Direct download links of CITP study guide at killexams.com

Rather than wasting period and money upon searching updated Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP) queries, you should move forward and sign up on killexams.com. Download 100% free of charge dumps purchase complete CITP exam dumps version. Read plus pass the CITP examination.

Exam Code: CITP Practice test 2023 by Killexams.com team
CITP Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP)

The content of the Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP) Examination was developed to test a candidates understanding of the fundamental sections of the CITP body of knowledge. The content of each of the topical sections is described in outline form and provides an overview of the knowledge and skills tested on the CITP Examination.

The examination questions are intended to test each content area and its logical extensions.

The percentage following each major content area in the outline represents the approximate weighting for that content area. The examination is fully computerized and consists of multiple-choice questions only



Module I: Information Security & Cyber Risks

A. Information Security Governance (25%)

1. Information security strategy

2. Policy, procedures, processes, and standards

3. Logical access controls

4. Hardware and physical access controls

5. Security authorization & authentication

6. Business continuity & disaster recovery

B. Cybersecurity Risk Management (12%)

1. Cybersecurity threats

2. Data breaches and privacy

3. Vulnerability management

C. SOC for Cybersecurity (3%)

1. Purpose

2. Content

3. Target audiences

4. How to use in conjunction with cybersecurity risk mitigation

Module II: Business Intelligence, Data Management and Analytics

A. Data Management (5%)

1. Information lifecycle management

2. Infrastructures and platforms

3. Data preparation/manipulation

4. Data governance

B. Data Analysis & Reporting (11%)

1. Data analytics

2. Predictive analytics

3. Audit data analytics

C. Business Intelligence Management (4%)

1. Digital transformation & technology disruptors

2. Data integration

3. Data warehousing

Module III: IT Governance, Risks & Controls

A. IT Governance & Strategy (15%)

1. Role of IT governance within an organization

2. IT governance principles

3. IT governance roles & responsibilities

4. IT governance implementation

5. Benefits of effective IT governance

B. IT Risks, Process & Controls (15%)

1. IT risk identification and assessment

2. IT control frameworks

3. IT general controls

4. Application controls

5. Business process management

6. Change management

7. Assessment of IT controls

C. System and Organization Controls Reporting (10%)

1. System and Organization Controls Reporting Overview

2. Types of Reporting



Detailed content specification outline

Module 1. Information Security & Cyber Risks

This module focuses on the security and risk management of systems and environments, including the use of the SOC for Cybersecurity report as a tool for reporting IT security and risk management for companies.

Information Security Governance — Covers the key areas of information security, including strategy, policies/procedures, control environments, and business continuity/disaster recovery; includes fundamental knowledge of various IT governance frameworks, logical access at the various levels of the “stack,” and the internal control structure of design, implementation, monitoring, and detection/reporting

Cybersecurity Risk Management — Covers the major threat vectors for systems, including cyber adversaries, the cybercrime economy

and various types of attacks; also includes data breaches and their impact on information privacy, as well as how to manage system vulnerabilities

SOC for Cybersecurity — Covers the SOC for Cyber report, including report content, target users and use of the report in conjunction with an entitys overall cybersecurity risk mitigation strategy



A. Information Security Governance (25%)

1. Information security strategy

a. Objectives

b. Components

c. Alignment with organizational strategy, IT strategy

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 1 — Information Security Governance

2. Policy, procedures, processes, and standards

a. Frameworks

b. Compliance with applicable laws and regulations

c. Roles and responsibilities

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 1 — Information Security Governance

3. Logical access controls

a. Objectives

b. Data (transactional. level

c. Application and financial system level

d. Network level

e. Identifying, designing, implementing, monitoring, detecting and reporting

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 3 — Logical access controls

4. Hardware and physical access controls

a. Objectives

b. Identifying, designing, implementing, monitoring, detecting and reporting

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 4 — Physical access controls

5. Security authorization and authentication Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 2 — Identity and access management

6. Business continuity and disaster recovery

a. Business continuity plan (BCP)

b. Disaster recovery plan (DRP)

c. Incident response plan (IRP)

d. Data backup and recovery

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 6 — Business continuity management



B. Cybersecurity Risk Management (12%)

1. Cybersecurity threats

a. Primary types of cyber adversaries (how to identify, what is their motivation.

1. How to identify

2. What is their motivation

3. How to manage/mitigate risk

4. Terms to use — Hacktivists, Nation states, Cybercriminals, Insider threat,

Competitors

b. Cybercrime economy (what could potentially drive a cybercrime against

a company.

c. Types of attacks

1. How to identify

2. Effect on the business/financials

3. How to manage/mitigate risk

4. Terms to use — Classic buffer overflow, Web-based application attacks,

Denial of Service/DDoS, Malware, ransomware, and spyware,

phishing/spear phishing, Social engineering

Cybersecurity Fundamentals for Finance &

Accounting Professionals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Author: Christopher J. Romeo

Publisher: AICPA

2. Data breaches and privacy

a. Causes of a data breach

b. Organizational impact of a data breach

c. Post breach response (business/financial point of view)

d. Personally Identifiable Information (PII)

Cybersecurity Fundamentals for Finance and

Accounting Professionals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Author: Christopher J. Romeo

Publisher: AICPA

3. Vulnerability management

a. Gap analysis, readiness and risk assessments, vulnerability assessments,

penetration testing (identification of vulnerabilities and how they could impact

business/financials.

b. Security policy & plan development (input regarding business/financial

implications in the policies/procedures.

1. Identity and access management (IAM)

2. Data loss management and prevention

Cybersecurity Fundamentals for Finance and

Accounting Professionals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Author: Christopher J. Romeo

Publisher: AICPA

C. AICPA Cybersecurity Risk Management Reporting Framework (SOC for Cybersecurity) (3%)

1. Purpose

SOC for Cybersecurity Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Authors: Tony Chapman, Anurag Sharma

Publisher: AICPA

2. Content

SOC for Cybersecurity Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Authors: Tony Chapman, Anurag Sharma

Publisher: AICPA

3. Target audiences

SOC for Cybersecurity Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Authors: Tony Chapman, Anurag Sharma

Publisher: AICPA

Detailed content specification outline

Module II. Business Intelligence, Data Management & Analytics

This module focuses on information management and the utilization of information to provide value in decision-making and other
managerial needs.

Data Management — Covers the information lifecycle, from identification of system information through destruction and the various types

of infrastructures and ERPs to support data; also discusses how data is collected and manipulated, including consolidation, cleaning, transformation, reduction, processing, etc.; lastly, covers the governance of data including objectives, strategy, and policies Data Analysis & Reporting — Covers the various types of data analytics, the tools and procedures to perform an analysis, and the methods of reporting and performance indicators; also covers the use of predictive analytics, including the various models, techniques, applications and deployment; lastly, covers the integration of analytics in the audit process, including risks and assertions, and continuous assurance Business Intelligence Management — Covers the various forms of technology disruptors, including cloud tech, IoT, and AI; also covers the use of data integration (ETL, EAI and EDR) as well as data warehousing (Active, OLAP, ROLAP, MOLAP, HOLAP and DOLAP)



A. Data Management (5%)

1. Information Lifecycle Management

a. Identify

b. Capture

c. Manage

d. Utilize

e. Archive

f. Retention

g. Destruction

Data Analysis Fundamentals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Data Analytics Modeling Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

2. Infrastructures & platforms

a. Types of Infrastructure/Platforms typically employed

1. ERP or other enterprise software

i. ERP implementation

2. Data warehouse infrastructure

Data Analytics Modeling Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Data Visualization Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA

3. Data preparation/manipulation

a. Data consolidation

b. Data mapping and collection

c. Data selection

d. Data cleaning

e. Data transformation

f. Data reduction

g. Data processing

Data Analytics Modeling Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA



A. Data Management (5%)

4. Data governance

a. Objectives

b. Principles

c. Strategy

d. Policy

e. Architecture

Data Analysis Fundamentals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams,

Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 1 — Information Security Governance

B. Data Analysis & Reporting (11%)

1. Data analytics

a. Types

1. Quantitative analysis

2. Descriptive statistics

3. Data visualization

b. Tools, techniques, and procedures

c. Performance metrics and reporting

Data Analysis Fundamentals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Data Visualization Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA

2. Predictive analytics

a. Types

1. Predictive models

2. Descriptive models

3. Decision models

b. Techniques

1. Regression

2. Machine learning

c. Applications of predictive analytics

d. Deployment

Forecasting and Predictive Analytics Certificate

Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Data Analytics Modeling Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA

3. Audit data analytics

a. Integrating analytics into the audit process

1. Audit applications of data analytics

2. Correlating audit tasks to risks and assertions

3. Continuous assurance

Integrating Audit Data Analytics into the Audit

Process

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA



C. Business Intelligence Management (4%)

1. Digital transformation & technology disruptors

a. Cloud

b. Internet of Things (IoT)

c. Artificial intelligence

Data Analysis Fundamentals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA

2. Data integration

a. Extract, Transform, and Load (ETL)

b. Enterprise Application Integration (EAI)

c. Enterprise Data Replication (EDR)

Data Analytics Modeling Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA

Data Analysis Fundamentals Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

3. Data warehousing

a. Role in supporting BI

b. Architecture and components

c. Types

1. Active Data Warehousing

2. Multi-dimensional Analysis — OLAP

3. ROLAP, MOLAP, HOLAP and DOLAP

Data Analytics Modeling Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Data Visualization Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Analytics and Big Data for Accountants

CPE self-study

Author: Jim Lindell

Publisher: AICPA



Detailed content specification outline

Module III: IT Governance, Risks & Controls

This includes knowledge pertaining to information technology risk and advisory services, engagement compliance, and IT controls and assessment. It also covers knowledge of various IT frameworks and related controls, including the use of SOC reporting as a framework to showcase a service organizations internal control environment.

IT Governance & Strategy — Covers the objectives, strategic planning, implementation and management of the IT function within an organization, as well as mitigation of risk; focuses on the management of value, resources, and performance in relation to key components and best practices of the IT function IT Risks, Process, & Controls — Discusses various IT frameworks, including COSO and COBIT, and the integration of frameworks with IT assessments; covers a variety of key control areas for IT assessments, including ITGCs, application, business process and change management controls System and Organizational Controls (SOC) Reporting — Focuses on the purposes for SOC reporting, the users of SOC reports, and the responsibilities of user auditors



A. IT Governance & Strategy (15%)

1. Role of IT governance within an organization

a. IT governance objectives

b. Management of the IT function

c. Mitigation of IT risk

d. IT strategic plan

1. Alignment with organizational strategy

IT Governance, Risks & Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 1 — Role of IT Governance

Information Strategy

CPE self-study

Author: Kaplan Publishing Limited

Publisher: AICPA

2. IT governance principles

a. Strategy and planning

1. Key components

2. Best practices

b. Value delivery management

1. Key components

2. Best practices

c. Resource management

1. Key components

2. Best practices

d. Risk management

1. Key components

2. Best practices

e. Performance management

1. Key components

2. Best practices

IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 1 — Role of IT Governance

3. IT governance roles and responsibilities IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 1 — Role of IT Governance

4. IT governance implementation IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 2 — Implement and Assess IT Governance

5. Benefits of effective IT governance IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 2 — Implement and Assess IT Governance



B. IT Risks, Process & Controls (15%)

1. IT risk identification and assessment IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 3 — IT Risk Management

Risk and Control of Information Systems

CPE self-study

Author: Kaplan Publishing Limited

Publisher: AICPA

2. IT control frameworks

a. COSO

1. Categories of objectives

2. Integrated components & principles

b. COBIT

1. Domains

c. Integration of control frameworks

COSO Internal Control Certificate Program

CPE self-study

Publisher: Committee of Sponsoring Organizations

(COSO.

Internal Control and COSO Essentials for Financial

Managers, Accountants and Auditors

CPE self-study

Author: Glenn L. Helms

IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 4 — IT Controls

3. IT general controls

a. Objectives of IT general controls

b. Types of IT general controls (including ERP)

IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 4 — IT Controls

Risk and Control of Information Systems

CPE self-study

Author: Kaplan Publishing Limited

Publisher: AICPA

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwenn Bettwy, Mark Williams, Mike

Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 3 — Logical access controls

4. Application controls

a. Objectives of application controls

b. Input controls

c. Processing controls

d. Output controls

IT Governance, Risks, and Controls

CPE self-study

Publisher: AICPA

Module 4 — IT Controls

Risk and Control of Information Systems

CPE self-study

Author: Kaplan Publishing Limited

Publisher: AICPA

Information Security Governance

CPE self-study

Authors: Gwen Bettwy, Mark Williams, Mike Beavers

Publisher: AICPA

Module 3 — Logical access controls



Certified Information Technology Professional (CITP)
Financial Professional certification
Killexams : Financial Professional certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CITP Search results Killexams : Financial Professional certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CITP https://killexams.com/exam_list/Financial Killexams : A Financial Advisor Will Boost Your Retirement Savings

Editorial Note: We earn a commission from partner links on Forbes Advisor. Commissions do not affect our editors' opinions or evaluations.

Working with a financial expert can kickstart your savings through avenues you don’t even know. A financial advisor can help you identify ways to increase your retirement readiness without sacrificing your current standard of living through optimized tax-efficient investments.

Despite advisors offering a leg up, approximately 40% of workers said they didn’t know who they could go to for financial or retirement advice, and just one-third of workers and retirees work with a professional financial advisor according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute. Here are all the ways your retirement savings can benefit from the help of a financial advisor.

5 Ways Financial Advisors Can Affect Retirement Savings

To put it simply, a financial advisor is a professional who provides clients with financial advice. There are many types of financial advisors, but some of the most commonly used for retirement planning are certified financial planners (CFPs), chartered financial analysts (CFAs) and chartered financial consultants (ChFC). Areas of expertise and costs vary by type of advisor.

Financial advisors focus on retirement planning work with their clients to create long-term goals and outline what steps they need to take to meet those goals. As a result, financial advisors can benefit your retirement savings in the following ways.

1. Maximizing Tax Efficiency

Over time, your income and  investments will—hopefully—grow. You’ll owe taxes on the profits from your investments, known as capital gains taxes, when you sell investments or assets. You can also benefit from making certain types of investments now that can reduce your taxable income. A good financial advisor or certified public accountant (CPA) will recommend tax optimization strategies to minimize your tax burden.

For example, a financial advisor may recommend one or more of the following strategies based on your income and tax bracket:

  • Tax-advantaged accounts. Your financial advisor will help identify tax-advantaged accounts you can use, such as health savings accounts (HSAs) that allow you to contribute money from a pre-tax basis and grow the earnings tax-free. Your withdrawals can be used for qualified health expenses tax-free. And once you turn 65, you can use the HSA funds without paying the usual penalty for ineligible expenses.
  • Backdoor Roth IRA. In some cases, an advisor may recommend converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA; you’ll pay taxes on the converted amount, but your future withdrawals in retirement will be tax-free.
  • Maximizing tax deductions. A financial advisor or CPA can ensure you’re claiming all of the tax deductions and credits you’re eligible for to minimize your tax bill.

It’s hard to overstate how much of a difference proper tax planning can make in your eventual retirement balance.

If you invest $10,000 today and continue to contribute $20,000 every year for the next 30 years, earning a 10% average annual return with a 24% top marginal tax bracket, here’s what your final balance would look like based on the type of account you have.

A financial advisor can help you identify which accounts are available to you and determine how to prioritize your investing in each. High earning years may be better for contributing pre-tax dollars. Low earning years may be the time to contribute to Roth accounts and complete Roth conversions. A financial advisor will be able to tell you how much to contribute to each and when.

2. Asset Allocation

As an investor, deciding what types of investments to invest in and what percentage of your portfolio should be invested in each asset class—such as stocks, bonds and cash or cash-like assets—can be one of the most difficult and important decisions you can make.

A financial advisor will review your current financial situation and develop a portfolio based on your goals, age, current savings, monthly contributions and risk tolerance.

For example, the asset allocation for someone with decades until retirement may be 80% invested in stocks and 20% in bonds to take advantage of market growth over the long term. But someone closer to retirement age typically cannot take on so much risk, so their focus may be on preserving their money with modest gains. For those investors, their portfolios may be 85% bonds and only 15% stocks.

3. Portfolio Rebalancing

As you save and invest for retirement, your portfolio’s asset allocation can shift over time as market conditions change and the value of your investments fluctuate. For example, bond prices may decrease, driving down the value of the bonds in your portfolio, and stock prices may increase. You need to rebalance your portfolio to ensure it’s aligned with the right level of risk to maximize returns.

With portfolio rebalancing, your financial advisor will monitor your investments and adjust your portfolio by buying or selling assets to maintain the agreed-upon asset allocation.

Although you can rebalance your portfolio yourself, portfolio rebalancing can be a time-consuming process, and it requires constant monitoring of your investments. Having an advisor handle it instead can simplify your finances and make it easier to stay on track.

4. Handling Withdrawals

Once you enter retirement, you may be unsure of how much money you can safely withdraw from your retirement fund and the impact of those withdrawals on taxes. An advisor will help you create a withdrawal strategy that satisfies required minimum distribution requirements and also allows you to have enough income for your lifetime.

If you’re thinking about your money not lasting long enough, your advisor will also work with you to create a budget and spending plan. If your savings are insufficient for your retirement goals, your advisor may recommend other strategies, such as delaying retirement or reducing your withdrawal amount to extend your savings and deliver your investments more time to grow.

5. Optimizing Social Security or Pensions

If you’re eligible for Social Security or an employer-provided pension, your financial advisor can assist you with navigating those benefits.

With Social Security, your advisor will work with you to determine when is the best time to begin receiving payments and, if applicable, how to handle spousal or survivor benefits. If you have a pension, an advisor can help you decide between taking a lump sum payment or accepting annuity payments.

Looking For A Financial Advisor?

Get In Touch With A Pre-screened Financial Advisor In 3 Minutes

Looking For A Financial Advisor?

Get In Touch With A Pre-screened Financial Advisor In 3 Minutes

Planning for Retirement

Retirement planning can be a complex process, and if you find it challenging or overwhelming, the expertise of a financial advisor can be invaluable. Your advisor can provide you with a personalized, strategic roadmap to help you reach your goals. And as your needs change or major life events happen, your advisor can help you adjust accordingly so you can retire in comfort.

Even if you don’t find planning for retirement challenging, checking in with a financial advisor throughout your working years can help you ensure that you’re staying on track. A good financial advisor can help identify ways to make your financial life more efficient so you can save more without feeling deprived.

Wed, 23 Aug 2023 06:32:00 -0500 Kat Tretina en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/retirement/financial-advisors-retirement-savings/
Killexams : Financial adviser Cam Jones earns certification
Cam Jones

BROOKINGS — Financial adviser Cam Jones of the financial services firm Edward Jones in Brookings has received the certified financial planner, or CFP, certification, granted by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards.

Becoming a CFP professional expands a financial advisor’s knowledge base in the following areas:

  • Financial management
  • Tax-sensitive investment strategies
  • Retirement savings
  • Insurance planning
  • Education planning
  • Estate considerations

In addition to the education and examination components of certification, Jones also has committed to abiding by the CFP Board’s Code of Ethics and Standards of Conduct.

Jones and Branch Office Administrator Chelsea Heckel can be reached at 605-627-1044. You can also visit Jones’ website at www.edwardjones.com/cam-jones.

Tue, 22 Aug 2023 07:44:00 -0500 text/html https://brookingsregister.com/article/financial-adviser-cam-jones-earns-certification
Killexams : GARP’s Financial Risk Manager (FRM®) Certification Benchmarked to Master’s Degree Level After Ecctis Reevaluation

FRM Program also now comparable to a master’s degree in Brazil, China, Japan, Mexico, and the UAE

JERSEY CITY, N.J., August 23, 2023--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP®) recently commissioned Ecctis, an internationally recognized and respected authority on global qualifications and skills standards, to reevaluate the FRM Certification against several diverse worldwide educational frameworks. Ecctis' evaluation included an assessment of various elements of the FRM Program against local educational standards, including program entry requirements, duration, curriculum content and structure, learning outcomes, modes of learning and assessment, and test administration.

Upon completion of its study, Ecctis reaffirmed the FRM designation’s comparability to a university earned master’s degree in nine countries and regions identified in the chart below. It separately confirmed, for the first time, the FRM certification’s comparability to a master’s degree in Brazil, China, Japan, Mexico, and the UAE.

The Ecctis benchmark provides individuals who have earned the FRM designation an objective validation of their educational and career skills achievements. This is valuable for those seeking employment opportunities requiring a master’s degree or equivalent in countries where the FRM has been benchmarked. Employers located in those countries can also rely on the Ecctis standard when evaluating applicants from different countries and educational backgrounds who have successfully completed the FRM Program.

William May, GARP’s senior vice president, global head of certifications and educational programs, says the Ecctis benchmark confirms that the FRM has kept pace with the latest developments in the financial services industry, and that it remains the world’s leading risk management professional certification.

"The FRM Program has undergone meaningful updates since the last benchmarking study in 2017, and it continues to evolve along with the profession," said May. "While the results were expected given the work of the FRM oversight committee comprised of senior risk management experts from around the world, we’re happy and gratified to see this objective validation of the FRM Program at a master’s level has been retained. The results also align with the 130 university master's level degree programs GARP currently collaborates with in support of risk education under our Academic Partner Program."

Expanding the list of countries covered is important. "Both existing Financial Risk Managers and new FRM candidates from Brazil, China, Japan, Mexico, and the UAE should benefit from the added credibility and flexibility the Ecctis benchmark brings when seeking global job opportunities."

The levels of comparability for the FRM designation, as confirmed by Ecctis, are summarized in the table below:

FRM Designation is comparable to the following standards:

UK

RQF Level 7*

USA

US master’s degree

Canada

OQF Level 12*

India

NSQF Level 9*

Hong Kong

HKQF Level 6*

Singapore

Singaporean master’s degree

Australia

AQF Level 9*

Brazil

Título de Mestre (Brazilian master’s degree)

China

Chinese master’s degree

Japan

Japanese master’s degree

South Africa

NQF Level 9*

UAE

QF Emirates Level 9

Mexico

Mexican master’s degree

Taiwan

Taiwanese master’s degree

* Comparable to RQF Level 7 (master’s degree standard)

About the Global Association of Risk Professionals

The Global Association of Risk Professionals is a non-partisan, not-for-profit membership organization focused on elevating the practice of risk management. GARP offers the leading global certification for risk managers in the Financial Risk Manager (FRM®), as well as the Sustainability and Climate Risk (SCR®) Certificate and ongoing educational opportunities through Continuing Professional Development. Through the GARP Benchmarking Initiative (GBI)® and GARP Risk Institute (GRI), GARP sponsors research in risk management and promotes collaboration among practitioners, academics, and regulators.

Founded in 1996, governed by a Board of Trustees, GARP is headquartered in Jersey City, N.J., with offices in London and Hong Kong. Find more information on garp.org or follow GARP on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter (X).

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20230822908570/en/

Contacts

press@garp.com

Wed, 23 Aug 2023 04:44:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/garp-financial-risk-manager-frm-164400741.html
Killexams : McBeath Financial Group Strengthens Bloomington-Normal Team with Addition of Two CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professionals

NORMAL, Ill., Aug. 23, 2023 /PRNewswire/ -- Announced by founder Krista McBeath, McBeath Financial Group, renowned for delivering concierge-level financial planning services, is solidifying its commitment to top-tier financial guidance with the exact addition of two CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals to its Bloomington-Normal team. While Julie Karstens has freshly achieved her CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ certification, Zack Brewer entered the team already possessing this respected designation.

Zack Brewer, a CFP® professional who joined McBeath in May, is an established financial planner in the Bloomington-Normal, serving for nearly a decade on the wealth management team of a prominent regional bank before joining McBeath Financial Group in May of 2023. Earning his prestigious CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ certification in 2019, Zack's commitment to clients shines through his personalized approach to comprehensive planning and extensive expertise in wealth management.

Julie Karstens, a cornerstone to McBeath Financial Group with her leadership, work ethic, and remarkable financial planning and tax planning skills over the past two years, recently achieved her CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ certification. With a total of ten years of experience at a prominent local bank, Julie also holds the designation of Certified Trust and Fiduciary Advisor (CTFA), which she earned during her time in the bank's wealth management and trust department before transitioning to McBeath Financial Group in 2021.

"These new team members epitomize the level of excellence we strive to offer our clients," commented Krista McBeath, founder of McBeath Financial Group. "With CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals like Julie and Zack, we are in an even stronger position to serve our clients' diverse financial planning needs."

McBeath Financial Group embraces financial advisory relationships with select families and individuals seeking to grow and preserve their wealth, sustain a comfortable lifestyle, and leave a legacy. They are passionate about delivering tested financial planning strategies and sound investment management services with clarity, confidence, and integrity.

To learn more about McBeath Financial Group, visit mcbeathfinancial.com or email info@mcbeathfinancial.com.

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. (CFP Board) owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, and CFP® (with plaque design) in the United States, which it authorizes use of by individuals who successfully complete CFP Board's initial and ongoing certification requirements.

Press Contact
Krista McBeath
309-808-2224
363966@email4pr.com
https://mcbeathfinancialgroup.com/

Cision

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mcbeath-financial-group-strengthens-bloomington-normal-team-with-addition-of-two-certified-financial-planner-professionals-301907568.html

SOURCE Krista McBeath

Wed, 23 Aug 2023 00:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/mcbeath-financial-group-strengthens-bloomington-124700386.html
Killexams : How to Choose a Financial Advisor in 2023 | Money No result found, try new keyword!Learn how to choose the best financial advisor for your needs, whether it’s investing, tax guidance, financial planning budgets or estate planning. Tue, 22 Aug 2023 06:08:47 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Killexams : Alternatives Education Is Essential For Financial Planners

Alternative investments have gathered the attention and interest of financial planners. According to a Financial Planning Association Survey, nearly half of advisors reported using or recommending some form of alternatives. While alternative investments may not be a silver bullet for difficult times, they can provide the diversification sought by long-term investors.

When it comes to alternative investment competency, however, the private wealth management industry needs focused tools and education. Broader consumer access to alternative investment options is here and will continue to grow. Financial planners, in turn, require additional tools to educate themselves and help their clients understand these investment vehicles.

Alternative investments have grown considerably over the past two decades, accounting for an estimated 50% of global revenue in the asset management industry, despite representing only 21% of global assets under management (AUM), according to a Boston Consulting Group study. The growth in interest and AUM can be attributed to increased capital formation and value creation in private markets, a global decline in bond yields for the better part of a decade, and, more recently, volatile equity markets. Moreover, private equity and credit strategies have grown from cottage to mature industries, further widening the appeal of available investment options.

However, 2022, the worst year for a U.S. 60/40 portfolio in decades, highlighted the importance of expanding an investment toolkit beyond public equity and bond markets and a renewed focus on building better portfolios, embracing illiquidity, and emphasizing objectives.

Over several decades, large asset owners, including endowments, foundations, pensions, and sovereign wealth funds, embraced alternative investments, often allocating significant portions of their portfolios to these strategies. The most aggressive endowments were early adopters, the largest of which allocated upwards of 50% to alternative investments. In contrast, individual investors generally allocate less than 5% of their portfolios to alternatives. According to Bain, individual investors hold approximately 50% of global assets under management. Yet, those same investors represent just 16% of AUM held by alternative investment funds. As demand increases from prospective buyers, technology improves access. When new fund vehicles become available, the opportunity is significant but is also a clarion call for individual investor education.

Financial planners must understand alternative investments before recommending (or dissuading) their clients from investing. Planners and clients face challenges and concerns regarding liquidity, fund structures, tax implications, and fees associated with alternative investments. Addressing these concerns and enhancing comfort levels within the industry will require collaborative educational efforts across asset management, service providers, and advisors directly.

One such effort is the exact partnership between the CAIA Association, the global professional body for the alternative investments industry, and FPA, the membership organization and trade association for CFP professionals, which aims to provide broader access to educating the financial planning community on these topics.

Education is essential for financial planners and the long-term outcomes for their clients, even more so when considering alternative investments. The professionals closest to individual investors can diagnose and recommend what is appropriate for their clients, which lends to the value of adding to a planner’s toolkit. In doing so, financial planners continue to facilitate the learning path of individual investors and serve a vital role in contributing to financial literacy across American households.

Aaron Filbeck, CAIA, CFA, CFP®, CIPM, FDP, is managing director and head of UniFi by CAIA at CAIA Association. UniFi by CAIA is a learning platform dedicated to educating the private wealth management industry on alternative investments.

Patrick D. Mahoney is chief executive officer of the Financial Planning Association (FPA), the leading membership organization and trade association for Certified Financial Planner professionals and those engaged in the financial planning process.

Mon, 21 Aug 2023 03:42:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wealthmanagement.com/alternative-investments/alternatives-education-essential-financial-planners
Killexams : And about that 401k: Here’s what a financial adviser has to say about cryptocurrency No result found, try new keyword!I’m amazed that people who have previously been so financially disinterested have suddenly lit up with a new passion for investing. Tue, 22 Aug 2023 22:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Killexams : Over 80% of finance and accounting students choose professional certifications for better career prospects: Survey

About 84% of students actively invested in various industry credentials such as CFA, CPA, CMA, ACCA, among other professional certificates to solidify their chances to tap good employment opportunities, a survey by ed-platform, Zell Education, stated.

As per the survey, female students competing with their male counterparts in the given fields have increased steadily over the years. Out of over 1,000 respondents, the difference between male versus female students in the Finance and Accounting field is marginal at 52% and 46% respectively.

The survey was conducted among Finance and Accounting students across India. Though younger students ranging from 18-24 years are more inclined to pursue certification compared to professionals of 25-34 years at 15%, the survey stated. Only 2.8% of professionals in the range of 35-44 years seek any additional credentials, the survey added.

Furthermore, the survey shows that all Tier-1 metro cities have the highest percentage of respondents (63%) investing in certification/s, followed by Tier-2 cities at 8% and 4.6% from Tier-3 cities. Additionally, around 74% of respondents are currently pursuing certification while 75% of respondents have cited better career prospects as the leading factor in pursuing education in the Finance and Accounting field, the survey stated. This is closely followed by 65% of respondents reporting personal interest and 37% of respondents quoting educational exposure as their driving factor while only 16% have taken this decision based on family/friend influence.

Financial Analyst was a top career of choice for the respondents, followed by Investment Banking, Accounting, Auditing, and Financial Planning roles at 37%, 24%, 17%, 14% and 6%, respectively. 46% of respondents also firmly believe that earning certification will lead to high-earning opportunities, while 35% aim for career advancement. Furthermore, job stability, challenging work and work-life balance at 7%, 6% and 5% are some other reasons to pursue a career in this field.

“Survey reveals a powerful shift in finance education. With 84% of Finance and Accounting students embracing professional certifications like CFA and CPA, the landscape is changing. Gender parity, urban dominance, and a focus on career prospects underline this trend. As aspirations align, certifications are pivotal for skill elevation and enhanced employability in a competitive job market,” Anant Bengani, co-founder, director, Zell education, said. 

Interestingly, most respondents are students and professionals; 50% still consider themselves beginners, and only 4% at advanced levels. In tandem with the in-demand roles, 36% of respondents are interested in Financial Analysis, 24% in Investment Banking, 14% in Auditing, 11% in Financial Reporting, 8% in Taxation and 5% in Risk Management. The private sector, Entrepreneurship and Social service (NGOs) are the leading choices for employment at 73%, 16% and 8%, respectively.

Mon, 21 Aug 2023 23:50:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.financialexpress.com/jobs-career/education-over-80-of-finance-and-accounting-students-choose-professional-certifications-for-better-career-prospects-survey-3212167/
Killexams : Lawtonian receives Certified Financial Planner certification

Mon, 21 Aug 2023 16:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.swoknews.com/community_news/lawtonian-receives-certified-financial-planner-certification/article_972b18e3-f1cd-53d1-942f-f841f237c264.html
Killexams : When should you hire a financial advisor?

Key points

  • A financial advisor can help you identify and achieve your financial goals.
  • Consider hiring an advisor if your finances are complex or you experience a major life event.
  • Choose an advisor you feel comfortable with and whose expertise aligns with your needs.

Hiring a financial advisor is a big decision. Not only are you inviting a complete stranger into some of the most intimate areas of your life, but you’re paying for the privilege. 

While more than 60% of Americans think their financial planning needs improvement, only 35% seek help from a financial advisor, according to Northwestern Mutual’s 2022 Planning and Progress Study.

The study also revealed how impactful a financial advisor can be, from helping clients save during the COVID-19 pandemic to making them feel like they’re on more solid ground.

Working with a financial advisor can be great, but it isn’t for everyone. Here’s how to determine if you need a financial advisor and what to look for if you do.

Do I need a financial advisor?

Deciding to work with a financial advisor is a personal choice. There is no set litmus test for whether you need one.

That said, if you have investable assets, personal and financial goals, or questions about your finances, you may want to hire a financial advisor.

If it sounds like anyone with money should work with a financial advisor, that’s the gist of it, according to Kimberly Stewart, a financial advisor at Ameriprise Financial, whose personal philosophy is “If you have money, you need a financial advisor.”

“Your finances are too important to leave to chance,” Stewart said. “Understanding money and its applications are paramount to achieving financial success.”

If you already possess that understanding and feel confident in your financial plan and ability to manage your money throughout life’s ups and downs, you may be fine on your own. 

Still, you might want to engage a financial advisor for a second opinion and to ensure you’re on track to reach your goals.

At the end of the day, a financial advisor’s job is built around offering counsel and actionable guidance. 

“If you’re the type of person who’d feel more confident and in control of your finances if you had someone to gut-check decisions and plans with, working with a financial advisor may be a smart move,” said Manuel Alvarez, a senior wealth advisor at Citi International Personal Bank U.S.

You may also want a financial advisor for peace of mind.

If money creates anxiety for you and you worry about your financial future, an advisor can help you understand your situation and suggest actions you can take to boost your financial confidence. 

When it makes sense

Just like there’s no set litmus test for whether you need a financial advisor, there’s no definitive answer to the question of when you should hire one. But certain situations tend to benefit from financial advice.

Experts say it makes sense to hire a financial advisor in the following circumstances:

  • You don’t have the time or inclination to manage your finances.
  • You experience a major life event, such as a marriage, divorce, loss of a spouse, birth of a child, relocation or change in your employment status.
  • Your financial situation changes, such as receiving an inheritance.
  • Your financial situation becomes more serious and the cost of a financial mistake more costly.

“When we begin our careers, our finances can be comparatively simpler than when our families grow, our income grows and life becomes more complex,” said John Diehl, senior vice president of applied insights at Hartford Funds. This is when getting financial guidance can make sense.

While a major event could be the impetus for hiring a financial advisor, Alvarez recommended finding one before life gets crazy. 

During busier and more stressful moments, you may feel rushed to choose an advisor and not deliver yourself sufficient time to vet candidates. 

“As many advisors like myself can attest, it’s during those quieter times that you’re more likely to provide an accurate financial picture and, in turn, help your advisor get a clearer sense of your goals as well as any potential pain points and opportunities,” Alvarez said.

Then, when life gets hectic, you’ll have someone in your corner to help.

Financial advisor vs. financial planner

A follow-up question is what type of professional to hire. You’ll most likely encounter two job titles: financial advisor and financial planner. While the terms may be used interchangeably, they describe different types of financial professionals, each providing unique guidance.

“A financial advisor typically focuses on a specific area of your finances,” Stewart said. “Conversely, a financial planner typically helps clients with a more holistic, comprehensive approach that encompasses several aspects of one’s finances, such as budgeting, savings, investments, retirement planning, insurance planning and estate planning.”

Another potential distinction between a financial planner and a financial advisor is the compensation model:

  • Financial planners are more likely to be paid a percentage of the assets they manage for you.
  • Financial advisors are more likely to be paid through commissions on the products they sell you.

Understanding these points is more important than what a financial professional chooses to call themselves.

Questions to ask a financial advisor

Once you decide to hire a financial advisor, it’s time to begin the interview process. 

You may want to meet several professionals to compare their services and fees. Questions to ask before hiring a financial advisor include the following:

  • What services do you offer?
  • What is your investment philosophy and strategy?
  • How are you compensated, and how much will it cost me to work with you?
  • How will we work together?
  • Do you specialize in any areas of financial planning?
  • How is your business structured? Do you work as part of a team or are you a solo practitioner?
  • Who will be my primary point of contact with your office, and how will we communicate?
  • What is your professional background?
  • What credentials do you hold?

Ultimately, while titles and certifications matter, it comes down to whether you feel comfortable working closely with the financial advisor long term. Ask yourself if you trust them and believe in their ability to responsibly manage and grow your wealth. If the answer is anything other than a resounding yes, keep looking.

Tips for choosing a financial advisor

When choosing a financial advisor, consider the following expert tips.

1. Tap your network for recommendations

Your network is a great place to begin looking for a financial advisor. It can include your friends, family, colleagues and neighbors. The best recommendations often come from people whose financial situations resemble yours or who share similar financial goals.

But don’t take a recommendation at face value. “Play the field and meet with multiple candidates to see who you mesh with,” Alvarez said.

2. Identify the factors that are most important to you

Ask yourself what you want most in a financial advisor. What would your ideal advisor be like? 

You might prefer working with a financial advisor whose background is similar to yours. For instance, Alvarez speaks Spanish and finds that many of his clients whose primary language is Spanish appreciate being able to communicate that way.

3. Find someone who listens

You could be working closely with this person for decades to come, so it’s crucial that you feel comfortable with them. Ask yourself if the advisor is receptive to your personal and financial goals and confident in their ability to create a financial plan to help you achieve them. 

4. Vet their background

Personality traits are important, but so are professional qualifications. “You will want to know about their background, their expertise and if they often work with clients in similar circumstances to yours,” Diehl said.

You can check an advisor’s credentials and disciplinary history using the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s BrokerCheck tool or the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Investment Advisor Public Disclosure website. 

The former is often used by financial advisors working at broker-dealers, while the latter is likely where you’ll find financial planners working at investment advisory firms. If the professional isn’t listed on the first site you check, try the other.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

A financial advisor can wear many hats, but common services include creating a financial plan, identifying investment products for you, and monitoring and managing your portfolio to ensure you’re on track to reach your goals.

The right time to get a financial advisor is when you need financial guidance, such as if you experience a major life change or your financial situation becomes more complex. Or maybe you’re just tired of doing it all on your own. 

You might even want a financial advisor to get a second opinion on the financial plan you’ve created for yourself. In short, there’s never a bad time to contact a financial advisor.

How often you should meet with your financial advisor will be determined by you and your advisor. 

Many experts recommend at least an annual or biannual review. 

Stewart’s tip: Meet with your advisor more often if your financial situation is complex or in flux.

Wed, 16 Aug 2023 03:16:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.usatoday.com/money/blueprint/advisors/do-i-need-a-financial-advisor/
CITP exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List