Go through EC-COUNCIL 412-79v10 Dumps and study guide

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Exam Code: 412-79v10 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Certified Security Analyst (ECSA) V10
EC-COUNCIL Certified thinking
Killexams : EC-COUNCIL Certified thinking - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/412-79v10 Search results Killexams : EC-COUNCIL Certified thinking - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/412-79v10 https://killexams.com/exam_list/EC-COUNCIL Killexams : EC-Council certification

The International Council of E-Commerce Consultants, Albuquerque, NM (www.eccouncil.org) provides certification in several e-business disciplines. Founded in 2001, the training is provided in more than 100 accredited training centers (ATCs) worldwide. Exams are taken at Prometric Testing Centers or online. Following are the EC-Council certifications.

CEA - Certified e-Business Associate

CEP - Certified e-Business Professional

The CEA requires the successful completion of one out of several test offerings such as e-Business security, CRM, ERP, supply chain management, e-Commerce architect and project management. The CEP requires completion of any three exams.

CEC - Certified e-Business Consultant

For proficiency in e-Business design and implementation.

ETC - E++ Technical Consultant

Covers Web publishing, application development and server administration, Java programming and networking.

CEH - Certified Ethical Hacker

For proficiency in ethical hacking and countermeasures (see ethical hacker).

CHFI - Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator

Covers forensic investigation to obtain legal evidence as well as audits for prevention of attacks (see computer forensics).

Wed, 20 Mar 2019 00:09:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia/term/ec-council-certification
Killexams : Best Digital Forensics Certifications

There is an appreciable number of available, high-quality certification programs that focus on digital investigations and forensics. However, there are also many certifications and programs in this area that are far less transparent and widely known.

There’s been a steady demand for digital forensics certifications for the past several years, mainly owing to the following:

  • Computer crime continues to escalate. As more cybercrimes are reported, more investigations and qualified investigators are needed. This is good news for law enforcement and private investigators who specialize in digital forensics.
  • There’s high demand for qualified digital forensics professionals because nearly every police department needs trained candidates with suitable credentials.
  • IT professionals interested in working for the federal government (either as full-time employees or private contractors) must meet certain minimum training standards in information security. Digital forensics qualifies as part of the mix needed to meet them, which further adds to the demand for certified digital forensics professionals.

As a result, there is a continuing rise of companies that offer digital forensics training and certifications. Alas, many of these are “private label” credentials that are not well recognized. Making sense of all options and finding the right certification for you may be trickier than it seems.

To help choose our top five certifications for 2019, we looked at several popular online job boards to determine the number of advertised positions that require these certifications. While the actual results vary from day to day and by job board, this should give you an idea of the number of digital forensic jobs with specific certification requirements.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order, by certification)*

SimplyHired   Indeed   LinkedIn Jobs   LinkUp  Total
Vendor neutral
CFCE (IACIS) 63 82 117 46 308
CHFI (EC-Council) 106 140 253 68 567
GCFA (SANS GIAC)  422 489 857 294 2,062
GCFE (SANS GIAC)  203 226 433 143 1,005
Vendor specific
ACE (AccessData) 25 29 31 12 97
EnCE (EnCase) 110 154 237 114 615

*We covered two GIAC credentials, presented together in a single GIAC section below.

Digital forensics is a relatively lucrative space for practitioners. The average salary for intermediate digital forensic jobs in the U.S. – $63,959, according to SimpyHired – trails that of network engineers, system administrators and project managers. However, a senior specialist or forensic analyst, whether working in the private industry or government channels, will often earn six figures in major metro areas. We found salaries on the high end running almost $107,000 for forensic analysts and more than $127,000 for digital forensic roles.

ACE: AccessData Certified Examiner

AccessData is the maker of the popular Forensic Toolkit (FTK) solution for digital investigations. The company also offers a variety of related products and services, such as AD Lab, AD eDiscovery, AD Enterprise and AD Triage.

The AccessData Certified Examiner (ACE) is worth pursuing for those who already use or plan to use FTK, which enjoys widespread use in law enforcement and private research and consulting firms. The certification requires one exam, which covers the FTK Imager, Registry Viewer, PRTK (Password Recovery Toolkit) and FTK Examiner Application/Case Management Window tools in detail. AccessData recommends basic to moderate forensic knowledge before attempting the exam. This includes an understanding of digital artifacts, Registry files, encrypting and decrypting files, hashing, attack types, using live and index searching, and other topics. See the latest ACE Study Guide for details.

Recertification is required every two years. Credential holders must pass the current ACE exam, which focuses on the most current versions of FTK and other tools, to maintain their credentials.

ACE facts and figures

Certification name AccessData Certified Examiner (ACE)
Prerequisites and required courses None; training recommended:

AccessData FTK BootCamp (three-day classroom or live online)

FTK Intermediate courses

Number of exams One test (ACE 6); includes knowledge-based and practical portions

Registration required to receive a join code to access the testing portal

Cost per exam $100 (exam fee includes retakes and recertification exams)
URL http://accessdata.com/training/computer-forensics-certification
Self-study materials There is a link to the free ACE Study Guide is on the certification webpage. The testing portal includes study videos, lessons in PDF and a practice questions (with an image file).

CFCE: Certified Forensic Computer Examiner

The International Association of Computer Investigative specialists (IACIS) is the organization behind the Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) credential. This organization caters primarily to law enforcement personnel, and you must be employed in law enforcement to qualify for regular IACIS membership.

A formal application form, along with an application fee, is necessary to join IACIS. Regular membership includes current computer/digital forensic practitioners who are current or former government or law enforcement employees or forensic contractors to a government agency. All other practitioners can apply for Associate membership to IACIS, provided they can pass a background check. Membership fees and annual renewal fees are required. IACIS membership is not required to obtain the CFCE credential.

To obtain the CFCE credential, candidates must demonstrate proficiency with CFCE core competencies. One option is IACIS’ Basic Computer Forensic Examiner (BCFE) two-week training course; it meets the 72-hour training requirement, costs $2,995, includes a free laptop and waives the IACIS membership fee for nonmembers. IACIS membership is required to attend the course. Candidates completing the training course can enroll directly in the CFCE program upon completion of the course. Those not attending the BCFE course may meet the 72-hour training requirement with a comparable course (subject to IACIS approval), pay a $750 registration fee, and successfully pass a background check to enroll in the CFCE program and sit for the exam.

The CFCE test is a two-step testing process that includes a peer review and CFCE certification testing:

  1. The peer review consists of accepting and completing four assigned practical problems based on core knowledge and skills areas for the credential. These must be solved and then presented to a mentor for initial evaluation (and assistance, where needed) before being presented for peer review. Candidates have 30 days to complete each of the practical problems.
  2. Upon successful conclusion of the peer review, candidates automatically progress to the certification phase.
    • Candidates must begin work on a hard-drive practical problem within seven days of the completion of the peer review phase. Forty days are allotted to candidates to independently analyze and report upon a forensic image of a hard drive provided to them. Following specific instructions, a written report is prepared to document the candidate’s activities and findings.
    • Once that report is accepted and passed, the process concludes with a 100-question written test (which includes true/false, multiple-choice, matching and short-answer questions). Candidates have 14 days to complete the written examination. A passing score of 80 percent or better is required for both the forensic report and the written test to earn the CFCE.

Upon completion of both the peer review and the certification phase, candidates must submit a notarized form certifying that the practical and written exams were completed independently without assistance from anyone else.

Certificants must recertify every three years to maintain the CFCE credential. Recertification requires proof of at least 40 hours of professional education, a passing score on a proficiency test in the third year, proof of computer/digital forensics work experience, or passing scores on three proficiency tests within three years, and either three years of IACIS membership or payment of a $150 recertification fee.

Despite the time and expense involved in earning a CFCE, this credential has high value and excellent name recognition in the computer forensics field. Many forensics professionals consider the CFCE a necessary merit badge to earn, especially for those who work in or for law enforcement.

CFCE facts and figures

Certification name Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE)
Prerequisites and required courses Basic Computer Forensics Examiner (BCFE) training course recommended ($2,995)

72 hours of training in computer/digital forensics comparable to CFCE core competencies; BCFE training course meets training requirement

Without BCFE training: take a comparable course, pay $750 registration fee and pass a background check

Number of exams Two-part process: Peer review (must pass to proceed to subsequent phase) and certification phase (includes hard-drive practical and written examination)
Cost per exam Included in BCFE training; $750 for the entire testing process for those not attending BCFE training
URL https://www.iacis.com/certification-2/cfce/
Self-study materials IACIS is the primary conduit for training and study materials for this certification.

CHFI: Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator

The EC-Council is a well-known training and certification organization that specializes in the areas of anti-hacking, digital forensics and penetration testing. The organization’s Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI) certification emphasizes forensics tools, analytical techniques, and procedures involved in obtaining, maintaining, and presenting digital forensic evidence and data in a court of law.

The EC-Council offers training for this credential but permits candidates to challenge the test without taking the course, provided they have a minimum of two years of information security experience and pay a non-refundable $100 eligibility application fee.

The CHFI course covers a wide range of courses and tools (click the test Blueprint button on the certification webpage). courses include an overview of digital forensics, in-depth coverage of the computer forensics investigation process, working with digital evidence, anti-forensics, database and cloud forensics, investigating network traffic, mobile and email forensics, and ethics, policies and regulations. Courseware is available, as well as instructor-led classroom training.

The EC-Council offers numerous other certifications of potential value to readers interested in the CHFI. These include the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), CEH (Practical), EC-Council Certified Security Analyst (ECSA), ECSA Practical, Certified Network Defender (CND) and Licensed Penetration Tester (LPT), Certified Application Security Engineer (CASE), and Certified Chief Information Security Officer (CCISO). It also offers credentials in related areas such as disaster recovery, encryption and security analysis. Visit the EC-Council site for more info on its popular and respected credentials.

CHFI facts and figures

Certification name Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (CHFI) v9
Prerequisites and required courses Application with resume and current or previous employer info required.

Candidates must agree to the EC-Council Non-Disclosure, Candidate Application and Candidate Certification agreement terms.

Training recommended but not required:

  • Live, online instructor-led training (includes courseware, six months of iLabs access, test voucher and test prep program; contact EC-Council directly for pricing)
  • iLearn self-paced class (includes one year of access to instructor-led training videos, courseware, six months of lab access and test voucher; $1,899)
  • Self-study courseware ($677)
  • Mobile training (contact EC-Council for pricing information)

To challenge the test without training, you must have two years of information security work experience and/or education to reflect specialization, pay a non-refundable application fee of $100, and complete the Exam Eligibility Application Form.

More information on the application process is located on the Application Eligibility Process webpage.

Number of exams One exam: EC0 312-49 (150 questions, four hours, passing score 70 percent, multiple choice). Available through the ECC test portal.
Cost per exam $500 (plus $100 application fee; candidates who do not participate in training must pay a $650 test fee plus $100 application fee)
URL https://www.eccouncil.org/programs/computer-hacking-forensic-investigator-chfi/
Self-study materials Visit the EC-Council Store and search for “CHFI” for preparation materials, including labs. Study guide and test guides are available on Amazon, as well as some practice exams.

EnCe: EnCase Certified Examiner

Guidance Software, acquired by OpenText in 2017, is a leader in the forensics tools and services arena. Its well-known and widely used EnCase Forensic software helps professionals acquire data from many different types of devices, complete disk-level examinations and produce reports of their findings. The company also sells software for remote investigations (EnCase Endpoint Investigator), eDiscovery, risk management, mobile investigations and endpoint security.

The company’s certification program includes the Certified Forensic Security Responder (CFSR), EnCase Certified eDiscovery Practitioner (EnCEP) and EnCase Certified Examiner (EnCe). Available to professionals in the public and private sector, the EnCE recognizes an individual’s proficiency using EnCase Forensic software and mastery of computer investigation methodology, including evidence collection, preservation, file verification, file signatures and hashing, first responder activities, and much more.

To achieve EnCe certification, candidates must show proof of a minimum of 64 hours of authorized computer forensic training or 12 months of qualified work experience, complete an application, and then successfully complete a two-phase test that includes a written and practical portion.

EnCE certifications are valid for three years from the date obtained. Recertification requires one of the following:

  • 32 credit hours of continuing education in computer forensics or incident response
  • A computer forensics or incident response-related certification
  • Attendance at an Enfuse conference (at least 10 sessions)

EnCE facts and figures

Certification name EnCase Certified Examiner (EnCe)
Prerequisites and required courses Required: 64 hours of authorized computer forensic training or 12 months of work experience in computer forensics

Training options through Guidance Software:

  • EnCE Prep Course (DF310), classroom, virtual classroom or on demand ($2,195)
  • EnCE Certification Bootcamp (aimed at new digital investigators) – includes DF120 (Foundations in Digital Forensics), DF210 (Building an Investigation) and DF310 ($5,085 for the bundle)

Completion of the EnCE application

Number of exams One two-phase exam:
  • Phase I written test (180 questions, two hours, minimum passing score 80 percent), delivered via ExamBuilder
  • Phase II practical test (18 questions, 60 days, minimum passing score 85 percent)

Passing the Phase I test earns an electronic license to complete the Phase II exam.

Cost per exam $200 total, or $300 international

$75 renewal fee

URL https://www2.guidancesoftware.com/training/Pages/ence-certification-program.aspx
Self-study materials Study materials provided in Guidance Software courses. Check Amazon for availability of current and practice exams.

Learning On Demand subscription provides access to 400 courses across the OpenText Learning Services platform.

GCFA And GCFE Certifications

SANS is the organization behind the Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) program. It is a well-respected and highly regarded player in the information security field in general. SANS not only teaches and researches in this area, it also provides breaking news, operates a security alert service, and serves on all kinds of government, research and academic information security task forces, working groups, and industry organizations.

The organization’s incident response and forensics credentials include the following:

  • GIAC Certified Forensic Examiner (GCFE)
  • GIAC Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA)
  • GIAC Reverse Engineering Malware (GREM)
  • GIAC Network Forensic Analyst (GNFA)
  • GIAC Advanced Smartphone Forensics (GASF)
  • GIAC Cyber Threat Intelligence (GCTI)

The intermediate GCFE and the more senior GCFA are the focus of this section. Neither credential requires taking SANS courses (which have a strong reputation for being among the best in the cybersecurity community, with high-powered instructors to match), but they are recommended to candidates and often offered before, during or after SANS conferences held around the U.S. at regular intervals.

Both the GCFE and GCFA focus on computer forensics in the context of investigation and incident response, and thus also focus on the skills and knowledge needed to collect and analyze data from Windows and/or Linux computer systems during such activities. Candidates must possess the necessary skills, knowledge, and ability to conduct formal incident investigations and advanced incident handling, including dealing with internal and external data breaches, intrusions, and cyberthreats; collecting and preserving evidence; understanding anti-forensic techniques; and building and documenting advanced digital forensic cases.

Most SANS GIAC credentials are valid for four years. Candidates may recertify for the GCFE and GCFA by earning 36 continuing professional experience (CPE) credits. In addition, credential holders must pay a certification maintenance fee of $429 every four years.

The SANS GIAC program encompasses more than 36 information security certifications across a broad range of courses and disciplines. IT professionals interested in information security in general, as well as digital forensics, would be well advised to investigate further on the GIAC homepage.

GCFE and GCFA facts and figures

Certification name GIAC Certified Forensic Examiner (GCFE)

GIAC Certified Forensic Analyst (GCFA)

Prerequisites and required courses None

GCFE recommended course: FOR500: Windows Forensic Analysis ($6,210)

GCFA recommended course: FOR508: Advanced Digital Forensics, Incident Response, and Threat Hunting ($6,210)

Number of exams One test for each credential (115 questions, three hours, passing score of 71 percent)

Exams proctored by Pearson VUE. Registration with GIAC required to schedule an exam.

Cost per exam $769 if part of training/bootcamp

$1,899 (no training – referred to as a certification challenge)

Additional details available here.

URL www.giac.org
Self-study materials Practice tests available on the GIAC test preparation page (two tests included in test fee; additional practice questions are $159 each). Study guides and practice exams can be found on Amazon and other typical channels.

Beyond the top 5: More digital forensics certifications

There are lots of other certification programs that can help to further the careers of IT professionals who work in digital forensics.

One certification we’ve featured in the past is the CyberSecurity Institute’s CyberSecurity Forensic Analyst (CSFA). The CyberSecurity Institute provides digital forensic services aimed at law firms, businesses and individuals, and administers a small but well-respected certification program. The CSFA is designed for security professionals with at least two years of experience performing digital forensic analysis on computers and devices running the Windows operating system and creating investigative reports. Although the certification didn’t generate as many job board hits as our other featured certifications, the CSFA is still worth your attention.

The same goes for the Certified Computer Examiner (CCE) from the International Society of Forensic Computer Examiners, also known as ISFCE. The CCE is well recognized in the industry and in the law enforcement community as a leading credential for digital forensics professionals, but it fell a little short on job board hits during our review this year.

Other good certifications include the Professional Certified Investigator (PCI), a senior-level, vendor-neutral computer investigations and forensics credential available through ASIS International. The organization also offers the Certified Protection Professional (CPP), which includes an investigation component, and the Physical Security Professional (PSP) in its certification program. Forensics candidates can also pursue one of the High Tech Crime Network vendor-neutral certifications – the Certified Computer Crime Investigator or Certified Computer Forensic Technician, both of which have a Basic and an Advanced credential.

If you look around online, you’ll find numerous other forensics hardware and software vendors that offer certifications and plenty of other organizations that didn’t make the cut for the 2019 list of the best digital forensics certifications. But before you wander outside the items mentioned in this article, you might want to research the sponsoring organization’s history and the number of people who’ve earned its credentials, and then determine whether the sponsor not only requires training but stands to profit from its purchase.

You might also want to ask a practicing digital forensics professional if they’ve heard of the certifications you found on your own and, if so, what that professional thinks of those offerings.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10755-best-digital-forensics-certifications.html
Killexams : NetCom Learning Announces EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker Version 12

"NetCom Learning launches C|EH v12 training program for organizations looking to train their employees on essential ethical hacking skills"

EC-Council recently announced the launch of the latest version of the world’s no. 1 credential in ethical hacking – C|EH v12. NetCom Learning, a leading IT and business training organization, being an official partner of EC-Council is offering C|EH v12 training program.

C|EH needs no introduction when it comes to ethical hacking. It is well recognized in the cybersecurity industry among the top enterprises. In its 12th version, C|EH not only provides comprehensive training but also in-depth hands-on lab, practice range experience, certification assessments, and global hacking competitions. The C|EH v12 program is curated through a new learning framework: 1. Learn 2. Certify 3. Engage 4. Compete.

The C|EH v12 course and more details about the program can be accessed on NetCom Learning’s website.

The key features of the C|EH v12 training program:

  • Unique learn, certify, engage and compete methodology
  • Structured professional course covering 20 modules
  • Over 220 hands-on labs
  • 500+ unique attack techniques with over 3,500 hacking tools
  • Real-world ethical hacking assignment
  • New challenges every month 


NetCom Learning CEO Russell Sarder commented, "As an Accredited Training Partner of EC-Council, we're thrilled to announce the all-new Certified Ethical Hacker version 12. We emphasize the importance of having skilled cybersecurity professionals in every organization to maintain and enhance its security posture owing to the ever-increasing cyber threats and breaches. Upskilling IT teams regularly helps them tremendously as it bridges the cybersecurity skills gap. We stay true to our commitment to instill lifelong learning, and all our initiatives are carefully planned and executed with this goal in mind.”

About NetCom Learning

NetCom Learning supports the development of innovative learning organizations in the workplace by structuring a more knowledgeable workforce, enabling changes, and stimulating growth. Since 1998 we have been empowering organizations to reach optimal performance results and address challenges by managing all aspects of organizational learning.

NetCom Learning helps build innovative learning organizations in the workplace by structuring a smarter workforce, supporting changes, and driving growth. With more than 23 years of experience, NetCom Learning has been empowering innovative learning organizations to adapt and drive growth in this fast-paced world by closing critical skills gaps and ensuring smooth deployment, implementation, and consumption through authorized training delivered by Certified Trainers.

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Mon, 10 Oct 2022 19:07:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/ab29209996/netcom-learning-announces-ec-council-certified-ethical-hacker-version-12
Killexams : Best InfoSec and Cybersecurity Certifications of 2022
  • The U.S. job market has almost 600,000 openings requesting cybersecurity-related skills. 
  • Employers are struggling to fill these openings due to a general cyber-skill shortage, with many openings remaining vacant each year. 
  • When evaluating prospective information-security candidates, employers should look for certifications as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality.
  • This article is for business owners looking to hire cybersecurity experts, or for individuals interested in pursuing a cybersecurity career. 

Cybersecurity is one of the most crucial areas for ensuring a business’s success and longevity. With cyberattacks growing in sophistication, it’s essential for business owners to protect their companies by hiring qualified cybersecurity experts to manage this aspect of their business. The best candidates will have a certification in information security and cybersecurity. This guide breaks down the top certifications and other guidance you’ll need to make the right hire for your company. It’s also a great primer for individuals who are embarking on a cybersecurity career.

Best information security and cybersecurity certifications

When evaluating prospective InfoSec candidates, employers frequently look to certification as an important measure of excellence and commitment to quality. We examined five InfoSec certifications we consider to be leaders in the field of information security today.

This year’s list includes entry-level credentials, such as Security+, as well as more advanced certifications, like Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP), Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) and Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA). According to CyberSeek, more employers are seeking CISA, CISM and CISSP certification holders than there are credential holders, which makes these credentials a welcome addition to any certification portfolio.

Absent from our list of the top five is SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC). Although this certification is still a very worthy credential, the job board numbers for CISA were so solid that it merited a spot in the top five. Farther down in this guide, we offer some additional certification options because the field of information security is both wide and varied.

1. CEH: Certified Ethical Hacker

The CEH (ANSI) certification is an intermediate-level credential offered by the International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council). It’s a must-have for IT professionals who are pursuing careers in white hat hacking and certifies their competence in the five phases of ethical hacking: reconnaissance, enumeration, gaining of access, access maintenance and track covering. 

CEH credential holders possess skills and knowledge of hacking practices in areas such as footprinting and reconnaissance, network scanning, enumeration, system hacking, Trojans, worms and viruses, sniffers, denial-of-service attacks, social engineering, session hijacking, web server hacking, wireless networks and web applications, SQL injection, cryptography, penetration testing, IDS evasion, firewalls and honeypots. CEH V11 provides a remapping of the course to the NIST/NICE framework’s Protect and Defend (PR) job role category, as well as an additional focus on emerging threats in cloud, OT and IT security, such as fileless malware.

To obtain a CEH (ANSI) certification, candidates must pass one exam. A comprehensive five-day CEH training course is recommended, with the test presented at the course’s conclusion. Candidates may self-study for the test but must submit documentation of at least two years of work experience in information security with employer verification. Self-study candidates must also pay an additional $100 application fee. Education may be substituted for experience, but this is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Candidates who complete any EC-Council-approved training (including with the iClass platform, academic institutions or an accredited training center) do not need to submit an application prior to attempting the exam.

Because technology in the field of hacking changes almost daily, CEH credential holders are required to obtain 120 continuing-education credits for each three-year cycle.

Once a candidate obtains the CEH (ANSI) designation, a logical progression on the EC-Council certification ladder is the CEH (Practical) credential. The CEH (Practical) designation targets the application of CEH skills to real-world security audit challenges and related scenarios. To obtain the credential, candidates must pass a rigorous six-hour practical examination. Conducted on live virtual machines, candidates are presented 20 scenarios with questions designed to validate a candidate’s ability to perform tasks such as vulnerability analysis, identification of threat vectors, web app and system hacking, OS detection, network scanning, packet sniffing, steganography and virus identification. Candidates who pass both the CEH (ANSI) and the CEH (Practical) exams earn the CEH (Master) designation.

CEH facts and figures

Certification name Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) (ANSI)
Prerequisites and required courses Training is highly recommended. Without formal training, candidates must have at least two years of information security-related experience and an educational background in information security, pay a nonrefundable eligibility application fee of $100 and submit an test eligibility form before purchasing an test voucher.
Number of exams One: 312-50 (ECC Exam)/312-50 (VUE) (125 multiple-choice questions, four hours)
Cost of exam $950 (ECC test voucher) Note: An ECC test voucher allows candidates to test via computer at a location of their choice. Pearson VUE test vouchers allow candidates to test in a Pearson VUE facility and cost $1,199.
URL https://www.eccouncil.org/programs/certified-ethical-hacker-ceh
Self-study materials EC-Council instructor-led courses, computer-based training, online courses and more are available at ECCouncil.org. A CEH skills assessment is also available for credential seekers. Additionally, Udemy offers CEH practice exams. CEH-approved educational materials are available for $850 from EC-Council.

Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) training

While EC-Council offers both instructor-led and online training for its CEH certification, IT professionals have plenty of other options for self-study materials, including video training, practice exams and books.

Pluralsight currently offers an ethical-hacking learning path geared toward the 312-50 exam. With a monthly subscription, you get access to all of these courses, plus everything else in Pluralsight’s training library. Through Pluralsight’s learning path, students can prepare for all of the domains covered in the CEH exam.  

CyberVista offers a practice test for the CEH 312-50 certification that includes several sets of exam-like questions, custom quizzes, flash cards and more. An test prep subscription for 180 days costs $149 and gives candidates access to online study materials, as well as the ability to obtain the materials for offline study. Backed by its “pass guarantee,” CyberVista is so confident its practice test will prepare you for the CEH test that the company will refund its practice questions costs if you don’t pass.

Did you know?FYI: Besides certifications in information security and cybersecurity, the best IT certifications cover areas such as disaster recovery, virtualization and telecommunications.

2. CISM: Certified Information Security Manager

The CISM certification is a top credential for IT professionals who are responsible for managing, developing and overseeing information security systems in enterprise-level applications or for developing organizational security best practices. The CISM credential was introduced to security professionals in 2003 by the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA).

ISACA’s organizational goals are specifically geared toward IT professionals who are interested in the highest-quality standards with respect to the auditing, control and security of information systems. The CISM credential targets the needs of IT security professionals with enterprise-level security management responsibilities. Credential holders possess advanced and proven skills in security risk management, program development and management, governance, and incident management and response.

Holders of the CISM credential, which is designed for experienced security professionals, must agree to ISACA’s code of ethics, pass a comprehensive examination, possess at least five years of experience in information security management, comply with the organization’s continuing education policy and submit a written application. Some combinations of education and experience may be substituted for the full experience requirement.

The CISM credential is valid for three years, and credential holders must pay an annual maintenance fee of $45 (ISACA members) or $85 (nonmembers). Credential holders are also required to obtain a minimum of 120 continuing professional education (CPE) credits over the three-year term to maintain the credential. At least 20 CPE credits must be earned every year.

CISM facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISM credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISM exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy
  4. Possess a minimum of five years of information security work experience in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years of test passage. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  5. Apply for CISM certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of test passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

Exam fees: $575 (members), $760 (nonmembers)

Exam fees are nontransferable and nonrefundable.

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cism

Self-study materials

Training and study materials in various languages, information on job practice areas, primary references, publications, articles, the ISACA Journal, review courses, an test prep community, terminology lists, a glossary and more are available at ISACA.org. Additionally, Udemy offers comprehensive training for the certification exam.

Other ISACA certification program elements

In addition to CISM, ISACA offers numerous certifications for those interested in information security and best practices. Other credentials worth considering include the following:

  • Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)
  • Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT)
  • Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC)

The CISA designation was created for professionals working with information systems auditing, control or security and is popular enough with employers to earn it a place on the leaderboard. The CGEIT credential targets IT professionals working in enterprise IT management, governance, strategic alignment, value delivery, and risk and resource performance management. IT professionals who are seeking careers in all aspects of risk management will find that the CRISC credential nicely meets their needs.

Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) training

Pluralsight offers a CISM learning path containing five courses and 17 hours of instruction. The courses cover the domains addressed in the exam, but the learning path is aimed at the CISM job practice areas. 

CyberVista offers a CISM online training course in both live and on-demand formats. The course includes more than 16 hours of training videos, supplementary lessons, custom quizzes, practice test questions and access to experts through the instructor. As with other CyberVista courses, the CISM training course comes with a “pass guarantee.” 

Did you know?Did you know?: According to CyberSeek, there are enough workers to fill only 68% of the cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. A cybersecurity certification is an important way to demonstrate the knowledge and ability to succeed in these job roles.

3. CompTIA Security+

CompTIA’s Security+ is a well-respected, vendor-neutral security certification. Security+ credential holders are recognized as possessing superior technical skills, broad knowledge and expertise in multiple security-related disciplines.

Although Security+ is an entry-level certification, the ideal candidates possess at least two years of experience working in network security and should consider first obtaining the Network+ certification. IT pros who obtain this certification have expertise in areas such as threat management, cryptography, identity management, security systems, security risk identification and mitigation, network access control, and security infrastructure. The CompTIA Security+ credential is approved by the U.S. Department of Defense to meet Directive 8140/8570.01-M requirements. In addition, the Security+ credential complies with the standards for ISO 17024.

The Security+ credential requires a single exam, currently priced at $381. (Discounts may apply to employees of CompTIA member companies and full-time students.) Training is available but not required.

IT professionals who earned the Security+ certification prior to Jan. 1, 2011, remain certified for life. Those who certify after that date must renew the certification every three years to stay current. To renew, candidates must obtain 50 continuing-education units (CEUs) or complete the CertMaster CE online course prior to the expiration of the three-year period. CEUs can be obtained by engaging in activities such as teaching, blogging, publishing articles or whitepapers, and participating in professional conferences and similar activities.

CompTIA Security+ facts and figures

Certification name

CompTIA Security+

Prerequisites and required courses

None. CompTIA recommends at least two years of experience in IT administration (with a security focus) and the Network+ credential before the Security+ exam. Udemy offers a complete and comprehensive course for the certification.

Number of exams

One: SY0-601 (maximum of 90 questions, 90 minutes to complete; 750 on a scale of 100-900 required to pass)

Cost of exam

$381 (discounts may apply; search for “SY0-601 voucher”)

URL

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/security

Self-study materials

Exam objectives, sample questions, the CertMaster online training tool, training kits, computer-based training and a comprehensive study guide are available at CompTIA.org.

CompTIA Security+ training

You’ll find several companies offering online training, instructor-led and self-study courses, practice exams and books to help you prepare for and pass the Security+ exam.

Pluralsight offers a Security+ learning path as a part of its monthly subscription plan for the latest SY0-601 exam. Split into six sections, the training series is more than 24 hours long and covers attacks, threats and vulnerabilities; architecture and design; implementation of secure solutions; operations and incident response; and governance, risk and compliance.

CyberVista offers a Security+ practice test so you can test your security knowledge before attempting the SY0-601 exam. The test comes with a 180-day access period and includes multiple sets of test questions, key concept flash cards, access to InstructorLink experts, a performance tracker and more. As with CyberVista’s other offerings, this practice test comes with a “pass guarantee.”

4. CISSP: Certified Information Systems Security Professional

CISSP is an advanced-level certification for IT pros who are serious about careers in information security. Offered by the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium, known as (ISC)2 (pronounced “ISC squared”), this vendor-neutral credential is recognized worldwide for its standards of excellence.

CISSP credential holders are decision-makers who possess the expert knowledge and technical skills necessary to develop, guide and manage security standards, policies and procedures within their organizations. The CISSP certification continues to be highly sought after by IT professionals and is well recognized by IT organizations. It is a regular fixture on most-wanted and must-have security certification surveys.

CISSP is designed for experienced security professionals. A minimum of five years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s eight common body of knowledge (CBK) domains, or four years of experience in at least two of (ISC)2’s CBK domains and a college degree or an approved credential, is required for this certification. The CBK domains are security and risk management, asset security, security architecture and engineering, communications and network security, identity and access management, security assessment and testing, security operations, and software development security.

(ISC)2 also offers three CISSP concentrations targeting specific areas of interest in IT security:

  • Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Each CISSP concentration test is $599, and credential seekers must currently possess a valid CISSP.

An annual fee of $125 is required to maintain the CISSP credential. Recertification is required every three years. To recertify, candidates must earn 40 CPE credits each year, for a total of 120 CPE credits within the three-year cycle.

CISSP facts and figures 

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) 

Optional CISSP concentrations:  

  • CISSP Architecture (CISSP-ISSAP)
  • CISSP Engineering (CISSP-ISSEP)
  • CISSP Management (CISSP-ISSMP)

Prerequisites and required courses

At least five years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains or four years of paid, full-time experience in at least two of the eight (ISC)2 domains and a college degree or an approved credential are required. Candidates must also do the following:

  • Agree to the (ISC)2 code of ethics.
  • Submit the CISSP application.
  • Complete the endorsement process.

Number of exams

One for CISSP (English CAT exam: 100-150 questions, three hours to complete; non-English exam: 250 questions, six hours) 

One for each concentration area

Cost of exam

CISSP is $749; each CISSP concentration is $599.

URL

https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP

Self-study materials

Training materials include instructor-led, live online, on-demand and private training. There is an test outline available for review, as well as study guides, a study app, interactive flash cards and practice tests.

Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) training

Given the popularity of the CISSP certification, there is no shortage of available training options. These include classroom-based training offered by (ISC)2, as well as online video courses, practice exams and books from third-party companies.

Pluralsight’s CISSP learning path includes 12 courses and 25 hours of e-learning covering the security concepts required for the certification exam. Available for a low monthly fee, the CISSP courses are part of a subscription plan that gives IT professionals access to Pluralsight’s complete library of video training courses.

When you’re ready to test your security knowledge, you can take a simulated test that mimics the format and content of the real CISSP exam. Udemy offers CISSP practice questions to help you prepare for this challenging exam.

5. CISA: Certified Information Systems Auditor

ISACA’s globally recognized CISA certification is the gold standard for IT workers seeking to practice in information security, audit control and assurance. Ideal candidates can identify and assess organizational threats and vulnerabilities, assess compliance, and provide guidance and organizational security controls. CISA-certified professionals demonstrate knowledge and skill across the CISA job practice areas of auditing, governance and management, acquisition, development and implementation, maintenance and service management, and asset protection.

To earn the CISA certification, candidates must pass one exam, submit an application, agree to the code of professional ethics, agree to the CPE requirements and agree to the organization’s information systems auditing standards. In addition, candidates must possess at least five years of experience working with information systems. Some substitutions for education and experience with auditing are permitted.

To maintain the CISA certification, candidates must earn 120 CPE credits over a three-year period, with a minimum of 20 CPE credits earned annually. Candidates must also pay an annual maintenance fee ($45 for members; $85 for nonmembers).

CISA facts and figures

Certification name

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA)

Prerequisites and required courses

To obtain the CISA credential, candidates must do the following:

  1. Pass the CISA exam.
  2. Agree to the ISACA code of professional ethics.
  3. Adhere to ISACA’s CPE policy.
  4. Agree to the information auditing standards.
  5. Possess a minimum of five years of information systems auditing, control or security work in described job practice analysis areas. Experience must be verifiable and obtained in the 10-year period prior to the application date or within five years after the test is passed. There are some exceptions to this requirement depending on the current credentials held.
  6. Apply for CISA certification. (The processing fee is $50.) The credential must be obtained within five years of test passage.

Number of exams

One: 150 questions, four hours

Cost of exam

$575 (members); $760 (nonmembers)

URL

https://www.isaca.org/credentialing/cisa

Self-study materials

ISACA offers a variety of training options, including virtual instructor-led courses, online and on-demand training, review manuals and question databases. Numerous books and self-study materials are also available on Amazon.

Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) training

Training opportunities for the CISA certification are plentiful. Udemy offers more than 160 CISA-related courses, lectures, practice exams, question sets and more. On Pluralsight, you’ll find 12 courses with 27 hours of information systems auditor training covering all CISA job practice domains for the CISA job practice areas.

Beyond the top 5: More cybersecurity certifications

In addition to these must-have credentials, many other certifications are available to fit the career needs of any IT professional interested in information security. Business owners should consider employing workers with these credentials as well.

  • The SANS GIAC Security Essentials (GSEC) certification remains an excellent entry-level credential for IT professionals seeking to demonstrate that they not only understand information security terminology and concepts but also possess the skills and technical expertise necessary to occupy “hands-on” security roles.
  • If you find incident response and investigation intriguing, check out the Logical Operations CyberSec First Responder (CFR) certification. This ANSI-accredited and U.S. DoD-8570-compliant credential recognizes security professionals who can design secure IT environments, perform threat analysis, and respond appropriately and effectively to cyberattacks. Logical Operations also offers other certifications, including Master Mobile Application Developer (MMAD), Certified Virtualization Professional (CVP), Cyber Secure Coder and CloudMASTER.
  • The associate-level Cisco Certified CyberOps Associate certification is aimed at analysts in security operations centers at large companies and organizations. Candidates who qualify through Cisco’s global scholarship program may receive free training, mentoring and testing to help them achieve a range of entry-level to expert certifications that the company offers. CompTIA Cybersecurity Analyst (CySA+), which launched in 2017, is a vendor-neutral certification designed for professionals with three to four years of security and behavioral analytics experience.
  • The Identity Management Institute offers several credentials for identity and access management, data protection, identity protection, identity governance and more. The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), which focuses on privacy, has a small but growing number of certifications as well.
  • The SECO-Institute, in cooperation with the Security Academy Netherlands and APMG, is behind the Cyber Security & Governance Certification Program; SECO-Institute certifications aren’t well known in the United States, but their popularity is growing. 
  • It also may be worth your time to browse the Chartered Institute of Information Security accreditations, the U.K. equivalent of the U.S. DoD 8570 certifications and the corresponding 8140 framework.

Also, consider these five entry-level cybersecurity certifications for more options.

TipTip: Before you decide to purchase training for a certification or an test voucher, see if your employer will cover the cost. Employers may cover all or part of the cost if you have a continuing education or training allowance, or if the certification is in line with your current or potential job duties.

Information security and cybersecurity jobs

According to CyberSeek, the number of cybersecurity job openings in the U.S. stands at almost 598,000, with about 1.05 million cybersecurity professionals employed in today’s workforce. Projections continue to be robust: The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics expects 33% growth in information security analyst positions between 2020 and 2030; in comparison, the average rate of growth for all occupations is about 8%.

Security-related job roles include information security specialist, security analyst, network security administrator, system administrator (with security as a responsibility) and security engineer, as well as specialized roles, like malware engineer, intrusion analyst and penetration tester.

Average salaries for information security specialists and security engineers – two of the most common job roles – vary depending on the source. For example, SimplyHired reports about $74,000 for specialist positions, whereas Glassdoor‘s national average is about $108,000. For security engineers, SimplyHired reports almost $112,000, while Glassdoor’s average is more than $111,000, with salaries on the high end reported at $261,000. Note that these numbers frequently change as the sources regularly update their data. [Meet the man who kept Microsoft safe and secure for more than a decade.]

Our informal job board survey from April 2022 reports the number of job posts nationwide in which our featured certifications were mentioned on a given day. This should give you an idea of the relative popularity of each certification.

Job board search results (in alphabetical order by cybersecurity certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

TechCareers

Total

CEH (EC-Council)

1,989

3,907

7,952

2,829

16,677

CISA (ISACA)

5,389

12,507

20,573

4,701

43,170

CISM (ISACA)

3,467

6,656

14,503

4,072

28,698

CISSP [(ISC)2]

11,472

23,463

34,716

11,060

80,711

Security+ (CompTIA)

5,953

6,680

5,998

1,851

20,482

Did you know?Did you know?: Cybersecurity matters even when you’re traveling. Find out how to keep your computer secure when you’re on the road for business or pleasure.

The importance of hiring information security and cybersecurity professionals

According to Risk Based Security‘s 2021 Year End Data Breach Quickview Report, there were 4,145 publicly disclosed breaches throughout 2021, containing over 22 billion records. This is the second-highest number of breached records, after an all-time high the year before. The U.S. was particularly affected, with the number of breaches increasing 10% compared with the previous year. More than 80% of the records exposed throughout 2021 were due to human error, highlighting an ever-increasing need for cybersecurity education, as well as for highly skilled and trained cybersecurity professionals. [Learn how to recover from a data breach.]

If you’re serious about advancing your career in the IT field and are interested in specializing in security, certification is a great choice. It’s an effective way to validate your skills and show a current or prospective employer that you’re qualified and properly trained. If you’re a business owner, hiring certified professionals and skilled IT managers can help prevent cyberattacks and provide confidence that your company’s security is in the right hands. In the meantime, review our quick cybersecurity tips to Improve your company’s protection.

Jeremy Bender contributed to the writing and research in this article.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10708-information-security-certifications.html
Killexams : Gidinerd Partners EC Council on Cybersecurity Skills

Emma Okonji

In a bid to position Nigeria as a global cybersecurity powerhouse, Gidinerd Limited, a marketing and technology company has partnered one of the world’s largest cybersecurity technical certification body, EC-Council.

EC Council is a leading IT and e-Business certification awarding body and also the creator of the famous Certified Ethical Hacker and Computer Hacking Forensics Investigator. EC-Council has trained over 80,000 individuals from organisations such as the US Army, the FBI, Microsoft, IBM and the United Nations with its certifications recognised worldwide and have received endorsements from various government agencies including: The US Federal Government via the Montgomery GI Bill, National Security Agency (NSA) and the Committee on National Security Systems (CNSS).

Speaking on the partnership, Co-Founder and GidiNerd’s Enterprise Solutions Architect, Confidence Staveley said: “It is no longer a question of can you be hacked? It is about dedicating resources to the mitigation and remediation of the cyber plague that is plaguing the world today. Consequently, EC-Council’s e-Learning courses are designed to help organisations and individuals take preemptive measures against malicious attacks, by learning how to identify and defend the weaknesses in their own network”.

According to the statement by EC-Council, “This partnership with EC-Council allows Gidinerd to provide industry leading, globally recognised credentials such as ANSI, Accredited Certified Ethical Hacker (C|EH), Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator (C|HFI) and Certified Network Defender (C|ND); which are highly valued by employers in Nigeria, as it is globally.”

This partnership will make it easier for organisations to enroll Information Technology (IT) personnels, auditors, security professionals, network and site administrators through GidiNerd for any EC Council certification program thereby empowering them with the skills needed for the industry.

Sun, 02 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.thisdaylive.com/index.php/2019/04/11/gidinerd-partners-ec-council-on-cybersecurity-skills/
Killexams : EC-Council Launch A New Version Of Certified Ethical Hacker CEH V12

(MENAFN- Market Press Release) September 16, 2022 12:34 am - The EC-Council launched a new version of Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification on 7th September 2022 that is CEH v12.

The new version of CEH follows a new framework to provide comprehensive training. The new learning methodology is:

Learn - Certify - Engage - Compete

1. Learn: Gain Knowledge
Learn about the difficulties that modern cyber workers confront. With the inclusion of Edge, Fog, Grid computing, MITRE ATT&CK framework, and much more, CEH v12 incorporates hacking methods of the most latest operating systems and unique hands-on cyber exercises.

2. Certify: Gain Recognition
Clear the CEH v12 test and get certified.

3. Engage: Build Skill
CEH v12 combines in-depth instructions and practical labs, followed by a simulated ethical hacking engagement. There are four hacking assessments, in which the last two are CTF challenges, lasting four hours each that require hacking the simulated organization in order to test the newly learned skills.

4. Compete: Build Respect
Under the Compete approach of the new CEH learning paradigm, candidates will be welcomed to a 12-month international hacking competition. There will be dynamic challenges every month covering everything from malware to service exploitation, web application attacks, SCADA and ICS systems that control everything from power grids to water supply systems of cities around the world, aspiring professionals will compete for the top ranks among ethical hackers worldwide.

The Certified Ethical Hacker (C|EH v12) program is one of the most prestigious certifications in the cybersecurity field. For 20 years, it has held the top spot in the world for ethical hacking certification, and many firms have consistently placed it first. CEH v12 is divided into 20 modules that are designed to help you master the foundation of ethical hacking

InfosecTrain is the authorized training partner for EC-Council in India and UAE. The CEH Online Training and Certification program from InfosecTrain follows CEH v12, the most latest version, to keep you one step ahead of hackers. The revised learning framework includes the industry's most complete, in-depth, hands-on lab and practice range experience in addition to a thorough training program to get you ready for the certification exam.

Check Now: InfosecTrain
InfosecTrain is a prominent security and technology training and consulting organization that offers a wide range of IT security services and training. InfosecTrain was created in 2016 by a group of eager and seasoned industry veterans with a combined experience of over 15 years.

To know more about training programs offered by Infosec Train:

Please write back to or call at IND: 1800-843-7890 (Toll-Free) / US: +1 657-722-11127 / UK: +44 7451 208413

MENAFN16092022003520003262ID1104877317


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Fri, 16 Sep 2022 02:04:00 -0500 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1104877317/EC-Council-Launch-A-New-Version-Of-Certified-Ethical-Hacker-CEH-V12
Killexams : EC-Council to Increase Development of Ethical Hackers to Address Mounting Shortage of Cybersecurity Professionals
EC-COUNCIL

EC-COUNCIL

ETHICAL HACKER TRAINING

ETHICAL HACKER TRAINING

With 50% Vacancies in US Cybersecurity Workforce, New Certified Ethical Hacker Training Framework Will Teach Trainees How to “Hack”

EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker program, used by many government agencies, is the gold standard for ethical hacker training. This model will train the new supply of cybersecurity professionals”

— Jay Bavisi

TAMPA , FLORIDA, UNITED STATES, September 7, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ --

EC-Council, the leading global cybersecurity certification body, has announced the release of its flagship Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) version 12 program, and plans to train up 100,000 new ethical hackers worldwide within 5 years to address the severe shortage of Certified Ethical Hackers across the globe.

Known for the de-facto global standard in building ethical hacking skill since 2003, EC-Council’s new CEH Version 12 program will be based on an entirely new learning framework incorporating a novel Learn, Certify, Engage, Compete methodology to create a new breed of skilled ethical hackers.

“The United States faces a severe shortage of skilled cybersecurity professionals today, putting companies, government agencies, infrastructure, and Americans themselves at great risk,” said Jay Bavisi, Founder and CEO of EC-Council Group. “EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker program, mandated by many government agencies today, is the gold standard for ethical hacker training, and the new learning model will help train up our supply of cybersecurity professionals with real skills and experience.”

A latest report by Cybersecurity Ventures pointed out that the gap of unfilled cybersecurity positions has grown by 350% between 2013 and 2021, with a current cybersecurity job vacancy rate of nearly 50%, according to CyberSeek, a project supported by the US Department of Commerce’s National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE). This shortage of available talent has real world consequences. According to a latest report from Fortinet, almost 80% of breaches were due to skill gaps that exist in organizations around the globe.

Bavisi added “Cybersecurity jobs evolve very fast, and we need professionals that have a broad range of skills that can be deployed in the real world,” “The new four-phase Learn, Certify, Engage Compete learning framework makes the CEH program the first program of its kind to actually take trainees beyond knowledge and have them put their skills to practical use.”

CEH today is relied upon by the US Department of Defense and other government agencies and used in 7 of the Fortune 10, 47 of the Fortune 100 within many cybersecurity functions, making it a de facto standard both in the public and private sector. The Certified Ethical Hacker program has been used by law enforcement, defense and Fortune 500 companies since early 2000. The Pentagon has embraced the CEH program as part of its defense workforce skill development program since 2010.

With the new version, it has been completely updated as part of the Learn and Certify methodology to match the cybersecurity challenges that cyber professionals face today. With the addition of Edge, Fog, Grid computing and the MITRE ATT&CK framework among others, CEH version 12 incorporates hacking techniques of the latest operating systems including Windows 11 and Server 2022, covering over 3500 cyber security tools, 519 Attack techniques, and over 220 distinct hands-on cyber exercises.

Candidates pursuing CEH Version 12 will now have access to the training program which incorporates comprehensive instruction and hands-on labs, followed by a simulated ethical hacking engagement to apply their skills in a live cyber range environment that emulates a mid-size target organization with four immersive, self-driven hacking assessments lasting 4 hours each which will require them to hack the organization in order to test their newly acquire skills from the program with a methodology called Engage.

Once the applied skills are mastered, candidates will be greeted with 12 months of global hacking competition under the Compete methodology of the new CEH learning model. Candidates will see monthly skill enriching competitions, leaderboards, and detailed assessments of their performance in each competition setting. Building global Ethical Hacker Challenge Leaderboards, aspiring professionals will compete for top ranks among ethical hackers across the world with dynamic challenges covering everything from Malware to Service Exploitation, Web Application Attacks, to SCADA and ICS systems that control everything from power grids to water supply systems of cities across the world.

About EC-Council

EC-Council is an ISO/IEC 17024 accredited organization with earned recognition from the DoD under Directive 8140/8570, in the U.K. by the NCSC and a variety of other authoritative bodies that influence the entire profession. Founded in 2001, EC-Council operates across 11 global offices in the USA, U.K., Malaysia, Singapore, India, and Indonesia. Its U.S. offices are in Albuquerque, NM, Phoenix, AZ and Tampa, FL.

EC-Council’s sole purpose is to build and refine the cybersecurity profession. EC-Council helps individuals, organizations, educators, and governments address global workforce problems. Through the development of world-class cybersecurity education programs and their corresponding certifications, EC-Council provides cybersecurity services to some of the largest businesses around the globe. EC-Council is trusted by seven of the Fortune 10, 47 of the Fortune 100, the Department of Defense, global intelligence communities, NATO, and more than 2,000 of the best universities, colleges, and training companies. EC-Council programs have made their way to more than 140 countries and have set the bar in cybersecurity education.

Best known for the Certified Ethical Hacker program, EC-Council builds individual and team/organization cyber capabilities through the Certified Ethical Hacker Program and other programs including Certified Secure Computer User, Computer Hacking Forensic Investigator, Certified Security Analyst, Certified Network Defender, Certified SOC Analyst, Certified Threat Intelligence Analyst, Certified Incident Handler, as well as the Certified Chief Information Security Officer.

Learn more at www.eccouncil.org
Follow EC Council on LinkedIn and Twitter

Mayur Prasad
EC-COUNCIL
email us here
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Tue, 06 Sep 2022 23:57:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.wkrn.com/business/press-releases/ein-presswire/589406542/ec-council-to-increase-development-of-ethical-hackers-to-address-mounting-shortage-of-cybersecurity-professionals/
Killexams : The Challenges Posed By Design Thinking—And How To Overcome Them

Everywhere you turn nowadays, people bring up design thinking as the panacea to invite customer experiences into the game. The 2017 EY report “Demystifying design thinking: becoming part of the movement”, for example, urged organizations to “embrace design thinking and embed it into their operating models”. 10 years after the movement emerged, specialists are seeing design thinking as THE catalyst to boost professionals’ involvement in their clients’ experience, be it in the fields of health, design, agriculture, architecture, high tech, software... and even foreign policy! Design thinking provides the necessary impetus to ensure the customer experience is considered before programs are built: “Startups and software companies were some of the first to embrace design thinking as a way to build an entire company,” continues the report. It concludes that this approach towards product development improves the chances of success and is more efficient than traditional models.

But what exactly is design thinking - beyond a way of solving wicked problems? Well, in a nutshell, it’s an approach that focuses on the users and other stakeholders and that emphasizes experimentation and iteration. The principle is to use empathy to frame and define problems from a user’s or a stakeholder’s perspective and to create innovative products, services and processes to solve such problems. To do this, it requires managers to be embedded in the experience of the users and to experiment the solutions envisioned frequently and early in the process. A typical design thinking project follows five steps: empathize with users; define their issues; ideate for solutions; create prototypes; and test them with the users. It’s particularly suitable to addressing complex problems and solving the challenges a fast-moving world is facing as linear approaches often miss the target.

Design Thinking Provokes Cultural Collisions

However, research by myself and senior academic Lisa Carlgren reveals that design thinking implementation in organization has enjoyed mixed results and several challenges remain unanswered. We have studied implementation stories through a cultural perspective lens. The resulting paper, “When Cultures collide: What Can we Learn from Frictions in the Implementation of Design Thinking?” was published in a special issue of Journal of Product Innovation Management earlier this year. Our five-year research project focused on 13 international firms in sectors ranging from software and food to healthcare and high tech which have adopted design thinking. We undertook hundreds of in-depth interviews with design thinking practitioners and experts, using qualitative ethnographic approaches to better understand the cultural tensions. As a result, we propose a cultural archetype of design thinking and identify the challenges that such archetype generates when confronted with the culture of the adopting organization.

The Challenges Posed By Emotion, Time And Centralization

As a practice, design thinking is characterized by openness, curiosity and acceptance of diverse backgrounds and competencies – an inclusive atmosphere where everyone’s opinion counts. Its emphasis is on empathy and emotional binding with the users and more generally the members of the project. However, our research shows that in several cultures an employee displaying his or her emotions and intuitions may be perceived as being inappropriate in organizations with a low tolerance for emotional outbursts.

Then there is the question of time. One employee tells us: “Companies intend to have a very short-term focus and design thinking takes time. You need to be able to invest and I think that doesn’t always work.” Another comments: “People have busy schedules, there is a life of short-cuts and hacks. No time and mind space for doing design thinking. They constantly want shorter versions of DT: one day, half a day, two hours, one hour…” This time pressure has negative consequences on implementing qualitative, long-term design thinking policies.

A centralized work culture also challenges design thinking and the flat hierarchy it requires. Indeed, design thinking is oriented towards decentralization since teams need high degrees of autonomy and trust to achieve creative goals. This thinking promotes a “rule-breaking” attitude to boost autonomy and instills a feeling that anything is acceptable in order to increase creativity. Therefore, challenges arise when control, power, and responsibility in the organization are concentrated at the top and when the control is tight, with many formal rules and procedures that guide behavior. Thus, cultural mismatches associated with such issues have affected the outcome of design thinking work and its perceived advantages

How To Overcome Cultural Mismatches

To counter all these mismatches, our work proposes a cultural archetype which we are convinced can help create awareness and foster dialogue to understand and limit potential tensions due to these mismatches. Managers can help create this awareness by setting goals for an ideal culture where design thinking is used. It can also help identify hindrances and enablers and their indicators.

This requires what we call “bilingual managers” who can marry design and business, thus championing design thinking in the business world. If you are looking for a broad culture change, for example, your managers need to consider your current systems and policies to identify those which reinforce unwanted values. How could design thinking be a catalyst to change these values directly or indirectly? Being aware of both the design thinking’s cultural characteristics and the factors in your organization that are impossible to change can allow you to create alternative strategies, such as creating microclimates. Identifying pockets where design thinking has a chance of succeeding can be the bedrock for scaling and building legitimacy at the heart of your business.

But, beware. Culture is just one part of the design thinking business approach and it doesn’t fully explain why it often fails. Factors like promotions and over-commercialization have also led to disappointing results. Design thinking can work but it remains just one piece in the business innovation puzzle.

Sihem BenMahmoud-Jouini is Associate Professor of Innovation at HEC Paris.

Daniel Brown is Chief Editor at HEC Paris.

Thu, 29 Sep 2022 11:59:00 -0500 HEC Paris Insights en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/hecparis/2022/09/30/the-challenges-posed-by-design-thinkingand-how-to-overcome-them/
Killexams : SOC 2 Certification–The Everything Guide

Ali Allage is CEO at BlueSteel Cybersecurity, a Security Compliance Consulting Firm.

The increase in data breaches and hacks over the past few years has forced most organizations to dedicate more resources and put more focus on their information security efforts. For organizations that outsource major business operations to third-party service providers, such as SaaS and cloud-computing vendors, this is particularly true. With my experience running a security compliance consulting firm, I know that if you mishandle customer data, your clients can become susceptible to attacks like malware installation, data thefts, blackmailing or even extortions.

SOC 2 compliance reports are used by enterprises to assure customers and stakeholders that particular vendors appreciate the value of cybersecurity and are committed to managing data securely and protecting the organization’s interests as well as the privacy of their clients.

What is SOC 2?

SOC 2 (System and Organization Controls 2) is a compliance standard for service organizations that replaced SAS 70 (Statement on Auditing Standards) in 2011. SOC 2 was created by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

SOC 2 specifies the criteria by which organizations should manage customer data and spells out five trust service principles or Trust Service Criteria (TSC): security, privacy, confidentiality, processing integrity and availability. Through these criteria, SOC 2 reports attest to the trustworthiness of services offered by an enterprise and result from an official audit procedure carried out by a certified public accountant.

The reports vary depending on the needs of each organization. Based on specific business practices, each enterprise can design its own control to adhere to one or all trust service principles. These reports help stakeholders, regulators and suppliers know how your organization’s service vendors manage customer data.

What are the differences between the types of SOC 2 reports?

Type I: These SOC 2 reports describe the service organization’s systems and test the system design to confirm that they meet the stipulated trust service principles at a specific point in time.

Type II: This type of report attests to the operating effectiveness of a vendor’s systems and controls throughout a disclosed period, usually 12 months.

Understanding The Five Trust Service Principles of SOC 2

For an organization to receive a SOC 2 certification, it must be audited by a certified public accountant. The auditor will confirm whether the service organization’s systems meet one or more of the trust principles or trust service criteria. The principle includes:

Security: Every organizational system needs protection from unauthorized or outside access. Physical and logical restrictions (access controls) must adequately prevent potential system intrusion, unauthorized deletion, theft, software misuse, disclosure of data and device manipulation.

Availability: The availability principle checks the accessibility of processes, products or services agreed upon by both parties when designing a service level agreement (SLA) or contract. The parties explicitly agree on the minimum acceptable performance level of the system.

Processing Integrity: The processing integrity confirms whether the system is performing as intended. For example, this type of review determines if the system delivers the right data at the right time, ensuring that the system processes are complete, accurate, timely and licensed.

Confidentiality: In this segment of the review, the focus is on assuring that data termed as confidential is restricted to certain individuals or organizations and protected according to policy and agreement signed by both parties. The principle of confidentiality covers business-to-business relationships, internal price lists, intellectual property, financial information forms and other sensitive data shared between businesses.

Privacy: The last principle is privacy, which involves how a system collects, uses, retains, discloses and disposes of customer information. A company's privacy policy must be in line with operating procedures. For instance, if an organization says it warns its customers any time it collects data, the audit report needs to show how the company provides the warning, whether through its website or another channel.

This policy applies to personally identifiable information (PII), including name, social security number, address, etc. The same goes for data related to race, religion and sex. All these pieces of data require an additional level of protection.

How long does it take to get SOC 2 compliance?

Usually, it takes six to 12 months for a company to generate a SOC 2 audit report. However, the duration varies depending on the type of report pursued, with Type I SOC 2 reports taking approximately 6 months and Type II SOC 2 reports taking a minimum of 6 months and sometimes lasting up to 12 months.

Why would a company invest in SOC 2 certification?

Companies that undergo SOC 2 auditing often enhance their security measures and overall efficiency. The audit report helps them streamline their operations and controls based on the understanding of cybersecurity threats their customers face. As a result, the organization can Improve its services, process or products.

SaaS, PaaS, B2B vendors processing and storing personal indefinable information or sensitive data need to invest in SOC 2 certification. Any company that collects and stores customer data needs to focus on security, considering the rise in cybersecurity threats and data breaches. A SOC 2 audit report will confirm to enterprise customers, users and potential clients that the products they’re using are safe and secure. Protecting customer data from unsanctioned access and theft should be at the forefront for these types of organizations.

A SOC 2 report gives a company a competitive edge over those that don’t have one. With the proliferation of data breaches, most businesses prefer working with SOC 2 certified vendors because these service providers are safe and have adopted the necessary measures to prevent unauthorized data access.

In most cases, the benefits of undergoing SOC 2 auditing and obtaining the SOC 2 certification outweigh the investment for achieving it. That’s because a SOC 2 report shows that an organization is committed to investing in the security of its services or product and protecting customer information. In return, the enterprise enjoys a competitive edge, a great business reputation and continuity.


Forbes Business Council is the foremost growth and networking organization for business owners and leaders. Do I qualify?


Wed, 28 Sep 2022 02:16:00 -0500 Ali Allage en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinesscouncil/2022/09/28/soc-2-certificationthe-everything-guide/
Killexams : What's Putin thinking? Tough to know for nuclear analysts

PARIS (AP) — Will President Vladimir Putin pull the nuclear trigger?

For Kremlin watchers trying to figure out whether the Russian leader’s nuclear threats are just bluffs, there is no more pressing -- or tough -- question.

For now, analysts cautiously suggest that the risk of Putin using the world's biggest nuclear arsenal still seems low. The CIA says it hasn't seen signs of an imminent Russian nuclear attack.

Still, his vows to use “ all the means at our disposal ” to defend Russia as he wages war in Ukraine are being taken very seriously. And his claim Friday that the United States “created a precedent” by dropping atomic bombs in World War II further cranked up the nuclear stakes.

The White House has warned of “catastrophic consequences for Russia” if Putin goes nuclear.

But whether that will stay Putin's hand is anyone's guess. Nervous Kremlin watchers acknowledge they can’t be sure what he is thinking or even if he’s rational and well-informed.

The former KGB agent has demonstrated an appetite for risk and brinkmanship. It's hard, even for Western intelligence agencies with spy satellites, to tell if Putin is bluffing or truly intent on breaking the nuclear taboo.

“We don’t see any practical evidence today in the U.S. intelligence community that he’s moving closer to actual use, that there’s an imminent threat of using tactical nuclear weapons,” CIA Director William Burns told CBS News.

“What we have to do is take it very seriously, watch for signs of actual preparations," Burns said.

Kremlin watchers are scratching their heads in part because they don't see how nuclear force could greatly help reverse Russia's military losses in Ukraine.

Ukrainian troops aren't using large concentrations of tanks to wrest back ground, and combat is sometimes for places as small as villages. So what could Russian nuclear forces aim for with winning effect?

“Nuclear weapons are not a magic wand,” said Andrey Baklitskiy, a senior researcher at the U.N.'s Institute for Disarmament Research, who specializes in nuclear risk. “They are not something that you just employ and they solve all your problems."

Analysts hope the taboo that surrounds nuclear weapons is a disincentive. The horrific scale of human suffering in Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the U.S. destroyed the Japanese cities with atomic bombs on Aug. 6 and Aug. 9, 1945, was a powerful argument against a repeat use of such weapons. The attacks killed 210,000 people.

No country has since used a nuclear weapon. Analysts guess that even Putin may find it difficult to become the first world leader since U.S. President Harry Truman to rain down nuclear fire.

“It is still a taboo in Russia to cross that threshold,” said Dara Massicot, a senior policy researcher at RAND Corp. and a former analyst of Russian military capabilities at the U.S. Defense Department.

"One of the biggest decisions in the history of Earth,” Baklitskiy said.

The backlash could turn Putin into a global pariah.

“Breaking the nuclear taboo would impose, at a minimum, complete diplomatic and economic isolation on Russia,” said Sidharth Kaushal, a researcher with the Royal United Services Institute in London that specializes in defense and security.

Long-range nuclear weapons that Russia could use in a direct conflict with the United States are battle-ready. But its stocks of warheads for shorter ranges — so-called tactical weapons that Putin might be tempted to use in Ukraine — are not, analysts say.

“All those weapons are in storage,” said Pavel Podvig, another senior researcher who specializes in nuclear weapons at the U.N.'s disarmament think tank in Geneva.

“You need to take them out of the bunker, load them on trucks,” and then marry them with missiles or other delivery systems, he said.

Russia hasn’t released a full inventory of its tactical nuclear weapons and their capabilities. Putin could order that a smaller one be surreptitiously readied and teed up for surprise use.

But overtly removing weapons from storage is also a tactic Putin could employ to raise pressure without using them. He’d expect U.S. satellites to spot the activity and perhaps hope that baring his nuclear teeth might scare Western powers into dialing back support for Ukraine.

“That’s very much what the Russians would be gambling on, that each escalation provides the other side with both a threat but (also) an offramp to negotiate with Russia," Kaushal said.

He added: ”There is a sort of grammar to nuclear signaling and brinksmanship, and a logic to it which is more than just, you know, one madman one day decides to go through with this sort of thing.”

Analysts also expect other escalations first, including ramped-up Russian strikes in Ukraine using non-nuclear weapons.

“I don’t think there will be a bolt out of the blue,” said Nikolai Sokov, who took part in arms control negotiations when he worked for Russia's Foreign Ministry and is now with the Vienna Center for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation.

Analysts also struggle to identify battlefield targets that would be worth the huge price Putin would pay. If one nuclear strike didn't stop Ukrainian advances, would he then attack again and again?

Podvig noted the war does not have “large concentrations of troops” to target.

Striking cities, in hopes of shocking Ukraine into surrender, would be an awful alternative.

“The decision to kill tens and hundreds of thousands of people in cold blood, that’s a tough decision," he said. “As it should be.”

Putin might be hoping that threats alone will slow Western weapon supplies to Ukraine and buy time to train 300,000 additional troops he's mobilizing, triggering protests and an exodus of service-aged men.

But if Ukraine continues to roll back the invasion and Putin finds himself unable to hold what he has taken, analysts fear a growing risk of him deciding that his non-nuclear options are running out.

“Putin is really eliminating a lot of bridges behind him right now, with mobilization, with annexing new territories," said RAND's Massicot.

“It suggests that he is all-in on winning this on his terms,” she added. "I am very concerned about where that ultimately takes us — to include, at the end, a kind of a nuclear decision.”


Follow AP’s coverage of the war in Ukraine at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 19:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thesunchronicle.com/news/nation_world/whats-putin-thinking-tough-to-know-for-nuclear-analysts/article_a81cb2ce-84ba-5c7c-ac6f-bc59ec238853.html
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