Get High Scores in H13-629 test with these Practice test

killexams.com is honored to help competitors to pass the H13-629 test in their first attempts. Our group of specialists and confirmed people are consistently endeavoring to refresh H13-629 free pdf by adding all the most recent H13-629 actual test questions and answers that will assist the applicants with getting tips and deceives to address H13-629 questions and practice with HCIE-Storage (Written) (Internetwork Expert-Storage) Exam Cram.

Exam Code: H13-629 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
HCIE-Storage (Written) (Internetwork Expert-Storage)
Huawei Expert-Storage) course outline
Killexams : Huawei Expert-Storage) course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/H13-629 Search results Killexams : Huawei Expert-Storage) course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/H13-629 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Huawei Killexams : Why Indonesia Has Embraced Huawei

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

But for much of the developing world, the story could not be more different.

With a few notable exceptions including Vietnam and India, the developing world still welcomes Chinese tech companies as providers of sorely needed communications infrastructure and training. Huawei and ZTE have experienced among their warmest embraces in Indonesia. First entering the Indonesian market in the late 1990s and early 2000s, these companies have emerged as integral suppliers both of Indonesia’s essential communications infrastructure and the training that will empower the workforce of the country’s booming digital economy. Huawei, for example, already has by a wide margin the largest share of Indonesia’s telecom carrier equipment market.

As with many other developing countries, the relatively low price point of Huawei and ZTE kits is a big part of the appeal. By some estimates, Chinese communications infrastructure is as much as 30 percent cheaper than its competitors’.

Yet in setting out to document how senior Indonesian government officials approach the risks of technological reliance on Chinese companies for our new report, Localization and China’s Tech Success in Indonesia, we found that the reasons for the expansive role of China’s tech companies are more complex and numerous than price point. As our interviews with a wide range of Indonesian officials and experts made plain, Chinese tech companies are seen as partners to both realize Indonesia’s big digital economy goals and navigate its daunting cybersecurity challenges.

Although the digital economy is central to the Indonesian government’s plans for catapulting the country into the top 10 global economies by 2030, the country also faces a massive skills shortage in the field of information communications technology, with the World Bank projecting that it will need 9 million additional such workers by 2030.

Meanwhile, Indonesia is among the countries most vulnerable to cyberattacks globally. According to Indonesia’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency, the country experienced 1.4 billion cyberattacks or web traffic anomalies in 2021. In 2017, when the number of cyberattacks was closer to 200 million, they were estimated to have cost the country $34.2 billion.

Despite deep suspicion of Chinese tech companies among rich liberal democracies, Huawei and ZTE have presented themselves as the solution to Indonesia’s twin challenges of an impending tech skills shortfall and pervasive cyberattacks.

In 2020, Huawei pledged to train 100,000 Indonesians in essential digital skills, including cloud computing and 5G. Despite the ambitiousness of the move, Huawei is backing its pledges with resources.

We found that Huawei is partnering with local Indonesian universities to offer free short courses and certifications in app development and other key skills. One Indonesian academic we spoke to shared emails showing that Huawei is expanding its outreach by seeking to partner with more local universities and education providers.

Huawei is offering training to the Indonesian government as well, with the company reportedly having trained 7,000 officials since 2019. Indonesia has long been a victim of China’s sophisticated cyber-espionage. Despite this, Indonesia sees the training offered by Chinese tech companies as a solution to many of the country’s most severe cybersecurity challenges.

For Indonesia, the threat of state-based cyber-espionage is far down the list of security concerns when compared to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors, misinformation, and disinformation. In addition to financial losses for Indonesian companies and identity theft and fraud for ordinary Indonesians, these threats endanger the country’s social and political stability.

With Chinese tech companies offering the training, technology, and security practices to reduce vulnerabilities to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors and the skills and technology needed to manage the information domain, the Indonesian government sees firms like Huawei as partners. As a testament to this, the country’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency signed a memorandum of understanding with Huawei on cybersecurity capacity building in 2019. This agreement was then upgraded to a three-party agreement with a leading Indonesian technology institute in 2021.

For the United States or Australia, the notion that a cybersecurity agency would sign such an agreement with Huawei might seem absurd—especially considering that the Chinese government can compel Chinese companies to assist with its intelligence efforts.

But for Indonesia, these concerns about state security are trumped by the training and technology benefits that companies like Huawei provide. As one senior Indonesian government official said to us: “If we’re constantly afraid, our development will stagnate.”

If the United States and its allies and partners want to compete with China in developing countries such as Indonesia, then, much like Huawei, they need to get themselves in the business of offering tangible benefits that respond to real needs.

The U.S. government should partner with its leading tech companies to offer free or at least highly subsidized technical training programs in Indonesia and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific. As well as subjecting the offerings from Chinese companies to some healthy competition, such initiatives would be welcomed by key U.S. allies and partners.

Countries such as Japan, Australia, and India are similarly concerned about the rise of Chinese tech companies across the Indo-Pacific and would strongly support such a U.S. initiative. Moreover, these countries could bolster such a U.S.-led effort by providing additional know-how, funding, and technology. Such a so-called minilateral initiative could also potentially be rolled into exiting Quad efforts to provide more public goods in the Indo-Pacific.

Rhetoric from the United States and like-minded countries about the rules-based international order and a free and open Indo-Pacific isn’t bad. But it won’t persuade developing countries to turn down tangible benefits like technology and training. To shift decision-making in Jakarta and elsewhere, Washington will need to step up with technology and training offers that provide a more appealing value proposition.

None of this is to say that strategic competition with China is the only reason for offering tech training programs in Indonesia and other developing countries in the Indo-Pacific.

Helping to upskill future generations of tech workers in the region is an unambiguously good thing. Many Indo-Pacific countries and their young populations will need these skills to realize their development goals in the global economy’s digital future.

But as well as the clear development rationale for providing these kinds of opportunities, there is a compelling realpolitik reason. Without training funded and supported by the United States and its allies and partners, Huawei and other Chinese tech companies will only increase their already strong influence over Indonesia’s—and the broader region’s—technology landscape.

The United States and its allies and partners have been missing in action on tech training in Indonesia and other key developing economies in the Indo-Pacific. It is time for them to get back in the game.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://foreignpolicy.com/2022/07/28/indonesia-china-huawei-tech-cybersecurity/?tpcc=onboarding_trending
Killexams : Digital Innovation: Huawei Unveil MEGA digital Infrastructure Solutions

SINGAPORE, July 25, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- During the Huawei Intelligent Finance Summit 2022, Huawei proposed the Multi-domain collaborative, Efficient, Green, and Autonomous (MEGA) financial digital infrastructure, and unveiled solutions empowering digital transformation of financial industry.

MEGA infrastructure is a global trend for finance.

Riding on the megatrends of fully connected, fully intelligent, and all scenarios finance, digital innovation is the key competitiveness for business growth, operational resilience, and sustainability, which has also become the crucial engine of the global digital economy. The ultimate user digital experience and business innovations are accelerating digital transformation of the financial industry.

Dr. Margaret Hu, President of Marketing and Solution Sales, Global Digital Finance, Huawei, said: "For digital and intelligent transformation of finance, Huawei will work with partners to embrace challenges ahead, and help the financial sector build MEGA digital infrastructure."

(PRNewsfoto/Huawei)

MEGA represents multi-domain collaborative, efficient, green, and autonomous. Huawei believes these directions of MEGA is important for financial digital infrastructure evolution in the new era. To build MEGA digital infrastructure, the computing power, storage, and connectivity will be reshaped to empower financial institutions achieve high-efficiency, high-availability, and high-performance services through in-depth Cloudification Collaboration, Cross domain Collaboration and Heterogeneous Collaboration.

Nicholas Ma, President of the Enterprise Business Group, Huawei Asia Pacific Region, Huawei, said: "To build the green, digital and intelligent finance, we can move faster together only with healthy and sustainable ecosystem collaboration. We plan to enhance the ecosystem collaboration with global partners to match the digital demands from financial industry based on our fundamental research capability, innovative solutions, technology platform and Huawei Cloud."

Driving digital transformation with innovation, Huawei Unveil MEGA Infrastructure Solutions

Based on Huawei's leading innovative technologies and capabilities, Huawei works with partners to develop innovative digital infrastructure solutions.

  • Industry's first Storage-Optical Connection Coordination (SOCC): The combination of millisecond-level optical transmission link fault detection and fast storage switchover algorithm reduces the I/O link switchover from 120 seconds to 2 seconds when a transmission line is faulty, ensuring zero transaction failures and 24/7 online service for financial customers.
  • Multi-Domain Controller (MDC): Financial customers' public clouds, private clouds, and traditional data centers are isolated from each other, which makes it difficult for multiple departments to collaborate on network O&M. The MDC solution implements network-wide simulation verification and one-click configuration delivery, reducing the network change efficiency from days to minutes.
  • Converged Storage Pool: To meet customers' multi-environment requirements, all data from physical machines, VMs, containers, or public clouds, can be stored in one data resource pool and centrally managed using Huawei Data management engine (DME). This solution consolidates the data resources, improving the overall resource utilization from 40% to 70%, and lowering the TCO by 30%.
  • Guaranteed Data Protection: In antivirus and anti-ransomware scenarios, the firewall, all-flash production, and all-flash backup are combined to achieve integrated protection ranging from virus detection, prevention, and isolation to data recovery. The virus detection rate is increased from 99.5% to 99.9%, and the backup and recovery time is shortened by five times. This solution effectively prevents virus attacks such as ransomware and ensures financial service security.
  • Huawei works with Netis to jointly develop a service-level intelligent O&M solution for the financial industry, to address a series of IT O&M challenges.by this solution O&M of services, applications, clouds, data centers, networks, and devices can be visualized from end to end, covering all links.
  • Huawei & Tongdun jointly developed Intelligent Risk Decision: Combining Tongdun's industry-leading decision-making engine, model management capabilities, and with Huawei Cloud, leading data & AI technologies, such as Hetu, DGC, Lakehouse, and GES. This solution helps financial customers Boost decision-making efficiency by over 70% in scenarios such as anti-fraud and credit rating. The average response time in large-scale concurrency scenarios can reach less than 50 ms. In addition, hundreds of typical rules and models are built in, facilitating quick deployment and meeting service challenges.

To date, Huawei has served over 2,000 financial customers in more than 60 countries and regions, including 49 of the world's top 100 banks.

SOURCE Huawei

[ Back To TMCnet.com's Homepage ]

Sat, 23 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.tmcnet.com/usubmit/2022/07/24/9643902.htm
Killexams : HSG and Huawei Jointly Released the Legacy Platform Migration Solution

SINGAPORE, July 26, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Hi Sun Fintech Global (HSG) and Huawei officially announced the Legacy Platform Migration solution at the Huawei Intelligent Finance Summit 2022 under the theme of "Shaping Smarter, Greener Finance".

Based on Huawei Cloud, this solution adopts HSG technologies and tools to provide independent, innovative, intelligent, and economical legacy platform migration services, helping customers move from a closed mainframe environment to open cloud computing platforms. Moreover, it allows customers to fully inherit their business assets, greatly Boost application scalability and integration capabilities, and quickly enhance the application requirement response and service innovation agility.

Sisi Yu, General Manager, HSG

At the sub-forum with the theme of "Building a Trusted and Innovative Cloud for the Financial Industry", Sisi Yu, General Manager of HSG, shared the company's over 30 years of experience in the mainframe field based on current pain points in the global financial IT architecture. She presented the latest research achievements on cloud-native distributed architectures, and also discussed how to help customers build multi-platform and multi-technology solutions to provide better differentiated financial services for users.

Recently, the IT architecture of the global financial industry is undergoing tremendous changes and new technologies such as cloud computing, big data, blockchain, IoT, and AI are booming. The increasingly fierce cross-industry competition and complex customer requirements bring both big challenges and new opportunities to the financial sector. Mainframes used to have a dominant position in the industry because of the high availability and performance. However, the position is undermined by the high cost, closed technology, and inflexible architecture, as well as the emergence of cloud-native distributed technology. Financial institutions are exploring solutions for legacy platform migration to achieve independence, mitigate security risks, and reduce costs.

The Legacy Platform Migration solution jointly released by HSG and Huawei leverages open platforms, open-source technologies, and independent R&D to simplify application development. This helps customers Boost the application development efficiency, linear system scalability, and comprehensive disaster recovery capability, achieving independent IT development.

Nicholas Ma, President of the APAC Enterprise Business Group, said, "Huawei can achieve shared success with our customers in building smarter and greener finance only through a healthy and sustainable ecosystem." Currently, HSG and Huawei have established a comprehensive partnership. In future, we will work together to bring greater value to the industry by accelerating digital transformation towards smarter and greener finance.

SOURCE Huawei

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 03:46:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/hsg-huawei-jointly-released-legacy-154600937.html
Killexams : computerworld
tt22 029 iphone 14 thumb pod

Today in Tech

iPhone 14: What's the buzz?

Join Macworld executive editor Michael Simon and Computerworld executive editor Ken Mingis as they talk about the latest iPhone 14 rumors – everything from anticipated release date to price to design changes. Plus, they'll talk about...


Wed, 27 Jul 2022 04:41:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.computerworld.com/
Killexams : Janes - News page

04 August 2022

Boeing avoids labour strike at three US defence plants


 Unionised workers at three Boeing military aircraft factories in and near St Louis, Missouri, have a...

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.janes.com/defence-news/
H13-629 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List