, and remaining resistant to false positives. Exploit block rates ranged from 88.3% to 100%. All products achieved 100% for resistance to evasion techniques.

"Security is your problem, not Amazon's," said Vikram Phatak, CEO of CyberRatings.org. "If you are migrating your data center to the cloud, create a plan for securing it." Phatak added. "And if you needed a firewall for your data center, you probably need one for your cloud deployment."

There are different ways consumers can purchase security products for the cloud. The individual test reports reflect the bring-your-own-license model while the comparative report illustrates the pay-as-you-go pricing. Both pricing models provide consumers with options to compare pricing on items important to their own organizations.

The following products were evaluated:
Check Point Cloud Network Firewall CloudGuard IaaS R81.20-581 AAA
Cisco Firepower Threat Defense for AWS Version 7.2.0 CC
Forcepoint Cloud Network Firewall v6.11 AAA
Fortinet Cloud Network Firewall v7.0.5 Build 0304(GA) AAA
Juniper Cloud Network Firewall 22.1R1.1 AAA
Palo Alto Networks Cloud Network Firewall PA-VM-AWS-10.2.2 AA
Sophos Cloud Network Firewall SFOS 19.0.0 GA-Build317 A
Versa Networks Cloud Network Firewall Versa-FlexVNF-21.2.3 AAA

To read the CyberRatings reports go to CyberRatings.org.

Cloud Network Firewall test tools were provided by Keysight (CyPerf and Breaking Point), and TeraPackets Threat Replayer.

Additional Resources About CyberRatings.org

CyberRatings.org is a non-profit 501(c)6 entity dedicated to quantifying cyber risk and providing transparency on cybersecurity product efficacy through testing and ratings programs. To become a member, visit www.cyberratings.org   

Cision View original content to obtain multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/cyberratingsorg-announces-results-from-first-of-its-kind-comparative-test-on-cloud-network-firewall-301691101.html

SOURCE  CyberRatings.org

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 23:16:00 -0600 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/cyberratings-org-announces-results-from-first-of-its-kind-comparative-test-on-cloud-network-firewall-1031947596
Killexams : Cisco SD-WAN update aimed at simplifying provisioning, management

Cisco is set to unveil a new edition of its SD-WAN software that will extend the system’s reach and include new management capabilities.

Among the most significant enhancements to Cisco SD-WAN release 17.10, expected in December, is the ability to use Cisco SD-WAN Multi Region Fabric (MRF) support with existing Software Defined Cloud Interconnect (SDCI) systems to significantly expand the reach and control of the SD-WAN environment. 

MRF lets customers divide their SD-WAN environments into multiple regional networks that operate distinctly from one another, along with a central core-region network for managing inter-regional traffic, according to Cisco. 

SDCI technology is used to link enterprise resources to a variety of cloud, network, and internet service providers. Cisco customers could use SDCI with their SD-WAN deployments in the past but not MRF.

By combining the two technologies and using the Cloud OnRamp Multicloud Interconnect Gateway in Cisco SD-WAN software, customers can now set network, configuration and security policies across a wide variety of locations from a central site. Cisco’s SD-WAN Cloud OnRamp links branch offices or individual remote users to cloud applications such as Cisco’s Webex, Microsoft 365, AWS, Google, Oracle, Salesforce and more.

Customers can now assign regions and roles to SD-WAN edges deployed within SDCI infrastructure, and they can segment MRF regions into multiple sub-regions and share border routers between these sub-regions, allowing for better redundancy and failover-centric network designs, according to John Joyal, senior manager, product and solutions marketing with Cisco's enterprise SD-WAN and routing group. (Joyal wrote a blog about Cisco's SD-WAN MRF enhancements.)

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

Tue, 29 Nov 2022 06:39:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.networkworld.com/article/3681657/cisco-updates-sd-wan-to-simplify-provisioning-management.html
Killexams : Cisco identifies vulnerabilities in Identity Services Engine

Cisco Systems’ network access control solution has five vulnerabilities rated High that could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to inject arbitrary operating system commands, bypass security protections, and conduct cross-site scripting attacks.

Four of the five problems in Cisco Identity Services Engine were identified earlier this month. However, network and security administrators will have to wait until Cisco releases software fixes for four of them. There is no workaround available for these holes, CVE-2022-20964. CVE-2022-20965, CVE-2022-20966 and CVE-2022-20967

Fortunately, they can be exploited only by valid and authorized ISE users, the company says. For protection, until the fixes are released, ISE administrators have to take extra care to restrict console access and admin web access.

Software updates have been released for the fifth vulnerability, CVE-2022-20961, described as a hole in ISE’s web-based management interface that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attack and perform arbitrary actions on an affected device,

This vulnerability, Cisco says, is due to insufficient CSRF protections for the web-based management interface of an affected device. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by persuading a user of the interface to follow a crafted link. A successful exploit could allow the attacker to perform arbitrary actions on the affected device with the privileges of the target user.

In listing four vulnerabilities in one advisory, Cisco noted they aren’t dependent on one another for exploitation. In addition, a software release that is affected by one of the vulnerabilities may not be affected by the other vulnerabilities.

Separately, Cisco said it had released security fixes for a vulnerability in ISE that is rated Medium. CVE-2022-20963 is a vulnerability in the web-based management interface of ISE could allow an authenticated, remote attacker to conduct a cross-site scripting (XSS) attack against a user of the interface on an affected device.

Sun, 27 Nov 2022 21:46:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.itworldcanada.com/article/cisco-identifies-vulnerabilities-in-identity-services-engine/515793
Killexams : Cisco Just Demonstrated the Power of Stock Buybacks

Networking-equipment giant Cisco Systems (CSCO -0.84%) reported results this Wednesday, covering the first quarter of fiscal-year 2023. The company generated adjusted earnings of $0.86 per diluted share, surpassing Wall Street's consensus earnings estimate of $0.84 per share.

Investors and analysts applauded Cisco's strong results, and the stock price closed 5% higher on Thursday. However, I don't see a ton of headlines mentioning one of Cisco's most shareholder-friendly qualities: The company is shoveling billions of dollars straight into the pockets of shareholders. I'm particularly impressed by Cisco's effective use of stock buybacks.

Cisco's buybacks make a difference

Fun fact: If not for the anti-dilutive effects of the buyback program, Cisco would barely have satisfied the consensus-earnings target.

Cisco's adjusted net income increased by 2% year over year, landing at $3.5 billion. At the same time, the stock-repurchasing program reduced the share count by 12 million stubs in the first quarter. The canceled stock adds up to 127 million shares on a trailing basis, which works out to a 3% reduction.

In a world where Cisco doesn't worry about share-count reductions, this-quarter's earnings would have landed at $0.84 per share, but only by the skin of its proverbial teeth. With three significant digits, you'd be looking at earnings of $0.856 per share, a rounding error away from missing the analyst target.

OK, that's no surprise

The lower share count shouldn't surprise anyone, especially since the bulk of this-year's buybacks fell in the second quarter of 2022. That period was covered in last-February's earnings update, giving everybody nine months to update their earnings estimates accordingly. The exercise above is just a bit of calculator-based entertainment, illustrating how generous Cisco's buyback program really is.

Cisco has invested an average of $1.1 billion per quarter in stock buybacks over the last three years. Dividend payments averaged $1.6 billion per quarter over the same period. That adds up to $1.69 billion of cash per quarter, sent right back to shareholders in the form of buybacks and dividends. Free cash flows in this time span averaged $3.53 billion per quarter, so the shareholder-bound cash returns consumed 48% of Cisco's average cash profits.

CSCO Stock Buybacks (Quarterly) Chart

CSCO Stock Buybacks (Quarterly) data by YCharts.

Cisco loves to share its cash profits with you, the shareholder

This generous cash return is no accident. Cisco has a history of generating massive cash flow and sharing them freely with stock owners.

On the earnings call, Cisco CFO Scott Herren said that the dividend-payout and buyback activity were "in line with our long-term objective of returning a minimum of 50% of free cash flow annually to our shareholders." That's been an official Cisco policy since the fourth quarter of 2019, three years ago.

I love seeing this shareholder-friendly policy in a veritable cash machine such as Cisco Systems. Even in an off-year like 2022, the company amassed $12.8 billion of trailing free cash flows -- and sent half of it right back to shareholders.

CSCO Free Cash Flow Chart

CSCO Free Cash Flow data by YCharts.

Today, Cisco's stock comes with a shrinking share count and a beefy dividend yield of 3.3%. You should expect the dividend payments to continue rising modestly over the years, while buybacks are adjusted to meet that 50% cash-sharing ambition, year by year. These qualities make Cisco a great buy for income investors, who value a free-flowing stream of cash profits and a tight commitment to cash-based profit sharing.

Anders Bylund has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has positions in and recommends Cisco Systems. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Thu, 17 Nov 2022 22:55:00 -0600 Anders Bylund en text/html https://www.fool.com/investing/2022/11/18/cisco-demonstrated-the-power-of-stock-buybacks/
Killexams : Cisco’s Chuck Robbins On XaaS: We ‘Realized We Weren’t As Operationally Ready’

Networking News

Gina Narcisi

‘Cisco’s got some ground to cover, but it’s really about the long game. While you can argue they are late to market, we believe that they’re going to be able to learn from the lessons of all their competitors and come out with even stronger products,’ one Cisco partner tells CRN about the company’s as-a-service drive.

 ARTICLE TITLE HERE

Customers are looking for different ways to acquire the IT they need, including buying in an as-a-service model to save some capital, but Cisco has faced a few exact hindrances to as a service, according to the company’s executives.

For the San Jose, Calif.-based tech giant, supply chain constraints have been an ongoing obstacle to the Everything-as-a-Service (XaaS) trend because Cisco and its partners couldn’t deliver the equipment that’s part of as-a-service offers, specifically, its Cisco Plus strategy.

“And then we also realized we weren’t as operationally ready,” Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins told analysts regarding the company’s XaaS push at Cisco Partner Summit 2022 earlier this month.

Many customers interpreted the launch of Cisco Plus as just a different way to finance IT — a “fancy lease” — versus a true XaaS model, said Neil Anderson, area vice president of cloud and infrastructure solutions for Maryland Heights, Mo.-based Cisco Gold partner World Wide Technology (WWT).

But channel partners want to put vendor XaaS offerings “under the hood” and built their own services on top of the stack to create a turnkey offering for their end customers. Customers, on the other hand, often want to have the option to manage some of their own IT, Anderson said.

“Part of the problem in getting to a true as-a-service model, as a utility, is that most customers still want some form of co-management. They don’t want somebody to just do everything for them and they have no visibility into it. They want a portal where they can see how things are going, maybe touch a few things. So, this idea of co-management, I think, is going to be really important for network as a service,” he said.

[Related: Cisco’s X Factor: How Chuck Robbins Is Taking Partners Into The Future ]

WWT is seeing this prerequisite across the board — not just in networking, but also in the collaboration space. The firm is seeing more RFPs with a requirement for managed services. “That allows the partner to add an additional layer of value to it so it’s not just a resell lead, it’s [giving] the partner some skin in the game long term,” said Joe Berger, area vice president of Digital Experiences for WWT.

Cisco Channel Chief Oliver Tuszik told CRN in an interview that the company is focused on enabling customers to buy and consume the Cisco portfolio in an as a service motion if that’s how they’d like to buy, and for more partners to sell in an as a service model.

“Our strategy must be that we allow our customers, wherever they are in the world, to buy whatever Cisco has in his portfolio in an as a service or managed motion,” Tuszik said.

But the as-a-service effort goes beyond products. It’s about building out Cisco’s Provider partner role the company introduced in 2021 within its Global Partner Program, he said, a role built with the MSP partner in mind and recognizes partners based on their investment in managed services and as-a-service solutions. As the managed services business has taken off, Cisco has since upped its investments in Provider partners with predictable pricing, deal registration for managed services, more flexible consumption options, dedicated investment and business development funds, technical support enablement, and co-marketing, the company said.

Cisco is also building more modular programs and new incentive schemes, Tuszik said. “We are incentivizing our people to sell partner-managed services,” he told CRN. “We’re paying our sales team more if they sell a partner-managed service — 50 percent more,” he added.

At Partner Summit 2022, the tech giant revealed it had tripled the number of staff working on service creation motions with partners, as well as a 1.5x payout multiplier to support the growth of partner-managed SD-WAN, Secure Access Service Edge (SASE), and full-stack observability offers.

Companies like HPE and Cisco are turning to partners during this time of resource constraints and talent shortages to learn more about what the channel can offer by way of managed services and what they can take off the vendors’ hands. Customers are looking for “cloud-like” IT experiences that are more automated and that also encompass on-premises tech environments for customers grappling with requirements that prevent them from going all-in on cloud, like data sovereignty. There’s where Cisco Plus fits in, said CJ Metz, vice president of Modern Infrastructure for Irvine, Calif.-based Cisco Gold Partner Trace3.

Trace3 also partners with HPE. Metz said that the major differentiator for HPE GreenLake has been in how the company shifted its entire focus to support its as a service strategy, including executive compensation, sales compensation and the support structures that underpin it. “[HPE] just has had more time to take more risks, to learn the hard lessons,” he said.

Cisco, he added, has been forthcoming to partners about its need to catch up. “Cisco’s got some ground to cover, but it’s really about the long game. While you can argue they are late to market, we believe that they’re going to be able to learn from the lessons of all their competitors and come out with even stronger products.”

For Cisco’s part in becoming more operationally ready for XaaS, Robbins told analysts: “I think over the next 6 to 12 months, you’ll see a lot of progress on this front.”

In the meantime, Cisco already has many as-a-service offers on the market today by way of their channel partners, the CEO added.

“We’ve got stuff going in the cloud marketplaces that we didn’t have before, we’ve got partners delivering as a service today and we’ve got the SASE [Cisco Plus Secure Connect Now] offer out there,” Robbins said. “There’s a few things we need to do, but there’s an awful lot offers that are out there today for customers.”

Cisco doesn’t specifically break out revenue related to its Cisco Plus strategy, but the company’s most exact fiscal quarter that ended Oct. 29 saw software subscription revenue climb 11 percent year over year.  

Gina Narcisi

Gina Narcisi is a senior editor covering the networking and telecom markets for CRN.com. Prior to joining CRN, she covered the networking, unified communications and cloud space for TechTarget. She can be reached at gnarcisi@thechannelcompany.com.

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 08:56:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/networking/cisco-s-chuck-robbins-on-xaas-we-realized-we-weren-t-as-operationally-ready-
Killexams : NCCU, Cisco Systems partner with 'Hybrid Learning' to increase access for students on and off campus

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the NC Central campus buzzed with activity and classrooms were full. "I’d say things have changed alot," said NC Central senior Maurice McKellar, who spent much of his college experience in a virtual learning mode.

He remembers how schools and universities had to quickly adapt to learning online with hopes of returning to the classic classroom model. Now, McKellar prefers both models.

He said, "It definitely gave us like a lot of opportunities to change the way we do things and still get an education."

"The world has changed and hybrid work is going to be the way of the future," says Scott McGregor, with Cisco Systems, an IT and networking company. They have partnered with NC Central as the school has embrace that hybrid model.

Cisco’s Webex app allows people to meet with anyone, anywhere and in real time. "The video and audio capabilities of our technology makes it easy for that student to really feel like they are much more present than it was in the past," said McGregor.

It wasn’t as smooth of a transition for other "sister institutions" according to NCCU’s chief information officer, Leah Kraus. She said, "Because we had prepared with a strong infrastructure, a strong network infrastructure and a strong partnership with CISCO, we were able to really pivot."

Jessica Ganao, chair of NCCU’s Department of Criminal Justice says the new Hybrid-Learning model meets the needs of many of her students who work other jobs. "Where our students will come into the classroom physically, come through Webex or we will record the sessions and allow them to view them after the class has taken place for that day.

School leaders say on-campus learning will always be an important part of the college experience for most students and faculty, however, now they have more options.

"I’ve been calling it moving from hybrid school or hybrid learning. We are really hybrid-living. I don’t really see us going backwards," said Kraus.

NC Central leaders say the flexibility of the hybrid-learning approach will make classes more accessible to students who may not be able to participate on campus.

Mon, 21 Nov 2022 06:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.wral.com/nccu-and-cisco-systems-partner-with-hybrid-learning-to-increase-access-for-students-on-and-off-campus/20590579/
Killexams : Cisco Stock Gains on Earnings. Layoffs Are Coming.

Cisco Systems shares are trading higher after the networking-infrastructure company posted better-than-expected revenue and profit growth for its fiscal first quarter, ended Oct. 29. The company also raised its guidance for the year.

Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins also disclosed that the company was “right-sizing certain businesses,” reducing head count in some areas. Cisco Chief Financial Officer Scott Herren said in an interview that the cuts could affect up to 5% of the workforce. Cisco had 83,300 employees as of the end of July. Despite the planned cuts, Cisco expects to end the current fiscal year with head count about flat with the start of the year.

Wed, 16 Nov 2022 10:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.barrons.com/articles/cisco-earnings-stock-price-51668548274
500-701 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List