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Exam Code: AZ-120 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
AZ-120 Planning and Administering Microsoft Azure for SAP Workloads

The content of this test was updated on July 21, 2020. Please download the test skills outline below to see what changed.
Migrate SAP Workloads to Azure (10-15%)
Design an Azure solution to support SAP Workloads (20-25%)
Build and deploy Azure for SAP Workloads (35-40%)
Validate Azure infrastructure for SAP Workloads (10-15%)
Operationalize Azure SAP architecture (10-15%)

Migrate SAP Workloads to Azure (10-15%)
Create an inventory of existing SAP landscapes
 network inventory
 security inventory
 computing inventory
 operations system inventory
 resiliency and availability inventory
 SAP Database Inventory
 SAP Landscape architecture
 SAP workload performance SLA and metrics
 migration considerations
Design a migration strategy
 certified and support SAP Hana hardware directory
 design criteria for Tailored Datacenter Integration (TDI) v4 and v5 solutions
 databox with import and export
 HANA System Replication (HSR)
 ASR for SAP
 backup and restore methods and solutions
 infrastructure optimization for migration
Design an Azure Solution to Support SAP Workloads (20-25%)
Design a core infrastructure solution in Azure to support SAP workloads
 network topology requirements
 security requirements
 virtual or bare metal
 compute
 operating system requirements
 support SAP version
 storage requirements
 proximity placement group
 infrastructure requirements
Design Azure infrastructure services to support SAP workloads
 backup and restoration requirements
 SLA/High Availability
 data protection (EFS, LRS/GRS, Availability Zones)
 compliance
 monitoring
 licensing
 application interfaces
 dependencies
Design a resilient Azure solution to support SAP workloads
 HA models supported in HANA (N+N, N+0 and N+1)
 application servers
 SAP Central services
 availability sets
 availability zones
 Disaster Recovery (DR) with Hero Regions
 Database HA
Build and Deploy Azure for SAP Workloads (35-40%)
Automate deployment of Virtual Machines (VMs)
 Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template
 automated configuration of VM
 scripting with automation tools, including script development, script modification, and deployment dependencies
Implement and manage virtual networking
 IDS/IPS for Azure
 routing fundamentals
 subnetting strategy
 isolation and segmentation for SAP landscape
Manage access and authentication on Azure
 custom domains
 Azure AD Identity Protection
 Azure AD join
 enterprise state roaming
 conditional access policies
 Role-based access control (RBAC)
 service principal
 Just in time access
Implement and manage identities
 Azure AD Connect
 AD Federation and single sign-on
 LDAP/Kerberos/SSH
 Linux VMs Active Directory domain membership mechanism
Monitor SAP workloads on Azure
 Azure Enhanced Monitoring Extension for SAP workloads
 Azure Monitors
 workspaces & metrics
Build & Deploy HA/DR infrastructure for SAP products
 ASCS/SCS deployments on Linux & Windows using either of the 4 supported
methodologies (SOFS with S2D, NetApp, Azure Files Premium, 3rd Party products that present a device as iSCS to OS)
 HA/DR scenarios for SAP HANA
 HA/DR scenarios for other RDBMS platforms
 HA for non-NetWeaver Products like IdM, SBOP BI/DS
 Where to use load balances & troubleshooting connectivity
Validate Azure Infrastructure for SAP Workloads (10-15%)
Perform infrastructure validation check
 JMeter, Avalanche for Mobility Services, Load Runner
 test implementation for SAP workloads
 verify network performance and throughput
 verify storage
 HWCCT (HANA)
 FIO and/or DD (AnyDB)
Perform operational readiness check
 backup and restore
 High Availability checks
 failover test
 DR test
 print test
Operationalize Azure SAP Architecture (10-15%)
Optimize performance
 SAP workloads on Azure using ABAPmeter
 storage structure
 SAP workloads on Azure support pre-requisites
 scheduled maintenance for planned outages
 recovery plan for unplanned outages
 SAP application and infrastructure housekeeping (i.e. snapshots on OS volumes)
 bandwidth adjustment for ExpressRoute
 IPtables and GlobalReach for HANA Large Instances (HLI)
Migrate SAP workloads to Azure
 migration strategy
 Azure Site Recovery (ASR)
 private and public IP addresses, network routes, network interface, subnets, and virtual network
 storage configuration
 source and target environments preparation
 backup and restore of data
Migrate SAP Workloads to Azure (10-15%)
Create an inventory of existing SAP landscapes
 network inventory
 security inventory
 computing inventory
 operations system inventory
 resiliency and availability inventory
 SAP Database Inventory
 SAP Landscape architecture
 SAP workload performance SLA and metrics
 migration considerations
Design a migration strategy
 certified and support SAP Hana hardware directory
 design criteria for Tailored Datacenter Integration (TDI) v4 and v5 solutions
 databox with import and export
 HANA System Replication (HSR)
 ASR for SAP
 backup and restore methods and solutions
 infrastructure optimization for migration
Design an Azure Solution to Support SAP Workloads (20-25%)
Design a core infrastructure solution in Azure to support SAP workloads
 network topology requirements
 security requirements
 virtual or bare metal
 compute
 operating system requirements
 support SAP version
 storage requirements
 proximity placement group
 infrastructure requirements
Design Azure infrastructure services to support SAP workloads
 backup and restoration requirements
 SLA/High Availability
 data protection (EFS, LRS/GRS, Availability Zones)
 compliance
 monitoring
 licensing
 application interfaces
 dependencies
Design a resilient Azure solution to support SAP workloads
 HA models supported in HANA (N+N, N+0 and N+1)
 application servers
 SAP Central services
 availability sets
 availability zones
 Disaster Recovery (DR) with Hero Regions
 Database HA
Build and Deploy Azure for SAP Workloads (35-40%)
Automate deployment of Virtual Machines (VMs)
 Azure Resource Manager (ARM) template
 automated configuration of VM
 scripting with automation tools, including script development, script modification, and deployment dependencies
Implement and manage virtual networking
 IDS/IPS for Azure
 routing fundamentals
 subnetting strategy
 isolation and segmentation for SAP landscape
Manage access and authentication on Azure
 custom domains
 Azure AD Identity Protection
 Azure AD join
 enterprise state roaming
 conditional access policies
 Role-based access control (RBAC)
 service principal
 just in time access
Implement and manage identities
 Azure AD Connect
 AD Federation and single sign-on
 LDAP/Kerberos/SSH
 Linux VMs Active Directory domain membership mechanism
Monitor SAP workloads on Azure
 Azure Enhanced Monitoring Extension for SAP workloads
 Azure Monitors
 workspaces & metrics
Validate Azure Infrastructure for SAP Workloads (10-15%)
Perform infrastructure validation check
 JMeter, AvalanchAvalanche for Mobility Services, Load Runner
 test implementation for SAP workloads
 verify network performance and throughput
 verify storage
 HWCCT (HanaHANA)
 FIO and/or DD (AnyDB)
Perform operational readiness check
 backup and restore
 high availability checks
 failover test
 DR test
 print test
Operationalize Azure SAP Architecture (10-15%)
Optimize performance
 SAP workloads on Azure using ABAPmeter
 storage structure
 SAP workloads on Azure support pre-requisites
 scheduled maintenance for planned outages
 recovery plan for unplanned outages
 SAP application and infrastructure housekeeping (i.e. snapshots on OS volumes)
 bandwidth adjustment for ExpressRoute
 IPtables and GlobalReach for HANA Large Instances (HLI)
Migrate SAP workloads to Azure
 migration strategy
 Azure Site Recovery (ASR)
 private and public IP addresses, network routes, network interface, subnets, and virtual
network
 storage configuration
 source and target environments preparation
 backup and restore of data

Planning and Administering Microsoft Azure for SAP Workloads
Microsoft Administering plan
Killexams : Microsoft Administering plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AZ-120 Search results Killexams : Microsoft Administering plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AZ-120 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Microsoft Killexams : Biden’s Anti-Big Tech Adviser Has Been Living the Dream

Wu even suggests that we’ve turned a corner in stemming Big Tech’s dominance. “Ten years ago or whenever, they were able to get away with acquiring potential competitors, or making deals to lock out other companies,” he says. “It’s a much more challenging environment to do that kind of stuff, and in some ways, they’ve changed their conduct. And when they change their conduct, it’s harder to remain as entrenched as they were.”

Not everything has gone swimmingly in Wu’s tech policy domain. For reasons I can’t comprehend, we currently have no US chief technology officer; instead we have three deputy CTOs. And while the Biden administration made a gutsy move by nominating Gigi Sohn, a righteous foe of the Powers That Be, to the Federal Communications Commission, it hasn’t been aggressive enough in either pushing the nomination to a vote or finding someone else. As a result, almost halfway through Biden’s term, the Democrats still don’t have an FCC majority.

Still, it’s clear that the Biden administration has dramatically changed the antitrust atmosphere, much in the way Wu had been advocating for before he moved to DC. The question now is whether this momentum can outlive the administration. (Microsoft, after losing its suit in 1999 under Clinton’s DOJ, later won a friendly settlement from the incoming Bush Justice Department.) Also, the exact Supreme Court ruling that limited enforcement by the EPA might portend similar rollbacks on government action against monopolistic corporations. Wu admits that’s a concern. “We know we face a somewhat challenging judicial environment,” he says. “We have to be really careful with the rules; we have to make sure they're well-rounded. But the good news is that, in many of these cases, we're just tapping authority that’s been there for a very long time.” He also notes that the administration is in favor of proposed antitrust legislation. (But, as far as I can see, not to the point where it’s cracking congressional heads to get it done.)

At the end of our conversation, Wu addressed what it was like to work for antitrust action from inside the White House. “It’s been a treat, an opportunity to try to put into practice things I've been thinking about or writing about for the better part of two decades,” he says. “In that respect, it's been kind of an experience of a lifetime.” After that summation, it wasn’t so surprising that, soon after we spoke, Bloomberg reported that Wu would be returning to private life “in the coming months.” Wu quickly tweeted that the rumors of his departure were “greatly exaggerated.” In government, no one has a monopoly on non-denial denials.

Time Travel

The last time the US government went big on tech antitrust was when it sued Microsoft. The government won its case—Bill Gates and company did compete illegally—but in a November 1999 Newsweek column, I wondered whether the judge’s plan to break up the company made sense.

Just as Microsoft seems in denial about its past, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson appears to be in denial about its future. True, in his 207-page "Findings of Fact," the judge in the Microsoft antitrust suit compellingly verifies the government's key charge that the company overstepped its bounds in forcibly enlisting its captive business allies to defend its turf. (Microsoft insists its behavior was exemplary.) But not all of the judge's ruling deals in fact. Some of it is conjecture about how the computer marketplace will evolve over the next few years. And some of it, despite appeals-court warnings against judicial kibitzing on software design, consists of Judge Jackson's surprisingly confident views on what features do and do not belong in an operating system (OS).

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.wired.com/story/plaintext-tim-wu-biden-big-tech/
Killexams : Microsoft broke its own hiring record, adding 40,000 employees over the year

Over the past year, Microsoft added 40,000 additional people to its roster which represents a 22% year over year increase and a total of 221,000 employees for the company as of June 30, 2022.

According to the company's Form 10K SEC filing, Microsoft's Seattle base consists of 122,000 while another 99,000 worldwide. Microsoft breaks down the sectors in which it employees' people in the following statement:

As of June 30, 2022, we employed approximately 221,000 people on a full-time basis, 122,000 in the U.S. and 99,000 internationally. Of the total employed people, 85,000 were in operations, including manufacturing, distribution, product support, and consulting services; 73,000 were in product research and development; 47,000 were in sales and marketing; and 16,000 were in general and administration. Certain employees are subject to collective bargaining agreements.

Two things should be noted about Microsoft topping its annual employee record this June, one, up to 8,000 employees are being tallied as acquisitional hirings from completed deals with Nuance and Xander where they provided around 6,500 and 1,500 employees respectfully.

The other thing to note about Microsoft's record hiring run is that the filing accounts for the month before the company typically announces its summer downsizing infinitives.

Earlier in July, Microsoft announced cuts to some positions within the company that amounted to 2,000 fewer employees in addition to enacting a temporary hiring freeze for many open positions.

As the world braces for a predicted recession, Microsoft's CFO Amy Hood assured investors that the company will be measuring its employment status over the course of the new fiscal year, as it looks to focus on "key growth areas."

As Geekwire notes, Microsoft's current breakdown is disproportionally focused on operations rather than research and development.

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Mon, 01 Aug 2022 12:13:00 -0500 Kareem Anderson en-US text/html https://www.onmsft.com/news/microsoft-broke-its-own-hiring-record-adding-40000-employees-over-the-year
Killexams : Surprise Netflix-Microsoft Ad Partnership May Be the First Step in a Larger Strategy | Analysis

Netflix’s announcement that it had selected Microsoft as its global advertising technology and sales partner came as a shock to the media industry, but the decision could be the first step in a larger strategic battle plan for the company.

Since Netflix announced in April that it would be introducing an ad-supported tier, many assumed that the existing infrastructure of major players such as Google, Amazon, Comcast and Roku would be natural fits for the company. Microsoft, while boasting a $10 billion advertising business and the ad-support system company Xandr, is considered a smaller player by comparison. Yet the potential synergies between the two companies and the lack of direct competition may pave the way for even larger moves ahead.

“There are so many more ways Microsoft and Netflix can be working together,” David Offenberg, associate professor of entertainment finance at LMU’s College of Business Administration, told TheWrap. “They could move this relationship into gaming. They could move Netflix off Amazon Web Services to the Microsoft Cloud storage system Azure. And if you want to get really crazy, Microsoft could eventually buy Netflix.”

The unexpected pairing looks to be a strategic decision on Netflix’s part to forgo higher revenue in order to maximize new areas of business and, crucially, protect its data.

Netflix declined to comment for this story.

Also Read:
Netflix to Partner With Microsoft on Ad-Supported Subscription Plan

There may be more than meets the eye

Microsoft is an unexpected ad partner for Netflix. But with 100 million active monthly Xbox users and the looming acquisition of Activision Blizzard for $69 billion, this partnership could converge with Netflix’s growing ambitions in the video game field. (Netflix COO Greg Peters, who also oversees games, made the announcement Wednesday).

“Aren’t there always additional economics at play?” one media analyst told TheWrap. “Here, it’s probably that Netflix will have its gaming partner in Microsoft and Xbox.”

In March, Netflix acquired game developer Boss Fight Entertainment, the third game studio snatched up by the company after “Oxenfree” developer Night School and “Stranger Things” puzzle game developer Next Games. Netflix’s push into gaming is an attempt to provide added value to subscribers at no extra cost, though it also represents a tantalizing new prospective revenue stream down the line. Plus, now Netflix and Microsoft can team on film and TV adaptations of Xbox’s biggest titles.

Also Read:
This Year’s Tech Deals Near $300 Billion, Boosted by Microsoft and Twitter Buys | Charts

Zooming out, this move may also set the stage for Netflix to depart Amazon Web Services, the cloud computing storage service that currently houses several major streamers. Given the chance, it makes sense for Netflix to remove an asset from a competitor by taking its business to Microsoft’s Azure, though an individual with knowledge of the situation said that “nothing has changed in that partnership or the overall approach to infrastructure management.”

Still, speculation continues to spike throughout the industry.

“The financial terms likely include a migration away from AWS to Azure. It could be the unseen thing they’re not saying out loud,” the media analyst said.

It’s also difficult to ignore the current realities of both companies. Netflix has shed roughly $200 billion in value since November. Its market cap currently sits at $77 billion while its share price has plunged 75% from its 52-week high of $700.99. (Netflix stock rebounded 5% Wednesday after the Microsoft announcement). Should company leadership ever look to sell, Microsoft and its nearly $2 trillion market cap — not to mention its growing GamePass business — would be a logical landing spot. Consumers can probably expect the two companies to roll out an attractive bundle in the near future anyway.

Also Read:
‘Resident Evil’ Review: Netflix Series Is a Confusing, YA-Tinged Letdown

Why Netflix made a surprising pick

Netflix leadership has already told employees that it wants to introduce its ad-supported tier by the end of 2022, and there’s a massive moneymaking opportunity available if the streamer can get it up-and-running in time for Fall’s midterm elections. Google, Amazon, Comcast and Roku already have technology in place that could simply be plugged into the Netflix system. Yet industry confidence in Microsoft’s ability to quickly ramp up in this arena is uneven.

“Xandr tech is not really suited for this,” an ad executive told TheWrap.

It certainly helps that Netflix co-CEO Reed Hastings previously served on Microsoft’s board and Microsoft executive Brad Smith currently sits on Netflix’s board.

The thinking behind the deal may come down to three key criteria:

  1. Can Microsoft develop the advertising infrastructure up to Netflix standards in time?

  2. How much revenue will be generated and how much will they have to share?

  3. How much of the data are they going have to share with their partner and can it be used against Netflix in the future?

Microsoft — unlike Google (YouTube), Amazon (Prime Video, Freevee), Comcast (NBCU) and Roku (Roku Channel) — isn’t a direct competitor in the video space.

“By choosing Microsoft, Netflix is minimizing its data risk and maximizing its revenue risk,” Offenberg said. “They keep the data and money out of the hands of a rival. However, the Googles, Amazons and Comcasts of the world would probably generate the most revenue for them.”

Regarding the data swap, Microsoft president of web experiences Mikhail Parakhin even wrote in a blog post that Netflix “endorses Microsoft’s approach to privacy.”

Also Read:
Activision Shareholders Sue to Block $69 Billion Microsoft Deal

Microsoft put very aggressive minimum guarantees on the table, according to individuals with knowledge of the situation. Revenue splits can be all over the place from a more standard 70/30 to a 90/10 and sometimes 50/50. It remains to be seen how Netflix and Microsoft will divvy up the pot.

Microsoft declined to comment further beyond Parakhin’s blog post.

One last immediate question that still hangs over Netflix’s march into advertising is what the company plans to do about ratings. To sell ads, Netflix will need to become far more transparent when it comes to viewership and the streamer’s current global hours viewed metric isn’t going to cut it.

“Netflix will have to get comfortable revealing exactly how many people viewed a title in order to sell ads,” Ian Greenblatt, J.D. Power’s managing director and GM, tech/media/telecom Intelligence, said. “Otherwise, they’re about to announce a new business model that’s never been used before.”

Also Read:
Why HBO Max’s Potential Return to Amazon Prime May Be a Bad Idea | Analysis

Thu, 21 Jul 2022 00:16:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/surprise-netflix-microsoft-ad-partnership-130000835.html
Killexams : The 10 best jobs you can get with an associate degree
Getty Images/Klaus Vedfelt

If you're looking for a lucrative career that only requires a degree from a two-year school, you may be surprised at the number of options. 

Many careers that can net you over $60,000 annually only require an associate degree. The best associate degree jobs are highly specialized and require strong skills in critical thinking and technical know-how.

Read on for the 10 best associate degree jobs that offer plentiful job opportunities, high salaries, and strong professional satisfaction.

In curating this associate degree job list, we looked for three desirable qualities:

  • Higher-than-average salary
  • Optimistic projected employment growth
  • Appealing to those with strong technical/computer and critical thinking skills

We also selected jobs based on whether or not you can land them with the most popular two-year degrees, such as an associate degree in business administration

Read on for our list of the top 10 careers you can get with an associate degree. Keep in mind, several of the careers included here generally require a bachelor's but may allow for an associate plus professional certifications.

1. Computer support specialist

Salary: $57,910 

Computer support specialists help maintain computer networks and offer technical support to different organizations and computer users. They may specialize in computer network or user support and need strong technical and communication skills to succeed. 

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects 9% growth in computer network specialist roles from 2020-30.

You can typically find entry-level to advanced work as a computer support specialist with an associate degree in computer science or other computer/IT-related major. 

Earning professional certifications may help you get a job. Consider the Electronics Technicians Association's Certified Network Technician credential or one of Microsoft's various certifications for computer support.

2. Dental hygienist

Salary: $77,810

Dental hygienists provide preventative oral care to patients, such as brushing patients' teeth, and monitor the progression of oral diseases. They are also responsible for assessing patients' oral health and sharing their notes with dentists. 

The BLS predicts that dental hygienists will see an employment growth rate of 11% from 2020-30.

Working as a dental hygienist requires earning an associate in dental hygiene, which typically takes three years and combines classroom learning with clinical and lab elements. Many colleges and trade schools offer online programs. 

Dental hygiene programs are accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation.

3. Information security analyst

Salary: $102,600 

Information security analysts protect organizations' computer networks and systems using software tools such as firewalls and data encryption programs. 

The BLS projects a 33% employment growth rate for this role from 2020-30. The high demand for professionals to counter cybercrime has created high cybersecurity salary and job security expectations.

You can get an entry-level job as an information security analyst with an associate in cybersecurity and professional certifications. The International Information System Security Certification Consortium's Entry Level Cybersecurity Certification is popular. 

Sometimes it helps to earn your degree or certification in a specialization such as penetration testing.

4. Occupational therapy assistant

Salary: $61,520

Occupational therapy assistants help patients recover from or live with serious illnesses and health issues, such as chronic pain. Success in this profession requires strong empathy, written and verbal communication, and critical thinking skills. 

The BLS projects a 34% growth in occupational therapy assistant positions from 2020-2030. This overwhelming demand can be attributed to the population growth of middle-aged and elderly patients.

You can become an occupational therapy assistant by earning an associate degree in occupational therapy from a community college or trade school. Programs in occupational therapy are typically accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education.

5. Administrative services or facilities manager

Salary: $99,290

Administrative services and facilities managers plan, coordinate, and oversee the daily functioning of different organizations. They may supervise entire offices or individual departments of facilities. 

Typically, these managers need strong leadership, critical thinking, and written and verbal communication skills. 

The BLS predicts that from 2020-30, administrative services and facilities managers will see a 9% employment growth rate.

Though many employers expect these managers to hold at least a bachelor's, some entry-level jobs may accept candidates with only an associate degree in management. Typically, you need fewer than five years' experience to qualify for a job as an administrative services or facilities manager.

6. Paralegal or legal assistant

Salary: $56,230

Paralegals and legal assistants assist lawyers with tasks such as case research, file organization, and documentation. These skilled workers need strong writing, critical thinking, and organizational skills.

The BLS projects a 12% employment growth rate for paralegals and legal assistants 2020-30.

Most paralegals and legal assistants hold at least an associate degree in criminal justice, legal studies, or other related major. 

Paralegal and legal assistant programs typically need accreditation from the American Bar Association, National Federation of Paralegal Associations, or National Association of Legal Assistants.

7. Radiologic or MRI technologist

Salary: $61,980

Radiologic technologists perform diagnostic imaging tests on patients, while MRI technologists operate magnetic resonance imaging machinery to produce medical imaging of patients. Physicians use the medical imaging these professionals help produce to help diagnose and monitor different health conditions. 

The BLS anticipates that employment for radiologic and MRI technologists will grow by 9% from 2020-30.

Radiologic and MRI technologists need an associate degree to practice. Many states have licensure requirements for radiologic technologists. Radiologic technologists typically need to complete a program accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology.

MRI technologists generally do not need licensure. 

8. Real estate broker or sales agent

Salary: $48,770

Real estate brokers and sales agents represent clients looking to buy, sell, and rent properties. These professionals need strong soft skills, including written and verbal communication, leadership, and self-advocacy. Generally, they are self-employed, though some work in real estate agencies. 

The BLS projects 4% growth in positions for real estate brokers and agents from 2020-30.

To become a real estate broker or sales agent, you usually need an associate degree in finance or a business administration associate degree featuring real estate and finance coursework. 

In every state, these professionals need to pass a licensing test in order to practice.

9. Respiratory therapist

Salary: $61,830

Respiratory therapists provide care for patients with breathing issues such as asthma or chronic pulmonary disease. These therapists need strong written and verbal communication, empathy, and critical thinking skills. 

The BLS projects that from 2020-2030, the number of respiratory therapists will grow by 23%. This overwhelming demand has to do with an increase in the population of middle-aged and elderly patients.

To work as a licensed respiratory therapist, you typically need at least an associate degree in respiratory therapy. Many community colleges, universities, and trade schools offer online associate degrees in respiratory therapy.

10. Web developer

Salary: $77,200

Web developers create and maintain websites and web-based applications. These tech professionals usually work from home and know multiple programming languages.

The need for web developers has exploded as more services and products reach consumers online. It will likely continue to grow. 

The BLS reports that web developers can anticipate a 13% employment growth rate from 2020-2030.

Educational expectations for web developers can vary, but you can typically secure entry-level web development work with a computer programming associate degree and a strong portfolio. 

Attending a full-stack web development bootcamp or earning a web development certificate can also help.

Unless otherwise noted, salary and job growth data is drawn from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics as of Aug. 1, 2022.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/education/best-associate-degree-jobs/
Killexams : Coronavirus Daily Briefing No result found, try new keyword!Here are five of today's top Microsoft Start stories about the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Check out our roundup daily for the news you need. Wed, 27 Jul 2022 09:26:10 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/health-news/coronavirus-daily-briefing/ar-AA102m7W Killexams : InnovationRx: Gates, Bezos Back Alzheimer’s Diagnostics; Plus, Biden’s Long Covid Office No result found, try new keyword!InnovationRx is your weekly digest of healthcare news. To get it in your inbox, subscribe here. A trio of billionaires are re-upping their philanthropic commitments to speed the development of ... Wed, 03 Aug 2022 10:34:33 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/innovationrx-gates-bezos-back-alzheimers-diagnostics-plus-bidens-long-covid-office/ar-AA10gE01 Killexams : Defying fiscal disruption: Defense revenues on Top 100 continue to climb, despite supply chain turmoil

WASHINGTON — For Raytheon Technologies, it wasn’t one specific material that surged in price, causing headaches for the defense contractor.

Instead, it has been virtually all supplies the company uses to make key defense products, including the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter’s engine.

“It’s components, it’s raw materials,” Greg Hayes, Raytheon’s chief executive, told analysts in October. “Think about aluminum prices going up, [think] of steel, all of the basic raw materials, lead times pushing out. And it’s just harder to get material in the door on time.”

See the Top 100 list here

Aerospace and defense firms faced a thorny mess in 2021, as pandemic-related supply chain snarls and worker shortages — plus fears of a U.S. government budget downturn — entangled the sector. Among the biggest American firms, sales growth last year was mostly flat, reflecting a multibillion-dollar dip in U.S. defense outlays at the end of the Trump administration, following several big increases.

The same day Raytheon, the world’s second-largest defense contractor, reported a more challenging supply chain, Lockheed Martin, the largest, disclosed that supply chain delays had struck its F-35 fighter and other programs, and lowered revenue expectations for 2021 and beyond.

Even so, the defense revenues of the top 100 defense companies climbed for a sixth consecutive year, a sign of the global industry’s continued resilience in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and related economic shocks that stretch back to 2019.

Fiscal 2021 defense revenue recorded for the Defense News Top 100 list totaled $595 billion, up nearly 8% from last year’s list. (The increase does come with an asterisk because of an anomaly with the Emirati firm Edge Group’s revenue calculations last year, but its exclusion would only nudge the increase to 9%.)

The growth is partly driven by the 2021 list’s inclusion of Chinese defense firms for the third straight year, which account for just under 20% of the Top 100′s total defense revenues.

The top 10 firms on this year’s list represent roughly 52% of the total defense revenue; the top 25 firms account for 75% of total defense revenue for the year.

Geographically, 46 of the firms on the list are based in the U.S., which accounted for 53% of total defense revenue. Thirty-one firms are based in Europe (including Turkey but excluding Israel and Russia), and there are nine non-Chinese firms from the Asia-Pacific region on the list, three Israeli firms and one each from Brazil, Canada, Russia and Saudi Arabia.

The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute’s broader assessment of global defense spending for 2021 found that figure continued to grow, surpassing $2 trillion for the first time. The five largest spending nations in 2021 were the U.S., China, India, the U.K. and Russia, which together account for 62% of expenditures, according to its tally.

The labor shortages and supply chain challenges have continued in 2022, along with intensifying inflation. Earlier this year, the chief executive of Boeing, the third-largest defense company in the world, said the firm’s defense business was suffering after winning fixed-price programs and later facing dramatically increased costs.

“We took some risks not knowing that COVID would arise and not knowing that an inflationary environment would take hold like it has,” David Calhoun said in April. “And both of those things have impacted us fairly severely.”

US defense companies

The top 10 U.S. firms are Lockheed Martin ($64 billion), Raytheon Technologies ($42 billion), Boeing ($35 billion), Northrop Grumman ($31 billion), General Dynamics ($31 billion), L3Harris Technologies ($15 billion), HII ($9 billion), Leidos ($8 billion), Amentum ($6 billion) and Booz Allen Hamilton ($6 billion).

Lockheed, whose revenue represents nearly 11% of the total, topped the list for the 23rd year in a row.

The annual Defense News Top 100 list relies heavily on self-reporting from companies, many of which provide estimates rather than definitive data for their defense percentages. That means that while the list is the industry standard, the numbers come with some qualifiers.

The order of the top 10 U.S. firms was virtually unchanged from this year compared to last year. Given the White House’s unfriendliness toward defense mergers by the largest companies — as exemplified by the blocked Lockheed-Aerojet Rocketdyne merger last year — the list may be frozen for some time to come.

“If Lockheed can’t buy Aerojet, and you assume the primes can’t buy each other, and at least with this administration and their view of consolidation, this could be it,” said Roman Schweizer, a market analyst with research firm Cowen. “This could be the way they line up.”

U.S. military spending in 2021 amounted to $801 billion, down 1.4% from 2020, according to SIPRI. Defying market expectations, the defense budget under President Joe Biden’s administration rose. And driven by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, defense spending is expected to rise in European countries and again in the United States.

“There may be another growth spurt coming after this. That doesn’t even include the Europeans, who are definitely going to see a big increase,” said Byron Callan of Capital Alpha Partners, a research firm. “Even if there’s a cease-fire in Ukraine, you’ve still got a Russia that’s implacably hostile to the West.”

Below the top tier, the revenue of firms on the list is diversified — with an average of about 56% of their revenue coming from defense, noted Steven Grundman, a former Pentagon industrial policy chief now with the Atlantic Council think tank.

The Raytheon-United Technologies Corp. merger in 2020, for example, tied together Raytheon, primarily a defense firm, with UTC, a company more focused on commercial aerospace.

Diversification reflects one response to market volatility, Grundman said.

“The conventional wisdom holds that most companies in defense are pure-play, without much diversification, but that’s not what these data show,” Grundman said. “Once you get beyond the top 10, most companies have exposure to commercial [markets], primarily commercial aero. In addition to helping to manage volatility, diversification also gives defense companies better access to advanced technologies.”

Defying the conventional wisdom that the defense industry is barbell shaped — a few large and small firms with very few midsized firms in between — roughly half of the firms on the list fall between $1 billion and $5 billion in revenue. They fall on a scale considered mid- or small-cap by Wall Street (a measure of the size of a firm based on the market value of its outstanding shares).

“It’s an indication of industry health that you have a nice mix of small, medium and large companies among the Top 100,” Grundman said.

Great power competitors

China again had seven firms on the list, all in the top quarter and with a combined $117 billion in defense revenue. That’s more than the combined defense revenue for firms from NATO countries (excluding the U.S.) — $110 billion — and far more than that of the other Asia-Pacific firms (excluding Russia) on the list, at $23 billion.

Whereas most Western defense firms on the list disclosed their defense revenue, Chinese firms did not. That data and analysis came from the London-based International Institute for Strategic Studies, which Defense News teamed with for the third consecutive year.

Russia, which historically accounts for 20% of global arms sales, this year had a sole participant: Tactical Missiles Corp., which reported a 36% increase in defense revenue from FY20 to FY21, from roughly $3 billion to about $4 billion.

No other Russian companies responded to requests for data, including Almaz-Antey, featured on the list for several prior years.

In 2021, Russia was building up its forces along the Ukrainian border and grew its military spending by nearly 3%, to about $66 billion, according to SIPRI. This was the third year of growth, and Russia’s military spending reached 4% of its gross domestic product in 2021.

The reaction from the West to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February won’t be reflected in 2021 data; neither will the fallout from retaliatory sanctions. But Daniel Gouré of the Lexington Institute expects the Russian market share to wane as its historic defense customers, like India, look elsewhere.

“The guys who have bought mostly Russian stuff are now shifting,” Gouré said, adding that beyond its economic isolation, there’s more competition from the U.S. and other global players.

“The Russians are going to find it tougher going forward,” he noted. “The West is going to be more of a competitor than it has been in the past because we may be willing to give out more stuff to keep the Chinese/Russians out [of markets], and then you’ve got more competition from middle-tier players like the Turks, the [South] Koreans.”

There are 31 European countries on the list (including Turkey but excluding Israel and Russia), whose defense revenues total about $120 billion, or 20% of the list’s total. BAE Systems ($26 billion), Leonardo ($14 billion) and Airbus ($11 billion) make up the top three.

Several European firms that weren’t on last year’s list — Polish Armaments Group, Ireland’s Eaton, Turkey’s Roketsan, Germany’s Diehl Group, Norway’s Nammo and Finland’s Patria — made it into the list’s bottom third.

France’s Dassault, whose revenues jumped 65%, primarily attributed the growth to its deliveries of Rafale aircraft, which increased from 13 in FY20 to 25 in FY21.

The evolving security environment in Europe this year is fueling increased demand for integrated missile defenses, early warning systems, air-to-air missiles, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms. As Lockheed executives noted on a exact earnings call, those investments will likely bear out over the long term.

Bill Greenwalt, a former deputy undersecretary of defense for industrial policy, now with the American Enterprise Institute, said the “interesting data shifts may be seen in the next couple of years as the impact of the war in Ukraine manifests itself in the [Top 100] data as sales are registered and new orders for replacement systems are executed.”

“I would expect those companies who specialize in munitions will see large gains in the coming years,” the think tanker added.

Ukraine’s Ukroboronprom comes in at 89th place, with about $755 million in defense revenue — a 16% rise from FY20 to FY21.

Mergers and absenteeism

Not all of the defense revenue increases on the list came from organic growth, as some firms climbed the list due to mergers and acquisitions.

  • Shipbuilding titan HII (17th this year), which in 2022 changed its name from Huntington Ingalls Industries, includes its acquisition of Alion Science and Technology (74th last year).
  • Amentum (21st this year) acquired PAE (80th last year).
  • Peraton (25th this year) acquired defense IT firm Perspecta (39th last year) and — for $3.4 billion — Northrop’s integrated mission support and IT solutions business. It reported a defense revenue jump from $651 million to about $5 billion.
  • KBR (32nd this year) bought Centauri in 2020 to expand its space and military intelligence business as well as tech consultancy Frazer-Nash. It reported $2 billion more in sales over the previous year, some it attributed to its support of U.S. operations to house Afghan evacuees.
  • Vectrus (57th this year) acquired both Zenetex and HHB Systems.
  • Teledyne (83rd this year) acquired FLIR Systems (88th last year).

State-owned Saudi Arabian Military Industries was a standout in terms of industry consolidation, reporting a revenue jump from roughly $20 million to $605 million, after its acquisition of the Advanced Electronics Co. The kingdom has been consolidating companies within SAMI to achieve a 50% technology transfer target, in line with the economic plan Saudi Vision 2030.

SAMI also attributes its growth to its weapons and missiles business, its emerging technologies division, as well as its joint ventures involving Saudi Aircraft Accessories and Components Co., Navantia and Thales.

The absence of several U.S. nontraditional defense firms on the list is partly a reflection of the state of Defense Department efforts to attract them through novel contracting methods, said Jerry McGinn, executive director of George Mason University’s Center for Government Contracting.

“The department is doing a lot of experiments, prototyping, [other transactional authority contracting]. But now we’re at the point of, ‘Does it scale?’” he said. “That’s how those companies start to get bigger. You’re starting to see it, but it’s not at this level yet.”

As the Pentagon invests in the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communication System and the Defense Enterprise Office Solution, information technology giants Microsoft and Amazon Web Services, which haven’t participated in the Top 100, are notable for their absence.

Gouré and other industry observers said high-profile tech firms might opt not to participate because they are sensitive to employee dissent. A group of Microsoft employees in 2019 demanded the company abandon a U.S. Army contract that relates to Microsoft’s HoloLens augmented reality technology, and protests from a group of Google employees in 2018 prompted it to pull out of Project Maven, a U.S. Air Force artificial intelligence project.

According to Gouré, the absence of such firms from the list will only become more glaring as the Pentagon spends more on artificial intelligence, quantum computing, and the development of the Joint All-Domain Command and Control project, or JADC2. Such cyber-centric capabilities, likely to come from the commercial side, are the “new arsenal of democracy,” he said.

“You’re now moving into a world in which these companies are providing higher-end products; they’re now participating in more important IT activities,” Gouré said. “The cloud computing backbone of JADC2, which seems like it will be billions upon billions of dollars — there may not be a single integrator, but a couple of companies with billions each for them.”

Joe Gould is senior Pentagon reporter for Defense News, covering the intersection of national security policy, politics and the defense industry.

Sun, 07 Aug 2022 21:35:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.defensenews.com/top-100/2022/08/08/defying-fiscal-disruption-defense-revenues-on-top-100-continue-to-climb-despite-supply-chain-turmoil/
Killexams : California bullet train enters key funding stage

The next few months will be key for California's embattled and costly high-speed train project as the agency overseeing the project works to assemble state and federal financing needed to complete the first leg.

The California High-Speed Rail Authority may hit the market as soon as November with a fresh tranche of state-backed bonds.

At the same time, officials have launched an aggressive push to capitalize on federal infrastructure dollars and political support from the Biden administration. If it's successful in winning all its targeted grants, federal funds could make up 37% of the cost of the next stage of the project, which features a 119-mile electrified corridor in the Central Valley.

The San Joaquin River Viaduct will span the San Joaquin River in north Fresno and Union Pacific tracks. It will feature a pergola structure to allow high-speed trains to cross over the top of the Union Pacific tracks.

California High-Speed Rail Authority

The bond deal would mark the first tranche of $4.2 billion of general obligation debt approved in June by the state Legislature as part of the fiscal 2023 budget.

The window of political support for the complex and long-delayed project has been cracked wide open by the $1.2 billion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which the authority estimates provides up to $70 billion for high-speed rail projects across the country. President Joe Biden is a well-known train aficionado and Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has said he hopes to set up high-speed rail projects in two or three areas of the country.

But the window could slam shut —as it did under former President Donald Trump— if Republican lawmakers, many of whom oppose the project and have dubbed it Frankenrail, gain a majority in one or both houses in midterm elections.

The authority's last significant infusion of federal aid came more than a decade ago, under the Obama administration, shortly after the project's inception in 2008.

"We're optimistic that with the support of the Biden administration and our alignment of Biden's and California's climate goals, we think our project is well-placed to see some significant awards to get that first passenger piece up and running," said Brian Annis, the authority's CFO.

With a price tag as high as $113 billion, the California bullet train is considered the most expensive infrastructure project in the country. The 500-mile line promises a ride time of less than three hours between San Francisco and Los Angeles along a route that extends through the Central Valley. It's one of only a handful of high-speed train projects in the U.S., and the only one that's publicly owned.

If it ever gets built, they will come
In a July House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing, Buttigieg said it's important to get a bullet train up and running to demonstrate the value to Americans and show the country has the ability to build one.  

"It's enough not to build out a full high-speed rail network across the U.S. but to begin to demonstrate that the U.S. can do high-speed rail as effectively as anyone," Buttigieg said. "And we look forward to supporting as many routes as possible. It'll probably be a handful stacked alongside all the other rail needs in the U.S., but enough I hope to show that America can lead here as well."

The technology has proven successful in every country that's tried it, said Andy Kunz, president and CEO of the U.S. High Speed Rail Association.

Among the fledging U.S.-based projects, California is the leader, he said. 

"In terms of the level of technology and progress of the system, California is ahead of everybody," Kunz said. The length of the California line, at 500 miles, is "almost the entire height of the United States," Kunz added. "That's the beauty of this, and it's also part of the reason why it's so expensive. It would be like if New York were planning a line all the way to Georgia."

Other high-speed projects remain at various levels of development.

Texas Central, the private firm planning to build a 240-mile route between Dallas and Houston for $30 billion, is mired in management turnover even as it notched a recent victory from the Texas Supreme Court.

Brightline, which operates a Florida train that runs slower than a high-speed train, has struggled to ramp up amid COVID-19 shutdowns, though officials say they are back on track to finish construction. The company is also trying to develop a line between Las Vegas and southern California, which could eventually connect with California's bullet train.

Amtrak's Acela, averaging less than 80 mph between New York and Washington, falls far short of any definition of high-speed rail even as it plans to reach speeds of up to 150 mph on some sections.

A proposed line in the Pacific Northwest, called Cascadia Rail, which has the support of Microsoft, gained traction when the Washington Legislature this year allocated $150 million to be used as matching funds for federal grants over the next six years. 

"We cheer on all the other projects," Annis said. "The more of these projects we can see nationally, once they're in place, they'll be well-used and the public will call for more of them, because that's what's happened everywhere else in the world," he said. "There's usually a starter line and countries never stop with the starter line, because once it's up and running it's very popular."

Assembling the financing
Over the next few months, as the federal government opens funding opportunities on IIJA grant programs, the authority will apply for them and expects to hear back soon on programs it already applied for, Annis said.

It also hopes to come to the bond market as soon as November with the first of multiple issuances over the next few years to take advantage of the $4.2 billion of newly authorized state-backed general obligation bonds, Annis said.

The authority issues through the State Treasurer's Office. A spokesperson for that office declined to provide information on a potential transaction.

The $4.2 billion marks the last piece of the $9.95 billion in Proposition 1A bonds approved by California voters in 2008 for the project.

When voters authorized the borrowing, the entire bullet train was estimated to cost $33 billion and be finished by 2020. The Central Valley segment is now set to be complete by 2030 with a price tag of around $24 billion.

The projection date for completion of Phase I, which would connect San Francisco to Anaheim, is 2033. The authority's revised 2022 draft plan estimates Phase I costs at between $86.7 billion and $88.2 billion, an increase of about $4.3 billion over the 2020 business plan, according to a February 2022 report from the Legislative Analyst's Office, the Legislature's non-partisan fiscal advisor.

Of the $9.95 billion of bond funds approved in Proposition 1A, the Legislature has appropriated $5.6 billion, and about $4.6 billion has been spent.

According to the governor's 2022-23 budget, $3 billion of the $4.6 billion of bonds remains outstanding and $1.46 billion has been redeemed.

As part of the bond authorization in the budget, lawmakers established an inspector general that calls for the IG to "report regularly to the Legislature and governor with a summary of findings and on the authority's progress in delivering the project," according to the budget.

On the federal side, the IIJA marks the first major opportunity for the bullet train project since 2010, and the authority hopes to win around $8 billion in grants, Annis said.

"There haven't been large funding opportunities for rail but those have returned now with the IIJA," he said. "Some big dollar levels are anticipated and that's why we have the $8 billion target."

Since 2010, the authority has received roughly $3.5 billion of federal money, about 15% of the $23.4 billion available or authorized for the project as of 2022.

If the authority secures all the funding, the federal share would be about 37% of total available authorized funding, according to a June 16 board presentation.

Out of the six grant programs, a total of $4.8 billion would go to complete the first segment from Merced to Bakersfield — according to the board report. The authority also plans to request $2 billion from three federal programs for the start of a Bay Area connection and $2 billion from four programs for early investments around the state, such as electric vehicle charging stations and connections between transit and HSR stations.

The authority in May applied for just under $1.3 billion in two federal programs, including funding that could be used to buy six electric train cars that would be capable of reaching 220 mph, which would mark a milestone for the project.

Besides bonds and federal grants, a chief revenue source for the project is cap-and-trade dollars, which the state began providing in 2014 under a deal that gives the project 25% of revenues from cap-and-trade auction proceeds.

Through October 2021, the project has received $4.52 billion in cap-and-trade trade funds and has spent about $2.5 billion, according to the LAO.

The state's cap-and-trade program sets a cap on statewide greenhouse gas emissions from major sources and creates credits that the companies are allowed to trade for funding at quarterly auctions.

The LAO notes in its report the authority's estimates for future costs beyond the Central Valley segment are "subject to substantial uncertainty." That's particularly true in light of inflation, which Annis acknowledged is a risk to this, and all infrastructure projects in the U.S.

The authority expects to provide a comprehensive update on the project in March 2023.

Advocates, like Kunz, said getting even one section of a bullet train operable will advance the full bullet train cause as people see how it works.

"It's hard to get it done when all everyone hears about is cost overruns in California," he said. "Once it's up and running, everyone's attitude will change."

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 08:37:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bondbuyer.com/news/california-bullet-train-enters-key-funding-stage
Killexams : About 16,000 govt employees benefited from training programmes in first half of 2022

Doha: General Director of the Institute of Public Administration of the Civil Service and Government Development Bureau Abdulaziz Saad Al Majali has said that about 16,000 government employees received training in the administrative and specialised tracks, in 744 training programmes, during the first half of 2022.

In an exclusive interview with Qatar News Agency (QNA), Al Majali said the 2022’s comprehensive training plan included 1327 programmes, with 744 of them in administrative and specialist tracks already accomplished within the first half of this year with participation from 16.000 trainees from government facilities. 

He indicated the programmes proposed included 877 for the administrative track, 301 for the specialist track, 69 special programmes, and 80 for managerial and supervisory positions, indicating that 56 percent of these programmes were carried out face-to-face, while the remaining 44 percent were presented remotely. 

The training plan was launched at the beginning of January, and before introducing the plan, the institute surveyed the training needs of the government facilities that are subject to the Civil Human Resources Law, said Al Majali, adding that workshops were held to train employees from 54 institutions to survey training needs for administrative and specialist tracks. 

He further indicated that the current year’s training plan cares for the conditions for employee promotion and the trainees’ needs through multiple options in terms of the schedules and methods of training, highlighting the option of turning face-to-face programmes into distant ones under any circumstances.

There is an agreement with some government institutions to carry out specialist training courses like cyber security in cooperation with the National Cyber Security Agency and internal investigation in collaboration with the University of Qatar and statistical programmes with the Planning and Statistics Authority in addition to carrying out specialist courses that cope with the governmental institutions’ demands, he said. 

  In the same context, Al Majali added that new programmes were introduced and some existing ones were developed including programmes of CV Formation, Job Interviews, Microsoft Teams, Mawared Sab, Receptionist Supervisor Skills, Institution Digital Editor, Project Management as well as long-term programmes in fields of the internal investigation, result-based strategic planning. 

Commenting on the private qualifying programmes for job seekers and new employees, he indicated that the institute gave due care to training new employees owning to the importance of their role and their awareness and involvement in the job market.

He added that they developed a special programme titled “Marhaba” with a focus on developing new employees’ knowledge and providing them key skills for governmental work including training courses on boosting the sense of citizenship, job ethics, the employee’s rights, and duties, behavioral and managerial skills and risks, basic computer skills, archiving skills and others. 

Al Majali added that the institute launched a training course for job seekers registered on the Kawader platform titled “The Art of CV Creation and Success in Job Interview” aimed at enhancing job seekers’ opportunities to find adequate work, noting that the programme was repeated for 76 times in the general training plan for 2022. 

Regarding the training programmes during the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022, he explained that all training programmes will be carried out remotely during the tournament, and only in the morning, to take into account traffic congestion and the reception of guests and fans at the tournament. 

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 17:45:00 -0500 en text/html https://thepeninsulaqatar.com/article/09/08/2022/about-16000-govt-employees-benefited-from-training-programmes-in-first-half-of-2022
Killexams : Secret Service’s ‘ludicrous’ deletion of Jan. 6 phone data baffles experts No result found, try new keyword!Experts are divided over whether the disappearance of phone data from around the time of the insurrection is a sign of incompetence or an intentional coverup. Fri, 29 Jul 2022 07:03:48 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/secret-service-e2-80-99s-e2-80-98ludicrous-e2-80-99-deletion-of-jan-6-phone-data-baffles-experts/ar-AA106wue
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