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Killexams : Medical Hygiene test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CDCA-ADEX Search results Killexams : Medical Hygiene test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CDCA-ADEX https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Don't Go Here Even if It's Open, Says COVID Expert

Although it feels like the pandemic is over in many ways, the medical community warns it's not and learning to live with the virus is the direction we're heading. While COVID is here to stay for now, keeping updated on the latest information and taking safety precautions is vital to staying healthy. Eat This, Not That! Health spoke with experts who share what to know about COVID right now and how to help prevent catching it. Read on—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had COVID.

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 23:01:41 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/dont-go-here-even-if-its-open-says-covid-expert/ss-AA12ZCdN
Killexams : The flu is coming. Here's what you can do to protect yourself and your family

After a COVID-19-induced two-year break, influenza seems to be coming back with a vengeance.

It's difficult to predict just how bad a might be, but U.S. scientists can typically take some clues from Earth's southern hemisphere, which experiences its winter season in June, July and August. Australia is emerging from its worst flu season in five years, spelling trouble for countries where temperatures are just now dropping.

Texas flu cases are already picking up faster than last year, although the totals are still relatively low. Hospital labs reported 240 positive flu tests for the week ending Sept. 24, according to Department of State Health Services data. The same week in 2021 saw only 3 positive tests.

This flu season is made all the more complicated by the still-spreading coronavirus. Experts expect that, just like in 2020 and 2021, COVID-19 cases will spike sometime during the holidays.

"It's going to be a question of 'What is the impact on the health care system,'" said Dr. James Cutrell, associate professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center. "If you have clinics or hospitals that are dealing with lots of people who are coming in with both COVID and flu, that combination has the possibility of putting additional strains on the ."

If both the flu and COVID-19 spike at the same time, hospitals will be fighting the viruses simultaneously for the first time. Public health protections used to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, like masking and social distancing, did a great job of also preventing the flu, but use of those tools is almost non-existent now.

And because spread of the flu was minimal during the pandemic, there's less circulating immunity, said Dr. Preeti Sharma, a pediatric pulmonologist at Children's Health in Dallas.

The thought of combating both is a scary one for North Texas hospitals, which are just now getting a reprieve from more than two-years of coronavirus waves. The number of patients hospitalized in the region with the virus topped 4,000 during the omicron surge in late January even as health care organizations struggled with outbreaks among their employees.

Doctors are warning people not to take a lax approach to this flu season, even if it feels like a less severe threat compared to COVID-19.

"We've all sort of looked at COVID as the severe respiratory viral illness, but prior to COVID, influenza had that history of hospital admission and other complications in variable age groups, from infancy through the elderly," Sharma said. "We know that the flu brings with it significant risk for complications."

Is it the flu, COVID-19 or a cold?

Symptoms associated with the flu, COVID-19 and the can look nearly identical.

All can come with congestion, cough, a sore throat, body aches and fever, although fevers tend to be lower with just a cold. The previously tell-tale sign of a COVID-19 infection—loss of taste and smell—is now relatively uncommon with the omicron variant, which is the dominant coronavirus strain in the U.S.

Both the flu and COVID-19 can also cause shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, and some patients experience gastrological symptoms, like nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Other viral illnesses are also beginning to spread, including , or RSV, which causes mild, cold-like symptoms for most people, but can be severe for infants and the elderly. RSV is the most common cause of pneumonia in children under 1 year old, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Cook Children's in Fort Worth reported 163 RSV cases between Sept. 18 and Sept. 24, representing a 19% RSV test positivity rate. At the same time last year the health system had only 50 cases.

The only way to truly tell the difference between circulating viral infections is by getting tested, said Dr. Joseph Chang, chief medical officer at Parkland Health. Regardless of the test result, people who are sick should stay home from work or school if possible.

"If you feel sick, you should be taking the same precautions, doesn't matter if it's COVID or it's flu or it's just a cold," he said. "When you're sick, you shouldn't be around other people anyway because you're going to get them sick."

Preventing winter-time illnesses

The best way to prevent yourself and others from getting the flu or COVID-19 is by getting vaccinated, said Dr. Razaq Badamosi, medical director of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at JPS Health Network in Fort Worth.

Both the flu shot and the COVID-19 vaccine are available for anyone older than 6 months. The new bivalent COVID-19 booster, which protects from both the original coronavirus strain and the omicron variant, is available to anyone 12 and older who had their last COVID-19 vaccine dose at least two months prior.

It's safe to get both the flu shot and the COVID-19 shot on the same day.

"You can get them at the same time, if you want, though you'll have two sore arms instead of one sore arm. That's up to you," Chang said.

Doctors can prescribe antiviral medications to people with a COVID-19 or flu infection to lessen the severity of the illness.

Other public health measures like regular hand washing, masking and staying home when ill also help prevent viruses from spreading. Good health hygiene is a practice that parents can teach their children at an early age.

"When your kid comes home from school, especially if there's a little baby in the house, make sure they wash their hands before they give their little brother or sister a kiss. Teach them to cough into their elbow or sleeve and to wash their hands when they're done coughing and sneezing," said Cook Children's hospitalist Dr. Laura Romano.

"And please, please, please keep them home if they're sick."



2022 The Dallas Morning News.

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Citation: The flu is coming. Here's what you can do to protect yourself and your family (2022, October 6) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-flu-family.html

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Thu, 06 Oct 2022 06:02:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-flu-family.html
Killexams : Lawyers update status of psychological exam for ex-cop accused of killing prominent Staten Island mom

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island woman who authorities say strangled her mother to death inside their South Shore home was presented for arraignment this week in state Supreme Court, St. George.

Mauri Belarmino — a pediatric nurse for the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene who formerly served as a police officer — was indicted earlier this month by a grand jury for charges that include murder and tampering with physical evidence, according to court documents.

During her most latest appearance Wednesday, Justice Lisa Grey inquired with Belarmino’s attorney about the progress of a psychological exam to determine whether the defendant would be mentally fit for trial. According to attorney S. Maquita Moody, deputy attorney-in-charge for the Legal Aid Society, the exam is scheduled for Monday.

Belarmino pleaded not guilty to the charges.

QUESTIONS ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH

Police responded around noon on Sept. 10 to a 911 call of an unconscious female at 43 Ramapo Ave. in Huguenot, according to a police statement.

Initially, the death of 74-year-old Sherylyn Bailey was thought to be from natural causes, subject to investigation, until the medical examiner deemed it a homicide by strangulation.

A source with knowledge of the investigation said previously the incident arose from a dispute between Bailey and Belarmino.

The family moved into the home more than 10 years ago, along with Belarmino’s now teenage son and a man thought to be her significant other, according to a neighbor on the block. He noted that at some point the man moved out.

More recently, he said, he noticed Belarmino wasn’t around for a while.

“I asked Sherry one day, where’s Mauri?”

“She said, ‘she’s in the hospital, she went off her medicine.’”

The neighbor said he never suspected any health issues prior to that conversation.

“She didn’t seem sick,” he said. “I never thought she was mentally ill.”

A law-enforcement source previously indicated mental-health struggles on the part of the defendant.

Judge orders psychological exam for Huguenot daughter accused of strangling mother

Mauri Belarmino, who faces charges of second-degree murder and first-degree strangulation. (Staten Island Advance/Joseph Ostapiuk)

MOTHER, DAUGHTER RELATIONSHIP

Weeks after Bailey celebrated her 74th birthday, the two-time breast cancer survivor, teacher and Historic Richmond Town board member received hundreds of well wishes — but one stood out.

“Happy Birthday, Mommy!!” wrote her daughter, Belarmino, on Facebook.

“Thank you so much!” responded Bailey, with a heart emoji.

The same day as her death, Bailey, who was working part-time at the Staten Island United Federation of Teachers office, was expected to meet a friend at the Staten Island Ferry to attend a labor parade in Manhattan with the organization.

She never showed up.

“That’s how we knew something was wrong,” said Thomas Murphy, the first vice president on the Historic Richmond Town Board and head of the retired teachers chapter of the United Federation of Teachers.

CRYPTIC FACEBOOK POSTS

Recent Facebook posts allowed a glimpse into the life of Belarmino.

On Aug. 9, she wrote a message saying that she had just come out the hospital, and complained that her Instagram and Twitter were “all f----d up.”

Weeks later, one day after her mother was found dead but before it was deemed a homicide, she posted a picture of a tweet with the message: “You deserve the best. The foggiest of cemetery strolls. The silkiest coffin lining. The most haunted of castles. The fiercest of hellhounds.”

“Don’t let anyone tell you you’re just a recluse the townsfolk tell stories about — you are an immortal countess with a horrifying secret,” the post read.

A STAPLE IN THE COMMUNITY

The news of Bailey’s death left friends and family stunned.

Bailey, 74, was a Rocco Laurie Intermediate School (I.S. 72) social studies teacher for nearly two decades before retiring. She was renowned for her ability to connect the community to the classroom. She would later become a dean of students at the school.

A coordinator for Strides Against Breast Cancer coordinator for the United Federation of Teachers since 2003, Bailey took part in fundraising efforts aimed at breast cancer research and advocacy. She also served as a lawyer and was an active member of a retired teachers’ chapter for the United Federation of Teachers.

Most recently, she served as the second vice president on the board of directors at Historic Richmond Town.

“RIP to the best teacher I ever had, I’m gonna miss you,” wrote one of her former students on social media in the days following her death.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 04:34:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.silive.com/crime-safety/2022/10/lawyers-update-status-of-psychological-exam-for-ex-cop-accused-of-killing-prominent-staten-island-mom.html
Killexams : Why study dental hygiene at Dal?


Preference is given to permanent residents of the Atlantic provinces. Applicants are selected on a competitive basis. An application form must be submitted for each year in which you apply for admission. Applicants must also arrange for official transcripts to be submitted to the Faculty of Dentistry by the issuing institution to the following address:

Faculty of Dentistry, Admissions Office
Dalhousie University
PO Box 15000
Halifax, N.S.
B3H 4R2

Applicants must disclose all successful or unsuccessful high school and/or university attendance on the application form. For more information on official transcripts visit How to Submit Documents.

Academic requirements

Applicants must have completed before May 30 of the year of expected entry to the Diploma in Dental Hygiene program (these requirements apply to the September 2022 intake) at least 30 credit hours of study at an accredited university. These credit hours should include:

  • at least six credit hours in introductory biology
  • at least six credit hours in an approved writing intensive course*, and
  • 18 additional credit hours

Note: Changes to academic requirements will come into effect for the September 23 intake and onwards. Effective September 2023, applicants must have completed before May 30 of the year of expected entry to the Diploma in Dental Hygiene program, at least 30 credit hours of study at an accredited university. These credit hours should include:

  • at least three hours in introductory chemistry
  • at least six credit hours in introductory biology
  • at least six credit hours in an approved writing intensive course*, and
  • 15 additional credit hours

* A writing-intensive course may be any course defined as such by the applicant's university. Alternatively, it can be any English course(s) or any course requiring a significant amount of written work that is evaluated for composition, structure, spelling, grammar, etc as indicated in the course outline. The course must be approved by the Admissions Committee.

Acceptance into the Diploma in Dental Hygiene program is highly competitive. Meeting the minimum requirements does not ensure admission. Applicants are selected on a competitive basis. In addition to the requirements above, preference is given to applicants with evidence of completing a full-time course load (five courses per term) and who have completed coursework in chemistry (September 2022 intake), anatomy, physiology, and a selection of courses from the humanities and/or social sciences.

We do not accept any advance standing or transfer students from other dental hygiene programs. All applicants admitted to the Diploma of Dental Hygiene program must complete all years of the program at Dalhousie University.


Non-academic requirements

Interview

Competitive applicants may be requested to make themselves available for an admissions interview or an orientation session.

Supplemental Information

Applicants must also complete supplemental forms and documents


Health Requirements

General Regulations

Programs in the Faculty of Dentistry involve students interacting with patients in a health-care environment, meaning students are in a position of special trust with patients. Therefore, all students must adhere to certain regulations and standards. View the full list of health requirements [PDF- 162 kB].

Immunization and CPR Requirements

Acceptance into the Faculty of Dentistry clinical programs is normally conditional upon receipt of evidence of complete immunization of the following:

  • Tetanus
  • Diphtheria
  • Pertussis (Td/Tdap)
  • Polio
  • Measles (Rubeola)
  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Hepatitis B (including post-immunization Antibody Titres)
  • Varicella
  • COVID-19
  • Annual influenza immunization for each year of study

Please note: students accepted to the program must also have a current Level C CPR/AED (automated external defibrillator) course.

Supplementary Information

Applicants are required to complete the Dalhousie University Faculty of Dentistry Immunization/CPR Record [PDF- 110 kB] as a condition of acceptance to the program. Please review the Faculty of Dentistry Immunization Procedure for Applicants [PDF- 162 kB].

Sat, 15 Aug 2020 22:17:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.dal.ca/academics/programs/professional/dentalhygiene.html
Killexams : Polio is likely circulating in Philadelphia. Here’s what you need to know.

The stealthy polio virus is likely circulating undetected in Philadelphia, according to the city’s top health official.

“I do suspect that if we look,” Health Commissioner Cheryl Bettigole said in an interview earlier this month, “we might find it.”

In July, the United States reported its first polio case in nearly a decade. A young man from New York, who was unvaccinated and developed paralysis, tested positive for a strain of the virus that health officials believe mutated from a weakened live virus used in the oral vaccine.

These Philadelphia-area polio survivors continue to suffer from a disease thought to be long gone

It’s still not clear exactly when or where the patient had contracted the disease, but subsequent wastewater testing found a similar strain in samples in New York. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cautioned that there have probably been asymptomatic or unidentified polio cases circulating in the state for months.

“This is a warning shot. It needs to be taken seriously,” said pediatrician Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “I suspect he won’t be the last case. This is not a disease you want to revisit.”

The United States declared itself polio-free in 1979. So why is it back? Here’s what you need to know:

Who’s at risk in Philadelphia?

Americans who are vaccinated are well-protected against polio. The polio vaccination rate in Philadelphia for children under 5 is 90% for the required four doses. However, in a few pockets of South Philadelphia, less than 60% of children have been vaccinated against polio, according to the city.

And that’s cause for concern, health experts say.

“If you’ve got polio in wastewater, there’s got to be a bunch of folks hanging around who have the polio virus in their intestines and are transmitting it — there’s community transmission, which scares the hell out of people and should,” said Richard Bruno, director of the New Jersey-based International Centre for Polio Education.

The CDC recommends children receive injections of the polio vaccine at 2 months, 4 months, between 6 and 18 months, and at 4 to 6 years old.

What’s the status of polio monitoring?

Public health agencies across the United States don’t routinely test wastewater for polio. Instead, health officials wait until someone infected with the virus turns up at a doctor’s office or hospital. By then, the virus is silently circulating. That’s what happened in New York after a young man in Rockland County sought treatment for polio-induced paralysis in June and subsequent wastewater testing found the virus in sewage samples in that county and three others, as well as in New York City.

Philadelphia currently tests wastewater only to find COVID-19. But Bettigole said she hopes to adapt the city’s testing program to proactively look for polio with the goal of getting ahead of potential spread in communities where people are unvaccinated or under-vaccinated. The virus, which reproduces in the intestines and sheds in stool, spreads through hand-to-mouth contact.

“One case of paralytic polio potentially indicates that there may be hundreds of other cases,” the city’s health department cautions.

If people are infected with polio, will they know it?

Most people infected with polio won’t know it.

Roughly 70% of those infected experience no symptoms but can infect others. Of those who do feel sick, the symptoms are mild, including fever, sore throat, fatigue, and an upset stomach. About 1 of every 200 cases will cause paralysis.

How long has polio been a health concern?

Polio is a centuries-old disease. Historians point to a stone slab from ancient Egypt that depicts a priest with telltale signs of paralysis — a withered leg and foot. But polio epidemics didn’t plague communities in the United States until the 1900s, when outbreaks sporadically surfaced across the nation, typically during warmer months.

There’s no settled science on why polio went from endemic — usually a mild, unremarkable disease akin to a cold or flu — to an epidemic, which peaked in the early 1950s, killing thousands of children and paralyzing many more. There are theories that better sanitation and hygiene in the late 1800s and early 1900s meant mothers were less likely to be exposed to the poliovirus and therefore didn’t make protective antibodies, passed to their babies in the womb, that helped fight off severe cases.

How did the U.S. eradicate polio with a vaccine?

A polio vaccine, created by Pittsburgh-area virologist Jonas Salk, first became available in this country in 1955.

Doctors administered the vaccine, which didn’t contain live virus, to children by injection. Within two years of the vaccine’s approval and widespread use, polio cases dropped dramatically.

How has the polio vaccine evolved?

In the 1960s, the United States started to administer an oral vaccine, created by medical researcher Albert Sabin, to children who lined up at schools to receive drops of it on sugar cubes. Unlike Salk’s injectable, inactivated vaccine, the oral vaccine contains a weakened version of the live virus.

People who receive the oral vaccine can shed the weakened virus in their stool. In communities with unvaccinated or under-vaccinated people, the weakened virus can circulate and eventually mutate to become a dangerous form of polio that can cause paralysis. Very rarely — about once in every three million times the oral vaccine is given — the mutated virus can cause paralysis, as in the case in New York.

For this reason, the oral vaccine has not been used in this country since 2000. Today, children in the United States are routinely immunized with the injectable vaccine. Injected vaccine does not pose a risk of mutating into active polio. Many developing countries, however, still rely on the oral vaccine because it’s cheaper and easier to distribute, with just a few drops on the tongue.

©2022 The Philadelphia Inquirer. Visit inquirer.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Sat, 15 Oct 2022 21:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/polio-is-likely-circulating-in-philadelphia-here-e2-80-99s-what-you-need-to-know/ar-AA1310qw
Killexams : Flu season in UAE: Residents urged to get vaccinated, test for Covid-19, maintain proper hygiene

 

Doctors in the UAE are witnessing an influx of patients contracting seasonal flu and most of them experiencing mild to moderate symptoms.

Healthcare practitioners have repeatedly urged residents to get themselves vaccinated against the seasonal flu, as they see many patients complaining of fever and body ache at their medical centres. Medics see the maximum number of infections and patients suffering from flu between August to February.

Dr Abhinav Gupta, Specialist Internal Medicine, Aster Clinic, Arabian Ranches, said, “A lot of people are getting infected by flu or are contracting cold in the UAE now due to the change in the climate. The main reason behind this is the growth of certain viruses during this time.”

He said, “In the UAE, you are more vulnerable to catching flu during these months (transition from summer to winter). This is because the influenza virus thrives and proliferates at a higher rate when the air is cold.”

Highlighting that while it’s difficult to clinically differentiate between Covid-19 infection and other viral illnesses based on the symptoms alone, testing for Coronavirus may be the only solution, when in doubt.

One differentiator could be “certain symptoms like loss of sense of smell (anosmia) or taste (ageusia) are seen in Covid-19 infection and rarely occur with flu. However, all patients should be tested for Covid as it is much more contagious than normal flu,” Gupta added.

As per the government guidelines, when patients have respiratory symptoms like sore throat, cough, or fever, they must get tested for Coronavirus.

Dr Prabir Paul, Medical Director, Burjeel Marina Health Promotion Center, Abu Dhabi, said, "To my knowledge, the patients coming to the ENT, pediatric, and family medicine clinics suffer from some respiratory viral or respiratory bacterial infection. This is a normal seasonal variation of flu and respiratory diseases, but they should get a PCR test done. As far as the Covid-19 figures are concerned, there hasn't been an abnormal spike in the cases."

Doctors reiterate it is essential to maintain proper hand hygiene, wear a mask, especially in crowded places, wash hands often and not touch eyes, mouth or nose. They also advise staying away from people who are coughing and sneezing.

Dr Mitchelle Lolly, Specialist Pulmonologist, Prime Hospital, said, “Currently we are living in a very busy world. Falling sick can be due to various physical, mental and environmental factors. Physical factors include inappropriate dietary habits, lack of physical activities, presence of other co-morbid illness and other habits including smoking and use of alcohol. Mental factors mainly include stress and environmental factors include bacteria, virus, pollution.

"Viral infections are usually self-resolving provided we take adequate rest, nutrition and hydration at the time of infection. My advice would be to stay safe by practising SMS that is social distancing, masking and sanitising, and follow an active and healthy life.

“A healthy life would be led with appropriate dietary habits including eating on time, avoiding junk food and adding ample fruits, vegetables with the right amount of protein UPTO 0.8 G / KG / DAY to your diet. An active life could be led by exercise which would be a minimum of 30 minutes of brisk walk at least three times a week.”

Copyright © 2022 Khaleej Times. All Rights Reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. (Syndigate.info).
 

Wed, 21 Sep 2022 16:28:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.zawya.com/en/life/health/flu-season-in-uae-residents-urged-to-get-vaccinated-test-for-covid-19-maintain-proper-hygiene-v542dxlq
Killexams : Dental Hygiene Program Organizes Acelero Head Start Program

East Brunswick, NJ (08818)

Today

Cloudy skies with periods of rain this afternoon. High 67F. Winds SSW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 70%..

Tonight

Showers early, then cloudy overnight. Low around 40F. Winds light and variable. Chance of rain 70%.

Updated: October 17, 2022 @ 5:42 am

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 02:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.quovadisnewspaper.com/news/campus_community/dental-hygiene-program-organizes-acelero-head-start-program/article_ff418efc-43f1-11ed-b34b-77ffc3ca34b0.html
Killexams : Staff say UCD student health center failed to inform patients about contaminated STI testing

In September 2019, a UC Davis student tested positive for the sexually transmitted infection chlamydia at the campus’ Student Health and Wellness Center. There was just one problem, medical staff recalled: she hadn’t had sex. At the patient’s insistence, a doctor agreed to retest her before prescribing treatment. This time, the result was negative.

To test for chlamydia, Student Health and Counseling Services, which runs the health center, used a nucleic acid amplification test, an advanced technology that is typically highly accurate. The false result thinking clinicians and medical staff.

On Oct. 15, SHCS leaders discussed the issue at a meeting. “3 weeks ago a provider had a patient with a positive result for chlamydia (swab test). Patient did not agree so test was rerun with a urine test and it was negative,” the meeting minutes state. Later that day, the laboratory discovered a positive chlamydia result for a second patient was false.

Chlamydia is one of the most common STIs in the world. Testing for it is fast and easy, and the disease can be effectively treated with antibiotics. If left untreated it can cause lasting damage that increases the risk of infertility and ectopic pregnancy. 

Because the disease only spreads through sex, a chlamydia diagnosis can also have dramatic social consequences, especially for people in relationships they presumed were monogamous. “If the patient did not have sex with somebody else, then the assumption is that their partner cheated on them,” said Ina Park, an STI researcher and professor at the UC San Francisco School of Medicine. “Psychologically, it can be devastating.”

On Sept. 23, 2019, Amanjit Sekhon-Atwal, a medical staff supervisor at SHCS, mentioned in an email that the student health center identified a false positive chlamydia result.

For nearly a month, SHCS paused its in-house chlamydia testing to investigate the errant results. The health center concluded deficiencies in its infection control protocol led to contamination, which “created some false positives,” SHCS Director Margaret Trout told The Enterprise, though it was impossible to know when the problems began or how many results were tainted.

In the preceding months, from July through September, 44 students tested positive for chlamydia at the student health center, according to an internal report. But three years later, medical staff feared many of those patients were never informed that their diagnoses were based on questionable results. “It seems like they tried to keep this as quiet as possible,” a staff member said.

Contamination

At the student health center, patient test samples for chlamydia were collected upstairs in exam rooms by clinical staff, stored in the clinic for up to a few days, and taken downstairs to the laboratory to be processed, typically on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

On Oct. 16, the day after SHCS discovered the second false positive, the health center halted its chlamydia testing. Over the next several days, certified from Hologic, the manufacturer of the diagnostic machine SHCS used to process chlamydia tests, visited the health center multiple times. After confirming the machine’s mechanics functioned properly, they found infection control problems at both ends of the testing process.

In August 2019, following a technical update published by Hologic, laboratory staff scaled back cleaning a rack that held patient samples within the machine from after each use to once per week. The new protocol was supported by studies, Hologic said, but when SHCS told the company about the false positives, a Hologic specialist advised the laboratory to disinfect the demo racks “more often than recommended,” according to an internal email. “The suspected cause [of the false positives] was contamination of the rack that holds samples within the diagnostic machine,” SHCS leaders said.  

Internal records show there were also problems during demo collection. After swabbing patients and placing the swabs in collection tubes, medical staff would put all the tubes in a single container, usually a blue paper cup, instead of storing each patient’s samples in their own biohazard bag, an industry standard. “We reviewed the collections process and found the actual collection container is flawed and can allow cross contamination,” Tanya Mcmanus, associate director of clinical services, said in an internal email. If chlamydia got on the outside of a collection tube, or if it was on a health care worker’s glove, a staff member explained, it could spread to other tubes and contaminate the samples when the machine’s needle punctured the tube’s septum to test the specimen.

“There were multiple places where contamination could have happened,” a staff member said. After discovering the false positives, SHCS Laboratory Supervisor Marsha Lucio swabbed surfaces in the laboratory and the exam rooms for traces of chlamydia. The cover of one of the machine’s demo racks tested positive. A couple months later, so did a benchtop in an exam room.

SHCS suspended its in-house chlamydia testing for nearly a month to investigate the cause of multiple false-positive test results. The health center determined contamination caused the false positives.

Patient notification

Scores of internal emails, meeting minutes and other documents, which The Enterprise obtained through public records requests, provide a detailed picture of the student health center’s day-to-day response to the contaminated testing. They indicate SHCS worked diligently to identify and correct its disinfection problems before resuming chlamydia testing in mid-November 2019. It is less clear what SHCS, which is supported by student fees and serves many of UC Davis’ roughly 40,000 students, did to notify patients who tested positive for chlamydia while those problems were present.

Industry guidelines advise health care providers to disclose errors that could potentially have impacted patients. “Withholding information without the patient’s knowledge or consent is ethically unacceptable,” the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics states. If a medical facility discovered its STI testing was unreliable, it would have an “ethical duty to notify people they may have gotten false results,” said Park, the UCSF professor, who co-authored the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s STI treatment guidelines.

In November 2021, multiple SHCS employees, who were directly involved in testing patients for chlamydia, approached The Enterprise with a nagging concern. They suspected SHCS never told more than a few patients about the contaminated testing. “This could have broken up patients’ marriages or long-term relationships,” one employee said. “I’m still upset about it.”

SHCS Medical Director Cindy Schorzman, Associate Medical Director Amanjit Sekhon-Atwal, and Trout, the SHCS director, all played a role in responding to the contaminated testing. They declined to be interviewed for this story. In collaboration with UC Davis’ communications office, the SHCS leaders provided collective written responses to questions from The Enterprise, which a campus spokesperson said should be attributed to UC Davis. They said they stood by the way the student health center handled patient outreach about the contaminated testing.

SHCS had software it could have used to generate a list of patients who tested positive for chlamydia during a chosen timeframe. Then, typically, the health center would have sent those patients a “batch message” through their confidential patient portal. But when they discovered the contaminated testing, SHCS leaders “favored the more sensitive doctor-to-patient communication,” they said, and never sent any batch messages about it.

“Providers were advised to discuss the situation with their patients, even though the opportunity for retesting may have passed due to treatment, in acknowledgement that a positive diagnosis could have caused stress for students or their partners,” the leaders said. However, internal documents, interviews with medical staff, and SHCS leaders’ responses to follow-up questions indicated the only providers who received that instruction were the few whose patients tested positive during a single week in mid-October, nearly two months after SHCS said it stopped cleaning its testing machine adequately and at least three weeks after it identified the first false positive.

Because there was no evidence of a substantial patient outreach plan in the hundreds of pages of emails and other records The Enterprise obtained, the newspaper asked SHCS to provide documentation showing doctors were told to contact patients about the unreliable testing. In response, SHCS leaders cited a single document they said confirmed “this approach,” an email Schorzman sent Sekhon-Atwal, then the medical staff supervisor, on Oct. 18, 2019. “Providers whose students had positive results this week should reach out directly to their students,” the email says. According to meeting minutes, three patients tested positive — one falsely — for chlamydia that week.

In the weeks and months prior, dozens of others tested positive. When The Enterprise asked SHCS leadership who, if anyone, told those patients about the contamination, the leaders appeared to contradict their statement that they informed patients who were already treated, “in acknowledgement that a positive diagnosis could have caused stress for students or their partners,” and suggest that contacting those patients was not a priority. “Since any repeat tests would be negative for individuals after treatment, the main effort was to encourage outreach to those that potentially had not yet been treated,” they said. According SHCS staff and medical experts, it generally takes a few days at most to diagnose chlamydia and prescribe treatment.

SHCS leaders told The Enterprise that rather than send patients a “batch message” about the contaminated testing, they asked doctors to discuss the situation with their patients. Internal emails suggest that outreach was limited to only a few patients who tested positive during a single week.

Medical ethics guidelines make it clear that clinical errors should be disclosed irrespective of their implications for treatment. “It’s important for people to know the truth,” Park said.  

The Enterprise spent months investigating whether SHCS providers did, in fact, discuss the situation with more than a few patients, and found no evidence of it. On the chance that an outreach plan was made without leaving a paper trail, the newspaper asked SHCS to arrange an interview with any provider who told patients about the contaminated testing. SHCS declined to do so. When The Enterprise reached out directly to dozens of medical staff, including several providers, Trout emailed staff a “refresher” on a UC Davis Student Affairs media policy, which tells employees they “should decline to comment” if approached by a journalist.

Despite that policy, multiple providers spoke to The Enterprise. They regularly tested and treated patients for chlamydia, and remembered the contamination in 2019, but they didn’t discuss it with their patients because they thought that type of outreach would have been taken care of by administration. “The situation is familiar to me, but I don’t know how it was handled,” one provider said. “It would have been a lab or administrative thing.”

Asking doctors to notify patients about an error that wasn’t theirs would have been both unpopular and unusual, medical staff and providers said, adding that “there was no reason not to send a batch message.” As far as they knew, there wasn’t a coordinated effort by doctors to contact their patients. “That did not happen,” a provider said.

In total, The Enterprise interviewed eight SHCS employees who were familiar with the contaminated testing, all of whom requested confidentiality because they were not authorized to speak to the newspaper. When medical staff learned during interviews that SHCS leaders told The Enterprise that “no batch (bulk) messages were sent” to patients about the contamination, they concluded many were simply never informed. “It’s a huge issue from a patient care perspective,” a high-level employee said. “If a patient had to talk to a partner, that conversation could have gone really badly.”

A deeper crisis

Internal documents do not reveal an explicit effort by SHCS to conceal information about the contaminated testing. However, medical staff said little was communicated to them about it, and several described a work environment that discouraged staff from taking initiative, particularly around anything that could risk the health center’s reputation. “The worst thing that could happen is that they get a complaint from a patient,” a staff member said.

In 2020, UC Davis conducted a staff experience survey, soliciting feedback on qualities like collaboration, culture and leadership. SHCS scored below the campuswide average in 19 out of 20 categories. It received especially bad scores for action taking, decision making and communication. “The sad truth is that is the student who are paying the price most of all for the failed management here,” the minutes from a 2021 staff meeting state.   

SHCS leaders attributed the health center’s performance on the survey and complaints recorded during meetings to the pandemic, whose toll on health care workers was well-documented. But staff told The Enterprise morale was an ongoing problem, and internal records paint a troubling picture both before the pandemic and recently.

According to emails, staff voiced alarm over poor infection control prior to the contaminated testing—a June 2019 email described a speculum stored in a clean area “still having bodily fluid on it”. — but those who advocated for higher standards faced bullying and retaliation. In 2021, an employee was “suspected of leaving a rat” on the desk of a staff member who raised concerns about infection control, according to internal emails. A week later, the staff member walked out her front door to find one of her cars had been egged and the other had a slashed tire. In a formal complaint, she said she was labeled a “snitch” after pushing for better hygiene practices.  

This week, an SHCS supervisor sent medical assistants an email with the subject line, “BULLYING,” saying she requested a meeting with upper management “to discuss the concerning behavior” of a group of medical staff.

“It was incredibly toxic,” said a former employee who worked at SHCS for several years. Others described “an ongoing culture of bullying” and staff meetings where shouting broke out, leaving people in tears. SHCS leadership said they were “not aware of a situation” like that, though written records suggest a degree of hostility during some meetings. “Please leave if you are always complaining,” the minutes from a 2021 meeting state. “There are other jobs.”

In that environment, an employee said, “people do things based on whether or not they’ll get in trouble, not based on whether it’s the right thing to do for the patient.”

Medical staff told The Enterprise bullying and low morale affected the quality of patient care and infection control at the student health center.

‘They didn’t do right by our patients’

As of this month, SHCS employees continued to worry about sloppy infection control. After the contaminated testing, staff reverted to some of the problematic practices it exposed. “All lab specimens need to be in a lab biohazard bag, do not use a cup,” Schorzman reminded staff in an email this June. “Only one patient per bag.” As far as the health center knew, no results were affected.

Since fall 2019, SHCS conducted regular proficiency testing and did not discover anymore false positives, according to SHCS leaders. This summer, the student health center sent 10 positive and 10 negative chlamydia test samples to the UC Davis Medical Center as part of a quality assurance program, all of which proved to be accurate. “Student health and Counseling Services imposes the highest standards for hygiene and infection control,” SHCS leaders said.

The health center’s laboratory and infection control practices were found to be fully compliant during accreditation inspections, which happen every three years, in 2018 and 2021. In 2020, an independent accreditation organization also accredited SHCS, though it ranked its proficiency testing practices near the bottom of a group of more than 750 peer medical labs nationwide.

Over the past year, SHCS made efforts to Boost morale and communications, its leaders said. They introduced a weekly “clinical highlights” email from Schorzman, the medical director, and monthly Zoom meetings where employees could ask questions anonymously. “UC Davis is a community that values critical feedback,” said UC Davis and SHCS leaders. They added that the campus “is committed to providing and maintaining a safe and secure environment free from all forms of bullying.”   

SHCS leaders pointed out that during the time contamination was found in its chlamydia testing, some patients, such as those who got tested because their partners had chlamydia, were almost certainly truly positive. Indeed, according to an internal report, the positivity rate in the summer and fall of 2019, even with the false positives, was not unusual for the student health center, an indication many of the results were likely accurate.

Nonetheless, medical staff said, when SHCS discovered contamination had caused inaccurate STI results, the health center had a responsibility to inform every patient who could have been impacted — in the months prior, there were a few dozen who tested positive — going back at least as far as it suspected the problem began. “The bottom line is they didn’t go back a few months and contact patients and they should have,” a medical staff member said. “They didn’t do right by our patients.”

— Reach Caleb Hampton at champton@davisenterprise.net. Follow him on Twitter at @calebmhampton.

Sat, 08 Oct 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.davisenterprise.com/news/local/staff-say-ucd-student-health-center-failed-to-inform-patients-about-contaminated-sti-testing/ Killexams : Smart Salem centre to provide swift medical test for UAE residency visa

No more waiting in line for long hours to take a medical test for your UAE residency visa. Customers can now get their medical fitness results within 30 minutes at the newly opened Smart Salem centre.

Sheikh Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Deputy Ruler of Dubai, and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance of the UAE, inaugurated the new centre for medical fitness and residence visa processing at the Dubai International Financial Centre (DIFC).

The state-of-the-art facility reflects the emirate’s commitment to provide exceptional, technology-driven services. It is the second facility of its kind to open in Dubai. The first one, located in City Walk, opened in 2020.

The centre is completely digital and paperless and has the capacity to cater to 800 customers per day. Spread across 12,000 square feet, the facility features the first automated blood collection system of its kind in the region.

It not only provides swift medical screening but also has seven private blood collection rooms, three X-ray rooms, an on-site laboratory, eight smart check-in kiosks, Emirates ID biometrics office and an Amer support office.

Smart Salem is also equipped with AI and smart automation and features a hygiene robot, a robot barista and transportation robots.

Awadh Seghayer Al Ketbi, director general of Dubai Health Authority said, “The launch of the new Smart Salem centre showcases Dubai’s drive to implement the latest technologies across all sectors to enhance the customer experience, reduce waiting time and raise service efficiency. The facility in DIFC will provide customers with high-quality services in a comfortable and exclusive setting.”

Emirates ID biometrics and other visa application support services will soon be available on-site at the new facility, providing customers with a fast, easy and comfortable residence visa processing experience.

Both Smart Salem centres in City Walk and DIFC are open six days a week from Sunday to Friday. Customers will be able to visit the location and receive their digital visa within just 60-90 minutes. The third Smart Salem centre is expected to open in TECOM by the end of this year.

Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:02:00 -0500 Zubina Ahmed en-US text/html https://gulfbusiness.com/smart-salem-centre-to-provide-swift-medical-test-for-uae-residency-visa/
Killexams : Flu season in UAE: Residents urged to get vaccinated, test for Covid-19, maintain proper hygiene

As per guidelines, when patients have respiratory symptoms like sore throat, cough, or fever, they should do the PCR test


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Published: Wed 21 Sep 2022, 5:53 PM

Last updated: Thu 22 Sep 2022, 10:38 AM

Doctors in the UAE are witnessing an influx of patients contracting seasonal flu and most of them experiencing mild to moderate symptoms.

Healthcare practitioners have repeatedly urged residents to get themselves vaccinated against the seasonal flu, as they see many patients complaining of fever and body ache at their medical centres. Medics see the maximum number of infections and patients suffering from flu between August to February.

Dr Abhinav Gupta, Specialist Internal Medicine, Aster Clinic, Arabian Ranches, said, “A lot of people are getting infected by flu or are contracting cold in the UAE now due to the change in the climate. The main reason behind this is the growth of certain viruses during this time.”

He said, “In the UAE, you are more vulnerable to catching flu during these months (transition from summer to winter). This is because the influenza virus thrives and proliferates at a higher rate when the air is cold.”

Highlighting that while it’s difficult to clinically differentiate between Covid-19 infection and other viral illnesses based on the symptoms alone, testing for Coronavirus may be the only solution, when in doubt.

One differentiator could be “certain symptoms like loss of sense of smell (anosmia) or taste (ageusia) are seen in Covid-19 infection and rarely occur with flu. However, all patients should be tested for Covid as it is much more contagious than normal flu,” Gupta added.

As per the government guidelines, when patients have respiratory symptoms like sore throat, cough, or fever, they must get tested for Coronavirus.

Dr Prabir Paul, Medical Director, Burjeel Marina Health Promotion Center, Abu Dhabi, said, "To my knowledge, the patients coming to the ENT, pediatric, and family medicine clinics suffer from some respiratory viral or respiratory bacterial infection. This is a normal seasonal variation of flu and respiratory diseases, but they should get a PCR test done. As far as the Covid-19 figures are concerned, there hasn't been an abnormal spike in the cases."

Doctors reiterate it is essential to maintain proper hand hygiene, wear a mask, especially in crowded places, wash hands often and not touch eyes, mouth or nose. They also advise staying away from people who are coughing and sneezing.

Dr Mitchelle Lolly, Specialist Pulmonologist, Prime Hospital, said, “Currently we are living in a very busy world. Falling sick can be due to various physical, mental and environmental factors. Physical factors include inappropriate dietary habits, lack of physical activities, presence of other co-morbid illness and other habits including smoking and use of alcohol. Mental factors mainly include stress and environmental factors include bacteria, virus, pollution.

"Viral infections are usually self-resolving provided we take adequate rest, nutrition and hydration at the time of infection. My advice would be to stay safe by practising SMS that is social distancing, masking and sanitising, and follow an active and healthy life.

“A healthy life would be led with appropriate dietary habits including eating on time, avoiding junk food and adding ample fruits, vegetables with the right amount of protein UPTO 0.8 G / KG / DAY to your diet. An active life could be led by exercise which would be a minimum of 30 minutes of brisk walk at least three times a week.”

Wed, 21 Sep 2022 02:50:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.khaleejtimes.com/health/flu-season-in-uae-residents-urged-to-get-vaccinated-test-for-covid-19-maintain-proper-hygiene?amp=1
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