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American-College Fundamentals course outline
Killexams : American-College Fundamentals course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HS330 Search results Killexams : American-College Fundamentals course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HS330 https://killexams.com/exam_list/American-College Killexams : General Education: The First Curricular Component

The General Education Curriculum is an affirmation of the strong belief of the Wilkes faculty in the value of study in the arts and sciences for all students and includes a broad spectrum of courses designed to stimulate the intellectual, personal, and social development of our students. The requirements of this curriculum are intended to serve as the foundation upon which all degree programs are based.

The General Education Curriculum requirements for all programs follow. Students are urged to use this outline of the requirements as an explanation of the "Recommended Course Sequence" provided for each major degree program described in this bulletin. With the exception of English (ENG) 101, English (ENG) 120, History (HST) 101, and First-Year Foundations (FYF) 101, which are required of all undergraduate students at Wilkes, the designation "Distribution Requirement(s)" in the "Recommended Course Sequence" for each major is a reference to the following statement of the General Education Curriculum requirements.

General Education Curriculum Requirements

The University faculty has approved the following set of requirements for the General Education Curriculum, which comprises four components: 1) Skill Requirements (0 – 13 credits); 2) First-Year Foundations (3 credits); 3) Distribution Areas (24 credits); and 4) the Senior Capstone (variable credit). All undergraduate students must satisfy these requirements in order to be eligible for graduation.

SKILL REQUIREMENTS 0 - 13 Credit Hours

All students pursuing the baccalaureate degree at Wilkes University must develop and demonstrate proficiency in six identified Skill Areas--Written Communication; Oral Communication; Quantitative Reasoning; Critical Thinking; Computer Literacy; and Diversity Awareness.

First-Year Foundations 0/3 Credit Hours

Completion of a First-Year Foundations (FYF) course 3 credit hours

Students who have completed 23 or fewer credit hours earned in a college classroom when they matriculate at the University are required to complete an FYF course during their first semester of study. All students who have completed more than 23 credit hours earned in a college classroom when they matriculate at the University are eligible, but not required, to take an FYF course. A student may earn academic credit toward graduation for only one FYF course.

Student Learning Outcomes for the Skill Areas

   Written Communication: Students will:

  • produce written texts that sustain a unifying focus with coherently-structured and logically-ordered sentences and paragraphs;
  • control surface features such as syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling;
  • present an argument in writing, with use of evidentiary examples;
  • adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality appropriate to different rhetorical situations, genres, and audiences; and
  • engage in scholarly research-based practices and document another writer’s written work and ideas, in a manner appropriate to relevant academic or professional disciplines.

Oral Communication: Students will:

  • construct a relevant message supported by scholarly and sufficient research;
  • organize message content based on an accepted and coherent organizational pattern;
  • deliver an audience-centered presentation;
  • use language clearly, appropriately, and inclusively and that follows to the grammatical rules of Standard American English; and
  • effectively deliver, in an extemporaneous manner, informative, persuasive and special occasion speeches.

Quantitative Reasoning: Students will:

  • represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically, and verbally, and interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables, and schematics.
  • apply arithmetical, algebraic, geometric and statistical methods with appropriate technological tools to solve problems;
  • think critically and apply common sense in estimating and checking answers to mathematical problems in order to determine reasonableness, identify alternatives, and select optimal results, judging the soundness and accuracy of conclusions derived from quantitative information; and
  • communicate mathematical information effectively using symbols, visual, numerical, or verbal representations.

Critical Thinking: Students will:

  • use critical thinking to recall relevant information accurately, and structure verbal and written message content based on an accepted and coherent organizational pattern;
  • paraphrase, synthesize, and analyze information from multiple sources to explain concepts;
  • analyze information and apply it to new contexts; and
  • utilize information to formulate and support a position. 

Computer Literacy: Students will:

  • define the relationship between hardware and software, in particular, the relationship between hardware and the operating system and the operating system and applications;
  • develop an understanding of privacy and security issues with respect to networks, email, social media and WWW usage;
  • know intellectual property laws with respect to software, music, and video, and understand the ethical use of information for academic and personal purposes;
  • utilize software such as word processing, spreadsheet, and database software to effectively organize, manage, and communicate information; and
  • understand the roles of computers and technology in mass communication, including social media.

Diversity Awareness: Students will:

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the diversity of the local and global communities, including cultural, social, political, and economic differences;
  • analyze, evaluate, and assess the impact of differences in race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, native language, sexual orientation, ableism, age, and religion; and
  • utilize perspectives of diverse groups when conducting analyses, drawing conclusions, and making decisions.

Four of these Skill Areas—Computer Literacy, Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning—are addressed and assessed within the context of specific academic experiences as described below. The development and assessment of Critical Thinking is embedded throughout all components and academic learning experiences of the Wilkes University curriculum.

Students may opt or test out of each skill requirement by demonstrating competency through means designated by the department responsible for each skill area. Please see your academic advisor for more information on program-designated courses that will satisfy these requirements.

Students will develop and demonstrate mastery of the outcomes for Computer Literacy, Written Communication, Oral Communication, and Quantitative Reasoning by means of the following academic experiences:

I. Computer Literacy

Completion of CS-115 (Computers and Applications) or higher

OR

Completion of 2 "Computer Intensive" (CI) courses minimum 3 credit hours

Students who do not complete CS 115 or test out of this Skill Area can satisfy the Computer Literacy requirement by completing courses that appear on the "Computer Intensive" (CI) List. The list of Computer Literacy skills, as well as a list of available CI courses, is available from the Office of the Registrar.

II. Written Communication

Completion of ENG-101 English Composition 4 credit hours

AND

Writing Across the Curriculum: Each undergraduate degree program, as well as the First-Year Foundations Program, incorporates writing and the progressive development of written communication skills into its curriculum. Courses throughout each degree program emphasize writing techniques and styles that are specific to that program of study. Most Senior Capstone courses have a significant writing component that requires proficiency in writing in order to complete the course.

III. Oral Communication

Completion of COM-101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking

OR

Completion of 2 Oral Presentation Option (OPO) courses minimum 3 credit hours

The Office of the Registrar maintains a list of OPO courses. OPO courses enable a specified number of students (or all students) in an approved course to complete the requirements for an OPO course. Satisfaction of the OPO requirement will not, in most cases, add credits to a students' program of study.

IV. Quantitative Reasoning

Completion of MTH-101 Solving Problems Using Mathematics

or higher minimum 3 credit hours

Distribution Areas 24 Credit Hours

Area I. The Humanities minimum 9 credit hours

Student Learning Outcomes in the Humanities:

Students will

  • apply analytical and critical reasoning skills when solving problems (critical judgment);
  • analyze problems by considering diverse and varying forms of evidence and multiple perspectives within global historical and cultural contexts (historical perspective);
  • demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate various ethical codes and belief systems including their own (ethical awareness);
  • use evidence and sound ethical reasoning to frame analyses and defend them. (ethical awareness);
  • demonstrate an awareness and understanding of the diversity and complexity of aesthetic expression (aesthetic expression); and
  • demonstrate the ability to speak and write effectively in languages including, but not restricted to, standard American English (linguistic awareness).

* Students should be able to demonstrate the above outcomes in their writing.

Students must complete three (3) of the courses listed below in order to satisfy the requirements for Distribution Area I: The Humanities.

ENG-120   Introduction to Literature and Culture; and

HST-101 Historical Foundations of the Modern World; and

Foreign Language at level of competence OR 

Any 100-level philosophy course

Students may request, through their academic advisors, a course substitution within this Area. For more details on course substitution policies for Area I, contact the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Forms for course substitution may be obtained from, and completed forms must be returned to, the Student Services Center.

Area II. The Scientific World minimum 6 credit hours

Student Learning Outcomes in the Scientific World:

Students will

  • describe how science affects contemporary issues;
  • access sources of scientific information that are both relevant and reliable;
  • explain ethical issues in the practice of science;
  • communicate scientific concepts effectively;
  • draw logical conclusions based on scientific data;
  • distinguish between scientific evidence and pseudoscience; and
  • explain the development of scientific theories using the scientific method.

Student must complete two (2) of the courses listed below in order to satisfy the requirements for Distribution Area II: The Scientific World. The two courses must be drawn from two different sub-areas of study and at least one of the two selected courses must include a laboratory component. Credit hours vary according to incorporation of the laboratory component.

Sub-AreasCourse Options

Biology BIO-105, BIO-121 or BIO-122

Chemistry CHM-105, CHM-111, CHM-115 (plus CHM-113), CHM-118 (plus CHM-117)

Earth and Environmental Sciences EES-105, EES-230, EES-240, EES-251, EES-271 or GEO-211

Physics PHY-105, PHY-174, or PHY-201 (plus PHY-204)

A number of degree programs satisfy the General Education Curriculum requirements in Area II on the basis of successful completion of the science requirements of the individual degree program. The following programs meet the aforementioned criteria by virtue of the degree curriculum: Biochemistry; Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science (B.S. degree program only); Earth and Environmental Sciences; Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering; Engineering Management; Health Sciences; Mathematics (B.S. degree program only); Nursing; Pre-Pharmacy; and Physics.

Students not enrolled in any of the programs listed above may request, through their academic advisors, a course substitution within this Area. For more details on course substitution policies for Area II, contact the Office of the Dean of the College of  Arts and Sciences. Forms for course substitution can be obtained from, and completed forms must be returned to, the Student Services Center.

Area III. The Behavioral and Social Sciences minimum 6 credit hours

Student Learning Outcomes in the Behavioral and Social Sciences:

Students will

  • critically read and understand tabular data, graphs, or other displays of data; (methodological reasoning);
  • identify independent variables and dependent variables; (methodological reasoning);
  • write or identify a well-formulated hypothesis; (methodological reasoning);
  • recognize and interpret types of relationships between variables (positive and negative); (methodological reasoning);
  • apply one or more conceptual frameworks to an issue or problem (conceptual reasoning); and
  • identify and explain the various factors that influence human behavior. (conceptual reasoning).

Students must complete two (2) of the five (5) courses listed below in order to satisfy the requirements for Distribution Area III: The Behavioral and Social Sciences.

ANT-101

Introduction to Anthropology

EC-102

Principles of Economics II

PS-111

Introduction to American Politics

PSY-101

General Psychology

SOC-101

Introduction to Sociology

 Students may request, through their academic advisors, a course substitution within this Area. For more details on course substitution policies for Area III, contact the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Forms for course substitution can be obtained from, and completed forms must be returned to, the Student Services Center.

Area IV. The Visual and Performing Arts minimum 3 credit hours

Student Learning Outcomes in the Visual and Performing Arts:

Students will meet 3 out of 4 outcomes

  • analyze works of art using vocabulary appropriate to the art form;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between artistic technique and the expression of a work’s underlying concept;
  • analyze the relationship between works of art and the social, historical, global and personal contexts in which they are created or experienced; and
  • engage in the artistic process, including conception, creation, interpretation, and ongoing critical analysis.

Students must complete one (1) of the courses listed below in order to satisfy the requirements of Distribution Area IV: The Visual and Performing Arts.

By means of a successful performance audition and written permission of the Chair of the Division of Performing Arts, students may substitute three (3) credit hours of performance or studio experience for the above course requirement.

By means of a satisfactory artwork portfolio evaluation and written permission of the Chairperson of the Department of Integrative Media and Art, students may substitute three (3) credit hours of studio experience for ART 101.

Permission for course substitutions in Area IV will be granted only in special cases that have received review and approval prior to registration. Students petitioning for Area IV course substitutions in Art must present a portfolio of creative work for review by the chair and faculty of the Department of Integrative Media and Art. Students petitioning for Area IV course substitutions in Dance, Music, or Theatre must schedule an interview with the chair and faculty in the Division of Performing Arts; in some instances, an audition may be required.

For more details on course substitution policies for Area IV, contact the Department of Integrative Media and Art or the Division of Performing Arts and the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Forms for course substitution may be obtained from and completed forms must be returned to, and completed forms must be returned to the Student Services Center. Written permission for course substitutions must be obtained before registering for the course.

Senior Capstone Credits Vary

Each student is required to complete a Senior Capstone course or experience in his or her major field of study as specified in the requirements for each degree program. For details about the capstone course or experience, see the degree requirements for the selected academic program. Satisfaction of this General Education Curriculum requirement will not add credit hours to most students' programs of study.

Thu, 12 May 2022 12:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wilkes.edu/bulletin/current/undergraduate/introduction/degree-programs-curricula/general-education-the-first-component.aspx
Killexams : English Course Listing College Writing I (Formerly 42.101)

Description

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from pre-writing to revision, with an emphasis on critical thinking, sound essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays.

Prerequisites

Anti Req for ENGL.1010 - students cannot receive credit for both ENGL.1010, ENGL.1110 and ENGL.1010S.

College Writing Studio

Description

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the writing process from prewriting to revision, with an emphasis on critical reading, essay structure, mechanics, and academic integrity. Students will read, conduct rhetorical analyses, and practice the skills required for participation in academic discourse. Students will write expository essays throughout the semester, producing a minimum of four formal essays. This 4-credit version of the course provides extra time and guidance each week for critical reading, sentence-level work, and revision. Anti Req for ENGL.1011 and ENGL.1010. Placement test score determines enrollment.

Prerequisites

Anti Req for ENGL.1010 - students cannot receive credit for both ENGL.1010, ENGL.1110 and ENGL.1010S.

Intensive Writing Lab - Supplemental Instruction (Formerly 42.101SI)

Description

Taken simultaneously with College Writing I, the Intensive Writing Lab offers students supplemental instruction to complement their work in that course. Students who place into the Writing Lab will receive extensive training in grammar, mechanics, and the use of Standard English. The once-per-week lab encourages students' success in College Writing I and in their other classes. The course credit cannot be used to satisfy the credits required for graduation, but may be used to satisfy credits required for full time student status.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: ENGL.1010 College Writing.

College Writing II (Formerly 42.102)

Description

A workshop course that thoroughly explores the academic research writing process with an emphasis on entering into academic conversation. Building on the skills acquired in College Writing I, students will learn to write extensively with source material. Key skills addressed include finding,assessing, and integrating primary and secondary sources, and using proper documentation to ensure academic integrity. Students will produce analytical writing throughout the semester, including a minimum of four formal, researched essays.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1010 or ENGL.1110 or HONR.1100 or CW1 Student Group waiver; Anti Req for ENGL.1020 - students cannot receive credit for both ENGL.1020 and ENGL.1120.

College Writing Workshop (Formerly 42.110)

Description

A workshop course that provides a thorough review of the basics of essay writing in preparation for success in College Writing I, with a focus on the particular needs of multilingual students. Students placed into this course will use the writing process to strengthen the fundamental skills necessary for clear academic writing in English, including the basic rules of grammar and principles of rhetoric. Credit for both 42.100/ENGL.1000 and 42.110/ENGL.1100 will not be granted.

Prerequisites

Instructor consent required; Anti req for 42.110 - students cannot receive credit for both 42.110 and 42.100

College Writing A ESL Supplemental Instruction

Description

College Writing A ESL Supplemental Instruction.

College Writing I ESL (formerly 42.103/111)

Description

Satisfies the first half of the first-year writing requirement, equivalent to 42.101 College Writing I, with a focus on the particular needs of multilingual students. Credit for both 42.101 and 42.111 will not be granted, nor credit for both 42.101 and 42.103.

Prerequisites

Instructor consent required; Anti Req for 42.111, 103 - students cannot receive credit for both 42.111 (103) and 42.101.

Supplemental Instruction for College Writing I ESL (Formerly 42.111SI)

Description

Supplemental Instruction for College Writing I ESL.

Prerequisites

Co-Req: ENGL.1110 College Writing I ESL.

College Writing II ESL (formerly 42.104/112)

Description

Satisfies the second half of the first-year writing requirement, equivalent to 42.102 College Writing II, with a focus on the particular needs of multilingual students. Credit for both 42.102 and 42.112 will not be granted, nor credit for both 42.102 and 42.104.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 42.103/111 Col Writing I-Internatl; Anti Req for 42.112, 104 - students cannot receive credit for both 42.112 (104) & 42.102.

College Writing II ESL Supplemental Instruction (Formerly 42.112SI)

Description

College Writing II ESL Supplemental Instruction

Prerequisites

Co-Req: ENGL.1120 College Writing II ESL.

Introduction to Literature

Description

This course, as the name implies, serves as an introduction to literature. We will read and discuss works in the main genres of the short story, short novel, poetry, and drama. In addition to presenting the conventions and development of each of these genres, the course will provide opportunities to strengthen skills in close memorizing and critical thinking.

Critical Methods of Literary Inquiry (Formerly 42.200)

Description

Examination of diverse critical and theoretical approaches to literature in the development of literary analysis.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: Engl.1010, and ENGL.1020, and Must be an English major, or and English minor, or and BLA-writing concentrator, or BLA-literature concentrator, or a Journalism and Professional Writing minor, or Creative Writing minor.

Classical Mythology (Formerly 42.201)

Description

This course takes a literary approach to the mythology of Ancient Greece and Rome. We will explore stories of creation of the world, the fall of Troy, the travels of Odysseus and Theseus, the sins of Oedipus, and the rage of Medea. These texts examine some of the most disturbing and violent of human experiences, as well as some of the most moving: men and women's encounters with community, family, war, death, and love. We will address how these narratives form ethical and social codes that underpin western culture, and devote some attention to how these texts are reinterpreted by later authors. Authors may include Homer, Hesiod, Ovid, Virgil, and the Greek tragedians.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Medieval Myth and Legend

Description

Explores myth and legend in the literatures of England, Europe, and the World in the Middle Ages (500-1500). courses may include dragons, djinns, and King Arthur, as well as knights, chivalry, the storyteller Scheherazade, Dante's walk through the Inferno, werewolves, and magic. We will discover how these fantastic tales negotiate cultural issues like genders, race, and ethnicity, political power, and the creation of art. All readings in modern English translation.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Great Books of the Modern Period (Formerly 42.202)

Description

Much of what we consider "contemporary" was born out of the modernist period, roughly 1900-1950, and was considered radical, even salacious, in its time.This course provides a sampling of modernist literature. Students will explore this period by examining exemplary texts, numerous historical and social events, and a few films.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

English Studies in a Digital Environment (Formerly 42.207)

Description

Students build on skills acquired in College Writing to gain English Studies discipline-speific mastery of the writing conventions, research, and citation practices used in departments of English. In addition, students practice the digital skills that will support them as they join the online learning community of the UML Department of English.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Drama (Formerly 42.210)

Description

Presents a study of plays from the classical period to the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-req or Co-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Poetry (Formerly 42.211)

Description

Studies selections from the Renaissance through contemporary periods.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Short Story (Formerly 42.212)

Description

This course teaches students how to sharpen their critical memorizing skills by learning to think about the short story in terms of its evolution over the last 200 years and by studying its literary techniques and themes. Student practice close, active memorizing as they examine and express their reactions to authors' works Readings may include authors such as Alexie, Alvarez, Baldwin, Bambara, Bechdel, Chekhov, Diaz, Faulkner, Gilman, Hawthorne, Hemingway, Irving, LeGuin, Lispector, Marquez, O'Connor, Poe, and Tolstoy.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Monsters, Apes & Nightmares (Formerly 42.216)

Description

This course examines literary responses to science in England and the United States from the early Nineteenth Century to the present. Readings include novels--Frankenstein, The Island of Doctor Moreau, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Jurassic Park--essays, and poems. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Horror Story (Formerly 42.217)

Description

Explores the genre from Poe to the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Comedy (Formerly 42.218)

Description

Presents the theory and practice of comedy from the Greeks to the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Oral & Written Communication for Computer Science (Formerly 42.220)

Description

The main goal of this course is to enhance the student's understanding of the elements of effective communication, and to put that knowledge into practice in a supportive, co-operative, workshop environment. Limited to Computer Science majors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ENGL 1020 College Writing II; Computer Science Majors only.

Oral Communication (Formerly 42.222)

Description

Develops and applies the basic speaking skills that can be adapted to a variety of personal and professional contexts. Emphasis is placed on selection, analysis, organization and presentation of speech materials. Practice skills include listening, interviewing and the delivery and critique of extemporaneous speeches.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Business Writing (Formerly 42.224)

Description

Studies the theory and practice of writing letters, memoranda and reports on specific business and technical problems. Registration preference for students enrolled in Business programs.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Scientific and Technical Communication (Formerly 42.226)

Description

Studies the theory and practice of letters, memoranda, reports and oral presentations on specific scientific and technical problems.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Essay Writing for English Majors (Formerly 42.227)

Description

Analyzes and discusses the techniques and styles of selected professional essayists as well as the preparation of student essays. Emphasis will be placed on the writing process from prewriting through drafting and revising. English majors and minors only.

Prerequisites

Pre/Co-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and English Majors, or English Minors, or BLA-Writing or BLA-English Concentration Only.

Turning Fiction into Film (Formerly 42.232)

Description

This course explores film adaptation by looking at how writing can be turned into the visual and auditory forms. Through memorizing novels and watching their film adaptations, students learn conventions of fiction and film, and draw on this knowledge to discover the implications of adapting a written story into a movie. By asking students to think about the different ways writers and filmmakers convey meaning to their audiences, this course attempts to answer the question of why the movie is never exactly like the book.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Play Analysis (Formerly 42.233)

Description

An introduction to the principles of play construction and the vocabulary and methods of interpreting play texts for theatrical production. Required of all theatre arts concentrators.

Science Fiction and Fantasy (Formerly 42.236)

Description

Designed to introduce students to understand science fiction and fantasy within the broader context of literature and literary theory. It attempts to develop and hone student's skills of critical analysis as it supplies them with the tools to contextualize their memorizing experience - i.e., to understand the origins and politics of the books that they read.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Introduction to Creative Writing (Formerly 42.238)

Description

A course for aspiring creative writers among freshman and sophomores which offers an introduction to the craft of creative writing in its primary genres: poetry, fiction, drama, creative non-fiction (emphases will vary depending upon instructor). The focus of this course will be on learning the fundamentals of craft techniques and peer review.

Prerequisites

Pre/Co-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and English Majors, or English Minors, or BLA-Writing or BLA-English Concentration Only.

Introduction to Creative Writing (All Majors)

Description

This course is an introductory level workshop in creative writing. Students will read and discuss works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction by established writers, and practice craft in all three genres through short exercises and assignments. Students will have an opportunity to workshop their creative work, and critique peer works. Class time will e divided between brief lectures on specific aspects of writing, craft techniques, group discussions of assigned reading, in-class writing exercises, and discussion of student writing assignments. This course is open to all majors.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1010 College Writing I.

Introduction to Professional Writing (Formerly 42.239)

Description

This course offers an introduction to different types of professional writing, including journalism, technical writing, business writing, and other professional communication. Focus in the course will be on understanding the rhetorical situation, including the audience, purpose, and context of each communication task. Students will learn how to work effectively and ethically in a collaborative and professional environment. Students may not earn credit for both 42.227 and 42.239.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Literature and Women (Formerly 42.240)

Description

A survey of literary attitudes toward women from the Judaic and Hellenic periods through the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Heroine in Modern Fiction (Formerly 42.242)

Description

Provides a study of selected short stories and novels which deal sympathetically with the changing roles of women.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Contemporary Women Writers (Formerly 42.243)

Description

Contemporary Women Writers introduces students to American women writers of the last fifty years. We examine the historical,socio-cultural, political, and personal influences on these writers' work by studying trends and events in exact American history and themes reflected in the works. By studying contemporary women's writing in this contextualized fashion, students can appreciate larger trends in our society, the role writing plays in examining such trends, and the value of literature as an exploration of human growth and struggle. Through discussion, group collaboration, critical analysis, and by designing their own graphic organizers, students gain a breadth of knowledge in the following areas: the themes and stylistic concerns of contemporary American women writers; the key historical events that influence contemporary American women's writing; the critical memorizing of literary texts. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Gay & Lesbian Literature (Formerly 42.246)

Description

Explores the treatment of homoeroticism and homosexual love in literature from Antiquity to the present. Emphasis is given to texts reflecting the construction of a homosexual identity and recurring motifs among gay, lesbian, and bisexual writers. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature on Technology and Human Values (Formerly 42.249)

Description

A study of the relationship between works of fiction, cultural attitudes toward technology, and social values. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Bible as Literature (Formerly 42.250)

Description

Presents a literary and historical analysis of selected Old and New Testament books.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

War in Literature (Formerly 42.251)

Description

In "War in Lierature" we will study conflict and human values in times of war, focusing on the literature of World War I, World War II, Vietnam, and the Gulf War. Content covered includes a selection of representative (and divergent) literary texts written throughout the 20th century in a variety of genres (poetry, essays, memoir, short story, novel, and hybrid forms like the "graphic novel"). Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Culture of American Sport (Formerly 42.253)

Description

An examination of the history, literature, sociology, and aesthetics of sport. Attention to corollary issues and values including racism, sexism, and violence.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Family in American Literature (Formerly 42.257)

Description

A study of literary selections dealing with traditions of family life, the individual, and social change. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Disability in Literature (Formerly 42.258)

Description

This course explores how texts -- including novels, short stories, poems, memoirs, essays, plays, and videos -- portray people with disabilities. We will consider the problematic stereotypes about disabilities that sometimes appear in popular culture and literary depictions, and read texts that provide insight into a diverse community of people with a range of disabilities.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Discovering Shakespeare (Formerly 42.267)

Description

This class introduces students to some of the Bard's most popular and accessible plays. We will learn to understand Shakespeare's language and see how the plays were produced in Renaissance England, as well as examine his living legacy, in theater, film, and popular culture, throughout the modern world today . No previous experience with Shakespeare needed. Old Title: Introduction to Shakespeare.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Robin Hood: From Outlaw to Icon

Description

From its medieval origins, the Robin Hood stories developed over centuries from violent rebel to aristocratic hero. This class will explore the English folk tale as it transitioned from stories of men in the forest, to commentary on the clergy and aristocracy, to tales of economic justice as Robin Hood stole form the rich and gave to the poor. The larger part of the class will study the literary and cultural traditions from medieval to nineteenth-century depictions. The latter part will investigate how Robin Hood moved from England to America, and from books to films, culminating in exact Hollywood blockbusters.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Vikings

Description

An introduction to Norse mythology, sagas, and culture. The class will read translations of medieval texts recalling traditions of the old Norse gods and their cults during the Viking Age (ca. 800-1050 AD), as these were preserved in 13th-century Icelandic texts, but also in Latin, Arabic, Old High German, Old Swedish and Old English manuscripts and runic inscriptions. Students will explore the worldview and value system of this unique culture, and examine relations, often violent but sometimes comic or friendly, between groups of highly intelligent, vulnerable beings, both living and dead, male and female, animal and human, god and giant - a crowded universe full of trolls, elves witches, dwarfs, valkyries, berserks, shapeshifters, and various social classes of human beings.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1010/S College Writing I, or ENGL.1020 College Writing II, or HONR.110 First Year Seminar in Honors:Text in the City.

Modern European Fiction (Formerly 42.272)

Description

A study of selected fiction by major continental writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

American Ethnic Literature (Formerly 42.277)

Description

The course addresses the literature of America's immigrant and cultural groups and how it contributes to defining our national character. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Introduction to Latinx Literature

Description

Describing a wide range of racial and ethnic denominations, Latinx is a complicated term which this course will examine the trouble. This course emphasizes the historical and aesthetic networks established in the Latinx literary canon that continue into the present, while also exploring the relationship between genre and socio-historical issues. memorizing from a diverse tradition that reflects the contested definition of "Latinx" and its shifting demographics in the U.S., this course investigates how U.S. Latinx literature speaks to and expands "American" literary traditions, and how unique ethnic identities such as the Mexican American, Dominican American, Cuban American, or mainland Puerto Rican offer different yet interconnecting representations of what it means to be Latinx in the U.S.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

British Literary Traditions (Formerly 42.281)

Description

A survey of British Literary history from the medieval through the modernist periods.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or English Majors.

American Literary Traditions (Formerly 42.282)

Description

A survey of American Literary history from early contact between Native American populations and European colonists through contemporary American writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or English Majors.

World Literature in Translation I

Description

A survey of world literature (works outside British and American literary traditions) through 1660; all course readings are translated into English. Students will become familiar with conventions of different literary genres, including epic and lyric poetry, drama, fables and folktales, and religious and philosophical texts. The course also provides the major cultural, religious, and political contexts of the literary texts. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or English Majors.

World Literature in Translation II

Description

A survey of world literature (works outside British and American literary traditions) since 1660; all course readings are translated into English. Students will become familiar with conventions of various literary genres, including short and long fiction, autobiography, lyric poetry, and drama. The course also provides the major cultural, religious, and political contexts of the literary texts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

Crime in Literature (Formerly 42.285)

Description

A study of how various authors use crime as a plotting device to study character, reveal social order, and critique social institutions. This course will focus particularly on detective and mystery fiction, sketching the history and development of these genres. Students might also study fiction and film outside these genres that explore significant questions of crime or criminality. Ultimately, students will think about how fictional representations of criminals, victims, policing, gender, and race relate to cultural assumptions and expectations. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Graphic Narrative: Comics in Context (Formerly 42.286)

Description

While picture-images date as far back as sthe Egyptian tombs, or the caves of Lascaux, this course wiill consider the development of the modern comic in twentieth-and twenty-first century America. Readings will include not just comics, but also the history of comics, art and literary theory, a novel about comics, and articles that consider the legal, political, and social issues surrounding comics. We will also look at traditional and contemporary comic strips and graphic novels to explore what we can learn from them about American Popular Culture. Comics are on the cutting edge of contemporary literature, and there are many avenues to pursue in the study of this narrative form. This course will include intensive memorizing and writing, and will ask students to engage with demanding theoretical works, in addition to incorporating a considerable amount of research. While the subject matter can be lighthearted the course takes these texts seriously, and asks for intellectual engagement with the issues and concerns of culture depicted in these words and pictures. (Full proposal and supplemental material available).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

History of English Literature I (Formerly 42.291)

Description

A survey of representative writers and works from the Anglo-Saxon period to the mid-seventeenth century.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

History of English Literature II (Formerly 42.292)

Description

A survey of representative writers and works from Milton into the twentieth century.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

History of American Literature I (Formerly 42.294)

Description

Studies the historical development of American literature from the Colonial period to the Civil War. Selected works by representative authors from each period are studied.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

History of American Literature II (Formerly 42.295)

Description

Studies the historical development of American literature from the Civil War to World War I.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Children's Literature (Formerly 42.298)

Description

A survey course covering traditional and contemporary children's literature. Texts are selected to represent different historical periods and a diversity of authorial perspectives. Attention is given to changing views of children and childhood as reflected in selected texts.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Intro to Journalism (Formerly 42.300)

Description

An introduction to techniques of writing for the news media.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ENGL1020 College Writing II and ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Creative Writing: Fiction (Formerly 42.302)

Description

Studies the theory and practice of fiction. Conducted as a workshop with close analysis of student work.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2381 Intro to Creative Writing for all Majors.

Creative Writing: Poetry (Formerly 42.303)

Description

Discusses the theory and practice of poetry. Conducted as a workshop with close analysis of student work.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2381 Intro to Creative Writing for all Majors.

Creative Writing: Playwriting (Formerly 42.304)

Description

Studies the theory and practice of playwriting. Conducted as a workshop with close analysis of student work.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.233. Play Analysis, or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2381 Intro to Creative Writing for all Majors.

Reviewing the Arts (Formerly 42.305)

Description

Theory and practice of writing short, critical essays in a journalistic mode on the visual and performing arts. Special attention to theater, movie, and television criticism. Conducted as a workshop with close analysis of student work.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II and ENGL.2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Intermediate Professional Writing (Formerly 42.306)

Description

This course develops more advanced skills in professional writing and communication. Students will focus on analyzing and responding to professional writing situations, in which they will consider purpose and audience. Students will work in a collaborative and professional environment. This course may include a service-learning component. Contact the instructor for more information.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 1020 College Writing ll, and ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/English Majors, or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

History of the English Language (Formerly 42.307)

Description

Explores the origins and structure of the English language, tracing the ways that English has evolved from Old English through Middle English to the varieties of Modern English in England and its former colonies, including the United States. We will also examine the literary, social, and political implications of these developments, for instance the evolution of Standard English or the use of dialects. The course does not assume any knowledge of Old or Middle English.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Structure and Variation of the English Language

Description

This course introduces students to a variety of approaches to the contemporary English language, with a focus on both structure and variation. Students will explore how English works in terms of its sounds (phonetics and phonology), words (morphology), sentence structures (syntax), meanings (semantics), and uses (discourse). Areas of variation may include social and regional dialects, World Englishes, accents, pidgins, creoles, multilingualism, language acquisition, registers, style, literacy, media, power, and identity. The course will also address attitudes towards language (language ideology), and the implications of language issues for education, work, policy, and everyday life.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Writing Popular Fiction (Formerly 42.310)

Description

This course is designed for students who are interested in writing in one or more of the popular forms of genre fiction: the mystery, the horror story, science fiction, fantasy, romance, and the thriller. Class time will be spent discussing and work-shopping student writing. Some time will also be devoted each week to brief lectures on practical matters like choosing between the short story and the novel, finding ideas, constructing plots, building characters, pacing, generating suspense, and marketing one's work. In addition, there will be assigned readings to illustrate the above.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The South in American Literature (Formerly 42.311)

Description

A study of the writers, movements, and social culture of the South, from both the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of Colonial America (Formerly 42.312)

Description

This course will explore the literatures (including some selections in translation) written during America's colonial era. The periods of exploration, first encounters, settlement, the rise of Anglo-America, the emergence of a national sensibility, and the years of transition in the new republic will be considered. The course will also treat a small selection of nineteenth century texts that present visions and re-visions of the colonial past.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of New England Witch Trials

Description

This course focuses on accounts of witchcraft and witchcraft trials, including traditions imported from England and both little-known and infamous cases in the American colonies. We'll read original court transcripts and non-fiction, fiction, and poetry about the trials created during the period and down through to the present day. Notable cases to be discussed include The Witches of Warboys, England (1593), Mary Parsons of Northampton, Massachusetts (1656, 1674), Mary Webster of Hadley, Massachusetts (1683), the Connecticut Witchcraft Trials (1647 to 1663), and the Salem Witch Trials (1692), Authors include Cotton Mather, Benjamin Franklin, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Margaret Atwood. Students will write several short papers and develop a final project of their own design.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Realism and Naturalism American Fiction (Formerly 42.313)

Description

A study of realism and naturalism in fiction from the end of the Civil War to World War I.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Old English Language and Literature (Formerly 42.315)

Description

Students will acquire memorizing knowledge of the Old English Language, spending half the semester mastering grammar and vocabulary, and the second half translating texts such as The Wanderer, Dream of the Rood, and Beowulf. Attention will also be given to early medieval cultures in England.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Middle English: Literature and Language (1066-1500)

Description

England in the 11th century had a multi-lingual and diverse culture, with French, German, Scandinavian, and Latin speakers interacting daily. By 1500, England was English-speaking, with various dialects of Middle English emerging from this linguistic mix. In this class, students will learn to read and analyze the dialects of Middle English, translating text such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Harley Lyrics, the York Plays, and the Canterbury Tales from their original language. We will learn and apply the rules of grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary. Students will analyze critically questions of creolization, dialect and social class, and the emergence of print culture.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

British Literature of the Twentieth Century (Formerly 42.317)

Description

A study of twentieth-century British short stories, poetry, and drama.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Personal and Reflective Writing (Formerly 42.320)

Description

A workshop format encourages peer criticism of individual writings and discussion of models from various texts.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing, or Permission of Instructor.

Community Writing I (Formerly 42.321)

Description

Students work on various writing projects the professor brings into the classroom on behalf of local non-profit organizations. This service learning course provides opportunities for students to learn through thoughtful engagement with the community, applying kowledge of writing gained in the classroom to real world problems. The course will be held in a workshop format with strong emphasis on revision.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ENGL1020 College Writing II and ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Creative Writing: Creative Non-fiction I (Formerly 42.322)

Description

An intermediate level creative writing workshop in nonfiction (personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, etc.).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2381 Intro to Creative Writing for all Majors.

Writing About Place (Formerly 42.324)

Description

Writers throughout time have been thoroughly grounded in place. Students in this course will read and write on a variety of topics: travel, cities, suburbs, dwelling places, nature, environmental issues, etc., in a variety of genres: creative non-fiction, essays, journalism, short stories, poetry, journals. This course will be held in a workshop format with strong emphasis on revision.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing, or Permission of Instructor.

Writing about the Environment

Description

From John Muir to Rachel Carson to Bill McKibben, environmentalists have traditionally relied upon the power of their prose to transform the thoughts and behavior of their contemporaries. Stemming form the premise that writing is a form of environmental action, this course introduces students to a range of modes of writing in environmental studies. In the process of reading, discussing and practicing different kinds of environmental writing, students will develop a variety of writing skill in addition to an appreciation for writing as an important form of environmental action.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and Co-req: ENGL.2270 Essay Writing for English majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing, or ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

The Rise of the Novel (Formerly 42.325)

Description

A study of the British novel in the eighteenth century, as it increased significantly in publication, sales, and cultural prominence. We explore the relation between formal elements (narrative, dialogue, plotting), philosophical questions (the nature of the self, the good society), and cultural and historical contexts (industrialization, middle class culture, the sexual double standard). Along with canonical authors such as Defoe, Richardson, and Austen, students will read other popular novels form the period, as well as texts such as spiritual autobiographies, criminal profiles, and advertisements.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Victorian Fiction (Formerly 42.327)

Description

A study of fiction from 1837 through 1901. May include memorizing and writing about texts by Dickens, Collins, Gaskell, Bronte, Eliot, Thackeray, Trollope, Hardy, Wilde, and others.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Writing About Women (Formerly 42.328)

Description

Writing About Women

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II and ENGL.2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Twentieth Century British Novel (Formerly 42.330)

Description

A study of the novel from Conrad through Greene and others.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

American Novels to 1900 (Formerly 42.331)

Description

with the emergence of novels labeled "American," novelists explored the role of the frontier, the shift from an agricultural to an industrial society, the rise of social reform movements, the impact and legacy of slavery, the influence of science and technology, the debate over gender roles and expectations, and the role of the artist/writer within American culture. The novels in this course, all written before 1900, allow us to explore the issues that a selection of American novelists treat within their fiction as well as to consider the debates that occurred over the nature of narrative.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Twentieth Century American Novel

Description

A study of the American novel from 1900 to the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Banned Books

Description

This course examines novels that are among those most frequently challenged, censored, or banned from schools, colleges, and libraries in the United States. Many of these books are considered modern literary classics, and several of them have won prestigious awards. But these books also contain language and ideas that have sometimes been considered politically subversive, socially disruptive, sexually explicit, or offensive. In addition to the novels, course courses include the history of censorship and current debates about freedom of expression and literary value.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

American Autobiography (Formerly 42.333)

Description

A Study of autobiographical writing from Colonial America to the present. Works from the 17th to the 21st century will allow students to explore the genre of autobiography and related sub-genres, including the captivity narrative, the slave narrative, and the immigration narrative. Readings will also explore literary and political autobiographies. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Autobiographies of Paris Modernism

Description

Students in this course study autobiographies of important figures of modernism in Paris and can expect to learn about the genre of autobiography and modernism as an artistic movement, particularly how modernist ideals manifested across several genres.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

American Women Novelists (Formerly 42.335)

Description

A study of selected novels by American women. Focus on the female voice within the American tradition. Treatment of such issues as domesticity, education, and authorship. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Beowulf and Heroic Literature (Formerly 42.336)

Description

We will read Beowulf in translation, and discuss contemporary approaches to the poem. We will also study other Old English works such as Judith, as well as Frankish and Old Norse-Icelandic literature in translation to gain a cultural context for Beowulf. May include discussion of how later works, such as those of J.R.R. Tolkien or modern fantasy writers have been influenced by these medieval epics.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

The Gothic Tradition in Literature (Formerly 42.337)

Description

This course will consider works that fall under the very broad genre known as "The Gothic." As this genre is one of highly contested boundaries, we will consider how to define the Gothic, and what exactly constitutes this form. We will look at texts from both England and America, and spanning from the late 18th century to our own times. Our study will focus on the form of the novel, and the development and emergence of the gothic novel from its beginnings in England to its contemporary manifestations in the United States.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Medieval Women Writers (Formerly 42.338)

Description

Woman have always written and read and participated in culture. This class will explore writings on literary and non-literary genres by woman in the European Middle Ages (600-1500). Students will learn how different pre-modern cultural conditions affected the possibilities for women's authorship, readership, and patronage. We will also examine how women writers interacted with literary traditions and constructions of gender.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Studies in Film (Formerly 42.341)

Description

A rigorous examination of a course of current interests in film studies organized by particular themes, genres or filmmakers.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

International Cinema Studies: French New Wave

Description

This course will introduce students to the aesthetic and theoretical qualities that define the New Wave movement in French cinema, focusing on major directors, performers, and composers associated with the New Wave. Through the close intertextual comparison of a range of films contextualized through the historical lens of 1960s Paris, students will develop sophisticated analyses that combine elements of film theory and cultural studies. This semester, we will read contemporary criticism, manifestos, mid-century French philosophy, and secondary scholarly studies to ground our discussions and writing in appropriate historical and theoretical context.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

Women Writers and the Past (Formerly 42.342)

Description

Women Writers and the Past. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Women in Theatre (Formerly 42.344)

Description

A study of the significant contributions of women to the literature and art of the theatre in various periods and cultures. courses may include: plays written by women, the progress of women in theater, the evolution of female roles, and the portrayal of feminism on the stage.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

British Women Novelists (Formerly 42.345)

Description

Selected novels by writers such as Austen, the Brontes, Eliot, Woolf, Bowen, and Drabble. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Homer's Iliad and Odyssey (Formerly 42.346)

Description

This class will explore the story of the ancient city of Troy from its origins in Homeric epic and classical drama to some of its many European iterations beginning with Vergil's Aeneid. Students will examine how these Trojan texts encode narratives of gender,ethnicity, and welfare, and how they help create an occidental European identity.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

Modern American Drama (Formerly 42.348)

Description

A study of such playwrights as O'Neill, Odets, Wilder, Williams, and Miller.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Arthurian Literature (Formerly 42.349)

Description

Will examine works in modern English translation from a variety of genres (romance, history, tragedy, epic) that tell stories of the mythical King Arthur and the knights and ladies of his courtly world. The course will focus primarily on texts of the medieval and renaissance periods, but will include attention to nineteenth- and twentieth-century versions in poetry, prose, art, music and film.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of the Middle Ages (Formerly 42.351)

Description

This course will examine a variety of medieval genres: epic, chanson de geste, romance, fable, lyric, and drama. We will analyze the circumstances under which the works were produced (orally and in manuscript) and imagine how they may have been read by men and women in their day. Texts are selected from the courtly pursuits of the aristocrats and from the popular, religious rituals and writings of the rising merchant class. We will also provide some attention to medievalism, that is , how the middle ages have been perceived and transformed by contemporary cultures.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Renaissance Literature (Formerly 42.352)

Description

A study of English prose and poetry of the period.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of the Seventeenth Century (Formerly 42.353)

Description

A study of English prose and poetry of the period excluding Milton.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of the Romantic Period (Formerly 42.355)

Description

A study of English prose and poetry from 1798-1832.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literature of the Victorian Period (Formerly 42.356)

Description

A study of British fiction, poetry, and prose from 1837 to 1901.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Medieval & Renaissance Theater (Formerly 42.360)

Description

A study of Medieval mystery cycles, morality plays, interludes, and other forms of popular and court theater.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Restoration Comedy (Formerly 42.361)

Description

A study of comic plays from 1660 to the mid-eighteenth century. Focus on the works of Ethridge, Wycherley, Congreve, and Sheridan.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Modern Drama (Formerly 42.362)

Description

A study of selected Continental, British and American plays of the late nineteenth century to the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

English Renaissance Drama (Formerly 42.363)

Description

A study of major dramatists of the Age of Shakespeare including Marlowe, Dekker, Webster, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher, Massinger, Ford and others

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

African American Drama (Formerly 42.364)

Description

A study of the history and development of African American drama, with emphasis on major aesthetic, political, and social movements in African American culture. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Creative Writing: Poetry II (Formerly 42.366)

Description

Combines discussion and critique of student poems with readings in contemporary poetry and poetics. The focus is on enabling students to develop their individual voices, forms, and subjects.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 42.303 Creative Writing: Poetry.

Feature Writing (Formerly 42.368)

Description

This writing-oriented course will focus on learning how to write feature stories for newspapers, magazines, and the Internet.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: (ENGL 1020 College Writing College Writing II or HONR.1100) and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing).

Sports Writing

Description

This course will explore the practice, theory, and context of sports writing. In the course, students will write in a variety of sports related genres: the game story, the feature, and the column, as well as online related work, such as a blog. The course will also discuss the meaning of sports; Sports writing often covers subjects that range beyond its genre, which is why it can be so evocative, funny, sad and profound.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Reading and Writing New Media (Formerly 42.369)

Description

This course will focus on learning how to write for electronic media and understanding the changing world of journalism.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: (ENGL 1020 College Writing College Writing II or HONR.1100) and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing).

History and Theory of Media

Description

In this course, students will explore the history of media to better understand the relationship between technology and public discourse. Throughout the semester, students will examine online archives featuring material from a variety of new and old media. Class meetings will be devoted to the examination of several shared case studies to introduce students to primary source research. Throughout the semester, students will conduct a series of small investigative projects.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Contemporary American Fiction (Formerly 42.370)

Description

Discusses novels and short fiction from World War II to the present.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

The Literature of the Beat Movement (Formerly 42.274/ENGL.2740)

Description

Explores both the writings and the personal lives of a loose confederation of poets, novelists, and essayist who emerged onto the American literary and cultural scene following World War II and who came to be known as the -Beat Generation.+ The primary focus will be on the life and writings of Lowell native Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) with others of the -beat circle+ included as well, i.e., Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Diana DiPrima, etc.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Modern Poetry (Formerly 42.373)

Description

A study of the development of British and American poetry from 1900 through World War II.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Contemporary Poetry (Formerly 42.374)

Description

A study of selected British and American Poets since World War II.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Modern Irish Literature (Formerly 42.375)

Description

Poetry, drama, and prose fiction from the Irish literary renaissance to the present. Writers will include Yeats, Joyce, O'Casey, Friel and Heaney.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

African-American Literature (Formerly 42.376)

Description

A study of selected works by black American writers, such as Toomer, Wright, Ellison, Walker, and Morrison. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Native American Renaissance

Description

Students in this course will examine and discuss fiction, poetry and autobiographical writings by four of the seminal figures of the Native American Renaissance: N.Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo and James Welch. Collectively, these writers helped restore modes of traditional cultural expression and historical perspective long imperiled by the histories of European and U.S. Colonialism in the Americas. Their work is also deeply imbued with concerns for the landscape and ecology, including in regards to conditions within the reservation system. Additionally, we'll pay sizeable attention to critical assessments of the Native American Renaissance as offered in the work of figures such as Paula Gunn Allen, Louis Owens, Gerald Vizenor and others.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Theories of Rhetoric and Composition (Formerly 42.377)

Description

This course will examine the history and theories of composition and rhetoric, studying the field from its inception to more exact developments and challenges. We will also explore our own writing processes and literary practices. The course is furthermore grounded on the idea that literary practices are shaped by our culture. The course introduces practical approaches to as well as theoretical frameworks beneficial for those interested in composition studies. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Applied & Integrative Learning (AIL).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

Asian American Literature (Formerly 42.378)

Description

Asian Americans hold an intriguing place in the cultural imagination: as perpetual foreigners, as so-called 'model minorities' that serve to maintain hegemonic power relations, and as living embodiments of America's memory of its involvement in exact wars. As artists, however, Asian Americans have contributed and impressive body of literary work, and we'll examine some of the most enduring and provocative of these texts. We'll explore themes such as trauma and the immigrant experience, issues of exile and dislocation, Asian Americans' embattled place in our country's history, and the intersections of race and ethnicity with gender and sexuality. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Diversity and Cultural Awareness (DCA) and Social Responsibility & Ethics (SRE).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Postcolonial Literature (Formerly 42.379)

Description

When the peoples of Africa, India, the Caribbean, Ireland, and Canada finally gained, to a greater and lesser extent, independence from the British during the 20th century, they found that their national, cultural, and individual identities had been radically altered by the experience of colonization. In this course, we will examine how authors have related this postcolonial condition. We will examine a diverse body of texts--poetry which eloquently describe the heroic journey out of colonialism, drama which lays bare the conflicts of assimilation, and novels which fantastically present political struggle--as we determine how postcolonial theory and literature affects and possibly redefines all literature.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II, or permission of instructor.

Literature of the Americas

Description

A course that introduces students to literary works across the hemisphere by considering their different, interrelated times, geographies, and languages. The course practices and up-to-date American literary study, one in which "America" signifies not just the United States, but, within and beyond the territorial boundaries of the U.S., other modalities of knowing, being, and collectivity in the hemisphere--and, indeed, the world.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Travel Literature

Description

We all yearn to travel. But why? In this course, we will investigate this question by not only studying works of travel writing (supposedly non-fiction travel accounts written by those who have done the journeying), but also other works of literature and culture in which travel is a significant theme. Our memorizing will cover a diversity of writers from around the globe and from different periods in history and we will pay particular attention to the interrelationship amongst the key issues of representation, power, and identity as we consider travel literature alongside interdisciplinary theories about travel and tourism.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Theatre History I: Ancient Greece through the 18th Century (Formerly 42.382)

Description

A survey of ancient to early modern theatre in its historical and social contexts, tracing changes and developments in acting styles, theatre architecture, scenic practices, dramatic literature, and the audience. The course examines how theatre both reflects and shapes the changing beliefs and priorities of a culture.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Theatre History II: Nineteenth Century to the Present (Formerly 42.383)

Description

A survey of theatre in its historical and social contexts from the 19th century to the present, focusing on innovations in design and technology, the advent of the director, the emergence of modern schools of acting, and the creation of new forms of theatre to suit the changing needs of a modern world.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Editing: Grammar and Style (Formerly 42.386: The Science of Editing)

Description

The course will examine the varied editing roles in a publishing company, from acquisitions to copy editing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.2000 Critical Methods, or ENGL.2270 Essay Writing, or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing,

Introduction to Editing and Publishing (Formerly 42.387)

Description

Designed for students considering a career in book publishing, this course provides an overview of the publishing industry. You will examine the stages of the book publishing process from acquisition to bound book or e-book, using assignments and examples from school, college, and trade book publishing. You will also consider the specific responsibilities of an editor. The course includes class visits by authors, editors, or publishing executives, as well as a trip to a local printing company.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II and ENGL.2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Undergraduate Seminar on the Teaching of Writing (Formerly 42.388)

Description

Training in writing theory for direct application in peer tutoring. Discussion supplemented by experimental exercises, class presentations, reading, and writing. Meets two hours each week. Students tutor four hours each week.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2000 Critical Methods, or ENGL 2270 Essay Writing, or ENGL 2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing, with a B or better, or Spring 2020 grade of "P".

Writing on the Job (Formerly 42.391)

Description

A study of special problems of writing in business from memos and press releases through reports and proposals, including strategies for correspondence, presentation of complex information, and writing for diverse audiences. For English majors and minors.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: (ENGL 1020 College Writing College Writing II or HONR.1100) and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing).

Visual Rhetoric (Formerly 42.392)

Description

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of visual communication. Students will explore what scholars mean by terms such as visual rhetoric and visual literacy in order to think concretely about how these concepts apply to the communication practices they will engage in their academic, professional, and everyday life. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which visual representations communicate culturally-specific meanings about race, gender, class, sexuality, age, nationality, and difference. Assignments include contributions to a course blog, rhetorical analyses of visual texts, design modules, and a multimodal project.

Prerequisites

Pre-req:(ENGL 1020 College Writing II or HONR.1100), and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing, or ENGL 2000 Critical Methods or ENGL 2390 Intro to Professional Writing).

Rhetorics of Social Movements

Description

This course examines the communication strategies used to build social movements and agitate for social change: What genres and persuasive tactics are used to identify social problems and attract people to participate in a social movement? What means of communication sustain the energy around and investment in social movements? How do people use language to silence or otherwise reject calls for social change? What role d journalists play in bringing attention to social movements? Students are introduced to social movement studies and analyze the rhetoric of historical movements in order to ultimately evaluate the persuasive strategies used in social movements happening today.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.2000 Critical Methods of Literary, or ENGL.2390 Introduction to Professional Writing.

Special courses in English (Formerly 42.395)

Description

This course focuses on the exploration of thematic or issue-oriented or timely courses of interest. The precise courses and methods of each section will vary. Barring duplication of topic, the course may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Topics in Latinx Literature and Culture

Description

This course focuses on thematic or issue-oriented courses in Latinx literature and culture. courses and methods will vary each section, but courses might include: "Monsters, Hauntings, and the Nation," which examines Latinx horror to understand how the genre addresses the unique experience of Latinx people in the Americas. memorizing from a wide variety of Latinx texts, students will gain a deeper understanding of the capacities of horror to depict the foundational yet spectral presence of Latinx people in the "American" imaginary.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Topics in Multiethnic Literature and Culture

Description

This course explores thematic or issue-oriented courses in multiethnic literature and culture. The precise courses and methods of each section will vary.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Selected Authors (Formerly 42.401)

Description

A study of selected works. Authors to be announced each semester.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Topics in Writing (Formerly 42.402)

Description

A study of issues and the practice of skills needed in specific areas of professional writing. courses to be announced each semester..

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing, or Permission of Instructor.

Community Writing II (Formerly 42.406)

Description

Students work for a local non-profit for the semester completing a variety of writing tasks, depending on the placement. In class students apply the principles of rhetoric and use the tools of research and revision to write effectively for their community partner; to articulate in a public presentation a thoughtful, intelligent position on relevant social policy; and to become more active, engaged citizens.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: (ENGL 1020 College Writing II or HONR.1100), and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing).

Grant Writing

Description

Professionals in a number of careers need to be able to use writing to fund-raise their non-profit organization, business, school, governmental office, and creative enterprises. Students in this class will gain a solid understanding of how one writes a grant form start to finish. This is a hands-on, workshop class with a strong emphasis on process and refection about learning and civic engagement.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.2390 Introduction to Professional Writing, or Permission of Instructor.

Creative Writing Fiction II (Formerly 42.407)

Description

Creative Writing Fiction II

Prerequisites

Pre-req: 42.302 Creative Writing: Fiction.

Principles of Technical Writing (Formerly 42.408)

Description

Provides the fundamental concepts and principles of technical writing, including technical description, audience analysis, editions, document specifications and outlines, graphics, definitions and revising documents. Writing assignments include preparing a document specification, editing and creating graphics.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing, or ENGL.2270 Essay Writing/English Majors, or ENGL.2290 Essay Writing.

Advanced Software Writing (Formerly 42.413)

Description

Introduces a range of advanced topice in software writing. courses may include electronic publishing, hyper text, adanced graphics, document set components, and working in project teams. In this course, the student selects some aspect of the computer industry that interets him/her and documents it.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: 42.412 Software Writing.

Young Adult Literature-Critical Methods (Formerly 42.415)

Description

Using young adult literature as a vehicle, this course considers traditional methods of interpretation and evaluation. Particular attention is given to the analytical, psychological and sociological approaches.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Creative Writing: Creative Non-fiction II (Formerly 42.418)

Description

An advanced creative writing workshop in nonfiction (personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, etc.).

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2381 Intro to Creative Writing for all Majors.

Shakespeare I (Formerly 42.423)

Description

A study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies. Meets Core Curriculum Essential Learning Outcome for Information Literacy (IL) and Written & Oral Communication (WOC).

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Shakespeare II (Formerly 42.424)

Description

A study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies not covered in 42.243. Shakespeare I is not a prerequisite.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Virginia Woolf

Description

The purpose of this course is to explore a range of works by Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), on of British modernism's most innovative writers of fiction and criticism, who also significantly shaped the contours of twentieth- and twenty-first-century English feminism. We will read selections from Woolf's writings in several genres, as well as one important exact example of Wool-centric biofiction.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

The Harlem Renaissance

Description

This course will introduce students to African-American fiction, drama, poetry, nonfiction, art, music, and film of the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance marks a seminal historical moment in which writers, musicians, and artists of the African Diaspora (particularly African-Americans, West Indians, and Africans) produced a complex body of written and visual text that drew upon the complexities of black life.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Introduction to Literary Theory (Formerly 42.429)

Description

A solid introduction to major trends in contemporary critical theory. Emphasis on producing a sample critical paper treating one or more current critical approaches to memorizing a literary text.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Introduction to Digital Humanities

Description

This course is an introduction to the field of digital humanities, which explores interpretive questions about history, culture, and meaning using computational analysis, data visualization, and the critical analysis of technology. We will focus on how computers and digital technologies are used to preserve, analyze, and create works of literature. Students will learn how to use different digital methods and will design and complete a digital project related to their own interests. No programming experience is required.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Literary Journalism (Formerly 42.435)

Description

This course that looks at the genre of Literary Journalism, a largely American Innovation in literature that developed in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Students will closely read and discuss books and articles by literary journalists, seeking to understand the genesis and shifts of this hybridized form (literary techniques applied to true or fact-based stories), and the contributions literary journalism is making to literature, to documentary and witness narratives, to historical records, and to the notions of truth reportage.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req; (ENGL 1020 College Writing II or HONR.1100), and (ENGL 2270 Essay Writing, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2000 Critical Methods).

Writing About Culture (Formerly 42.436)

Description

In this course, students will write about local culture, using a mix of first-hand observation, archival research, and/or contextual or geographic readings of culture of literature produced in the region. This course is designed to serve as a course in a study abroad program or one that focuses on regional authors such as Jack Kerouac or Henry David Thoreau.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2000 Critical Methods, or ENGL 2270/229 Essay Writing, or ENGL 2380 Intro to Creative Writing.

Newspaper Editing (Formerly 42.437)

Description

This course will explore the techniques of putting together a student newspaper, focusing on everything from brainstorming for coming up with stories, to writing and editing them, writing headlines and captions, and design and layout. The course also discusses the nature of journalism audiences. It also discusses the practicalities of applying for journalism jobs and writing query letters for freelance writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 2270 Essay Writing for English Majors, or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing for Non-English Majors, or ENGL 2380 Intro. to Creative Writing or ENGL 2390 Introduction to Professional Writing, or Permission of Instructor.

Writing a Book

Description

In this course, students will learn about the methods of writing and publishing a book and put those lessons to work in writing their own work in a genre of their choice.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Creative Writing: Capstone (Formerly 42.450)

Description

In this intensive workshop course, upper-level students in the creative writing concentration work for an entire semester on a memorizing and longer-form writing project in one of three genres - poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students devise memorizing lists specific to their writing projects, with instructor's guidance. Through a creative process that involves planning and drafting, peer workshop, instructor feedback, and rigorous revision, students ultimately create portfolios that represent their best undergraduate writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL 3660 Creative Writing: Poetry II, or ENGL 4070 Creative Writing: Fiction II, or ENGL 4180 Creative Writing: Non-fiction II.

Literature Seminar (Formerly 42.479)

Description

An advanced course that explores a variety of issues and courses in literature, literary history, and related fields. The course or issue for a specific seminar will be announced in advanced.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL 1020 College Writing II.

Directed Studies in Writing (Formerly 42.490)

Description

The student develops a plan for a sustained writing project or portfolio and submits preliminary and final versions for critique and evaluation.

Prerequisites

Pre-Reqs: ENGL.1020 College Writing II and ENGL 2270 Essay Writing/Eng Majors or ENGL 2290 Essay Writing.

Directed Study in Literature (Formerly 42.491)

Description

The student develops a plan of directed reading, defines a problem for individual research, and prepares a paper or papers.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Directed Study in Language Analysis (Formerly 42.492)

Description

The student develops a plan of directed readings in linguistics, semantics, or stylistics and defines a course for individual research.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Directed Study in Creative Writing (Formerly 42.493)

Description

The student develops a series of projects in creative writing and composes poetry, fiction, or drama.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Internship I (Formerly 42.496)

Description

Internship experience (usually off-campus) gives English majors the opportunity to apply their skills in real business, technical, educational, or professional situations. Classroom time supports student professionalization and career development. courses include resumes, cover letters, networking, LinkedIn profiles, portfolios, and professional behavior and expectations.

Prerequisites

Pre-req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II, and ENGL.2000 Critical Methods, or ENGL.2380 Intro to Creative Writing, or ENGL.2390 Intro to Professional Writing.

Practicum (Formerly 42.497)

Description

An off-campus professional experience for English Majors, Minors, and BLA English Concentrators. The Practicum is intended to provide students with the opportunity of applying their writing skills in real business, technical, educational, or professional situations. By permission only.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Practicum-English Study (Formerly 42.498)

Description

A short-term, intensive project related to English study and/or writing.

Prerequisites

Pre-Req: ENGL.1020 College Writing II.

Mon, 14 Dec 2015 16:35:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.uml.edu/Catalog/Undergraduate/FAHSS/Departments/English/Course-listing.aspx
Killexams : Pre-Professional and Dual Programs

Pre-Professional and Dual Programs

Pre-Professional Programs

Western Illinois University offers nine pre-professional programs designed to prepare students for professional study at other universities at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Each pre-professional program consists of a series of WIU courses which students are advised to take to gain the knowledge and skills required for professional study in a specific field. An academic advisor is assigned to each of the pre-professional programs. Students should consult with the advisor for information on the entrance requirements of professional schools, recommended WIU courses for professional preparation, and degree completion requirements and options.

Pre-Engineering

Students who wish to transfer to a college of Engineering after two years of pre-professional study should complete the program below, which is designed to meet the requirements from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign (UIUC). Any student planning to attend an Engineering school other than UIUC should inform his or her advisor of this fact, so that changes in the program can be suggested. Those who start this curriculum and subsequently decide to remain at WIU usually transfer to related programs without loss of credit.

Students interested in this program should contact the Pre-Engineering advisor in the Department of Physics.

Freshman Year

Fall Semester - ENG 180; ET 105; MATH 133*; PHYS 211**
Spring Semester - CS 225; MATH 134; PHYS 212; Elective

* Engineering students planning to attend the University of Illinois should keep in mind that any course below the level of MATH 133 will not count toward the Engineering degree. However, several pre-calculus courses are available for students unable to take four years of college preparatory Mathematics in high school.
** PHYS 211 has MATH 133 or the equivalent as a corequisite.

Sophomore Year

Fall Semester - CHEM 201; MATH 231, 311; PHYS 213
Spring Semester - CHEM 202; ENG 280; MATH 333; PHYS 214; PHYS 310

Students may select electives in the Social Sciences and Humanities from a list of transferable electives which can be obtained from a Pre-Engineering advisor; a partial list appears below. Transfer credit for foreign languages courses at the University of Illinois will be approved only after a review of the student’s high school foreign languages background. All transfer students entering the college of Engineering are required to have completed two college/university semesters of a foreign language or three years of a foreign language in high school.

Technical courses are available at WIU which may also be taken as electives. For example, civil engineers may take a course in surveying or Geology. Mathematical Statistics is recommended for some other fields of Engineering.

Humanities
AAS 281, 282, 283
ARTH 180, 282, 283, 394, 395
ENG 195, 200, 201, 202, 205, 290, 300, 301, 328, 338
Foreign Languages: FR/GER/SPAN 121, 122, 223, 224, 325, 326 (Review of high school preparation required by University of Illinois.)
HIST 105, 106, 115, 116, 300
MUS 190, 195, 393, 397
Philosophy: all courses except PHIL 140 and 340
Religious Studies: all courses
THEA 110, 390, 391

Social Sciences
AAS 100, 145, 251, 290, 300
ANTH 110, 111
ECON 231, 232; Note: ECON 231 is a required course in some Engineering curricula.
GEOG 100, 110
POLS 122, 284
PSY 100, 250, 251
SOC 100, 200, 250

Pre-Engineering students should maintain at least a 3.00 (A=4.00) grade point average. Isolated D grades are accepted under certain conditions and may count toward graduation.

Pre-Forestry

Students who wish to pursue studies in Pre-Forestry should contact the academic advisor in the School of Agriculture. This two-year curriculum is designed to prepare students to enter a School of Professional Forestry with advanced standing.

The following is presented as a general outline which will be modified to meet the demands of the school to which the student expects to transfer.

First Year

AGRI 120; FOR 200; BOT 200; ZOOL 200; CHEM 201, 202; ENG 180; HORT 180
Kinesiology
Mathematics (2 semesters)

Second Year

COMM 241; ECON 231; FOR 208; ENG 280
Humanities (2 semesters)
Social Science (2 semesters)
Physics (2 semesters)

Pre-Health Program (Medicine, Optometry, Dentistry, Physical/Occupational Therapy)

Western Illinois University provides excellent instruction to prepare students for a health-related professional degree in Medicine, Optometry, Dentistry, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Therapy. Most students at Western who wish to pursue a professional degree in a health-related field major in Biological Sciences, but other majors may also be appropriate. See more information about Western’s Medical Sciences option offered by the Department of Biological Sciences.

Pre-Law

Law schools do not require any particular undergraduate major. Students are encouraged to pursue a course of study in line with their intellectual interests. They are cautioned against narrow specialization directed too pointedly toward later professional training and practice. Many of the goals of legal education are also goals of a broad liberal education. It is advisable for students to select intellectually challenging courses which promote the development of skills of comprehension and communication (written and verbal), which enhance creative thinking, and which foster a critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law addresses.

Admission to law school is highly competitive. The two major criteria for admission are the undergraduate grade point average and the score on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). The LSAT is a standardized examination given multiple times each year. Students intending to apply to law school should plan to take this test no later than December of their senior year.

Pre-Law Advising

All students, whatever their major, may request a Pre-Law advisor to supplement their major advising and assist them in their preparation for law school. Students considering law school are urged to seek Pre-Law advice as early as possible in their undergraduate career. Dr. Lorette S. Oden, Centennial Honors College, Dr. Jill Joline Myers, School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, and Victoria Smith, Student Legal Advocate, are available for advising students interested in a legal career.

Pre-Law Major Options

Some degree programs at Western Illinois University include a Pre-Law option. Pre-Law options allow students to prepare for success in law school within their major area of study. Brief descriptions of Western’s Pre-Law options are provided below.

The B.A. in History Pre-Law Option, offered by the Department of History, surveys the origins and evolution of American legal traditions—in enlightenment thought, in the foundations of British and American constitutionalism, and in the evolution of American federalism, civil rights, and commercial and criminal law. Students’ History courses will also help them develop the analytical and problem-solving skills, critical memorizing ability, writing skills, oral communication and listening skills, and general research skills that they will need in law school and when practicing law. For more information about the History Pre-Law Option, see the Department of History section of this catalog.

The B.A. in Political Science Pre-Law Option, offered by the Department of Political Science, provides students the opportunity to explore law-related courses by studying constitutional law directly. In addition, it emphasizes courses related to law making and interpreting institutions, including the courts, Congress, and state legislatures. This option helps students understand the role of law in society while providing a basis for them to gauge their interest in law school. By analyzing cases, as well as presenting and critiquing arguments, students will develop reading, writing, and presentation skills that foster success in a legal career. For more information about the Political Science Pre-Law Option, see the Political Science section of this catalog.

Pre-Law Minors

The interdisciplinary Minor in Law and Society helps prepare students for careers in law and related fields, such as the administration of justice. Its interdisciplinary nature provides a solid background in the history and philosophy of law, as well as its current relevance for resolving social, political, and moral questions. In addition to helping students understand legal concepts and the role of law in contemporary society, the minor helps build skills in critical thinking and communication. For more information about the Minor in Law and Society, see the Interdisciplinary Minors section of this catalog.

The Minor in Legal Studies, offered by the School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration, complements all majors and helps students prepare for law school, paralegal programs, or careers in court related services. The courses selected for the minor offer legal theory and applied knowledge. The minor will assist students in articulating the various processes by which different types of cases proceed within the American legal system, in understanding and analyzing legal conflicts through memorizing and discussing the practical and theoretical bases of case law, and in communicating effectively through classroom presentations and demonstrations of courtroom activities. For more information about the Minor in Legal Studies, see the Law Enforcement and Justice Administration section of this catalog.

The Pre-Law Honors Minor is a unique interdisciplinary minor for students who are enrolled in the Centennial Honors College and who plan careers in law. The curriculum for this minor is designed to provide students with skills and knowledge important as a foundation for the study of law. Emphasis is given to the development of effective written and oral communication, analytical and critical reasoning, and an understanding of institutions, social processes, and human values important to legal studies. Students from all majors are eligible for this honors option, and upon completion of the requirements will graduate as Honors Scholars. For more information about the Pre-Law Honors Minor, see the Centennial Honors College section of this catalog.

Pre-MBA

The Pre-MBA minor is designed specifically for students majoring in areas outside the Bachelor of Business who are considering graduate level study in business. Through a set of core business courses, this minor provides students with the fundamentals of business administration and gives them a solid preparation for many entry level positions in business. The minor facilitates the undergraduate’s transition to the MBA at Western Illinois University.

The Pre-MBA curriculum has been created to include accelerated courses for the principles of Accounting and Economics. These are complemented by courses in Finance, Information Systems, Management, Marketing, and Statistics. A majority of these courses are at upper-division; this allows students to begin this minor late in their undergraduate programs and complete the requirements without delaying their graduation.

Completion of the Pre-MBA minor does not certain admission to an MBA program. Students seeking an MBA at WIU are required to complete the GMAT examination. Admission to the MBA program is based on a combination of undergraduate GPA and GMAT score. The MBA program also requires a minimum grade of “C” and a minimum GPA of 2.75 in the Pre-MBA core courses.

The Pre-MBA minor is not available to students seeking the Bachelor of Business degree.

For more information about the Pre-MBA minor, contact an advisor in the Business Advising Center in Stipes Hall 133 or (309) 298-1619 in Macomb or (309) 762-9481 at the WIU—Quad Cities Riverfront Campus.

Minor in Pre-MBA 21–27 s.h.
  1. ACCT 307 (or ACCT 201 and 202): 3–6 s.h.
  2. ECON 408 (or ECON 231 and 232): 3–6 s.h.
  3. FIN 331: 3 s.h.
  4. IS 340: 3 s.h.
  5. MGT 349: 3 s.h.
  6. MKTG 327: 3 s.h.
  7. STAT 171: 3 s.h.
Pre-Veterinary Medicine

The WIU School of Agriculture offers a pre-professional program designed to meet the requirements for admission to a School of Veterinary Medicine. Students who wish to pursue studies in Pre-Veterinary Medicine should contact the academic advisor in the School of Agriculture. Due to intense competition for admission to Schools of Veterinary Medicine, most students complete a four-year bachelor’s degree program prior to admission. Those students considering a career in Veterinary Medicine should have a good foundation in Biological Sciences and Chemistry, including Biochemistry, as the minimum knowledge base for success in the curriculum. In addition, a course or courses concerning livestock production and animal ethology are highly desirable for all students. Those seeking a career in Veterinary Medicine related to Agriculture should consider additional background in nutrition, livestock management, and the economics of production by working toward a degree in Agriculture prior to admission to veterinary school. Students may also pursue other major fields of study. The 60-hour Pre-Veterinary requirement and the suggested WIU courses for admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois are outlined below. Admission requirements for other schools of Veterinary Medicine are different but can be met with advisor consultation

Required

BIOL 330; BOT 200; CHEM 201, 202, 330, 421; ENG 180 and 280 or COMM 241; MICR 200; PHYS 114, 115 or 124, 125; ZOOL 200
Humanities or Social Science (12 s.h.)
Junior/Senior level approved Agriculture and science electives (12 s.h.)

Recommended, But Not Required

AGRI 376; ANSC 112, 314, 322, 424; BIOL 340; ZOOL 430
Mathematics—calculus, trigonometry, and statistics

Dual Programs

Western Illinois University has made arrangements with professional schools at other universities so that students can complete requirements for a bachelor’s degree in the College of Arts and Sciences while working toward a professional degree or certificate. This is done in cases where credits can be transferred from the professional school in work closely related to that offered in the college. Typically, students complete three years of work at WIU and transfer one year of work from the professional school in satisfaction of WIU degree requirements.

Dual Program in Arts and Sciences and Clinical Laboratory Science

This dual program is four years in length and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory Science. The first three years of the program are spent at WIU, followed by 12 months at an approved School of Medical Technology. The clinical year program requires a 2.75 grade point average. After completion of the four-year program, graduates take an examination for registration given by the Board of Registry of Medical Technology of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. Upon successful completion of the total program, a student receives the Bachelor of Science degree at Western and the MT (ASCP) certificate from the Registry of Medical Technologists. Students enrolling in this program will be advised by the Department of Biological Sciences. The curriculum is given below.

First Year

BIOL 170; BOT 200; CHEM 201, 202; ENG 180; MATH 128, 129 or 133 or equivalent (see advisor); ZOOL 200
Social Science elective (FYE)
Humanities elective
Human Well-Being elective (UNIV 100)

Second Year

CHEM 330 or 331 and 421 (or 332); ENG 280; F L 121, 122 or equivalent (see advisor); MICR 200, 434
Social Science elective
Social Science elective

Third Year

COMM 241; PHYS (see advisor) 124, 125 or 114, 115; STAT 171; ZOOL 430
2 Electives—BIOL 330 or 340; MICR 400 or 463 or 464 or 460
Humanities elective
Multicultural Studies elective

Fourth Year

Taken at an approved School of Medical Technology (approximately 32 s.h.)
Clinical Biochemistry
Clinical Chemistry
Clinical Hematology
Clinical Microbiology (bacteriology, parasitology, mycology)
Clinical Serology and Immunology
Blood Bank

Dual Program in Arts and Sciences and Engineering

Western Illinois University has an agreement with the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois, whereby students may obtain the bachelor’s degree from the College of Arts and Sciences at WIU and a degree from the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois. In general, students spend three years at WIU and two to two and one-half at the University of Illinois or the University of Iowa. The student becomes eligible for both degrees when the entire program is completed.

Students who wish to participate in the Arts and Sciences and Engineering dual program should contact an academic advisor in the Department of Physics. Students who enter the program must complete the Pre-Engineering programs described in the Pre-Professional Programs section and the requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. Since the granting of the two degrees depends on specified course requirements and not the amount of time on each campus, care in planning a program of courses is essential for students to complete the dual program in five academic years. For students interested in pursuing the dual degree option in Physics along with a bachelor’s in Engineering, the Engineering Physics curriculum is recommended.

Similar dual-degree programs are available with other Engineering Schools, including the Binary Program with Case Western Reserve University. Please consult your advisor to ensure successful completion of degree requirements.

Students who begin their Pre-Engineering program at a community college and wish to benefit from the WIU dual program must earn a minimum of 30 s.h. at WIU and satisfy all the requirements for the WIU Bachelor of Science degree, except those requirements dealing with majors and minors.

Dual Program in Arts and Sciences and Law

Exceptionally well-qualified students majoring in English, History, or Political Science at Western Illinois University are eligible to pursue an accelerated admission program at John Marshall Law School (JMLS) in Chicago following the completion of their junior year of undergraduate study at Western. Students must have earned at least 90 WIU semester hours, with the additional 30 hours required for a WIU B.A. in the three stipulated majors (120 semester hours total) completed during two full semesters at JMLS. Program participants will receive a baccalaureate degree from WIU following successful completion of the first year of law school at JMLS, and the law degree (J.D.) from JMLS after successfully completing the required law school curriculum, allowing for the fulfillment of requirements for both degrees in a shorter period.

Students interested in this opportunity must work with the academic advisor in their major to ensure successful compliance with all program requirements. Note: Participants are required to meet the WIU graduation requirement of completion of a minor.

Dual Program in General Studies and Chiropractic

Western Illinois University has an agreement with Palmer College of Chiropractic, Davenport, Iowa, whereby students can earn a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer and a Bachelor of Arts in General Studies degree from Western. The dual degree program requires admission into WIU’s Bachelor of Arts in General Studies degree program and 90 semester hours of credit in approved prerequisite courses prior to enrolling at Palmer. A minimum of 30 semester hours of academic credit from Palmer may be transferred back to WIU to complete the Bachelor of Arts in General Studies degree.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 10:19:00 -0500 en text/html http://www.wiu.edu/catalog/programs/pre-prof.php
Killexams : Why American Campus Communities Inc. (ACC)’s Most exact Report Reveals Some Hints About Its Future

American Campus Communities Inc. (NYSE:ACC) went up by 0.08% from its latest closing price compared to the exact 1-year high of $65.43. The company’s stock price has collected 0.12% of gains in the last five trading sessions. The Wall Street Journal reported on 04/19/22 that Blackstone Makes $13 Billion Bet on Student Housing

Is It Worth Investing in American Campus Communities Inc. (NYSE :ACC) Right Now?

American Campus Communities Inc. (NYSE:ACC) scored a price-to-earnings ratio above its average ratio, recording 286.93 x from its present earnings ratio. Plus, the 36-month beta value for ACC is at 0.74. Opinions of the stock are interesting as 0 analysts out of 1 who provided ratings for American Campus Communities Inc. declared the stock was a “buy,” while 0 rated the stock as “overweight,” 1 rated it as “hold,” and 0 as “sell.”

The average price from analysts is $65.50, which is -$1.81 below the current price. ACC currently public float of 138.30M and currently shorts hold a 9.40% ratio of that float. Today, the average trading volume of ACC was 2.53M shares.

ACC’s Market Performance

ACC stocks went up by 0.12% for the week, with a monthly jump of 0.79% and a quarterly performance of 1.62%, while its annual performance rate touched 33.56%. The volatility ratio for the week stands at 0.09% while the volatility levels for the past 30 days are set at 0.15% for American Campus Communities Inc. The simple moving average for the period of the last 20 days is 0.31% for ACC stocks with a simple moving average of 12.38% for the last 200 days.

Analysts’ Opinion of ACC

Many brokerage firms have already submitted their reports for ACC stocks, with Deutsche Bank repeating the rating for ACC by listing it as a “Hold.” The predicted price for ACC in the upcoming period, according to Deutsche Bank is $60 based on the research report published on January 03rd of the current year 2022.

Citigroup, on the other hand, stated in their research note that they expect to see ACC reach a price target of $62, previously predicting the price at $56. The rating they have provided for ACC stocks is “Buy” according to the report published on December 14th, 2021.

Goldman gave a rating of “Buy” to ACC, setting the target price at $57 in the report published on September 23rd of the previous year.

ACC Trading at 0.82% from the 50-Day Moving Average

After a stumble in the market that brought ACC to its low price for the period of the last 52 weeks, the company was unable to rebound, for now settling with -0.01% of loss for the given period.

Volatility was left at 0.15%, however, over the last 30 days, the volatility rate increased by 0.09%, as shares surge +0.96% for the moving average over the last 20 days. Over the last 50 days, in opposition, the stock is trading +1.02% upper at present.

During the last 5 trading sessions, ACC rose by +0.12%, which changed the moving average for the period of 200-days by +27.30% in comparison to the 20-day moving average, which settled at $65.25. In addition, American Campus Communities Inc. saw 14.19% in overturn over a single year, with a tendency to cut further gains.

Insider Trading

Reports are indicating that there were more than several insider trading activities at ACC starting from Bayless William C Jr, who sale 24,998 shares at the price of $64.98 back on Jun 01. After this action, Bayless William C Jr now owns 314,566 shares of American Campus Communities Inc., valued at $1,624,370 using the latest closing price.

Rippel John T, the Director of American Campus Communities Inc., sale 255 shares at $64.68 during a trade that took place back on May 04, which means that Rippel John T is holding 35,417 shares at $16,493 based on the most exact closing price.

Stock Fundamentals for ACC

Current profitability levels for the company are sitting at:

  • +17.13 for the present operating margin
  • +21.92 for the gross margin

The net margin for American Campus Communities Inc. stands at +3.52. Equity return is now at value 1.10, with 0.40 for asset returns.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 19:38:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://newsheater.com/2022/08/10/why-american-campus-communities-inc-accs-most-recent-report-reveals-some-hints-about-its-future/
Killexams : Startups News No result found, try new keyword!The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of American City Business Journals. Sun, 07 Aug 2022 12:41:00 -0500 text/html https://www.bizjournals.com/news/technology/startups Killexams : UF receives $3 million for new civics program with conservative links

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Fri, 15 Jul 2022 10:50:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.gainesville.com/story/news/education/campus/2022/07/15/university-florida-gets-3-million-classical-civics-program-backed-organization-linked-conservatives/10067439002/
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