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CSCP APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional

Earning the Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) designation demonstrates your mastery of the essential technology, concepts and strategies in supply chain management and enterprise resource planning.



Earning the CSCP can:

Demonstrate competency in end-to-end supply chain management.

Increase your salary and Strengthen your hiring potential.

Prove mastery of concepts, strategies, and terminologies and increase functional knowledge of the end-to-end supply chain.

Improve internal operations and increase customer satisfaction.

Demonstrate your commitment to advancing both your career and your companys operations.



Supply Chain Design



- Considering inputs and objectives of supply chain management strategy

- Recognizing and resolving misalignments and gaps

- Accounting and financial reporting information, strategic analysis tools, and economic considerations

- Designing the supply chain while understanding and working within business considerations

- Designing fulfillment strategies and products for different markets and requirements

- Identifying and managing market segments

- Understanding electronic business considerations and key technology applications

- Understanding implementation tools including project management processes communication



Supply Chain Planning and Execution



- Procuring and delivering goods and services using supply chain management

- Using demand management, including demand forecasting and prioritization

- Using master planning, master scheduling, and sales and operations planning (S&OP)

- Managing, planning, and controlling inventory

- Understanding the effects of inventory on financial statements and inventory-related cost categories

- Managing supply in the supply chain based on total cost of ownership and make-versus-buy analysis

- Developing supply plans based on buyer-supplier relationships

- Logistics and warehouse management, forecasting, and planning

- Making considerations for trade, regulation, and currency funds flow

- Segmentation of customer-driven marketing, customers, suppliers, and other partners

- Fundamentals of provider relationship management (SRM) and customer relationship management (CRM)

- Managing reverse logistics and waste



Supply Chain Improvement and Best Practices



- Standards, regulations, and sustainable best practices compliance

- International standards and considerations for import/export, intellectual property, licensing, tax and accounting, and labor laws

- Corporate social responsibility for sustainability, UN Global Compact, and GRI initiatives

- Accreditation, certifications, and standards for quality, environmental, social, and safety

- Identifying, assessing, classifying and responding to risks

- Compliance, security, and regulatory concerns

- Improving the supply chain through measuring performance and supply chain metrics focused on customers, financial reports, and operational practices, and customer service

- Utilizing continuous improvement and change management techniques and principles, including lean and just-in-time as well as other continuous improvement philosophies
APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional
APICS Professional history

Other APICS exams

CSCP APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional
CPIM-BSP CPIM - Basics of Supply Chain Management
CPIM-MPR Certified in Production and Inventory Management - Master Planning of Resources
CLTD Certification in Logistics, Transportation and Distribution

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Maintenance
CSCP
APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional
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CSCP
C. perceived value
D. speed
E. value
Answer: C
Question: 391
What impact does the proliferation of product and service options have on forecasting
customer demand for a specific model?
A. it makes forecasting easier
B. it has no impact on forecasting since the volume remains unchanged
C. it makes forecasting more difficult
D. the demand for a specific model has no impact on forecasting
Answer: C
Question: 392
All of the following are reasons why companies are adding more services around their products
EXCEPT:
A. commoditization of products
B. need to get closer to the customer
C. desire of companies to compete on price
D. increase in IT capabilities that make this offering possible
Answer: C
Question: 393
If there are 400 units available for sale and the relationship between demand and price can be
expressed by the equation: Demand = 1000 - 0.5* Price which of the following revenue
management strategies will typically yield the greatest total revenue?
A. set price at a single value
B. have a two tier pricing strategy
C. have a three tier pricing strategy
D. have a pricing strategy with as many tiers as there are market segments that are price or
time sensitive
Answer: D
Question: 394
Which formula below is used to calculate cash-to-cash cycle time?
A. days of outstanding sales
CSCP
B. inventory days of supply plus days of sales outstanding
C. inventory days of supply plus days of sales outstanding minus average payment period for
materials
D. inventory days of supply minus average payment period for materials
E. days of sales outstanding minus inventory days of supply
Answer: C
Question: 395
Which measure below defines the number of days required to achieve an unplanned,
sustainable 20 percent increase in production?
A. delivery performance to request
B. upside production flexibility
C. supply chain response time
D. order fulfillment lead time
E. total inventory days of supply
Answer: B
Question: 396
All of the following are effects of e-markets on suppliers EXCEPT:
A. allow suppliers to reduce marketing and sales costs
B. allow relatively large suppliers to expand their horizons
C. allow suppliers in fragmented industries to access spot markets
D. allow suppliers to better use their available capacities and inventories
Answer: B
Question: 397
Many startup e-markets offer all of the following EXCEPT:
A. serving as an intermediary between buyers and suppliers
B. conducting the auction
C. identifying, qualifying, and supporting suppliers
D. decreasing the number of suppliers involved in the bidding event
E. identifying saving opportunities
Answer: D
Question: 398
What type of e-market would involve a single, typically large, buyer?
A. public
CSCP
B. consortium
C. private
D. A or B
E. all of the above
Answer: C
Question: 399
All of the following are ways e-markets have affected buyers EXCEPT:
A. increased market reach
B. better collaboration with suppliers
C. clear direction about the type of marketplace a firm should compete within
D. remove inefficiencies from their supply chains
Answer: C
Question: 400
All of the following describe indirect materials EXCEPT:
A. referred to as MRO
B. part of finished product
C. not part of the manufacturing process
D. essential for the business to operate
Answer: B
Question: 401
Which production scheduling technique is used with the third stage of SAP's Stages of
Excellence (i.e., integrated internally)?
A. basic MRP
B. no planning
C. advanced planning systems (APS)
D. constraint-based planning
Answer: D
Question: 402
Which production scheduling technique is used with the fourth stage of SAP's Stages of
Excellence (i.e., multi-enterprise integrated)?
A. basic MRP
B. no planning
CSCP
C. advanced planning systems (APS)
D. constraint-based planning
Answer: C
Question: 403
Which group of users are most impacted by a DSS?
A. all end-users
B. small group of decision makers
C. most middle managers
D. executives
Answer: B
Question: 404
Which group of users are most impacted by an ERP system?
A. all end-users
B. small group of decision makers
C. most middle managers
D. executives
Answer: A
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APICS Professional history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CSCP Search results APICS Professional history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CSCP https://killexams.com/exam_list/APICS Chronology of Professional Football

1869-1939 | 1940-1959 | 1960-1979 | 1980-1999 | 2000-present 

1869

Rutgers and Princeton played a college soccer football game, the first ever, November 6. The game used modified London Football Association rules. During the next seven years, rugby gained favor with the major eastern schools over soccer, and modern football began to develop from rugby.

1876

At the Massasoit convention, the first rules for American football were written. Walter Camp, who would become known as the father of American football, first became involved with the game.

Heffelfinger_Pudge

1892

In an era in which football was a major attraction of local athletic clubs, an intense competition between two Pittsburgh-area clubs, the Allegheny Athletic Association (AAA) and the Pittsburgh Athletic Club (PAC), led to the making of the first professional football player. Former Yale All-America guard William (Pudge) Heffelfinger was paid $500 by the AAA to play in a game against the PAC, becoming the first person to be paid to play football, November 12. The AAA won the game 4-0 when Heffelfinger picked up a PAC fumble and ran 35 yards for a touchdown. 

1893

The Pittsburgh Athletic Club signed one of its players, probably halfback Grant Dibert, to the first known pro football contract, which covered all of the PAC's games for the year.

1895

John Brallier became the first football player to openly turn pro, accepting $10 and expenses to play for the Latrobe YMCA against the Jeannette Athletic Club.

1896

The Allegheny Athletic Association team fielded the first completely professional team for its abbreviated two-game season.

1897_Latrobe

1897

The Latrobe Athletic Association football team went entirely professional, becoming the first team to play a full season with only professionals.

1898

A touchdown was changed from four points to five.

1899

Chris O'Brien formed a neighborhood team, which played under the name the Morgan Athletic Club, on the south side of Chicago. The team later became known as the Normals, then the Racine (for a street in Chicago) Cardinals, the Chicago Cardinals, the St. Louis Cardinals, the Phoenix Cardinals, and, in 1994, the Arizona Cardinals. The team remains the oldest continuing operation in pro football.

1900

William C. Temple took over the team payments for the Duquesne Country and Athletic Club, becoming the first known individual club owner.

1902

Baseball's Philadelphia Athletics, managed by Connie Mack, and the Philadelphia Phillies formed professional football teams, joining the Pittsburgh Stars in the first attempt at a pro football league, named the National Football League. The Athletics won the first night football game ever played, 39-0 over Kanaweola AC at Elmira, New York, November 21.

All three teams claimed the pro championship for the year, but the league president, Dave Berry, named the Stars the champions. Pitcher Rube Waddell was with the Athletics, and pitcher Christy Mathewson a fullback for Pittsburgh.

Mason_uniform

The first World Series of pro football, actually a five-team tournament, was played among a team made up of players from both the Athletics and the Phillies, but simply named New York; the New York Knickerbockers; the Syracuse AC; the Warlow AC; and the Orange (New Jersey) AC at New York's original Madison Square Garden. New York and Syracuse played the first indoor football game before 3,000, December 28. Syracuse, with Glen (Pop) Warner at guard, won 6-0 and went on to win the tournament.

1903

The Franklin (Pa.) Athletic Club won the second and last World Series of pro football over the Oreos AC of Asbury Park, New Jersey; the Watertown Red and Blacks; and the Orange AC.

Pro football was popularized in Ohio when the Massillon Tigers, a strong amateur team, hired four Pittsburgh pros to play in the season-ending game against Akron. At the same time, pro football declined in the Pittsburgh area, and the emphasis on the pro game moved west from Pennsylvania to Ohio.

1904

A field goal was changed from five points to four.

Ohio had at least seven pro teams, with Massillon winning the Ohio Independent Championship, that is, the pro title. Talk surfaced about forming a state-wide league to end spiraling salaries brought about by constant bidding for players and to write universal rules for the game. The feeble attempt to start the league failed.

Halfback Charles Follis signed a contract with the Shelby (Ohio) AC, making him the first known black pro football player.

1905

The Canton AC, later to become known as the Bulldogs, became a professional team. Massillon again won the Ohio League championship.

1906

The forward pass was legalized. The first authenticated pass completion in a pro game came on October 27, when George (Peggy) Parratt of Massillon threw a completion to Dan (Bullet) Riley in a victory over a combined Benwood-Moundsville team.

Arch-rivals Canton and Massillon, the two best pro teams in America, played twice, with Canton winning the first game but Massillon winning the second and the Ohio League championship. A betting scandal and the financial disaster wrought upon the two clubs by paying huge salaries caused a temporary decline in interest in pro football in the two cities and, somewhat, throughout Ohio.

1909

A field goal dropped from four points to three.

1912

A touchdown was increased from five points to six.

Jack Cusack revived a strong pro team in Canton.

1913

Jim Thorpe, a former football and track star at the Carlisle Indian School (Pa.) and a double gold medal winner at the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, played for the Pine Village Pros in Indiana.

1915

Massillon again fielded a major team, reviving the old rivalry with Canton. Cusack signed Thorpe to play for Canton for $250 a game.

1916

With Thorpe and former Carlisle teammate Pete Calac starring, Canton went 9-0-1, won the Ohio League championship, and was acclaimed the pro football champion.

1917

Despite an upset by Massillon, Canton again won the Ohio League championship.

1919

Canton again won the Ohio League championship, despite the team having been turned over from Cusack to Ralph Hay. Thorpe and Calac were joined in the backfield by Joe Guyon.

Earl (Curly) Lambeau and George Calhoun organized the Green Bay Packers. Lambeau's employer at the Indian Packing Company provided $500 for equipment and allowed the team to use the company field for practices. The Packers went 10-1.

Hay_Ralph

1920

Pro football was in a state of confusion due to three major problems: dramatically rising salaries; players continually jumping from one team to another following the highest offer; and the use of college players still enrolled in school. A league in which all the members would follow the same rules seemed the answer. An organizational meeting, at which the Akron Pros, Canton Bulldogs, Cleveland Indians, and Dayton Triangles were represented, was held at the Jordan and Hupmobile auto showroom in Canton, Ohio, August 20. This meeting resulted in the formation of the American Professional Football Conference.

A second organizational meeting was held in Canton, September 17. The teams were from four states-Akron, Canton, Cleveland, and Dayton from Ohio; the Hammond Pros and Muncie Flyers from Indiana; the Rochester Jeffersons from New York; and the Rock Island Independents, Decatur Staleys, and Racine Cardinals from Illinois. The name of the league was changed to the American Professional Football Association. Hoping to capitalize on his fame, the members elected Thorpe president; Stanley Cofall of Cleveland was elected vice president. A membership fee of $100 per team was charged to deliver an appearance of respectability, but no team ever paid it. Scheduling was left up to the teams, and there were wide variations, both in the overall number of games played and in the number played against APFA member teams.

Four other teams-the Buffalo All-Americans, Chicago Tigers, Columbus Panhandles, and Detroit Heralds-joined the league sometime during the year. On September 26, the first game featuring an APFA team was played at Rock Island's Douglas Park. A crowd of 800 watched the Independents defeat the St. Paul Ideals 48-0. A week later, October 3, the first game matching two APFA teams was held. At Triangle Park, Dayton defeated Columbus 14-0, with Lou Partlow of Dayton scoring the first touchdown in a game between Association teams. The same day, Rock Island defeated Muncie 45-0.

By the beginning of December, most of the teams in the APFA had abandoned their hopes for a championship, and some of them, including the Chicago Tigers and the Detroit Heralds, had finished their seasons, disbanded, and had their franchises canceled by the Association. Four teams-Akron, Buffalo, Canton, and Decatur-still had championship as-pirations, but a series of late-season games among them left Akron as the only undefeated team in the Association. At one of these games, Akron sold tackle Bob Nash to Buffalo for $300 and five percent of the gate receipts-the first APFA player deal.

1921

At the league meeting in Akron, April 30, the championship of the 1920 season was awarded to the Akron Pros. The APFA was reorganized, with Joe Carr of the Columbus Panhandles named president and Carl Storck of Dayton secretary-treasurer. Carr moved the Association's headquarters to Columbus, drafted a league constitution and by-laws, gave teams territorial rights, restricted player movements, developed membership criteria for the franchises, and issued standings for the first time, so that the APFA would have a clear champion.

The Association's membership increased to 22 teams, including the Green Bay Packers, who were awarded to John Clair of the Acme Packing Company.

Thorpe moved from Canton to the Cleveland Indians, but he was hurt early in the season and played very little.

A.E. Staley turned the Decatur Staleys over to player-coach George Halas, who moved the team to Cubs Park in Chicago. Staley paid Halas $5,000 to keep the name Staleys for one more year. Halas made halfback Ed (Dutch) Sternaman his partner.

Player-coach Fritz Pollard of the Akron Pros became the first black head coach.

The Staleys claimed the APFA championship with a 9-1-1 record, as did Buffalo at 9-1-2. Carr ruled in favor of the Staleys, giving Halas his first championship.

1922

After admitting the use of players who had college eligibility remaining during the 1921 season, Clair and the Green Bay management withdrew from the APFA, January 28. Curly Lambeau promised to obey league rules and then used $50 of his own money to buy back the franchise. Bad weather and low attendance plagued the Packers, and Lambeau went broke, but local merchants arranged a $2,500 loan for the club. A public nonprofit corporation was set up to operate the team, with Lambeau as head coach and manager.

The American Professional Football Association changed its name to the National Football League, June 24. The Chicago Staleys became the Chicago Bears.

The NFL fielded 18 teams, including the new Oorang Indians of Marion, Ohio, an all-Indian team featuring Thorpe, Joe Guyon, and Pete Calac, and sponsored by the Oorang dog kennels.  Canton, led by player-coach Guy Chamberlin and tackles Link Lyman and Wilbur (Pete) Henry, emerged as the league's first true powerhouse, going 10-0-2.

1923

For the first time, all of the franchises considered to be part of the NFL fielded teams. Thorpe played his second and final season for the Oorang Indians. Against the Bears, Thorpe fumbled, and Halas picked up the ball and returned it 98 yards for a touchdown, a record that would last until 1972.

Canton had its second consecutive undefeated season, going 11-0-1 for the NFL title.

1924

The league had 18 franchises, including new ones in Kansas City, Kenosha, and Frankford, a section of Philadelphia. League champion Canton, successful on the field but not at the box office, was purchased by the owner of the Cleveland franchise, who kept the Canton franchise inactive, while using the best players for his Cleveland team, which he renamed the Bulldogs. Cleveland won the title with a 7-1-1 record.

1925

Five new franchises were admitted to the NFL-the New York Giants, who were awarded to Tim Mara and Billy Gibson for $500; the Detroit Panthers, featuring Jimmy Conzelman as owner, coach, and tailback; the Providence Steam Roller; a new Canton Bulldogs team; and the Pottsville Maroons, who had been perhaps the most successful independent pro team. The NFL established its first player limit, at 16 players.

Chronology_Grange

Late in the season, the NFL made its greatest coup in gaining national recognition. Shortly after the University of Illinois season ended in November, All-America halfback Harold (Red) Grange signed a contract to play with the Chicago Bears. On Thanksgiving Day, a crowd of 36,000-the largest in pro football history-watched Grange and the Bears play the Chicago Cardinals to a scoreless tie at Wrigley Field. At the beginning of December, the Bears left on a barnstorming tour that saw them play eight games in 12 days, in St. Louis, Philadelphia, New York City, Washington, Boston, Pittsburgh, Detroit, and Chicago. A crowd of 73,000 watched the game against the Giants at the Polo Grounds, helping assure the future of the troubled NFL franchise in New York. The Bears then played nine more games in the South and West, including a game in Los Angeles, in which 75,000 fans watched them defeat the Los Angeles Tigers in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

Pottsville and the Chicago Cardinals were the top contenders for the league title, with Pottsville winning a late-season meeting 21-7. Pottsville scheduled a game against a team of former Notre Dame players for Shibe Park in Philadelphia. Frankford lodged a protest not only because the game was in Frankford's protected territory, but because it was being played the same day as a Yellow Jackets home game. Carr gave three different notices forbidding Pottsville to play the game, but Pottsville played anyway, December 12. That day, Carr fined the club, suspended it from all rights and privileges (including the right to play for the NFL championship), and re-turned its franchise to the league. The Cardinals, who ended the season with the best record in the league, were named the 1925 champions.

1926

Grange's manager, C.C. Pyle, told the Bears that Grange wouldn't play for them unless he was paid a five-figure salary and given one-third ownership of the team. The Bears refused. Pyle leased Yankee Stadium in New York City, then petitioned for an NFL franchise. After he was refused, he started the first American Football League. It lasted one season and included Grange's New York Yankees and eight other teams. The AFL champion Philadelphia Quakers played a December game against the New York Giants, seventh in the NFL, and the Giants won 31-0. At the end of the season, the AFL folded.

Halas pushed through a rule that prohibited any team from signing a player whose college class had not graduated.

The NFL grew to 22 teams, including the Duluth Eskimos, who signed All-America fullback Ernie Nevers of Stanford, giving the league a gate attraction to rival Grange. The 15-member Eskimos, dubbed the Iron Men of the North, played 29 exhibition and league games, 28 on the road, and Nevers played in all but 29 minutes of them.

Frankford edged the Bears for the championship, despite Halas having obtained John (Paddy) Driscoll from the Cardinals. On December 4, the Yellow Jackets scored in the final two minutes to defeat the Bears 7-6 and move ahead of them in the standings.

1927

At a special meeting in Cleveland, April 23, Carr decided to secure the NFL's future by eliminating the financially weaker teams and consolidating the quality players onto a limited number of more successful teams. The new-look NFL dropped to 12 teams, and the center of gravity of the league left the Midwest, where the NFL had started, and began to emerge in the large cities of the East. One of the new teams was Grange's New York Yankees, but Grange suffered a knee injury and the Yankees finished in the middle of the pack. The NFL championship was won by the cross-town rival New York Giants, who posted 10 shutouts in 13 games.

1928

Grange and Nevers both retired from pro football, and Duluth disbanded, as the NFL was reduced to only 10 teams. The Providence Steam Roller of Jimmy Conzelman and Pearce Johnson won the championship, playing in the Cycledrome, a 10,000-seat oval that had been built for bicycle races.

1929

Chris O'Brien sold the Chicago Cardinals to David Jones, July 27.

The NFL added a fourth official, the field judge, July 28.

Grange and Nevers returned to the NFL. Nevers scored six rushing touchdowns and four extra points as the Cardinals beat Grange's Bears 40-6, November 28. The 40 points set a record that remains the NFL's oldest.

Providence became the first NFL team to host a game at night under floodlights, against the Cardinals, November 3.

The Packers added back Johnny (Blood) McNally, tackle Cal Hubbard, and guard Mike Michalske, and won their first NFL championship, edging the Giants, who featured quarterback Benny Friedman.

1930

Dayton, the last of the NFL's original franchises, was purchased by William B. Dwyer and John C. Depler, moved to Brooklyn, and renamed the Dodgers. The Portsmouth, Ohio, Spartans entered the league.

The Packers edged the Giants for the title, but the most improved team was the Bears. Halas retired as a player and replaced himself as coach of the Bears with Ralph Jones, who refined the T-formation by introducing wide ends and a halfback in motion. Jones also introduced rookie All-America fullback-tackle Bronko Nagurski.

The Giants defeated a team of former Notre Dame players coached by Knute Rockne 22-0 before 55,000 at the Polo Grounds, December 14. The proceeds went to the New York Unemployment Fund to help those suffering because of the Great Depression, and the easy victory helped deliver the NFL credibility with the press and the public.

1931

The NFL decreased to 10 teams, and halfway through the season the Frankford franchise folded. Carr fined the Bears, Packers, and Portsmouth $1,000 each for using players whose college classes had not graduated.

The Packers won an unprecedented third consecutive title, beating out the Spartans, who were led by rookie backs Earl (Dutch) Clark and Glenn Presnell.

1932

George Preston Marshall, Vincent Bendix, Jay O'Brien, and M. Dorland Doyle were awarded a franchise for Boston, July 9. Despite the presence of two rookies-halfback Cliff Battles and tackle Glen (Turk) Edwards - the new team, named the Braves, lost money and Marshall was left as the sole owner at the end of the year.

1932_PLAYOFF

NFL membership dropped to eight teams, the lowest in history. Official statistics were kept for the first time. The Bears and the Spartans finished the season in the first-ever tie for first place. After the season finale, the league office arranged for an additional regular-season game to determine the league champion. The game was moved indoors to Chicago Stadium because of bitter cold and heavy snow. The arena allowed only an 80-yard field that came right to the walls. The goal posts were moved from the end lines to the goal lines and, for safety, inbounds lines or hashmarks where the ball would be put in play were drawn 10 yards from the walls that butted against the sidelines. The Bears won 9-0, December 18, scoring the winning touchdown on a two-yard pass from Nagurski to Grange. The Spartans claimed Nagurski's pass was thrown from less than five yards behind the line of scrimmage, violating the existing passing rule, but the play stood.

1933

The NFL, which long had followed the rules of college football, made a number of significant changes from the college game for the first time and began to develop rules serving its needs and the style of play it preferred. The innovations from the 1932 championship game-inbounds line or hashmarks and goal posts on the goal lines-were adopted. Also the forward pass was legalized from anywhere behind the line of scrimmage, February 25.

Marshall and Halas pushed through a proposal that divided the NFL into two divisions, with the winners to meet in an annual championship game, July 8.

Three new franchises joined the league-the Pittsburgh Pirates of Art Rooney, the Philadelphia Eagles of Bert Bell and Lud Wray, and the Cincinnati Reds. The Staten Island Stapletons suspended operations for a year, but never returned to the league.

Halas bought out Sternaman, became sole owner of the Bears, and reinstated himself as head coach. Marshall changed the name of the Boston Braves to the Redskins. David Jones sold the Chicago Cardinals to Charles W. Bidwill.

In the first NFL Championship Game scheduled before the season, the Western Division champion Bears defeated the Eastern Division champion Giants 23-21 at Wrigley Field, December 17.

1934

G.A. (Dick) Richards purchased the Portsmouth Spartans, moved them to Detroit, and renamed them the Lions.

Professional football gained new prestige when the Bears were matched against the best college football players in the first Chicago College All-Star Game, August 31. The game ended in a scoreless tie before 79,432 at Soldier Field.

The Cincinnati Reds lost their first eight games, then were suspended from the league for defaulting on payments. The St. Louis Gunners, an independent team, joined the NFL by buying the Cincinnati franchise and went 1-2 the last three weeks.

Rookie Beattie Feathers of the Bears became the NFL's first 1,000-yard rusher, gaining 1,004 on 101 carries. The Thanksgiving Day game between the Bears and the Lions became the first NFL game broadcast nationally, with Graham McNamee the announcer for NBC radio.

In the championship game, on an extremely cold and icy day at the Polo Grounds, the Giants trailed the Bears 13-3 in the third quarter before changing to basketball shoes for better footing. The Giants won 30-13 in what has come to be known as the Sneakers Game, December 9.

The player waiver rule was adopted, December 10.

1935

The NFL adopted Bert Bell's proposal to hold an annual draft of college players, to begin in 1936, with teams selecting in an inverse order of finish, May 19. The inbounds line or hashmarks were moved nearer the center of the field, 15 yards from the sidelines.

All-America end Don Hutson of Alabama joined Green Bay. The Lions defeated the Giants 26-7 in the NFL Championship Game, December 15.

1936

There were no franchise transactions for the first year since the formation of the NFL. It also was the first year in which all member teams played the same number of games.

The Eagles made University of Chicago halfback and Heisman Trophy winner Jay Berwanger the first player ever selected in the NFL draft, February 8. The Eagles traded his rights to the Bears, but Berwanger never played pro football. The first player selected to actually sign was the number-two pick, Riley Smith of Alabama, who was selected by Boston.

A rival league was formed, and it became the second to call itself the American Football League. The Boston Shamrocks were its champions.

Because of poor attendance, Marshall, the owner of the host team, moved the Championship Game from Boston to the Polo Grounds in New York. Green Bay defeated the Redskins 21-6, December 13.

1937

Homer Marshman was granted a Cleveland franchise, named the Rams, February 12. Marshall moved the Redskins to Washington, D.C., February 13. The Redskins signed TCU All-America tailback Sammy Baugh, who led them to a 28-21 victory over the Bears in the NFL Championship Game, December 12.

The Los Angeles Bulldogs had an 8-0 record to win the AFL title, but then the 2-year-old league folded.

1938

At the suggestion of Halas, Hugh (Shorty) Ray became a technical advisor on rules and officiating to the NFL. A new rule called for a 15-yard penalty for roughing the passer.

Rookie Byron (Whizzer) White of the Pittsburgh Pirates led the NFL in rushing. The Giants defeated the Packers 23-17 for the NFL title, December 11.

Marshall, Los Angeles Times sports editor Bill Henry, and promoter Tom Gallery established the Pro Bowl game between the NFL champion and a team of pro all-stars.

1939

The New York Giants defeated the Pro All-Stars 13-10 in the first Pro Bowl, at Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, January 15.

Carr, NFL president since 1921, died in Columbus, May 20. Carl Storck was named acting president, May 25.

An NFL game was televised for the first time when NBC broadcast the Brooklyn Dodgers-Philadelphia Eagles game from Ebbets Field to the approximately 1,000 sets then in New York.

Green Bay defeated New York 27-0 in the NFL Championship Game, December 10 at Milwaukee. NFL attendance exceeded 1 million in a season for the first time, reaching 1,071,200.

1940-1959>>

Tue, 15 Feb 2022 21:40:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.profootballhof.com/football-history/chronology-of-professional-football/
The Link: Christian History Today Thu, 05 Apr 2018 04:53:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.christianitytoday.com/history/issues/issue-72/link-christian-history-today.html History

Pearl Harbor survivors, from left, Harry Chandler, Ken Stevens, Herb Elfring and Ira "Ike" Schab salute while the National Anthem is played during the 82nd Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day ceremony on Thursday, Dec. 7, 2023, at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawaii. Mengshin Lin/AP hide caption

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.npr.org/sections/history/
Code archaeologist digs up oldest known ancestor of MS-DOS No result found, try new keyword!DOS version 0.1-C found and archived – all nine files of it An intrepid code archaeologist has found and uploaded an early ancestor of what became MS-DOS, which later sparked the IBM PC-compatible ... Thu, 04 Jan 2024 21:39:06 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ History of UNG

Founded originally as Gainesville Junior College in March 1964, the college was the result of visionary community leaders who sought to fill a need for accessible, quality higher education for Northeast Georgians. While a campus was in development, the college initially held classes at the Gainesville Civic Center and First Baptist Church.

In 1966, Gainesville Junior College moved to its permanent campus. With an aim to prepare students for the local workforce or to transfer on to other senior institutions, Gainesville Junior College experienced high demand from the outset. It promoted an educational experience that included academics, athletics, student activities, and public service.

Drawing students primarily from the region surrounding Lake Lanier, the college's logo incorporated an anchor symbol and blue and gold colors. The college's athletic teams competed as The Lakers until the 1985-86 academic year, when intercollegiate athletics were discontinued due to lack of spectator support and a reallocation of institutional resources.

In 1987, the University System of Georgia Board of Regents authorized the removal of "Junior" or "Community" from the two names of two-year institutions to better reflect the quality of the educational experiences students in those colleges received. Gainesville Junior College became Gainesville College.

In 1998, the college adopted a new logo that replaced the anchor previously used to represent the college with a symbolic bell tower that greeted students as they entered campus. The college's colors, too, changed from blue and gold to green.

In 2003, the college expanded to include the Oconee Campus in Watkinsville, Ga., where enrollment grew quickly.

In 2005, the institution's name changed to Gainesville State College, reflecting the growth of four-year degree programs within the college.

The college's historic seal incorporates the State of Georgia seal, an anchor symbolizing the college's first mascot – The Lakers, and the lake in the background symbolizing the Lanier Land service area.

Thu, 13 Aug 2020 13:37:00 -0500 en text/html https://ung.edu/about/history.php
Department of History

From disaster preparedness to nanoscience to food security, Drexel's Department of History is embroiled in some of the most critical issues of our day.

In the Department of History at Drexel University, our students learn through experience — from full-time co-op positions in archives, museums and other sites, to conducting and presenting original research, to visiting sites of historical significance. The department has particular strengths in the History of Science, Technology and the Environment, and in Global History.

Historians are not traditional scientists; there are no experiments we conduct that can predict future events — we have no theories of evolution or universal gravitation to guide us. Instead, we have the historical record — this is our laboratory. Though we are often looking at events and people long past and dead, historians are often embroiled in the most heated political arguments of our day. This is especially true in a democracy, where the open discussion of history and shared values is necessary, and where this discussion constantly defines and redefines public policy and democratic practice. In other words, the practice of history is also the practice of democracy. Does this kind of learning, research and debate interest you? If so, you are in the right place.

The Drexel Co-Op

Through Drexel's renowned cooperative education program, students embark on six-month periods of full-time employment, exploring their career options, strengthening their résumés and building a professional network in the process.

Learn More About the Drexel Co-op Program

Upcoming Events

There are currently no upcoming events.

Wed, 12 Aug 2020 13:52:00 -0500 en text/html https://drexel.edu/coas/academics/departments-centers/history/
Welcome to History

Native American peoples inhabited and visited the landscape encompassed within Wyoming for centuries prior to the founding of the University of Wyoming (UW) in 1887 and we would like to acknowledge the Arapaho, Cheyenne, Crow, Lakota, Shoshone, and Ute, on whose land we stand today.

Long committed to the history of the American West, the History Department at UW is uniquely positioned to situate this field in a global context. Drawing on expertise ranging from Europe, East and Central Asia, Africa, and the Americas, we strive to explore historical questions with thematic as well as comparative approaches. Our goal is to deliver students a truly global perspective on history.

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH A HISTORY DEGREE?

 At the most basic level, history teaches how to assess evidence, to access conflicting interpretations, to arrive at convincing arguments, and to speak and write about these arguments to a wide variety of audiences. These skills make history one of the foremost majors that graduate and professional schools and employers seek when they admit graduate students or hire employees. Viewed from a practical perspective, a history degree provides lifelong skills that are in demand in fields ranging from teaching and law to government and business administration. History is a very useful degree.

History is a foundational discipline that blends the methodologies and perspective of the humanities and social sciences in order to engage with the history of human culture on a global scale. UW's History degree program emphasizes interdisciplinary teaching and research and provides course work, research experiences, and internships on both American and international topics. The History program offers a Bachelor of Arts degree major and minor, and a Master of Arts degree.

WHY STUDY HISTORY?

Who hasn’t heard someone say, “I just love history?” Maybe that person is you? History is a vibrant and fascinating study of people, events, and institutions in the past and, for many people, that’s reason enough to earn a history degree. But there are larger and more practical reasons to choose history as your major. Here are a few of those reasons that historian Peter Stearns complied for the American Historical Association:

  • History Helps Us Understand People and Societies
  • History Helps Us Understand Change
  • History Helps Us Understand How the Society We Live in Came to Be
  • History Provides Identity
  • Studying History Is Essential for Good Citizenship

In addition to the historical content obtained in your coursework, a degree in History also provides excellent training in rigorous analysis and research skills, and the oral and written skills necessary to achieve success in any top-flight professional career. Typical career paths for History graduates include work in museums and archives, national security agencies (the FBI, CIA, and NSA all love to recruit History B.A. students), and the Department of State. The History major is also excellent preparation for various professional schools, such as law and medicine, as well as post-graduate work in the humanities and social sciences.  We pride ourselves on placing our graduates in highly competitive careers and post-graduate masters and doctoral programs.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES 

Bachelor's Degree (B.A.)

The History Department Faculty has identified the specific objectives of its undergraduate curriculum. The following are the learning outcomes that each History major should learn. We are continuously and actively assessing our program to ensure that these learning outcomes are being met.

1. Students shall be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills by analyzing, synthesizing, and evaluating historical information from multiple sources.

2. Students will develop the ability to distinguish between different culturally historical perspectives.

3. Students will produce well researched written work that engages with both primary sources and the secondary literature.

4. Students will develop an informed familiarity with multiple cultures.

5. Students will employ a full range of historical techniques and methods.

6. Students will develop an ability to convey verbally their historical knowledge.

7. Students will demonstrate their understanding of historical cause and effect along with their knowledge of the general chronology of human experience.

8. Students will develop an understanding of the concepts of historical theary and/or conceptual frameworks and be able to use these in their own studies. 

 

Graduate Degrees (M.A. and M.A.T.)

The History Department offers two distinct graduate programs. Any field of study offered by the Department can be accommodated within either degree program.

The M.A. degree is designed to prepare the student for employment opportunities and PhD-level work. This degree program is also suitable for students interested in careers as community college instructors as well as for lifelong learners who seek formal advanced education.

 

Students who graduate with an M.A. in History will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of the theories and methodologies of the discipline of History.

2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the historiography of their field of specialization.

3. Demonstrate some understanding of comparative and/or thematic methods, approaches, and theories.

4. Conduct original research based on primary sources and construct an argument based on that research.

5. Write graduate-level expository prose and orally present their ideas at an advanced level.

 

The M.A.T. degree is designed to enhance the teaching of history and related disciplines by secondary and middle school teachers. This is a non-thesis degree, designed to provide breadth of preparation rather than specialization. Applicants are expected to have already completed their certification and pedagogy courses.

Students who graduate with an M.A.T. in History will be able to:

1. Demonstrate the significance of historical courses with reference to broader historical context, historiographic trends, or contemporary relevance.

2. Construct original historical arguments using a blend of primary and secondary source material.

3. Demonstrate a superior quality of writing both in terms of mechanics and in developing an argument effectively.

4. Convey a broad understanding of historical material suitable for teaching.

Thu, 10 Aug 2023 03:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.uwyo.edu/history/index.html
Affiliated Professionals

Brian Burford

Brian Burford, New Hampshire State Records Manager
Brian Burford, New Hampshire State Records Manager

Brian Burford has been the New Hampshire State Records Manager for 15 years and the New Hampshire State Archivist for more than eight years. Prior to this esteemed position, he worked as a land surveyor, which piqued his interest in archival history and quite literally opened the door to the state archives.

As an Affiliated Professional with Keene State College’s new Master of Arts Degree in History and Archives, Brian will serve as a guest lecturer, point of contact at the NH State Archives, and mentor to Keene State students.

Brian, who is also a Keene State graduate and Second Vice President of the Alumni Association, is a strong believer in giving back to the organizations that have played a role in guiding his education and career path.

We welcome Brian into the program and appreciate his willingness to share his time, experience, and wealth of knowledge with our students.

brian.burford@sos.nh.gov


Alan Rumrill

Alan Rumrill
Alan Rumrill, Executive Director of the Historical Society of Cheshire County

Alan Rumrill has been Executive Director of the Historical Society of Cheshire County for 35 years. He holds a Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Rhode Island and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in History from Keene State College.

Over the years, Alan has worked with more than 100 student interns and volunteers, mostly from Keene State College, and has served as guest lecturer in several classes at the College. He is thoroughly familiar with the 300,000-item collection held by the Historical Society of Cheshire County.

As part of his work at the Society, Alan has presented more than 1,000 public programs, published eight books on local art and history, and presents a weekly radio program and newspaper column on historical topics. He has served as president of the New Hampshire Archives Group and as an officer of other statewide professional history organizations. He is passionate about sharing stories through his writing and presentations.

director@hsccnh.org


Jennifer “Jenna” Carroll

Jenna Carroll
Jenna Carroll, Director of Education of the Historical Society of Cheshire County

Jennifer Carroll, Director of Education at the Historical Society of Cheshire County, has been managing historical societies and museums in New England for over 20 years. She has also served as curator and executive director of museums.

She holds a Master’s of Arts Degree in Historical Administration from Eastern Illinois University and a Bachelor’s of Arts Degree in History and Women’s Studies from the University of New Hampshire.

With a passion for engaging people of all ages in local history, Jennifer helps coordinate more than 150 public programs for students and residents each year. She also manages a team of curatorial volunteers who catalog and digitize the Society’s object collections.

Jennifer also teaches student interns about the care and maintenance of artifacts and to promote the preservation of Cheshire County history.

Beyond the scope of her work at the Historical Society, Jennifer is on the Board of Directors of the Association of Historical Societies of New Hampshire. She was recognized as one of the Keene Sentinel’s Extraordinary Women of the Monadnock Region in 2017 and is the 2019 recipient of the Keene State College Presidents’ Community Partner Award.

dired@hsccnh.org

Tue, 12 Feb 2019 05:50:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.keene.edu/academics/graduate/master-of-arts-degree-in-history-and-archives/affiliated-professional/
History of IEEE

IEEE, an organization dedicated to advancing innovation and technological excellence for the benefit of humanity, is the world's largest technical professional society. It is designed to serve professionals involved in all aspects of the electrical, electronic, and computing fields and related areas of science and technology that underlie modern civilization.

IEEE's roots go back to 1884 when electricity began to become a major influence in society. There was one major established electrical industry, the telegraph, which since the 1840s had come to connect the world with a data communications system faster than the speed of transportation. The telephone and electric power and light industries had just gotten underway.

Tue, 08 Nov 2022 12:49:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.ieee.org/about/ieee-history.html




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