Newly update content of CBBF exam with free Exam Questions download

Make your concepts crystal clear for CBBF exam topics with killexams.com CBBF real questions and go through complete question bank several time so that you can memorize and master all the CBBF questions and answers. You really do not need to download any of the free contents from internet because, those are outdated. Just practice our CBBF real questions and pass your exam.

Exam Code: CBBF Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
CBBF Certified Blockchain Business Foundations

The CBBF test is a 70 question multiple-choice test that lasts 1.5 hours and is a performance-based evaluation of basic Blockchain skills and knowledge. Internet access is not provided during the exam, nor is any course material or study guides.

Scores and Reporting
Official scores for exams come immediately following the test from Pearson VUE. A passing score is 70%. test results are reported PASS/FAIL and you will be provided your percentage. Blockchain Training Alliance does not report scores on individual items, nor will it provide additional information upon request.

The Certified Blockchain Business Foundations (CBBF) test is an elite way to demonstrate your knowledge and skills in this emerging space. Exams are conducted at Pearson VUE.

The guide helps to cover the four sections sections of the exam:
- General Blockchain Knowledge
- Why Use Blockchain
- How Blockchain Works
- Using Blockchain for Business

Target Roles Include:
- IT Leadership
- Key Business Managers
- CEO/CTO/CIO
- Network Operations
- Business Analysts
- IT Consultants
- Project Managers
- Systems Integrators
- Help Desk / Service Desk
- Managed Service Providers
- Solution Providers
- Sales Staff
- Government Officials

A person who holds this certification has demonstrated their understanding of the following:
- Blockchain Basics
- Why an organization should or should not use Blockchain
- How Blockchain Works
- Implementing Blockchain in Business
- Blockchain Use Cases

Certified Blockchain Business Foundations
BlockChain Foundations book
Killexams : BlockChain Foundations book - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CBBF Search results Killexams : BlockChain Foundations book - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CBBF https://killexams.com/exam_list/BlockChain Killexams : Keep Growing, Keep Giving: Maha Abouelenein

At one point during my conversation with Maha Abouelenein over Zoom, she holds a sweater label tag close to her camera, saying, "This is a certificate that basically says that it is an original piece of clothing that has been authenticated on the blockchain. This is the value of what we'll be able to do with Web3, and this is why people need to learn and understand blockchain technology." Out of her living room in her home in the American state of Minnesota, Abouelenein would not be imploring me (and you) to take Web3 seriously if she was not sure that it would significantly change the way we live and work.

And Abouelenein is someone you'd want to listen to- before moving back to the US in 2020, she had been working as a strategic communications consultant out of Egypt and the UAE for 23 years, and during this time, she had firsthand experience of the profound impact technological disruptions have had on the world at large. "I had a front seat into the internet being introduced into the MENA region, and then to the introduction of mobiles by launching almost every mobile network in the Middle East and Africa in more than 18 countries," Abouelenein recalls. "And now, we're about to launch into Web3 and non-fungible tokens (NFT) and become the thought leader in the space when it comes to how blockchain technology will impact brands, businesses, and our lives."

It is therefore not surprising that Abouelenein now, again, has the edge over how brands and businesses should find their voice in this new world professed by Web3- she has already led communications for some of the leading projects in the space, such as the VeeCon 2022 mega-conference hosted by VeeFriends, the NFT project run by acclaimed entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk, aka GaryVee. Her prowess as an entrepreneur and digital communications consultant comes from running her strategic communication consulting firm, Organizational Consultants, with offices in the USA and Dubai, as well as its signature podcast, Savvy Talk. Besides managing the personal brand public relations for Vaynerchuk, Abouelenein also offers her advisory services to a clientele that includes noted Indian-American author Dr. Deepak Chopra and Dubai-based influencer-cum-entrepreneur Karen Wazen, as well as acclaimed companies like Target and Emirates Airline, alongside Web3 startups like Utopia, Bedu, and Vayner3, among others.

© Provided by Entrepreneur Source: Maha Abouelenein

However, it is indeed news to me that Abouelenein wants to talk with me now about an old-fashioned, paperback book, and not just any book, but a book based on her personal story. "I want to tell my story, because I want to inspire people," Abouelenein says. "I want to inspire women who want to learn how both to take care of their parents and build their own careers, entrepreneurs who don't know how to do communications but know it's an important piece of their business, people who have setbacks in their careers but realize that they can switch gears, and create a new chapter for themselves."

And now, if you expect that this interview will supply you a sneak peek into how Abouelenein has done it all, you are right, it will; but her whole story will be available in 2024, when the book is expected to be published. "My measuring stick for life is based on what I am doing to bring value to others- personally and professionally," Abouelenein says, when asked about the secret to her success. "Creating value behind the scenes is about finding that value equation that comes from knowing how to choose the right strategy, how to put in the work, and how to build the right network. It all comes with experience."

Related: Infinite Possibilities: Deepak Chopra, Founder, The Chopra Foundation

© Provided by Entrepreneur

Abouelenein with Indian-American author Dr. Deepak Chopra

.

Source: Maha Abouelenein

Born to Egyptian parents in Mankato, Minnesota, Abouelenein earned her bachelor's and graduate degrees at Minnesota State University, and started her career by interning for Weber Shandwick and also briefly working for General Mills, before moving to Egypt in 1997 to care for her mother who was unwell at the time, while her father accepted a new assignment as the dean of a business school in the UAE. In Cairo, she first worked for Egyptian billionaire and media and telecom mogul, Naguib Sawiris. "During my time there, I was part of the team that led the country's first dual listing on the London and Egyptian stock exchanges," Abouelenein recalls. "We did the largest initial public offering (IPO) in Egyptian history, and we also worked on the largest acquisition in the history of Egypt when we acquired 18 licenses from the telco, Telecel, in Africa." It was also in Egypt that, a few years later, Abouelenein was appointed Google's Head of Global Communications and Public Policy. "I accepted the job on January 25, 2011, which was the day the Arab Spring started in Egypt, and so, I started only in March and worked on helping businesses leverage the economic impact of the internet," she explains. "We launched Google Maps Street View and YouTube in the Middle East. We invested heavily in getting more Arabic content online, and building the internet ecosystem among developers and the tech industry."

Another of her key roles in her career was being the founding Managing Director of Weber Shandwick for the MENA region, in which she set up 18 offices for the enterprise. In between these high-profile stints, Abouelenein has also been committed to her Minnesota and Dubai-based communications firm Organizational Consultants, which has helped the likes of companies like Netflix, Udacity, and Careem to help with their public relations in the Middle East. "One of the biggest things that I'm really proud of that I did, for example with Netflix, is that when they first decided to come into the Middle East, they didn't know the importance of Ramadan," Abouelenein says. "But by the next year, they had shows about food, cooking, and family, as well as television serials. So, by explaining the nuances of our Arab culture, we were able to make that bridge between East and West, and say, 'This is like our Super Bowl, where the advertising is really high during this peak period, and so watching ad-free content on Netflix would be a huge advantage."

Her advice on these matters were heeded by the likes of Microsoft's Bill Gates and Udacity's Sebastian Thrun, whom she remembers telling to not go straight into business at meetings in the Middle East, but to focus a bit more on building personal connections. More recently, Abouelenein remembers her work with Vaynerchuk serving as a reminder on the importance of understanding one's audience in order to avoid unnecessary mistakes. "I was very nervous when I first brought Vaynerchuk to the UAE, because he is in-your-face, very loud, high-energy, and all this kind of stuff, but he was actually completely intuitive at practicing the room, respecting the culture, letting them lead, and listening first," she recalls. Another story from her time with Vaynerchuk serves as a more practical response to my question to her to define what the value is that she brings to others. "It's something that's important to you, not to me," Abouelenein replies. "And the secret sauce is finding out what you value the most, and then how I can deliver it for you."

Related: I Quit Google To Become An Entrepreneur

© Provided by Entrepreneur

Abouelenein with Gary Vaynerchuk at the VEECON 2022 mega-conference.

Source: Maha Abouelenein

With Vaynerchuk, this meant realizing that, in addition to a 30-person team building his personal brand on social media when Abouelenein started working with him over five years ago, she had to look at how to bring him to new audiences through personal relationships, leveraging his speaking gigs and getting him in front of editors and news programs. "I had to find a lane to bring value because he had such a robust content machine team," Abouelenein explains. "I started to think about what new relationships I could create for him when he is only a direct message away from anyone he wants to connect with. I started focusing on news organizations and media outlets, and new markets like Dubai, to reach new audiences. For example, last week, Gary was on The Drew Barrymore Show, a television show that appeals to more women, which is a target audience we really care about reaching."

Our conversation now turns to the ambitious Emirate of Dubai where Abouelenein has a number of satisfied clients, including Dubai Future Foundation, Emirates Airlines, Careem, Al Ghurair Foundation for Education, Rain, and FitRepublik, to name but a few. She states that, while she is a proud Egyptian, she cherishes Dubai for "what it stands for and what it enables people to do," and aims to use her PR skills "to tell people about why they should do business with and in Dubai." Mean- while, to Minnesota, she is grateful for "teaching her American business ethics and values." Abouelenein adds, "The best part of being an Egyptian American is using my knowledge of both cultures and worlds to be a bridge between East and West in my career. I feel it's what has given me an edge and propelled me to be in a unique position. I come from a place of tremendous gratitude for being in the right place at the right time when it comes to things like that."

Related: How Huda, Mona, And Alya Kattan Built The Billion-Dollar Huda Beauty Brand Out Of Dubai

© Provided by Entrepreneur

Abouelenein with Huda Kattan and Eva Longoria at the VeeCon 2022 mega-conference.

Source: Maha Abouelenein

Abouelenein has been writing her book from that place of gratitude, and she assures me that it will not be a tell-all book, but instead a collection of her memories and personal experiences that are aimed at illuminating a larger mindset change. One example, she says, is that she wants to make the concept of switching gears in lives and careers more acceptable, especially among people in the Middle East. "You go to school, you get married, you have kids, you get a job are societal norms that exist everywhere, right? But I think now what we're learning because of new words in our life, like disruption, or a side hustle, or a startup, is that it's okay to switch gears and to pick your passion and to do things you love in addition to what you were traditionally expected to do, or planning to do."

As our conversation comes to an end, I realize that Abouelenein's career has been destined to blur the boundaries between opposing sides -be it the East and the West, or online and offline- and bring them closer together. And that is in line with the main goal that she wishes to achieve with her book- to put her knowledge in the service of everyone everywhere. "At this point in my career, I really am in a position to pick what I want to work on, and so what I think about the most now is how to scale my knowledge for everyone to learn," Abouelenein concludes. "It is because everybody should be thinking about their personal brand, their reputation, or startups about their PR, and I don't want to be on their payroll, but to supply them the tools so that they can win on their own and learn critical communications skills they need."

Related: Making A Splash: Karen Wazen And Elias Bakhazi Launch Their MEA-Focused Investment Firm, KE Partners

© Provided by Entrepreneur

Abouelenein with Dubai-based influencer Karen Wazen.

Source: Maha Abouelenein

'TREP TALK: Tips for entrepreneurs from Maha Abouelenein

It's ok to not know what you don't know "I became the Managing Director of my own company in 2004 when I really had no idea how to do that. I was capable of doing the work and serving the clients, but I had no idea when it came to running a 'company,' or how to manage key pillars, like finance, human resources, operations, legal, and so on. Then, you learn the gaps, and you have to hire to fill them. It was a fast awakening of all of my shortcomings- just because I knew about PR and comms didn't mean I knew how to run a PR company. Thankfully, it's 2022, and I look back and take away so many lessons from that time. The big lesson here is: ask for help, and hire the right people you need to deliver. Be humble, and admit what you don't know."

Believe in yourself "When all else fails, who can you rely on to show up? You! You have to put in the work; you have to believe you can. If you don't believe in yourself, nobody else will. Self-doubt is a killer. I really struggled with putting myself out there, because I wasn't sure anyone who care about what I had to say, or that nobody would listen to my advice. But I believed- I kept saying, if not me, then who? I can do this. And I did, one day at a time.

Invest in yourself "Nobody will ever put you at the top of their priority list. You have to do that. Information is for free- you need to seek it. So invest in yourself, learn new skills, read newsletters, and blogs, watch YouTube videos- do what it takes to sharpen your skills and stay relevant."

Managing yourself is hard work "If you are an entrepreneur and you work from home, you feel me right now! Being disciplined around time organization, the structure of your team, of your day and all from home is not easy. So the best thing to do is the best that you can. Build a routine."

Build a network "Nobody can get ahead or win alone. Nobody knows how to do everything alone, you need a network. How much time are you spending on that network- building, nurturing, growing, and supporting it? Time to get building!"

Related: Shifting The Conversation: What It Really Means To Add Value

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 22:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/smallbusiness/keep-growing-keep-giving-maha-abouelenein/ar-AA132Rwg
Killexams : Andreessen Horowitz's Crypto Lobbying Blitz Is Paying Off

In April, Andreessen Horowitz partners Ben Horowitz, Anthony Albanese, and Chris Dixon threw a fundraiser for Bronx congressman Ritchie Torres at the New York nightclub Zero Bond. They encouraged guests to donate between $500 and $5,800 in U.S. dollars or Ether to support Torres’ congressional run for New York’s 15th district. In the days leading up to the event, the partners themselves had contributed $17,000.

Just a few months later, Torres Zoomed into a panel hosted by Andreessen Horowitz portfolio company Flowcarbon, throwing his political support behind the fledgling cryptocurrency startup, which has been called a “hammer in search of a nail” and “scam” by critics. The slick new venture, which was cofounded and backed by WeWork’s Adam Neumann and into which Andreessen Horowitz led a $32 million funding round in May, aims to bring carbon credits onto the blockchain.

“Tokenization has the potential to magnify the power that the private sector can play in combating catastrophic climate change,” Torres told attendees, heralding crypto as “the best hope for de-concentrating power in both finance and technology." He did not disclose that Andreessen partners had helped him raise money until it was reported by CNBC.

Since Andreessen Horowitz announced a crypto lobbying blitz in Washington a year ago, dispatching its team on a week-long tour last October, the firm’s leaders have donated almost $2.2 million to financing the campaigns of more than a dozen lawmakers and a political action committee (PAC) that supports them, according to a Forbes analysis of Federal Election Commission data. The bulk of these contributions, $2 million, went to a single super PAC, GMI, which poured money into other PACs that paid for ads and canvassing on behalf of crypto-friendly lawmakers.

Torres in particular has emerged as a crypto cheerleader, aligning himself with Andreessen Horowitz, or a16z. In March, Torres declared on Twitter that “crypto is the future,” sharing an op-ed he penned titled “A liberal case for cryptocurrency” that hailed a16z Web3 chief Chris Dixon as a “powerful thought leader on crypto.” (No other crypto bigwigs were mentioned in the piece.) It marked the first time the young lawmaker had publicly taken a position on the issue, demanding that “New York City should and must embrace crypto.”

Rep. Ritchie Torres (D-NY), pictured, told Forbes he is a blockchain believer and "a skeptic about policies that discriminate against the technology." Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images © Provided by Forbes Rep. Ritchie Torres (D-NY), pictured, told Forbes he is a blockchain believer and "a skeptic about policies that discriminate against the technology." Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Shortly after, Torres appealed to carbon registries that had hit pause on tokenization and brought companies like Flowcarbon to a screeching halt. In May, the organization Verra banned projects from converting retired credits into cryptocurrencies, in order to investigate ways for preventing massive fraud. To the ire of Flowcarbon’s community, the company has delayed its token launch for months, citing Verra’s decision as a source of uncertainty, and has yet to debut a public product.

Forbes obtained a letter the congressman sent in July to Verra and the American Carbon Registry — another standards body that also paused tokenization of credits — in which he stated he was “very concerned” by their recent decisions, and urged the groups to reverse their mandates. “As someone who developed asthma because of the toxic air I breathed growing up in public housing, I am painfully aware that environmental justice is racial justice. Stifling innovations that can unlock carbon markets and stimulate climate action is the exact opposite of what we should be doing during a crisis,” Torres wrote. He declined to comment on the letter.

“I can assure you, it was only because they knew I was in town and asked me to.”

—Verra spokesperson Steve Zwick, on why he hosted a Flowcarbon panel

What compelled Torres to advocate for the carbon credit blockchain market, a relatively small niche of the cryptosphere, remains unclear. “It doesn't look good,” says Michael Gilbert, the vice dean of University of Virginia Law, where he researches campaign finance law. “This firm shows up and says, 'Hey, we're entering this political market,' they drop a whole bunch of money, you have evidence they support him and look, suddenly, he's all over their issues.”

In response to questions about whether employees of a16z discussed Flowcarbon or the carbon registries with Torres, a16z spokesperson Kim Milosevich declined to answer, but told Forbes in an emailed statement that a16z’s efforts are to seek “regulatory clarity and thoughtful web3 legislation."

Torres didn’t respond to questions about his relationship with a16z and Flowcarbon, or his communication with the carbon registries. In a statement, Torres said he has held “hundreds” of fundraisers, and two of them have been connected to crypto. “There’s nothing shocking about individuals supporting candidates who share their policy views,” he said. “That is what voters and donors typically do.”

A16z leaders, L-R Marc Andreessen, Ben Horowitz, and Chris Dixon, have led a Washington blitz this election cycle to advance the firm's vast crypto interests. Ethan Pines for Forbes © Provided by Forbes A16z leaders, L-R Marc Andreessen, Ben Horowitz, and Chris Dixon, have led a Washington blitz this election cycle to advance the firm's vast crypto interests. Ethan Pines for Forbes

On behalf of Flowcarbon, Sharron Silvers, a senior director at communications firm APCO Worldwide, said in an email that the company "did not ask the Congressman to write letters” to the carbon registries. Silvers added that Torres was invited to its event because "he is a prominent proponent of using technological innovations to protect the environment.”

Campaign financing is just one of several ways a16z is pushing its agenda in Washington, both directly and indirectly. In the past year, it has published more than a dozen blog posts, whitepapers, and studies that promote its crypto motivations and those of its portfolio companies. It has sent letters to federal agencies, organized fundraisers for lawmakers, and hired former SEC officials to further its concerns. (The firm told the New York Times last October that its team does not register as lobbyists, and disclosures show it has not reported any lobbying activity this year.)

In an open letter published last month, Neel Maitra, a partner with Wilson, Sonsini, and Scott Walker, a16z’s chief compliance officer — both who previously oversaw blockchain technologies at the Securities and Exchange Commission and now represent a16z — called on the agency to adopt new rules allowing investors to enhance their crypto holdings through staking. “If the SEC really wants to protect investors in crypto assets in the same way it protects investors in more conventional investments,” the co-authors wrote, “implementing the suggestions set out above would allow the commission to demonstrate that in a meaningful way.” The SEC did not respond to a comment request.

Such revolving door appointments — hiring former federal agency officials to represent a firm’s interests before that agency — are common practice in Washington. “That's how lobbying works,” says Carol Goforth, a law professor at the University of Arkansas, who researches regulation of crypto assets. “That means that the person, or the entity with the most money, gets the most access, gets the most time, gets the most attention.”

“Campaign donations do not have any influence on legislation Sen. Lummis introduces or cosponsors.”

—Stacey Daniels, spokesperson for Senator Cynthia Lummis
Senator Cynthia Lummis (R-WY), pictured, held a “crypto education dinner” for senators in February at DC restaurant La Vie, and spent nearly $700 on “crypto books” for her colleagues. Drew Angerer/Getty Images © Provided by Forbes Senator Cynthia Lummis (R-WY), pictured, held a “crypto education dinner” for senators in February at DC restaurant La Vie, and spent nearly $700 on “crypto books” for her colleagues. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

While other venture firms have poured similar campaign financing dollars into this election cycle — employees of Sequoia Capital contributed $7 million, while Founders Fund employees contributed $3.5 million (excluding Peter Thiel) — few of a16z’s peers have mirrored its strategy and solely targeted crypto-friendly candidates.

And it’s clear why: A16z has raised $7.6 billion for Web3 investments, making it the largest fund of its kind, and has more than 80 portfolio companies, making it uniquely vested in political outcomes related to crypto. The firm has seemingly gained allies in the House and Senate, where a roster of friendly lawmakers have introduced pro-crypto bills and advocated on behalf of the industry.

In June, Senators Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming, and Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, introduced a novel bill that would enshrine the crypto industry’s belief that digital assets are commodities and not securities. As a result, the bill would also delegate its regulation to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission instead of the Securities and Exchange Commission, which has helmed the crypto enforcement push. “We met with industry leaders, they basically said, ‘we just need to know what the rules of the road are,’” Gilibrand said in a CNBC interview. “We’ve been seeking regulation from various regulators and the delays and response have been unconscionable.”

Each senator received $11,600 in campaign donations from Chris Dixon and Ben Horowitz a week before their announcement, according to FEC data. Dixon and Horowitz also gave a combined $23,200 to the Financial Innovation Victory Committee, a joint fundraising committee that has almost exclusively supported Lummis and Gillibrand since its registration in May, and was the focus of a fundraiser organized by crypto investor Multicoin Capital that month where both candidates were guests. Gillibrand did not respond to a request for comment.

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), pictured, emerged as an ally of the crypto industry after introducing a bill that would move regulation of digital assets away from the SEC. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images © Provided by Forbes Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), pictured, emerged as an ally of the crypto industry after introducing a bill that would move regulation of digital assets away from the SEC. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

It is notoriously difficult to determine the full extent of who gave what to which candidate, as contributions can be made through PACs that distribute funding to multiple campaigns or even other PACs. Since individual donations are capped by federal law at $2,900 per person, these donations may also seem small. But collectively, a16z’s leaders have given millions of dollars to pro-crypto candidates and PACs that wound up supporting them.

GMI, a crypto-specific PAC that has raised $11 million since January, received $2 million from Marc Andreessen and Ben Horowitz. The political committee, whose crypto moniker “Gonna Make It” underscores its optimism, is also backed by FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried and President Donald Trump’s former press secretary Anthony Scaramucci, and has been steadily funneling money to two other crypto PACs, Web3 Forward and Crypto Innovation. Web3 Forward has received $4.5 million from GMI since February, and has supported Democratic candidates in Texas, Hawai’i, Illinois, California, and Pennsylvania. Crypto Innovation, meanwhile, has overwhelmingly backed Republicans, including North Carolina crypto allies Rep. Ted Budd, who voted against certifying the 2020 election, and Rep. Patrick McHenry, who told crypto conference guests last month that he would prioritize their needs if elected.

Some candidates had familiarized themselves with crypto before linking up with a16z. In March, Anthony Albanese and Chris Dixon contributed a total $7,800 to Massachusetts Rep. Jake Auchincloss, who was a crypto project investor prior to entering Congress and has called the current Web3 regulatory landscape “not fair.” In July, the Democrat joined Dixon in a Twitter Spaces discussion on Web3 policy, and again on a16z’s crypto podcast, in which he asked Dixon for suggestions on how to regulate NFTs. “Chris, I’m interested for your thoughts on the potential of NFTs and what type of regulatory architecture might help them thrive, and help the creator economy do better with them.” Auchincloss spokesperson Matt Corridoni told Forbes the congressman “approached Mr. Dixon about doing the Twitter spaces — we go anywhere and talk to anyone in order to reach a broad audience.”

Other major crypto stakeholders have bolstered a16z’s beltway efforts. FTX’s Bankman-Fried, for example, had promised to spend up to $1 billion on American politics ahead of the 2024 election. (He recanted the pledge this month, telling Politico “That was a dumb quote on my part.”) In April of this year, he gave $16 million to super PACs largely backing Democrats, and has described his ambitions as “bipartisan.” Bankman-Fried did not respond to a comment request.

Measuring the success of donations and lobbying can be challenging. That said, it’s perhaps worth noting that Senator Lummis held a “crypto education dinner” for senators in February at DC restaurant La Vie, and one month prior spent nearly $700 on “crypto books” from publishing house Wiley for her congressional colleagues, according to campaign expenditure records. In July, 68-year-old Lummis tweeted: “Fight the FUD” — an acronym for ‘fear, uncertainty and doubt,’ and a pejorative used by crypto believers to dismiss naysayers and skeptics. “Campaign donations do not have any influence on legislation Sen. Lummis introduces or cosponsors,” Lummis spokesperson Stacey Daniels told Forbes. The senator did not respond to questions about which books she purchased; Wiley has numerous crypto titles including Cryptocurrency Investing For Dummies, Cryptocurrency All-in-One For Dummies, Bitcoin For Dummies, Cryptocurrency Mining For Dummies, and Blockchain For Dummies.

Whether Torres’ petition to carbon authorities will have a material impact on companies like Flowcarbon remains to be seen. In its response to the congressman, the American Carbon Registry wrote that while it’s interested by the promise of blockchain technologies, the group is “committed to a rigorous assessment process to ensure that they don’t undermine the foundations of carbon market integrity.”

Verra spokesperson Anne Thiel told Forbes the organization did not directly respond to Torres, “but are definitely taking the content of his letter into consideration as part of our public consultation and greatly appreciate them.”

Last month, however, Verra financial innovations director Benoit Clement spoke at the same Flowcarbon event that Torres attended. In a panel discussion, he told audience members that he was interested in “opportunities around transparency and liquidity,” and how tokenization can assist this effort. Verra media relations manager Steve Zwick told Forbes that “Benoit participated in that event because he was in town for Climate Week and was invited.”

Zwick added that he too moderated a panel at the event. "And I can assure you, it was only because they knew I was in town and asked me to.”

MORE FROM FORBES

MORE FROM FORBESHighest-Paid NBA Players 2022: LeBron James Keeps Pushing Up The Earnings RecordBy Brett Knight

© Provided by Forbes

MORE FROM FORBESThis Billionaire Made His Fortune Selling Affordable Fashion For Big Fat Indian WeddingsBy Anu Raghunathan

© Provided by Forbes

MORE FROM FORBESTech Billionaire Larry Ellison's Record Political Giving Funds Election Deniers In MidtermsBy Matt Durot

© Provided by Forbes

MORE FROM FORBESCould Dungeons & Dragons Be The Next Harry Potter? Stranger Things Have HappenedBy Brett Knight

© Provided by Forbes
Sun, 16 Oct 2022 23:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/andreessen-horowitzs-crypto-lobbying-blitz-is-paying-off/ar-AA132ver
Killexams : Video Tutorials are Making Blockchain Technology More Accessible

Have you ever tried to explain Bitcoin or cryptocurrency to a friend, only for them to stare doe-eyed into the display, and saying, “I don’t understand a word of this!” 

Sometimes it’s hard to explain these concepts to newbies, and it’s more than a little challenging to explain the past and future of cryptocurrency in simple terms. It’s also not the easiest thing to, you know, explain who the hell Satoshi Nakamoto actually was. 

But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible either. One of the best ways you can educate people of all ages regarding the blockchain is to stop practicing so much “expert commentary”, and instead use a video tutorial to better explain the fundamentals of blockchain tech. 

In this article we’re going to consider some of the basics, and also share some video tutorial links that will further your education. 

Why Understanding the Blockchain Matters

Emphasizing blockchain theory first is important, and even more so than the cryptocurrency, which is what most people have heard about. 

The blockchain refers to a system of recording transactions, sort of like a digital ledger, but one that cannot be easily changed, hacked, or altered. Every new transaction is distributed across a network of linked P2P computer systems and usually involves cryptocurrency. 

Explaining this simple fact helps people to understand that blockchain is ultimately about decentralizing many financial processes. Every member of the network has a copy of the distributed virtual ledger book, meaning everyone can verify transactions for themselves, and not rely on a central finance company to oversee the process. 

Besides, blockchain technology is what is rapidly growing, arguably more than or at least equal to crypto itself. Multiple industries are using blockchain tech for their own purposes, viewing it as a new commodity – and one without a central authority. 

The invention of Bitcoin was actually to help everyone learn to “make their own bank” and eliminate middlemen or intermediary companies when possible. 

The Best Learning Resources for New Blockchain Trainees

Who better to explain blockchain than the movers and shakers behind Ethereum.org? The site has plenty of guides to crypto basics, wallets, Web3, energy consumption, glossaries, and understanding blockchain ledgers. You can even access a forum to ask questions. 

If you prefer to read such complicated concepts in book form, you can buy “Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies: A Comprehensive Introduction Illustrated Edition” via paperback, hardcover, or Kindle. 

But one of the best video programs on the blockchain is by Gary Gensler, who offers an in-depth YouTube commentary on the blockchain, as well as a complete video course available from MIT OpenCourseWare.

Gary covers contextual history, failed digital currencies, blockchain theories, technology, financial sector problems, blockchain potential opportunities, challenges with blockchain technology, Q&As, and much more. 

Over at SimpliLearn, there is a tutorial focusing on the future of money in general, and why blockchain is set to change much of our future. This video course goes into more detail regarding decentralization, and how that actually protects intellectual property. The course also discusses how companies can use blockchain to Boost their business model. 

Video Streaming and Blockchain Coincide

Over at Medium, there’s a thought-provoking article covering how video streaming and blockchain are both transforming the modern internet. Streaming technology with video is actually growing astronomically in usage. Video is already expected to reach 4 zettabytes, and by the end of the year, it’s believed that over 80% of all internet traffic will be for videos. 

The quality of videos is improving, with 4K, 8K and 360 experiences, and so we are changing the way we create niche entertainment, find new markets, and deliver customized experiences to others. You can even buy free video loop footage for films, educational videos, and other projects. 

The internet is certainly helping us to connect to virtual niche communities all over the world. With tech as promising as the ISOVerse or Meta, we’re seeing the distant future today – a virtual world will billions of tradeable, virtual commodities. 

An Unregulated Decentralized Social Media

But where it gets interesting is how blockchain-based video is rising in popularity. Blockchain is now helping users to encrypt their videos and store the videos permanently using an “IPFS swarm.” 

These broadcasts rely on relay nodes and IPFS to not only protect creators (by ensuring the integrity of ownership), but also to decentralize hosting. Just read this jaw-dropping article from Legacy Research, covering how social media may eventually become free of censorship with a decentralized blockchain approach to users maintaining their own content. 

The Blockchain Is Your Future, One Way or Another

The future of blockchain is intrinsically tied in with the cultural and commercial trends of modern consumers in general. Whatever we want, and however we want to connect with others, technology finds a way to deliver that custom experience. The blockchain promises more user-created and user-stored media and the sky’s the limit. 

Now is the time to understand blockchain tech not only because it’s the future of our culture, but also because now is the time to invest and find a way to use blockchain for your own business goals. 

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 20:00:00 -0500 Angela Scott-Briggs en-US text/html https://techbullion.com/video-tutorials-are-making-blockchain-technology-more-accessible/ Killexams : The case for banks to get into staking

How could banks fit into decentralized finance? They could start by playing a role in staking, some industry observers say. 

The concept of staking, in which participants in a blockchain network pay an ante, run nodes of the blockchain on their own computers, help validate transactions and are rewarded for doing so, is becoming more popular in decentralized finance, or DeFi. Some say this is a natural place banks could participate in the future. 

One person who says this is Diogo Monica, president of Anchorage Digital Bank in San Francisco. 

"You're not just being rewarded for helping the network run the node," Monica said. "You might be paid more than the IT costs that you have of running a node. But now you have an interesting ensure that these transactions are correct because there's a computer inside of your IT closet run by your IT staff that all of the transactions are saved on. The network can't fool you into doing something wrong because now you literally own one of the nodes. So from a security perspective, you want this as a bank and you're being paid to run it and even being incentivized to run it." 

Having multiple banks run nodes on a blockchain also makes the blockchain resistant to failures, he said. 

Monica has experience with this. Anchorage started out as a storage technology startup focused on secure yet accessible storage of cryptocurrency private keys. It was granted a national trust bank charter from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency in January 2021. It was the first bank to have staking listed as a banking activity in its OCC charter. 

On Thursday, Anchorage and the Provenance Blockchain Foundation, a network that now includes 50 bank participants, announced they have a staking relationship. Anchorage has had a partnership with Provenance since March through which it is the institutional banking custodian for Provenance's hash token. Anchorage now allows clients to stake this hash from qualified custody. This means they can participate in the consensus mechanism while their assets are still under the custody of Anchorage Digital Bank. 

Bank participants can now buy a stake in the Provenance blockchain, run a node of it and receive fees for doing so.

There are several reasons banks might be interested in staking, according to Monica Summerville, head of capital markets at Celent. They may want to build a service or join a consortium building a service on a particular blockchain like Provenance. They may want to participate in the governance of that blockchain, "which can be attractive if you are building applications on the blockchain as you can input into the technology roadmap," she said. There's the passive income they can earn. Some banks might want to offer clients a staking service, as a way to earn passive income on crypto tokens. In a recent Celent survey of institutional investors, 77% of those surveyed said they would want to access staking pools for enhanced yield on crypto assets. 

"If banks are interested in offering blockchain-based services and would consider interacting with a blockchain protocol directly by hosting or running a node, then proof of stake can be a more attractive consensus mechanism than proof of work due to the former requiring significantly less compute power so more environmentally friendly," Summerville said. 

The proof-of-work consensus mechanism used on the bitcoin blockchain consumes as much electricity as the entire country of Australia. This is a major reason many Ethereum blockchains have shifted to proof of stake.

But there are also risks to banks in providing staking.

"From a very big picture standpoint, I would say that this administration is very focused on the risks that it sees in digital assets," Steven Lofchie, a partner at the law firm Fried Frank and founder and manager of the legal website Fried Frank Regulatory Intelligence, said in an interview. "There has been a constant series of warnings from the major parts of the administration that digital assets may be used for money laundering or to evade sanctions or that they are a threat to financial stability. Even if one does not agree that the risks are as substantial as the regulators believe, firms have to concede that the regulatory view on digital assets is not a friendly one."

Every firm has to make decisions as to its regulatory relationships, Lofchie noted. "Those decisions go beyond, does this activity comply with law? That's the base level. There's a lot more to regulatory relationships than whether you comply with law. So every firm has to consider, if the OCC and the other regulators are skeptical of digital-asset activities, how does that affect my calculation not only as to this particular activity, but as to my general relationship with the regulators?"

Evolution of the Provenance blockchain

Mike Cagney, who was the founder and CEO of SoFI and is now CEO of Figure Technologies, and his wife June Ou, who also worked at SoFi and is chief operating officer at Figure, developed the Provenance blockchain and set up the Provenance Blockchain Foundation. 

So far, the bank members use it to buy and sell mortgages and home equity lines of credit. The name Provenance is a nod to an important element to securitization that went missing during the mortgage crisis: the ability to know for sure how a mortgage originated and how it got to the place it is today. 

The Provenance blockchain is being used to solve pain points in the mortgage process, Monica pointed out. 

"The tracking of mortgages, the paying of mortgages, everything about the home-buying process is hair-pulling bad from a process perspective," he said. "It is just so ripe for disruption and everyone that touches it hates it so vividly."

With the use of a blockchain, "It's just like cutting through the middleman and saying, no, this is the one true source for this and it's cheap and it's efficient," Monica said. "And nobody can touch it unless you're adding value. What is the value that you're adding? And if you're adding value, then we'll allow you onto the network. No one is being paid to just push paper from left to right." 

Morgan McKenney, CEO of the Provenance Blockchain Foundation, previously worked at Citi for 18 years and calls herself a recovering banker. 

"I'm an OG of blockchain land, because I was running cross-border payments in 2016 when bitcoin and blockchain were first surfacing in the public consciousness," McKenney said in an interview.  

At that time, Citi was looking into using blockchain or bitcoin to Boost its cross-border payments business.

"As more financial and other assets go on-chain, obviously you need digital money to buy those," McKenney said. "My view is it will never be in bitcoin. It will be in fiat-linked money minted by banks."

The Provenance Blockchain Foundation maintains the blockchain software and is a participant on the network. But it doesn't control the network. Provenance creates USDF tokens that act like stablecoins but that the organization calls "bank-minted tokenized deposits." 

"We are working to help financial services participants put their business flows on blockchain for business and customer value," McKenney said. "So we are an infrastructure to help them basically reduce cost."

In addition to cost reductions, using a blockchain increases transparency, increases transferability of assets and eases access to financial services, she said. 

"Ultimately this is a new way to do finance," McKenney said. "You issue the financial asset natively on-chain."

The servicing, financing, trading and securitization of mortgage credit on Provenance is "the new digital assembly line of financial services," she said.

Another use of Provenance is private market securities. 

"The equity of young companies sits on Provenance and you can issue equity easily, much more digitally, and then manage that cap table and then offer secondary trading opportunities," McKenney said. "So it's creating more liquidity. This is a new financial system. And what we're doing is ultimately disrupting a lot of intermediation that happens in finance today. People have to tell your bank to do something with the asset that you own. So you own the asset, but you don't control the asset. This is a participatory platform." 

More recently, Provenance has been used for payments.

"I think if you ask anybody in crypto, remittances and cross-border payments are going to be the one number one use case because it's such an obvious one in which the internet is a lot better," Monica said. "Part of the reason for this is that if you think about it, a network effect by definition is the effect in which when you add a new participant to a network, all of the other participants benefit from that addition. So there's value being accrued. So they are very easy to become very valuable very quickly."

Blockchains like Provenance also have the benefit of instant finality, Monica said. 

"That's super important," he said. "Instant finality means when I receive it on this account, I know it's mine and it won't be clawed back. And that's very different from ACH, very different from SWIFT. In ACH you have all the way to 40 days where things can be taken back. … In crypto it's seconds or minutes finality." 

On Provenance, cross-border payments don't require accounts in foreign banks. 

"Everybody has a wallet and you don't need to open an account with someone to send them funds," Monica said. This streamlines the process and reduces maintenance cost. "You can just fund it and there's a list of public addresses for each participant and you can send it. So that makes it very unique and very different and just tailored for remittances. I think it is a great use case."

Staking

In a proof-of-stake blockchain like Provenance, there is a consensus mechanism that lets computer nodes on the blockchain agree on which transactions are legitimate. It also lets members vote on any changes to a smart contract running on the blockchain. 

Banks and others on the Provenance network will buy hash tokens generated by Provenance and put them in a virtual wallet on the network that will be safeguarded by Anchorage.

"The staking is quite important because you're putting something of value at risk," McKenney said. "People who are staking and putting their capital at risk can vote on things, can propose things, can write new smart contracts that help financial services be better."

Monica compares these stakes to putting down a deposit on a house. 

"When you leave the rental, they have the deposit and they'll keep it if you did something horrible to their house," he said. "It's that type of insurance mechanism that that proof of stake actually uses to ensure alignment of the participants in the network. The reason why it's called proof of stake is because you have something at stake."

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 21:51:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.americanbanker.com/news/the-case-for-banks-to-get-into-staking
Killexams : The Island of Artemis - a mystery Metaverse world waiting to be explored

You're practicing Entrepreneur Georgia, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

Manifesto:

Nothing is banned.

Nothing is illegal.

Freedom is absolute.

So are the consequences…

------------

Imagine an anonymous world where absolute freedom exists, everything is permitted, and nothing is banned. A mystery place of boundless opportunity, in which it is up to you to find your path and your true self. The Island of Artemis is the name of the first-ever role-playing Metaverse world, and it is already waiting to be built, created, and lived in. The immersive conversation-driven reality integrates a voice mask that will keep your voice anonymous, and allows you to change its characteristics as you desire. There is one crucial rule - do not anger the Matriarch! - the true heir of Goddess Artemis, creator of the island. The Matriarch is everywhere, but few have seen her. What angers the Mother of Deers is a closed book for participants.

The multiplayer role-playing game, enriched with real-time digital content creation and blockchain technology, was founded by Georgia-based Web3 company Two Point Zero, a team of storytellers, digital artists, engineers, and game developers transforming stories into things people will enjoy, use, interact with and share.

"This is not just Roblox for adults. You have an avatar, an island, and a voice mask. It is up to you to create and develop that island and its economy. The Island of Artemis is a place of absolute freedom, but everything has a price. The more free you are, the more you will be responsible for your actions. Why the Artemis and Greek theme? Greece was a place of extreme freedom - humans fought the Gods for freedom, and we believe that there is no greater freedom than this. In the new Metaverse world, people 18+ will be welcomed and allowed to decide how to behave in the ancient Greek-themed park, one in which there is everything: traditions, pleasure of the body and mind, money, weapons, religions, and so on," says the CEO of Two Point Zero, Zura Sharashenidze.

As to whether the Metaverse will bring people closer, Zura claims: "The Metaverse does not divide us, but connects us. On the Island of Artemis, participants will have face-to-face communication, without any kind of bureaucracy or unnecessary barriers that prevent communication".

Each district on the island is under the control of a different clan. Divisions among the earliest inhabitants of the island gave rise to these clans. Each has its leaders, traditions, and culture. Any contact with them needs to be properly thought out. By joining a clan, you can gain power and influence by advancing within the nefarious underbelly. playing an appropriate part in the drama, becoming a part of the story, taking part in the Matriarch's schemes, starting them, or thwarting them, or attempting to unravel the mystery of who the enigmatic Mother of Deers and her servants—the magical Sisters of Artemis—are.

They say that the devil is in the details, and the Island of Artemis is full of sinister intricacies in both its architecture and landscape. Everyone deserving of experiencing this magnificent universe will be amazed and excited by the depth and beauty of the weave that is created by the connections and interweaving of all things, with each element coming to and from itself.

Who will you meet on the island?

Beastborns

The beasts of Artemis, giant fish monsters that live in the depths around the island, introduce new players to this Metaverse universe. Local fishermen go after the monsters, slit their bellies, and after the newborns are removed, the island's limitless prospects are revealed.

The Matriarch

Silent but omnipresent, she oversees the island with the help of the Sisters of Artemis. Remember the main rule: do not anger the Matriarch!

The Sisters of Artemis

The Matriarch is supported and served by the twelve Sisters of Artemis. Aside from their creator, they are the most powerful characters on the island. In their various districts, they are in charge of maintaining order and ensuring freedom.

Cognitants & Technocrats

While Technocrats oversee all financial activity on the island and are in charge of the world's largest unobtanium mine, Cognitants serve as the Sisters' counselors and soothsayers.

…and so on.

The story of Artemis cannot be complete without the support of the community. The creators of The Island of Artemis are storytellers who turn stories into objects that people will engage with. They expand on concepts, guiding them in directions they never imagined possible. NFTs, Web3, crypto-gaming, and other immersive concepts inspired the staff to create invaluable experiences, such as the experimental gamification project deckk*, a socially motivated project with a single overarching goal: to create an online and blockchain-based memorial for all those affected by Putin's wars and crimes - IS PUTIN DEAD YET?, the largest collection of sound crypto advice the world has ever seen - Candlesticks, and the NFT project for emotion-driven transmedia storytelling - Ohh! Football.

The (A) Team is all set to establish the foundations for where this world will take us tomorrow. "We'll go there, do that, get the t-shirt, and come back to tell you all about our adventures so you can come along on the next one or even set the roadmap for our journey together yourself," the team says. The next destination and experience is The Island of Artemis - whose launch date will be announced in January 2024.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 00:34:00 -0500 Entrepreneur Staff ka text/html https://www.entrepreneur.com/ka/business-news/the-island-of-artemis-a-mystery-metaverse-world-waiting/437086
Killexams : 'I Knew I Was Here to Stay': Talking the Future of Web3 With David Bianchi BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 31: David Bianchi attends The Block LA Party hosted by Reactify on March 31, 2022 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Robin L Marshall/Getty Images) © Robin L Marshall BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 31: David Bianchi attends The Block LA Party hosted by Reactify on March 31, 2022 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Robin L Marshall/Getty Images)

The red carpet can be deceiving. The glamor of Hollywood can mislead. Consider, for example, the case of working actors in television.

“Unless you’re a series regular, you’re not making real money,” says David Bianchi, an actor with over 100 film and TV credits that range from “NCIS” to “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” to “Westworld.” “That’s an important thing to talk about, because I do want to level the playing field.”

These days Bianchi has “made it,” but back when he moved to Los Angeles he had cockroaches in his kitchen, slept on the floor and worked as a bartender for 15 years while cranking out acting gigs. The bartending job was discreetly hidden from his IMDb page but it was crucial for survival.

“I wasn’t gonna turn down $1,500 cash a week, right?” says Bianchi. “To call myself a ‘working actor?’ It’s ridiculous.”

See also: 'I'm a Crypto Guy': Why Steve Aoki Believes in Web3

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Bianchi found something he believes will level the playing field for actors and creatives. You can probably guess where this is going.

“Web 3, I think, really chops down the barricades,” says Bianchi.

That overall idea might not be new – many have called for Web 3 to “disrupt” Hollywood and empower creators. But Bianchi isn’t just speaking in abstractions. In a sense, he’s betting his career on Web 3. The founder of Exertion3 (a blockchain production company), Bianchi is executive producing and starring in “Razor,” an upcoming dystopian sci-fi drama about neural implants, coding culture and black-market crimes. It will be released on the blockchain through a partnership with Gala Films.

“Why is the blockchain important?” Bianchi asks. “For the first time in Hollywood history, audiences will be able to actually, tangibly own a motion picture. That’s never been done before.”

This isn’t Bianchi’s first brush with crypto. He’s also a poet who has created a genre he calls “Spinema,” or “spinning cinema through spoken word” – indie and activist art that isn’t exactly Hollywood-friendly. Enter non-fungible tokens. Bianchi minted and sold Spinema NFTs such as “I Can’t Breathe,” designed to bring attention to police brutality and the murder of George Floyd. (The “I Can’t Breathe” NFT was actually bought by MetaKovan, the prolific collector who bought Beeple’s $69 million NFT.)

After that? Bianchi was all-in. “I knew I was here to stay,” says the actor, who spent months in Clubhouse rooms and Discords to immerse himself in Web 3 culture. He even begins our Zoom call with a cheery, “Gm, gm!” The man knows the space. Here, he opens up about how Web 3 can empower artists, lead to the creation of better content, and unlock a future of media that he calls a “cataclysmic shift.”

Interview has been condensed and lightly edited for clarity.

The NFT world can be tricky. When you first got started, how’d you navigate it?

At that time I don't think there was anybody in NFTs who was minting entire short-form films as one-of-one pieces of art. I was probably the only one. And I had no idea what I was doing. I was just like, “I got a lot of hustle, I believe in my heart, I believe in this and I'm just down to be a part of whatever the hell is going on.”

I really just asked a lot of open-ended questions. The NFT community was so generous with their time, and they were so available to answer these newb questions. I was blown away by their generosity. It’s incredibly unusual for people in Hollywood to offer their time freely to answer questions and to send me their phone numbers and talk to me.

So when you minted “I Can’t Breathe,” it was bought by MetaKovan. How did that impact you?

Forbes covered the story. I donated all the proceeds to the George Floyd Memorial Foundation. I was able to educate the Floyd Foundation on the values of blockchain and cryptocurrency.

And this is how powerful the NFT community is. The film was seen by [civil rights attorney] Lee Merritt. It was seen by Benjamin Crump [another prominent civil rights attorney]. It was seen by Bridget Floyd. And not only did they see it, out of all the content that the Floyd family received during that period, they said, “This is the one. We want to show this film at the one-year memorial of his passing.”

And I can't tell you how many times I wept, how many times I cried during those Clubhouse rooms. There were 4,000 people and not a dry eye in the room. And for the first time in my entire life, I felt like my work had purpose.

See also: Investing in Web3: Culture and Entertainment

Incredible. And now let’s back up a bit. Can you talk about how your artistic journey entered the world of Web 3?

One of the main reasons I came to NFTs is because I was pitching Spinema as a television series, and it got represented by a big agency. When I pitched, everybody unanimously said, “David, we love your passion, we love your idea, we just don't know what to do with it.” Hollywood told me no.

So I said, “Thank you for telling me no. That just gives me a reason to go left or to go right. But I'm not gonna stop moving.”

Then I landed in the NFT community and I met people like you – young, influential, well-to-do, tech-savvy, connected and hungry for high art and purpose. And suddenly the clouds parted and it was almost like Neo in “The Matrix" when he sees the code and can dodge the bullets and see the matrix.

What was it that you saw, exactly? What became clear to you?

Creator economies. Residual income that artists can earn. The open nature of the blockchain and everything that comes with it. And I knew I was here to stay.

There was nothing that was gonna pull me away from minting and creating NFTs, and creating socially conscious art that talks about who we are as a people, that talks about where we are as a community, that raises the voices of BIPOC people, that raises the voices of the struggle, that raises the voices of the people who don't have voices. I wanna be able to create art that will be discussed in 2100.

That’s a good segue to “Razor.” It will be distributed on the blockchain. How does that work?

The mechanics are still sort of being tested. But what we're playing with is the idea that if you own an NFT then you won't necessarily have to pay to stream to watch.

If you don't own an NFT, then we will either create a PPV [pay per view] model, which will be a nominal fee for a single view or it will be a very low membership rate that will absolutely compete with the major streaming platforms in Web 2. So when you're watching the content, you'll actually be watching it from a streaming mechanism.

Read more: Can Starbucks Bring Web3 Into the Mainstream? | Opinion

So it’s going to have Web 2 streaming as well?

The Web 3 assets that are tethered to “Razor” and the world of “Razor” will be minted as ERC 721 tokens. So you're gonna have NFTs and then you're gonna have the streaming mechanisms.

We'll have an exclusive window of streaming that will be on Gala, and then we will release and do licensing deals in Web 2. So that could be Netflix, it could be Hulu, it could be Amazon, it could be HBO Max.

Ah, so if you own an NFT and you watch it on the Gala blockchain, you might get to see it weeks or months before it’s available on Netflix or Hulu or whatever?

Correct.

How else does digital ownership fit into this?

We're going to be minting storyboards, graphic animatics, a lot of digital assets, and giving digital access to the community. But also IRL access to the cast and crew – like table reads, premiers, etc.

I'm even eventually going to be able to NFT three lines in an episode, and I'm gonna bring you [the theoretical NFT holder] in, and set you up with an acting coach and you'll have a trailer. We'll knock on your door and bring you coffee, and you'll become a working actor.

Love it. What’s the timeline on this?

It's aggressive. We’re rolling out our pre-production NFT collection just a week before Halloween [Oct. 31]. Then we're going into physical production on episodes one through eight in Los Angeles starting in November. We’ll probably have episodes one and two ready to drop around the end of Q1 2023.

Okay, there’s one thing in the world of NFTs, where “scarcity” is prized, that never really gets talked about. All of that innovation sounds great but, ultimately, people need to want to see the show, right? The underlying asset needs to be something compelling, right?

It can't suck.

[Both laugh.]

It can't suck! Exactly. So on top of experimenting with a new Web 3 model and platform, do you also feel this added pressure to nail the content?

Oh, man. I mean, look, if I told you that the intimidation wasn't there, I'd be fooling myself and you. Is it terrifying? Sure. But it's exhilarating, right?

The distinction between the fearful man and the courageous man is that the courageous man walks through fear. And I have never shied down from any challenge. I tend to do my best work when my back is up against the wall.

But you're absolutely right. The world of "Razor" has to compel you enough that you want to buy into this. Now Gala has a very, very robust community – [among] Gala Games, Gala Music and now Gala Films. And we’re starting to do slow-rollout campaigns where there are thousands of Web 3-fluent people who are sort of film buffs, and don’t yet know what we’re doing.

So for us, community-building is just as important as pre-production, which is why we’re doing a pre-production NFT drop – we want to engage with our audience as early as humanly possible to keep them a part of the process.

Getting the Discord alive, answering questions, allowing people to really chime in and weigh in on what they like, what they don’t like. Because that’s a fundamental component of a community of Web 3 – we really get to hear their voices.

That all makes sense, but how does this tack back to the idea of the underlying content and it needing to be compelling?

One of the things Hollywood doesn't do very well is that they make movies and then they test them and they hope they work. You know, we just saw the $90 million "Batgirl" get trashed, like, it just didn't get released. They completed it. But what ended up happening was they realized they overshot the budget and the movie was gonna be lost no matter which way you slice it and dice it. Unfortunately, their box office metrics showed that minority-led pictures usually don't break $25 million. So they threw it away, they trashed it.

Instead, what we’ll be doing is releasing assets, and we're gonna be measuring the pulse of the community.

Ah, so the idea is that you’re sort of working in collaboration with the community from the jump, improving the chances that it lands? Got it. So tell us about “Razor.”

I wanted it to be something that was existential, gritty and character-driven, and taps into socially conscious notions of what we are as a society, who we are as human beings and where we are going as a society.

It’s a dark, somewhat dystopian look at the world of neural implants, code culture and the underbelly of black-market crime. It revolves around a character named Razor, and it was actually inspired by Elon Musk's Neuralink Technology.

What happens when you can create a neural device that you can implant into your cerebrum that can tap into all the information of the World Wide Web instantaneously? And what does that do to the mind?

Great hook. I’m in. So in the spirit of sci-fi, supply us a few real-world predictions. Let’s imagine that it’s five years from now and Web 3 in film and TV really takes off, really finds mass adoption. What does that future look like? How would it be different?

It's a great question. I think about this a lot.

First, from a work-model perspective, there will be a work system where – whether you’re a gaffer, an electrician, a [production assistant], a cinematographer, an actor or whatever – your work portal will have your profile and your experience tethered to the blockchain. Your digital wallet will be there. All of your tax paperwork will be there.

When you come on set, it's completely paperless, it's moneyless. All your pay is authenticated on the blockchain. Everything happens seamlessly. I see the unions, the Screen Actors Guild, I see IATSE (they may not like this). Because what does transparency do? Guess what, you can't cook the books anymore.

I’m eventually going to start building this.

Interesting. How about a prediction from the consumers’ perspective?

We’re in a generation where the idea of digital ownership is still quite foreign, right? We grew up in a world where somebody climbs to the top of Mount Everest and takes a great picture and we think, “I got it for free, why would I pay for it?” But the question of these assets is, why wouldn't you pay for it, right?

So now we're headed into this new world where Gen Z is gonna be very accustomed to digital ownership and transparency. I think it’s going to be demanded that people have digital ownership of assets tethered to the TV shows and the movies that they like to watch.

How about a prediction for distribution?

At the exhibition level, for the movie theater-goer, there will be NFTs that will be your monthly movie pass and you’ll have credits for popcorn. You're gonna be able to have all these [digital] collectibles and memorabilia.

But people aren't gonna call them NFTs five years from now. It's just gonna be like, "I just bought some stuff." Like, nobody says, “I’m going on the information highway to look for a movie ticket.” I'm just hopping online, I'm buying a movie ticket, right?

100%. I agree it’s likely that the acronym NFT eventually dies, even as NFTs get more prominent. One final prediction?

Now people are very tricky about the acronyms, on whether it’s [called] AR or VR, but I’m thinking of something like HoloLens technology, where it’s what I consider “extended reality.”

I’m wearing this device on my face so my hands are free, and I have extensions of metaverse elements in my physical reality. I could tell if my dog is chewing up my couch and I'm not blindsided.

So follow me on this one. You're watching your favorite show, maybe it’s "Mr. Robot.” You're watching it while you’ve got your HoloLens glasses on, and they’ll be very lightweight. And as you're watching it, you'll be able to pause, stop, zoom in, see that shirt that Rami Malek is wearing and say, "I wanna buy that shirt." You're gonna buy that shirt.

And as you're watching, you’re going to be able to pause, stop, and see the casting. And then you go to IMDB and you're gonna see digital assets. And then while that's happening, you can just swap your frame and you can go to your football game.

While you're watching your football game, you think, “Wait a second, did he step out of bounds?” You can pause, you can zoom in, you can see that he actually did step out of bounds.

Then you can check the game’s over-under [gambling odds], and for fantasy football you’ve got your stats, you got all your players and you can buy and sell memorabilia. And all of this is gonna be happening behind the veil of your extended reality glasses that will be connected to the blockchain to authenticate all this stuff.

Last question. What’s your ultimate goal with all of this?

I want to leave a legacy of work – that can be writings, poems, films, performances, screenplays, you name it. When the blockchain archaeologists of the next millennia look back in time at these early days of NFTs, they’ll look at what art was really standing out, what art really talked about our civilization. And I hope that my art will be in that discussion.

That’s a good goal. Congrats, and best of luck with “Razor.”

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 04:37:39 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/e2-80-9ci-knew-i-was-here-to-stay-e2-80-9d-talking-the-future-of-web-3-with-david-bianchi/ar-AA12TcT5
Killexams : Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy celebrates 20th anniversary

NEW YORK (AP) — Dolly Parton was jokingly uncharitable after the crowd at the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy ceremony tried singing along with her during her acceptance speech at Gotham Hall.

“That was terrible,” the Grammy-winning country superstar said after a muted sing-along of “Books, Books,” the song she wrote to support her Imagination Library initiative. That philanthropic program, which provides children under five a free book every month, was one of the reasons she was part of this year’s class of Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy honorees, as well as her donation to coronavirus vaccine research in 2020 that helped develop the Moderna vaccine.

“I’m very proud and honored to be a part of anything that is going to make the world a better place,” Parton said, adding that she was pleased to be celebrated along with Dallas entrepreneur Lyda Hill, Kenyan industrialist Manu Chandaria, and Lynn and Stacy Schusterman, from the Oklahoma investment family.

People are also reading…

The ceremony Thursday night celebrated the 20th anniversary of the award, which was established in 2001 as the “Nobel Prize of philanthropy.” To mark the milestone, which was postponed a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Carnegie institutions launched the Carnegie Catalyst award to “celebrate the transformative power of human kindness.” The award went to World Central Kitchen, the anti-hunger nonprofit founded by chef Jose Andres.

Stacy Schusterman, chair of the Schusterman Family Philanthropies, said she was proud to accept the award with her mother, Lynn, as the first mother-daughter team to be honored in the award’s history. However, she said there is also an urgent need for philanthropy to be more collaborative and to take on more challenges to Boost society.

“The U.S. was founded with ideals we have yet to realize,” she said in her acceptance speech. “When we say, ‘All men are created equal,’ it is clear ‘men’ does not yet mean all Americans, including women, gender expansive people, and all ethnicities, races and religions.”

The Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation was established in 1987 to invest in systemic change in the United States and Israel on matters of justice and equity. When Charles died in 2000, Lynn Schusterman took over the foundation, expanding its work and becoming an outspoken advocate for inclusion, especially for the LGBTQ community. In 2018, their daughter Stacy Schusterman took over the foundation, which changed its name last year to Schusterman Family Philanthropies.

Schusterman Family Philanthropies donates more than $400 million annually in programs that focus on justice and equity in the United States and Israel, as well as work in reproductive equity, voting rights and criminal justice.

“Philanthropy alone cannot solve these problems,” Stacy Schusterman said. “But we do have a huge responsibility to be a partner at the table – to work in partnership with the people and communities most impacted, to take risks and to find solutions.”

Lyda Hill believes many solutions can come from science. “People will look back years from now and say, ’One of the things the pandemic did was that it brought science to the forefront and it advanced medical research,” Hill told the Associated Press in an interview before the ceremony. “But we can’t just have half the population doing the research for Pete’s sake. We need the whole population involved. That’s why we started If/Then… It’s a program to encourage young girls to go into science so they realize that’s a field they can go into. We need different thinking.”

Manu Chandaria didn’t keep the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy around his neck for long. As soon as the photographs of him accepting the award were finished, he took the medal from his neck and put it around the neck of his great granddaughter. In his acceptance speech, he explained that it is important for philanthropists to pass on the reasons for giving to future generations.

The Chandaria Foundation was established in 1956, providing scholarships in Kenya, and has continued to expand to the point that now it builds education and healthcare infrastructure throughout Africa.

“In our giving, we want involvement,” he said. “It’s not just writing a check. And I think that this makes a lot of difference because the people know that these people are not going to just write a check and go away. We’re going to be there making very sure that the money is utilized properly and brings results.”

Associated Press coverage of philanthropy and nonprofits receives support through the AP’s collaboration with The Conversation US, with funding from Lilly Endowment Inc. The AP is solely responsible for this content. For all of AP’s philanthropy coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/philanthropy.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 00:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.stltoday.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/carnegie-medal-of-philanthropy-celebrates-20th-anniversary/article_e0d991b6-f935-528d-ba11-47db0283de08.html
Killexams : Provenance Blockchain Foundation Appoints Financial Services and Marketing Veteran Dan Garzia as Chief Marketing Officer

Garzia Brings Significant Marketing, Financial Services, and Blockchain Expertise to Provenance

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Provenance Blockchain Foundation, a leading organization focused on enabling financial services firms to adopt blockchain solutions and reimagine how their businesses operate, is delighted to announce the appointment of Dan Garzia as its Chief Marketing Officer. Garzia will be responsible for building out the full range of Provenance's global marketing capabilities with the goal of building brand awareness, driving growth of new users and developers, and broadening usage of HASH, Provenance Blockchain's native utility token.

An experienced marketing executive, Garzia joins Provenance Blockchain Foundation after serving most recently as Chief Marketing Officer at Securitize, a leading blockchain digital asset securities firm. At Securitize, Garzia played a key role in the growth of the brand and its awareness, including the launch of three new business lines, a 4x increase in new users, and the integration of the Pacific Stock Transfer acquisition.

"The Provenance Blockchain Foundation is uniquely positioned to catalyze and enable the financial service industry's use of blockchain technology to Boost the speed, access, and efficiency of its products and services," said Garzia. "I'm excited to join Morgan and the team to build awareness and adoption of the Provenance Blockchain."

Prior to entering the blockchain space, Dan held executive marketing roles in the traditional financial services sectors, leading brands and technology start-ups, including at BlackRock and Franklin Templeton, in the property and casualty industry with Travelers and Safeco, at gaming giant Electronic Arts, and with travel site Travelocity.

"We are thrilled to welcome Dan as Provenance's Chief Marketing Officer," said Morgan McKenney, CEO of Provenance Blockchain Foundation. "Dan's deep expertise across several industries and practices including tech, blockchain, traditional finance and marketing make him a unique leader - and a perfect fit for Provenance as we bring digital assets, digital money, and blockchain technology to traditional finance for business value."

The Provenance Blockchain Foundation brings together a diverse community of financial service businesses and developers to resolve real-world financial services inefficiencies at scale on the Provenance Blockchain. The Provenance Blockchain is used across lending, mortgages, payments, and capital market management to more efficiently enable the entire digital asset cycle, from origination to financing, funding and trading. To date, Provenance Blockchain has supported over $10 billion in transactions.

About Provenance Blockchain Foundation 

Provenance Blockchain is built specifically for the financial services ecosystem. Leading financial institutions and fintechs leverage Provenance Blockchain to enable the entire digital asset lifecycle, from origination to financing, funding, and trading. Built with Cosmos SDK, Provenance Blockchain has supported over $10 billion in transactions, enabling pioneering transformation in lending, securitization, private assets, marketplaces, and payments. Provenance Blockchain's native utility token, HASH, is used to pay transaction fees and enable governance, and is available on OkCoin and dlob.io. Learn more at provenance.io, on Twitter @provenancefdn, and on LinkedIn.

Provenance Blockchain Foundation Media Contact:
info@feinbergstrategies.com

Cision

View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/provenance-blockchain-foundation-appoints-financial-services-and-marketing-veteran-dan-garzia-as-chief-marketing-officer-301639484.html

SOURCE Provenance Blockchain

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 00:32:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/provenance-blockchain-foundation-appoints-financial-123000276.html
Killexams : Provenance Blockchain Foundation Appoints Financial Services and Marketing Veteran Dan Garzia as Chief Marketing Officer

Garzia Brings Significant Marketing, Financial Services, and Blockchain Expertise to Provenance

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Provenance Blockchain Foundation, a leading organization focused on enabling financial services firms to adopt blockchain solutions and reimagine how their businesses operate, is delighted to announce the appointment of Dan Garzia as its Chief Marketing Officer. Garzia will be responsible for building out the full range of Provenance's global marketing capabilities with the goal of building brand awareness, driving growth of new users and developers, and broadening usage of HASH, Provenance Blockchain's native utility token.

An experienced marketing executive, Garzia joins Provenance Blockchain Foundation after serving most recently as Chief Marketing Officer at Securitize, a leading blockchain digital asset securities firm. At Securitize, Garzia played a key role in the growth of the brand and its awareness, including the launch of three new business lines, a 4x increase in new users, and the integration of the Pacific Stock Transfer acquisition.

"The Provenance Blockchain Foundation is uniquely positioned to catalyze and enable the financial service industry's use of blockchain technology to Boost the speed, access, and efficiency of its products and services," said Garzia. "I'm excited to join Morgan and the team to build awareness and adoption of the Provenance Blockchain."

Prior to entering the blockchain space, Dan held executive marketing roles in the traditional financial services sectors, leading brands and technology start-ups, including at BlackRock and Franklin Templeton, in the property and casualty industry with Travelers and Safeco, at gaming giant Electronic Arts, and with travel site Travelocity.

"We are thrilled to welcome Dan as Provenance's Chief Marketing Officer," said Morgan McKenney, CEO of Provenance Blockchain Foundation. "Dan's deep expertise across several industries and practices including tech, blockchain, traditional finance and marketing make him a unique leader - and a perfect fit for Provenance as we bring digital assets, digital money, and blockchain technology to traditional finance for business value."

The Provenance Blockchain Foundation brings together a diverse community of financial service businesses and developers to resolve real-world financial services inefficiencies at scale on the Provenance Blockchain. The Provenance Blockchain is used across lending, mortgages, payments, and capital market management to more efficiently enable the entire digital asset cycle, from origination to financing, funding and trading. To date, Provenance Blockchain has supported over $10 billion in transactions.

About Provenance Blockchain Foundation 

Provenance Blockchain is built specifically for the financial services ecosystem. Leading financial institutions and fintechs leverage Provenance Blockchain to enable the entire digital asset lifecycle, from origination to financing, funding, and trading. Built with Cosmos SDK, Provenance Blockchain has supported over $10 billion in transactions, enabling pioneering transformation in lending, securitization, private assets, marketplaces, and payments. Provenance Blockchain's native utility token, HASH, is used to pay transaction fees and enable governance, and is available on OkCoin and dlob.io. Learn more at provenance.io, on Twitter @provenancefdn, and on LinkedIn.

Provenance Blockchain Foundation Media Contact:
info@feinbergstrategies.com

Cision View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/provenance-blockchain-foundation-appoints-financial-services-and-marketing-veteran-dan-garzia-as-chief-marketing-officer-301639484.html

SOURCE Provenance Blockchain

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 00:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://whnt.com/business/press-releases/cision/20221004NY91213/provenance-blockchain-foundation-appoints-financial-services-and-marketing-veteran-dan-garzia-as-chief-marketing-officer/
CBBF exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List