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Exam Code: NailTech Practice test 2023 by Killexams.com team
NailTech Nail Technician

Title: Healthcare Nail Technician Certification

Test Detail:
The Healthcare Nail Technician certification validates the knowledge and skills required to provide safe and hygienic nail care services in a healthcare setting. This certification is designed for individuals who work as nail technicians in healthcare facilities such as hospitals, clinics, or long-term care facilities.

Course Outline:
The Healthcare Nail Technician course provides participants with comprehensive knowledge and practical skills in providing nail care services while adhering to strict hygiene and safety standards. The following is a general outline of the key areas covered in the certification program:

1. Infection Control and Hygiene Practices:
- Understanding the importance of infection control in a healthcare setting
- Practicing proper hand hygiene and personal protective equipment (PPE) usage
- Disinfection and sterilization of nail care tools and equipment

2. Nail Anatomy and Physiology:
- Understanding the structure and function of the nail and surrounding tissues
- Identifying common nail disorders and diseases
- Recognizing contraindications and precautions for nail care services

3. Healthcare Regulations and Policies:
- Familiarizing with healthcare regulations and policies related to nail care
- Understanding the scope of practice for healthcare nail technicians
- Complying with patient confidentiality and privacy guidelines

4. Patient Assessment and Communication:
- Conducting a thorough assessment of the patient's nail health and needs
- Communicating effectively with patients, including those with special needs or limitations
- Recognizing and addressing potential risks or concerns for patients with compromised health conditions

5. Nail Care Services in a Healthcare Setting:
- Performing safe and hygienic manicures and pedicures
- Applying nail polish and other nail enhancements following healthcare guidelines
- Providing education and advice on nail care and hygiene practices for patients

6. Health and Safety Considerations:
- Identifying and responding to allergic reactions or adverse events related to nail care products
- Implementing proper waste disposal protocols
- Maintaining a clean and organized nail care workspace

Exam Objectives:
The Healthcare Nail Technician certification test assesses candidates' understanding of infection control practices, nail anatomy, healthcare regulations, patient assessment, and the safe provision of nail care services in a healthcare setting. The test objectives include, but are not limited to:

1. Demonstrating knowledge of infection control and hygiene practices in a healthcare setting.
2. Understanding nail anatomy, common disorders, and contraindications for nail care.
3. Complying with healthcare regulations and policies relevant to nail care services.
4. Conducting patient assessments and communicating effectively with patients.
5. Performing safe and hygienic nail care services, including manicures and pedicures.
6. Applying health and safety considerations in a healthcare nail care environment.

Syllabus:
The Healthcare Nail Technician certification program typically includes theoretical training, practical hands-on experience, and supervised clinical practice in a healthcare facility. The syllabus provides a breakdown of the syllabus covered throughout the course, including specific learning objectives and milestones. The syllabus may include the following components:

- Introduction to healthcare nail technician certification and test overview
- Infection Control and Hygiene Practices
- Nail Anatomy and Physiology
- Healthcare Regulations and Policies
- Patient Assessment and Communication
- Nail Care Services in a Healthcare Setting
- Health and Safety Considerations
- test Preparation and Practice Tests
- Final Healthcare Nail Technician Certification Exam
Nail Technician
Healthcare Technician certification
Killexams : Healthcare Technician certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NailTech Search results Killexams : Healthcare Technician certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NailTech https://killexams.com/exam_list/Healthcare Killexams : 15 Medical Certifications That Are In Demand No result found, try new keyword!A certificate only medical career offers great wages, opportunities, and low barrier to entry. It can take anywhere from 2-24 months to kick-off that new career as a healthcare worker. In this article ... Fri, 11 Aug 2023 04:08:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Killexams : Community news: Westport EMS holds EMT training, looks to rebuild ranks No result found, try new keyword!Westport EMS looking to rebuild ranks and Justin Paul highlighting a star-studded Playhouse event are a few coming things in this week's community news. Wed, 23 Aug 2023 14:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sfgate.com/westport/article/community-news-westport-justin-paul-ems-training-18297489.php Killexams : Honolulu EMS hiring new medical technicians

Wed, 23 Aug 2023 06:04:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kitv.com/news/business/honolulu-ems-hiring-new-medical-technicians/article_4598b4fa-41d7-11ee-9d28-370f77a2566d.html
Killexams : Senior living: New Medicare proposal would cover training for family caregivers

Even with extensive caregiving experience, Patti LaFleur was unprepared for the crisis that hit in April 2021, when her mother, Linda LaTurner, fell out of a chair and broke her hip.

LaTurner, 71, had been diagnosed with early-onset dementia seven years before. For two years, she’d been living with LaFleur, who managed insulin injections for her mother’s Type 1 diabetes, helped her shower and dress, dealt with her incontinence and made sure she was eating well.

In the hospital after her mother’s hip replacement, LaFleur was told her mother would never walk again. When LaTurner came home, two emergency medical technicians brought her on a stretcher into the living room, put her on the bed LaFleur had set up, and wished the daughter well.

That was the extent of the help LaFleur received upon her mother’s discharge.

She didn’t know how to change her mother’s diapers or dress her, since at that point, LaTurner could barely move. She didn’t know how to turn her mother, who was spending all day in bed, to avoid bedsores. Even after an occupational therapist visited several days later, LaFleur continued to face caretaking tasks she wasn’t sure how to handle.

“It’s already extremely challenging to be a caregiver for someone living with dementia,” said LaFleur, who lives in Auburn, Washington, a Seattle suburb. Her mother died in March 2022.

“The lack of training in how to care for my mother,” she added, “just made an impossible job even more impossible.”

A new proposal from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services addresses this often-lamented failure to support family, friends and neighbors who care for frail, ill, and disabled older adults. For the first time, it would authorize Medicare payments to health care professionals to train informal caregivers who manage medications, assist loved ones with activities such as toileting and dressing, and oversee the use of medical equipment.

The proposal, which covers both individual and group training, is a long-overdue recognition of the role informal caregivers — also known as family caregivers — play in protecting the health and well-being of older adults. About 42 million Americans provided unpaid care to people 50 and older in 2020, according to a much-cited report.

“We know from our research that nearly 6 in 10 family caregivers assist with medical and nursing tasks such as injections, tube feedings and changing catheters,” said Jason Resendez, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Caregiving.

But fewer than 30% of caregivers have conversations with health professionals about how to help loved ones, he said.

Even fewer caregivers for older adults — only 7% — report receiving training related to tasks they perform, according to a June 2019 report in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Nancy LeaMond, chief advocacy and engagement officer for AARP, experienced this gap firsthand when she spent six years at home caring for her husband, who had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a neurological condition also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Although she hired health aides, they weren’t certified to operate the feeding tube her husband needed at the end of his life and couldn’t show LeaMond how to use it. Instead, she and her sons turned to the internet and trained themselves by watching videos.

“Until very recently,” she told me, “there’s been very little attention to the role of family caregivers and the need to support caregivers so they can be an effective part of the health delivery system.”

Several details of CMS’s proposal have yet to be finalized. Notably, CMS has asked for public comments on who should be considered a family caregiver for the purposes of training and how often training should be delivered.

(If you’d like to let CMS know what you think about its caregiving training proposal, you can comment on the CMS site until 2 p.m. Sept. 11. The expectation is that Medicare will start paying for caregiver training next year, and caregivers should start asking for it then.)

Advocates said they favor a broad definition of caregiver.

Since often several people perform these tasks, training should be available to more than one person, Resendez suggested. And since people are sometimes reimbursed by family members for their assistance, being unpaid shouldn’t be a requirement, suggested Anne Tumlinson, founder and chief executive officer of ATI Advisory, a consulting firm in aging and disability policy.

As for the frequency of training, a one-size-fits-all approach isn’t appropriate given the varied needs of older adults and the varied skills of people who assist them, said Sharmila Sandhu, vice president of regulatory affairs at the American Occupational Therapy Association. Some caregivers may need a single session when a loved one is discharged from a hospital or a rehabilitation facility. Others may need ongoing training as conditions such as heart failure or dementia progress and new complications occur, said Kim Karr, who manages payment policy for AOTA.

When possible, training should be delivered in a person’s home rather than at a health care institution, said Donna Benton, director of USC’s Family Caregiver Support Center and the Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center. All too often, recommendations that caregivers get from health professionals aren’t easy to implement at home and need to be adjusted, she said

Nancy Gross, 72, of Mendham, New Jersey, experienced this when her husband, Jim Kotcho, 77, received a stem cell transplant for leukemia in May 2015. Once Kotcho came home, Gross was responsible for flushing the port that had been implanted in his chest, administering medications through that site, and making sure all the equipment she was using was sterile.

Although a visiting nurse came out and offered education, it wasn’t adequate for the challenges Gross confronted.

“I’m not prone to crying, but when you think your loved one’s life is in your hands and you don’t know what to do,” she said, “that’s unbelievably stressful.”

For her part, Cheryl Brown, 79, of San Bernardino — a caregiver for her husband, Hardy Brown Sr., 80, since he was diagnosed with ALS in 2002 — is skeptical about paying professionals for training. At the time of his diagnosis, doctors gave Hardy five years, at most, to live. But he didn’t accept that prognosis and ended up defying expectations.

Today, Hardy’s mind is fully intact, and he can move his hands and his arms but not the rest of his body. Looking after him is a full-time job for Cheryl, who is also chair of the executive committee of California’s Commission on Aging and a former member of the California State Assembly. She said hiring paid help isn’t an option, given the expense.

And that’s what irritates Cheryl about Medicare’s training proposal.

“What I need is someone who can come into my home and help me,” she told me. “I don’t see how someone like me, who’s been doing this a very long time, would benefit from this. We caregivers do all the work, and the professionals get the money? That makes no sense to me.”

KFF Health News is eager to hear from readers about questions they’d like answered, problems they’ve been having with their care and advice they need in dealing with the health care system. Visit kffhealthnews.org/columnists to submit requests or tips.

KFF Health News is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues and is one of the core operating programs at KFF — an independent source of health policy research, polling and journalism. 

Mon, 21 Aug 2023 01:00:00 -0500 Judith Graham en-US text/html https://www.dailynews.com/2023/08/21/senior-living-new-medicare-proposal-would-cover-training-for-family-caregivers/
Killexams : Westport Volunteer EMS Seeks New Medical Technicians

The following announcement is from Westport Volunteer Emergency Medical Service:

WESTPORT, CT — Westport Volunteer Emergency Medical Service (WVEMS) has opened registration for their Connecticut Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) course beginning on August 30th. Space is limited and goes quickly for the class held in their Westport headquarters.

Volunteer EMTs have been saving lives in Westport since 1979 - helping many of you, your families, friends, and neighbors. However, the lack of EMT classes during the pandemic lockdowns has led to a sharp decline in new volunteers joining the service - one of the lowest points in the organization’s latest history.

This locally-renowned course is taught by Westport Paramedic and EMS Instructor Rick Baumblatt and will utilize cutting edge equipment and technologies in harmony with his over four decades of EMS experience. All students will learn from the ground up: from Band-aids to multisystem trauma care.

Upon successful completion of the course and its testing, students will be eligible for state certification, allowing them to volunteer on Westport’s ambulances and save lives in their own community.

“High schoolers or retirees: many of our members have found the training and their service invaluable. There’s nothing more important than being able to help save a life in one’s own community,” says Crew Chief Jaime Bairaktaris.

No prior experience or knowledge is necessary to take the course. Members come from many walks of life in our area while all enjoy the satisfaction of being able to save lives in their free time, with whatever time they can give.

A full tuition reimbursement program is available to those who successfully complete the course in accordance with Westport Volunteer EMS bylaws.

Those interested in obtaining additional details or applying should email the Westport EMS Training Division: training@westportems.org, or visit westportems.org.

Fri, 11 Aug 2023 06:25:00 -0500 en text/html https://patch.com/connecticut/westport/westport-volunteer-ems-seeks-new-medical-technicians
Killexams : TSTC addressing state’s need for occupational health and safety technicians

ABILENE With the need increasing for occupational health and safety technicians across the state, Texas State Technical College is helping to fill those jobs.

TSTC’s Occupational Safety and Environmental Compliance program, which offers an Associate of Applied Science degree and certificates of completion at the Abilene, Fort Bend County and Waco campuses, trains future technicians for jobs in different industries, a news release said.

According to onetonline.org, the need for occupational health and safety technicians in Texas was projected to increase 22% from 2020 to 2030. Technicians in Texas can earn a median salary of $52,460, the website stated.

Teresa Purcell, an instructor at TSTC’s Abilene campus, said in the release the need for qualified technicians is important in West Texas.

“Texas is growing, and the need for safety technicians is in high demand. If it is in construction, wind energy, the oil and gas industry, or in general industry facilities, the need is there,” she said. “Currently there are more than 3,500 job postings throughout Texas for safety inspectors.”

Purcell recently discussed what the program involves for students and what excites them about learning from experienced instructors.

What is TSTC’s Occupational Safety and Environmental Compliance program?

The program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and hands-on skills needed to help companies create effective safety and environmental programs. The student will learn how to analyze if a workplace is safe. Students develop a strong background in safety, health and environmental topics. In the program, students will get hands-on water, soil and air sampling and testing procedures. They will gain knowledge of Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations in construction and general industry. They will learn how to conduct environmental health site assessments. There is so much with this program on both sides, safety and environmental, that the student will learn the ability to work in different environments.

What have graduates told you about their career successes?

They love what they are doing. They love the challenges each day. In their work environment, co-workers feel good and have high moral values because of knowing that safety is top priority.

How does it make you feel, as an instructor, to learn of a graduate’s success?

I feel proud knowing that a student is doing what they love and are succeeding. It is exciting to know they are making a difference in their workplace and are proud to be able to contribute in a positive way.

What makes a person, including yourself, excited about occupational safety?

Just knowing that the workplace is safe and workers are going home every night to their families. There is so much a person learns about occupational safety. It is a rewarding feeling knowing that things are done safely and you are part of it.

Why is it important for companies to have safety inspectors?

The primary goal of health and safety inspections is to prevent accidents, injuries and other incidents from occurring at the workplace. Companies’ cost of insurance is lower when less reportable injuries happen because of the safety inspector identifying and preventing accidents from happening.

Registration for TSTC’s fall semester is underway. For more information, visit tstc.edu.

Tue, 22 Aug 2023 04:54:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.oaoa.com/local-news/education/tstc-addressing-states-need-for-occupational-health-and-safety-technicians/
Killexams : SSM Health to partner with Siemens health, Urban League for imaging equipment, training

Patients are set to receive more accurate MRIs, CT scans and other medical imaging in a deal that both upgrades technology in the SSM Health system and creates a job training program aimed at helping women and people of color prepare for jobs in health care.

Officials from SSM and Siemens Healthineers said Monday that the technology’s improved accuracy will help speed up the diagnosis and treatment of illnesses, such as cancer. It will also Improve working conditions for technicians, said Dave Pacitti, Siemens president in the Americas.

“We’re trying to streamline the process and not need repeat scans,” Pacitti said.

SSM is purchasing the new imaging equipment from Siemens Healthineers. Officials would not release the purchase amount.

SSM is also working with the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis Inc. and Siemens to recruit and train people for radiologic technician roles. They’re specifically targeting people of color and women as a way to increase equity in health care.

People are also reading…

“The program will create a meaningful lift for underserved communities,” said Jeremy Fotheringham, regional president of SSM.

According to a study from the Radiology Society of North America, there are too few diagnostic radiology trainees. The aging population — who are more likely to need imaging technology for their ailments — has risen by 34%, and the far smaller increase in diagnostic radiology trainees is not enough to keep up with the demand.

Michael McMillan, CEO and president of the Urban League, said the organization has partnered with SSM Health for decades.

Pacciti said Siemens is developing the training program, and the Urban League will help recruit participants.

“It will bring a great opportunity to the St. Louis community,” he said.

Scientists have improved the resolution of MRI magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to make it 64 million times sharper than it was before.

Mon, 14 Aug 2023 09:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/ssm-health-to-partner-with-siemens-health-urban-league-for-imaging-equipment-training/article_eef31af2-386a-11ee-8178-ab24de20af67.html Killexams : Ukrainian pilots are finally learning to use F-16s, and NATO training plans have said they could be taught to fly other fighter jets too No result found, try new keyword!Ukrainian officials have been eyeing Sweden's JAS 39 Gripen, a well-armed fighter jet that experts hail as a highly capable aircraft. Mon, 21 Aug 2023 07:27:52 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Killexams : Carroll County continues hiring for Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services No result found, try new keyword!The Department of Fire and Emergency Medical Services is continuing to hire firefighters, paramedics, engine drivers, and civilian personnel, to work in the county’s first combination paid and ... Mon, 21 Aug 2023 01:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Killexams : A New Medicare Proposal Would Cover Training for Family Caregivers

Even with extensive caregiving experience, Patti LaFleur was unprepared for the crisis that hit in April 2021, when her mother, Linda LaTurner, fell out of a chair and broke her hip.

LaTurner, 71, had been diagnosed with early-onset dementia seven years before. For two years, she’d been living with LaFleur, who managed insulin injections for her mother’s Type 1 diabetes, helped her shower and dress, dealt with her incontinence, and made sure she was eating well.

In the hospital after her mother’s hip replacement, LaFleur was told her mother would never walk again. When LaTurner came home, two emergency medical technicians brought her on a stretcher into the living room, put her on the bed LaFleur had set up, and wished LaFleur well.

That was the extent of help LaFleur received upon her mother’s discharge.

She didn’t know how to change her mother’s diapers or dress her since at that point LaTurner could barely move. She didn’t know how to turn her mother, who was spending all day in bed, to avoid bedsores. Even after an occupational therapist visited several days later, LaFleur continued to face caretaking tasks she wasn’t sure how to handle.

“It’s already extremely challenging to be a caregiver for someone living with dementia. The lack of training in how to care for my mother just made an impossible job even more impossible,” said LaFleur, who lives in Auburn, Washington, a Seattle suburb. Her mother passed away in March 2022.

A new proposal from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services addresses this often-lamented failure to support family, friends, and neighbors who care for frail, ill, and disabled older adults. For the first time, it would authorize Medicare payments to healthcare professionals to train informal caregivers who manage medications, assist loved ones with activities such as toileting and dressing, and oversee the use of medical equipment.

The proposal, which covers both individual and group training, is a long-overdue recognition of the role informal caregivers — also known as family caregivers — play in protecting the health and well-being of older adults. About 42 million Americans provided unpaid care to people 50 and older in 2020, according to a much-cited report.

“We know from our research that nearly 6 in 10 family caregivers assist with medical and nursing tasks such as injections, tube feedings, and changing catheters,” said Jason Resendez, president and CEO of the National Alliance for Caregiving. But fewer than 30% of caregivers have conversations with health professionals about how to help loved ones, he said.

Even fewer caregivers for older adults — only 7% — report receiving training related to tasks they perform, according to a June 2019 report in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Two people with medium dark skin tone are photographed. One is a woman in a blue jacket, smiling and looking at her husband. The other is her husband, who is wearing a stripped collared shirt with knee-length cream shorts. He is smiling at the camera while using some sort of medical device where he stands and holds onto bars near his head. His wife is holding onto the device's other set of bars, near his hips.

Cheryl Brown’s husband, Hardy, was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, in 2002. He can’t walk but he can use his arms and hands. Brown says she “never gets a break” from caregiving responsibilities.

(Van Howard

/

Image Arts)

Nancy LeaMond, chief advocacy and engagement officer for AARP, experienced this gap firsthand when she spent six years at home caring for her husband, who had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a neurological condition also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Although she hired health aides, they weren’t certified to operate the feeding tube her husband needed at the end of his life and couldn’t show LeaMond how to use it. Instead, she and her sons turned to the internet and trained themselves by watching videos.

“Until very recently, there’s been very little attention to the role of family caregivers and the need to support caregivers so they can be an effective part of the health delivery system,” she told me.

Several details of CMS’ proposal have yet to be finalized. Notably, CMS has asked for public comments on who should be considered a family caregiver for the purposes of training and how often training should be delivered.

(If you’d like to let CMS know what you think about its caregiving training proposal, you can comment on the CMS site until 5 p.m. ET on Sept. 11. The expectation is that Medicare will start paying for caregiver training next year, and caregivers should start asking for it then.)

Advocates said they favor a broad definition of caregiver. Since often several people perform these tasks, training should be available to more than one person, Resendez suggested. And since people are sometimes reimbursed by family members for their assistance, being unpaid shouldn’t be a requirement, suggested Anne Tumlinson, founder and chief executive officer of ATI Advisory, a consulting firm in aging and disability policy.

As for the frequency of training, a one-size-fits-all approach isn’t appropriate given the varied needs of older adults and the varied skills of people who assist them, said Sharmila Sandhu, vice president of regulatory affairs at the American Occupational Therapy Association. Some caregivers may need a single session when a loved one is discharged from a hospital or a rehabilitation facility. Others may need ongoing training as conditions such as heart failure or dementia progress and new complications occur, said Kim Karr, who manages payment policy for AOTA.

When possible, training should be delivered in a person’s home rather than at a health care institution, suggested Donna Benton, director of the University of Southern California’s Family Caregiver Support Center and the Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center. All too often, recommendations that caregivers get from health professionals aren’t easy to implement at home and need to be adjusted, she noted.

Two people with light skin tone smile into the camera for a selfie together. One, a man, is wearing a light-colored hat and sweater, with what looks like a light grey turtleneck underneath. The other, a woman, is wearing a grey sweaters with a white scarf.

Nancy Gross had to perform “nursing tasks I wasn’t prepared to do” when her husband, Jim Kotcho, came home after a stem cell transplant for leukemia. “Until you’re really into caregiving, you don’t know what your issues will be,” she says.

(Courtesy of Jim Kotcho)

Nancy Gross, 72, of Mendham, New Jersey, experienced this when her husband, Jim Kotcho, 77, received a stem cell transplant for leukemia in May 2015. Once Kotcho came home, Gross was responsible for flushing the port that had been implanted in his chest, administering medications through that site, and making sure all the equipment she was using was sterile.

Although a visiting nurse came out and offered education, it wasn’t adequate for the challenges Gross confronted. “I’m not prone to crying, but when you think your loved one’s life is in your hands and you don’t know what to do, that’s unbelievably stressful,” she told me.

For her part, Cheryl Brown, 79, of San Bernardino, California — a caregiver for her husband, Hardy Brown Sr., 80, since he was diagnosed with ALS in 2002 — is skeptical about paying professionals for training. At the time of his diagnosis, doctors gave Hardy five years, at most, to live. But he didn’t accept that prognosis and ended up defying expectations.

Today, Hardy’s mind is fully intact, and he can move his hands and his arms but not the rest of his body. Looking after him is a full-time job for Cheryl, who is also chair of the executive committee of California’s Commission on Aging and a former member of the California State Assembly. She said hiring paid help isn’t an option, given the expense.

And that’s what irritates Cheryl about Medicare’s training proposal.

“What I need is someone who can come into my home and help me,” she told me. “I don’t see how someone like me, who’s been doing this a very long time, would benefit from this. We caregivers do all the work, and the professionals get the money? That makes no sense to me.”

What questions do you have about Southern California?

Fri, 18 Aug 2023 11:54:00 -0500 en text/html https://laist.com/news/health/a-new-medicare-proposal-would-cover-training-for-family-caregivers
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