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AACN-CMC Cardiac Medicine Subspecialty Certification

CMC® is a subspecialty certification for certified nurses who provide direct care to acutely/critically ill adult cardiac patients. Nurses interested in this certification may work in areas such as cardiac care units, medical ICUs, telemetry, progressive care, heart failure clinics, home care, interventional cardiology, cardiac cath labs and/or electrophysiology units.

A current, unencumbered U.S. RN or APRN license is required.
An unencumbered license is not currently being subjected to formal discipline by any state board of nursing and has no provisions or conditions that limit the nurses practice in any way.

A current nationally accredited clinical nursing specialty certification, to which the CMC credential will be attached, is required.

Candidates must complete one of the following clinical practice hour requirement options:

Two-Year Option

Practice as an RN or APRN for 1,750 hours in direct care of acutely/critically ill adult patients during the previous two years, with 875 of those hours accrued in the most exact year preceding application. Of those 1,750 hours, 875 need to be in the care of acutely/critically ill adult cardiac patients.
OR
Five-Year Option
Practice as an RN or APRN for at least five years with a minimum of 2,000 hours in direct care of acutely/critically ill adult patients, with 144 of those hours accrued in the most exact year preceding application. Of those 2,000 hours, 1,000 need to be in the care of acutely/critically ill adult cardiac patients.

Must be completed in a U.S.-based or Canada-based facility or in a facility determined to be comparable to the U.S. standard of acute/critical care nursing practice.
Are those spent actively providing direct care to acutely/critically ill adult patients or supervising nurses or nursing students at the bedside of acutely/critically ill adult patients, if working as a manager, educator, preceptor or APRN.
Are verifiable by your clinical supervisor or professional colleague (RN or physician). Contact information must be provided for verification of eligibility related to clinical hours, to be used if you are selected for audit.
For complete eligibility requirements.

Cardiac Medicine Subspecialty Certification
Medical Certification approach
Killexams : Medical Certification approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AACN-CMC Search results Killexams : Medical Certification approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AACN-CMC https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Amid a school mental health crisis, a new training approach shows promise

For several years, Julia Taylor had one of the nation's most underappreciated jobs: middle school counselor.

"I was in the trenches for a decade before higher ed," said Taylor, now an associate professor of counselor education in the University of Virginia's School of Education and Human Development. "I would have loved something like this."

"This" is a that pairs people like Taylor, who are steeped in the research on student mental , with counselors, psychologists, nurses and social workers who face a growing number of students in crisis.

In fact, Taylor is a co-author of a exact study published in Child & Youth Care Forum, which showed this new approach works. She and colleague Michael Lyons have found that something relatively simple—regular Zoom calls with a handful of school divisions—leaves the school feeling better equipped to help students with .

Simply put: "We're trying to Strengthen the quality of mental health services provided to youth in schools," Taylor said.

Getting to that point meant bridging what Taylor and Lyons call the "research-to-practice gap." That's the divide that separates people who immerse themselves in the study of child and adolescent mental health from front-line school workers who "have a problem with a kid right now," said Lyons, an associate professor of clinical and school psychology at UVA. "And they need solutions to that problem."

The problem is growing.

"Student mental health has plummeted and the pandemic has disrupted almost every aspect of their lives," Taylor said. "It is not plausible to simply bounce back from this."

According to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, emergency-room visits related to mental health increased 31% among adolescents from 2019 to 2020. A exact UVA Health study showed suspected suicide attempts by poisoning among children ages 6 to 19 increased nearly 27% between 2015 and 2020.

"Researchers at UVA and all over the country have developed new interventions, new assessment tools to be more efficient and effective at identifying kids who need mental health supports, and then to effectively intervene," Lyons said. "The problem is that often doesn't get into the hands of frontline providers."

One potential solution, they believe, is an idea centered on a tele-mentoring model called Project ECHO, or Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes. It's a system medical doctors created to consult on complex cases in rural areas. This study tested the idea in a new context: schools.

As part of a statewide initiative called the Virginia Partnership for School Mental Health, mental health staff from four Virginia school divisions participated in a professional development program. To see what was more effective, some participants had access to online training modules while others had both the online training and the monthly Zoom sessions.

During each virtual session, one participant presents a specific case, then the full team discusses and shares recommendations. subjects cover a range of mental health concerns, including trauma in schools and the mental health needs of high-achieving students. Conversations would reference resources in the modules, helping participants apply it to a real-life scenario.

The group that participated in ECHO sessions showed higher engagement with the training modules, and higher satisfaction with the program, compared to the participants who only interacted with the modules.

A key finding, Taylor said, is that the regularity of the meetings provided a more engaging and cost-effective way for school mental health professionals to learn, compared to more traditional avenues like annual training or seminars.

"Consistency is the key," Taylor said. And, Lyons added, this approach is tailor-made for rural school districts where counselors and nurses may not have access to robust training and support.

While these findings are preliminary, the research team has several follow-up studies in the works. Researchers said upcoming studies currently under review suggest that ECHO could also affect participants' knowledge and confidence.

"What we want folks to do is sustain the learning and distribute it over time," Lyons said. "We're starting to see this in later studies, but the hope is that it actually changes the way that they understand their role, and school mental health evidence-based practices, and then change the team's behavior to promote better student mental health outcomes—which is the ultimate goal."

The study, and the ongoing ECHO sessions, are one part of a much larger initiative to Strengthen school mental health in the commonwealth. The Virginia Partnership for School Mental Health began in 2019, bringing together school divisions and universities to increase the number of school mental health professionals who provide evidence-based services in Virginia.

Another focus of the partnership is training graduate students in mental health leadership.

At UVA, with grant funding from the partnership, six school counseling students graduated in May having engaged in more than 700 hours of fieldwork in a high-need school division, supervised by practitioners trained by the partnership. They also participated in a semester of ECHO sessions and took extra course credits focused on school mental health.

"They worked tremendously hard in their two years at UVA and I could not be prouder of their flexibility, curiosity and determination," Taylor said. "Their counseling skills are polished, their case conceptualization skills are seasoned, and they exemplify the term 'leader.' I have no doubt they will make an incredible impact on the youth they serve in Virginia's public schools."

In the past two years, the partnership has continued to expand—recently adding Old Dominion University, William & Mary, Radford University, James Madison University and Virginia Tech, as well as the Hampton and Roanoke city schools. The team also hopes to explore how to widen the community involved in the partnership.

"School mental health really is a whole-school and community problem to tackle," Lyons said. "So there's interest in thinking about how to engage other allied professionals, families and community partners to create an even more robust, integrated network to support student well-being."

Lyons said participants in the ECHO sessions shared that the experience worked because it helped them feel like part of a team. For Lyons himself, participating in the ECHO sessions brought the partnership's vision—of a strong local community of school professionals working together to support students—to life.

"In real time, you see how a network of people working together can come up with solutions that no one person would have come up with alone," he said. "And that's an amazing thing to be a part of."



More information: Michael D. Lyons et al, Supporting School Mental Health Providers: Evidence from a Short-Term Telementoring Model, Child & Youth Care Forum (2022). DOI: 10.1007/s10566-022-09673-1#citeas

Citation: Amid a school mental health crisis, a new training approach shows promise (2022, August 9) retrieved 9 August 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-08-school-mental-health-crisis-approach.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 03:38:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-08-school-mental-health-crisis-approach.html
Killexams : Study highlights the importance of teaching physician advocacy to medical students

The Journal of Public Health Management & Practice has published a study from University of Minnesota researchers highlighting the Dr. Pete Dehnel Public Health Advocacy Fellowship and the program's positive impact on University of Minnesota Medical School students.

The 9-month program uses a community-centered approach to teaching physician advocacy to on both the Twin Cities and Duluth campuses. The fellowship is organized around skills training, personalized physician-mentor pairings and hands-on advocacy activities.

"Medical care only accounts for 10% to 20% of . Social determinants of health, including socioeconomic and environmental factors, account for the other 80% to 90%. Healthcare professionals have a professional and moral obligation to step outside of our clinics and hospitals, elevate the voices of frontline communities and use our expertise and privilege to advocate for policies that promote public health," said Laalitha Surapaneni, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School and a hospitalist with M Health Fairview.

The research found key components of the fellowship, including a flexible curricular structure with built-in adaptability and emphasis on long-term health advocacy engagement, are associated with student growth. It also found that community-centered models of advocacy training offer a compelling way to enable physician advocacy to center on community needs, elevate the voices of those impacted by inequities and foster innovative system change driven by community wisdom.

The study also found programs that approach physician advocacy training similar to traditional medical education risk adopting an "ivory tower" approach that replicates existing power hierarchies and inadvertently focuses on physician accomplishments instead of community needs.

Twin Cities Medical Society started the fellowship program in 2018 with 11 students and mentors. It has grown to include more than 80 student/mentor pairs. Medical students interested in joining a future cohort can fill out an online form.



More information: Sruthi Shankar et al, Building a Community-Centered Public Health Advocacy Training Program for Medical Students, Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (2022). DOI: 10.1097/PHH.0000000000001486

Citation: Study highlights the importance of teaching physician advocacy to medical students (2022, July 28) retrieved 9 August 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-07-highlights-importance-physician-advocacy-medical.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 07:03:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-07-highlights-importance-physician-advocacy-medical.html
Killexams : Research Brief: Importance of teaching physician advocacy to medical students

image: 2021 Public Health Advocacy Fellowship students and mentors. view more 

Credit: Twin Cities Medical Society

The Journal of Public Health Management & Practice published a study from University of Minnesota researchers highlighting the Dr. Pete Dehnel Public Health Advocacy Fellowship and the program’s positive impact on University of Minnesota Medical School students. 

The 9-month program uses a community-centered approach to teaching physician advocacy to medical students on both the Twin Cities and Duluth campuses. The fellowship is organized around skills training, personalized physician-mentor pairings and hands-on advocacy activities. 

“Medical care only accounts for 10% to 20% of health outcomes. Social determinants of health, including socioeconomic and environmental factors, account for the other 80% to 90%. Healthcare professionals have a professional and moral obligation to step outside of our clinics and hospitals, elevate the voices of frontline communities and use our expertise and privilege to advocate for policies that promote public health,” said Laalitha Surapaneni, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School and a hospitalist with M Health Fairview.

The research found key components of the fellowship, including a flexible curricular structure with built-in adaptability and emphasis on long-term health advocacy engagement, are associated with student growth. It also found that community-centered models of advocacy training offer a compelling way to enable physician advocacy to center on community needs, elevate the voices of those impacted by inequities and foster innovative system change driven by community wisdom.

The study also found programs that approach physician advocacy training similar to traditional medical education risk adopting an “ivory tower” approach that replicates existing power hierarchies and inadvertently focuses on physician accomplishments instead of community needs.

Twin Cities Medical Society started the fellowship program in 2018 with 11 students and mentors. It has grown to include more than 80 student/mentor pairs. Medical students interested in joining a future cohort can fill out an online form. 

Funding for the fellowship program is provided by the Physicians Foundation.

###

About the University of Minnesota Medical School
The University of Minnesota Medical School is at the forefront of learning and discovery, transforming medical care and educating the next generation of physicians. Our graduates and faculty produce high-impact biomedical research and advance the practice of medicine. We acknowledge that the U of M Medical School, both the Twin Cities campus and Duluth campus, is located on traditional, ancestral and contemporary lands of the Dakota and the Ojibwe, and scores of other Indigenous people, and we affirm our commitment to tribal communities and their sovereignty as we seek to Strengthen and strengthen our relations with tribal nations. For more information about the U of M Medical School, please visit med.umn.edu.


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Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/960267
Killexams : CareerStep Launches Training Program to Meet Growing Demand for Medical Lab Assistants

Workforce training pioneer's flexible, skills-focused approach helps working learners earn credentials for in-demand allied health roles

BOSTON, Aug. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Penn Foster-Carrus, whose jobtech platform is used by major employers nationwide to identify, recruit, and train workers for middle-skill careers, today announced the launch of a new training program for the fast-growing medical laboratory assistant role. Available through CareerStep, the new course prepares learners to sit for two industry-recognized and employer-preferred certification exams: the American Medical Technologists (AMT) Certified Medical Laboratory Assistant (CMLA) exam and the National Healthcare Association (NHA) Certified Phlebotomist Technician (CPT) exam.

Penn Foster (PRNewsfoto/Penn Foster)

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that the demand for clinical lab-related skills will continue to accelerate in the next 8 years, as the volume of laboratory tests increases to meet both population growth and the development of new types of medical diagnostics. Penn Foster-Carrus' portfolio of healthcare training programs already includes in-demand fields like Phlebotomy, Medical Assistant, and Hemodialysis Technician; the addition of the Medical Laboratory Assistant program will enable more working learners to access affordable, job-aligned training programs that help them take the next step in their careers. Thanks to the unique design of the program's externship course, learners who complete and pass the certification exams will be fully certified for the role, with no other additional requirements needed.

"Middle-skill roles like medical lab assistant are critical to the country's labor market, and play a vital role in ensuring quality of care amidst a rapidly changing healthcare landscape," said Misty Frost, CEO of Penn Foster-Carrus. "This is not just about meeting the most immediate talent needs of hospital systems and healthcare providers, but also building a skilled workforce that is better-prepared to navigate a complex and dynamic labor market in the years to come."

Penn Foster and Carrus, which combined in 2021, now provide training in middle-skill fields like allied health, design, and skilled trades for more than 450,000 learners each year.

About Penn Foster
Penn Foster is bridging the gap between education and economic opportunity to build the workforce of tomorrow. We partner with employers to design and deliver digital and blended learning programs that attract, upskill, and retain workers in America's fastest-growing fields and professions. With more than 40,000 graduates each year, Penn Foster helps individuals discover pathways to opportunity through accredited diploma, certificate and degree programs that matter in the world of work. For more information, visit https://www.partners.pennfoster.edu.

About Carrus
Carrus delivers quality, trusted healthcare learning content, continuing education, and certification management to new learners, healthcare professionals, and institutions through an integrated technology platform that provides the most seamless healthcare learning experience possible. In 25+ years, Carrus—through its CareerStep and CareerCert divisions—has trained over 150,000 learners for new careers, partnered with more than 150 colleges and universities nationwide, and educated more than 100,000 healthcare professionals

Cision

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/careerstep-launches-training-program-to-meet-growing-demand-for-medical-lab-assistants-301597177.html

SOURCE Penn Foster

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/careerstep-launches-training-program-meet-130000292.html
Killexams : VR For Education: How The World Already Changes Its Approach To Training

Founder and Member of the Management Board at HQSoftware.

The education industry today is facing a major challenge. Should educational facilities and businesses embrace modern technology in their training programs?

More often than not, technological progress comes to every industry, including education. However, the ability of the business to embrace technology depends on several factors, such as the goal of the training or budget.

One of the most versatile and efficient technologies being applied to training programs is virtual reality. VR makes it possible to bring together the missing pieces that make any learning process truly effective: interactivity, engagement and visual representation.

But it's important to note that some companies may be perfectly fine sticking to traditional education or applying VR to particular steps of education only—for example, welders need practical experience with their equipment, and it is easier to achieve with training in the real world. For this case, VR training lacks appropriate force feedback and manipulators that resemble welding machines; however, it can be used for learning the principles of brazing, adhesive bonding and more.

The global market of VR in education is projected to reach $13,098 million by 2026. In 2018, the annual figure was as little as $656 million. Just imagine: compound annual growth in this sector is expected to be around 43% for this period.

This tremendous growth is explained by the benefits VR brings to education.

• Learners feel 40% more confident when studying using VR compared to classroom training.

• On a large scale, VR learning can be more cost-efficient.

• VR learners complete their training four times faster than those in classrooms.

Despite having tons of benefits, VR has limitations too. For example:

• Building VR training solutions has an expensive barrier of entry, even though they save budgets tremendously in the long run.

• VR is not suitable for every training scenario. Sometimes it’s better to examine other options, like blending traditional methods with VR.

• The majority of solutions lack force feedback features that are crucial for learning practical skills.

Let's start with the benefits and see how these advantages are demonstrated in the various types of educational VR applications.

Soft Skills Training

According to one study, VR learners are 275% more confident about applying soft skills learned in VR than classroom learners. By providing VR tools for employee training in soft skills, such as conflict resolution, critical thinking, logical reasoning, etc., employees can practice with virtual people without the need to involve extra staff for training.

Reconstruction Of Events

A VR simulation can recreate clearly how and why an accident happened and teach employees how to behave more safely in similar situations. Some companies are already building such solutions, such as The Boiler Room, and using these VR apps at manufacturing facilities to train workers on following safety protocols—for example, when the plant is on fire or when a worker gets hurt using equipment.

Sport Skills

With VR, it’s possible to polish sports skills. Users benefit from VR sports solutions not only because they are fun to use but also because they provide a real opportunity to practice and work on real skills. VR Motion Learning's sports education programs, for example, help optimize motion techniques by analyzing the individual biomechanics of users. The solution offers an authentic tennis experience with realistic physics and even allows users to participate in comprehensive virtual tournaments.

Medical Manipulations

Solutions like Immertec allow for collaboration on live surgical cases no matter where the participants are located. Doctors can "stream" live surgeries, enriched with extra data, for any interested participants. The users can observe the surgery and up to four live medical imaging feeds, and the whole experience is customizable for each participant.

AR AR For Learning

AR is also used for immersive training, and here we have an example of successful technical training done in AR. Field workers and engineers at manufacturing facilities need proper hands-on training to perform their jobs efficiently and in accordance with all safety precautions. Solutions such as 3spin Learning allow for training workers using AR as a substitute for dull manuals and pictures. With AR, workers can learn how to perform anything from day-to-day tasks to emergency responses to equipment failure and dangerous situations.

When VR Is Not The Best Option

Of course, there are situations when VR is not the best solution due to its limitations.

Again, when hands-on experience with particular equipment is a must, a VR solution should come with custom manipulators that will help students really feel what they do—like welders. Crafting these manipulators that will resemble real equipment is extremely expensive.

Also, extra expenses are caused by the need to employ a storyboard writer—a specialist who will create a thought-out description of an upcoming VR education experience. Usually, it is an expensive specialist with a rare set of skills. Usually, they possess skills from both educational and business analysis spheres.

The ability to combine these skills is vital for the project’s successful execution. It is important to describe a solution in a way that other people would comprehend and deploy the right way. If the budget for training is limited and there’s no way you can employ a storyboard writer, it is worth considering other options than VR.

To Summarize

Immersive technologies have the potential to disrupt many industries and change how we work, chat, play and learn. In terms of learning, VR is driving the development of advanced immersive learning solutions; even the metaverse is a descendant of VR.

Nevertheless, there are other effective options. For some companies, it could be better to use VR for only a part of their educational program, especially for those with limited educational budgets or focused on hands-on practice with real equipment.

I believe this is what a significant part of the future of global training will look like—immersive, interactive and much more efficient, thanks in part to the use of VR and AR.


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Mon, 01 Aug 2022 23:45:00 -0500 Sergei Vardomatski en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2022/08/02/vr-for-education-how-the-world-already-changes-its-approach-to-training/
Killexams : Using a bibliometric approach to evaluate the scientific literature on digital teaching in medical education

JMIR Publications recently published "Digital Teaching in Medical Education: Scientific Literature Landscape Review" in JMIR Medical Education which reported that digital teaching in medical education has grown in popularity in exact years.

These JMIR Medical Education authors used a bibliometric approach to unveil and evaluate the scientific literature on digital teaching research in medical education, demonstrating recurring research topics, productive authors, research organizations, countries, and journals.

The Web of Science electronic database was searched to identify relevant papers on digital teaching research in medical education.

Dr. Eva Schaden from The Medical University of Vienna said, "Rapid advancements in information technology and worldwide internet access potentially allow for the full substitution of traditional face-to-face medical education with digital teaching methods (including but not limited to remote teaching)."

New in JMIR MedEdu: Digital Teaching in medical education #mededu: Scientific Literature Landscape Review https://t.co/pg8rUPQ9Qo pic.twitter.com/tGpFNZnbz4

-; JMIR Publications (@jmirpub) February 9, 2022

Often, digital teaching is used together with traditional approaches in so-called hybrid learning. Although it has received higher acceptance by students, blended learning did not exhibit a significant difference in comparison to the traditional methods based on final test scores.

Digital teaching in medical education shares similarities with other educational areas as it enhances self-directed learning and computer literacy skills.

In the context of medical education, digital teaching is applicable for teaching medical students, resident or specialty training, and continuing medical education of physicians.

There are several major potential barriers for digital teaching applications in medical education:

  1. The presence of technology or infrastructure
  2. Institutional support
  3. Trained educators, and
  4. Overall acceptance by the students

Thousands of scientific studies have explored different kinds of digital teaching applications in medical education.

Dr. Schaden and the research team concluded in their JMIR Publications Research Output that the analyzed literature in the field of digital teaching research in medicine contained 3978 publications. The literature received worldwide contributions with the most productive countries being the United States and the United Kingdom.

Reviews were significantly more cited, but the citations between open access versus non–open access papers did not significantly differ. Some themes were more highly cited, such as virtual reality, innovation, trial, effectiveness, and anatomy. Different aspects in medical education were experimented for digital teaching, such as gross anatomy education, histology, complementary medicine, medicinal chemistry, and basic life support.

Some studies have shown that digital teaching could increase learning satisfaction, knowledge gain, and even cost-effectiveness. This would be particularly useful for clinical teaching during pandemics, gaining insights into highly infectious diseases or rare diseases that do not have available cases in a local setting.

Source:

Journal reference:

Yeung, A.W.K., et al. (2022) Digital Teaching in Medical Education: Scientific Literature Landscape Review. JMIR Medical Education. doi.org/10.2196/32747.

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 10:18:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20220729/Using-a-bibliometric-approach-to-evaluate-the-scientific-literature-on-digital-teaching-in-medical-education.aspx
Killexams : Allegheny College teams up with Meadville Medical Center for sports medicine

Aug. 9—Meadville Medical Center now is providing athletic training services to Allegheny College athletics beginning with the onset of the college's fall sports practices.

The move follows Meadville Medical Center (MMC) taking over operations in 2021 of Allegheny College's Winslow Health Center for the students' general health needs.

MMC Sports Medicine at Allegheny College is led by Dr. Christopher Rial, team physician, and Michael D. Carr, a certified and licensed athletic trainer and licensed physical therapist who is director of MMC's Sports Medicine. The program is staffed with a team of athletic trainers.

"I want to bring the same high quality care and approach to the student athletes of Allegheny that have been so successful in our local high schools over the past 20 plus years," Carr said.

Allegheny College currently has approximately 500 student athletes participating in 23 collegiate sports in the President's Athletic Conference and North Coast Athletic Conference.

Bill Ross, Allegheny's director of athletics, said the college is excited to team up with MMC Sports Medicine.

"The health and well-being of our student athletes is our number one priority," Ross said. "Through the resources and expertise that MMC Sports Medicine offers, we have elevated that commitment."

Allegheny College joins the Commodore Perry, Conneaut, Cranberry, Crawford Central, Jamestown, PENNCREST and Valley Grove school districts in using Meadville Medical Center for their respective sports medicine needs.

MMC started providing outreach athletic training services to local high schools in the 1998-99 school year under the direction of Dr. Vincent Paczkoskie and Carr.

Paczkoskie is a dual board certified and fellowship trained sports medicine and upper extremity physician at Orthopedic Associates of Meadville who joined the program in 2000.

"The sports medicine program at MMC could initially be found in the basement of the Liberty Street facility," Paczkoskie said. "Today, we have a comprehensive team of board certified and fellowship trained orthopedic surgeons, athletic trainers, physical therapists, imaging services, and a state-of-the-art training facility to assist with recovery and rehabilitation."

MMC Sports Medicine athletic trainers work with orthopedists, primary care physicians, other physician specialties and neuropsychologists along with physical and occupational therapists, sports first aiders, coaches, athletic directors and principals.

The sports medicine system program includes education, prevention, management, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries, accidents and overuse conditions, according to Paczkoskie.

Another fellowship trained sports medicine physician, Dr. James Nemunaitus, will join Orthopedic Associates of Meadville later this month, Paczkoskie said.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 01:52:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/allegheny-college-teams-meadville-medical-135200485.html
Killexams : Mercury Medical Receives EU Quality Management Medical Device (MDR) Certification

Mercury Medical CPR Manual Resuscitation Products Are Now Available in the EU

CLEARWATER, FL / ACCESSWIRE / July 27, 2022 / Mercury Medical recently received MDR CE Mark Certification for their CPR manual resuscitation line. This certification ensures the quality system is in accordance with Regulation (EU) 2017/745 allowing for CPR product line sales in the European market. The EU Medical Device Registration (MDR) replaces the EU's Medical Device Directive (93/42/EECI) thatwent into effect in May of 2021.According to the European Commission, (EC), no existing requirements have been removed but new requirements have been added to the MDR. Several additions include:

  • Greater emphasis placed on life-cycle approach to safety

  • Increased control and monitoring by national competent authorities and the EC

  • Reclassification of devices, wider scope of devices

  • Coverage of internet sales of medical devices

  • Introduction of clinical evaluation consultation procedure

  • New Unique Device Identification system with enhanced traceability and post-market surveillance

  • Increased transparency with clinical studies and devices

Mercury Medical, Wednesday, July 27, 2022, Press release picture

A statistic from July 18th states 85% of MDR Certificates have not been issued transitions from MDD. This means there is a huge backlog and certification is taking 13-18 months.1.

John Gargaro MD, President and CEO at Mercury Medical, states: "This is a HUGE milestone requiring a tremendous amount of resources to achieve MDR certification. This important work allows EU access to clinically differentiated resuscitation devices including a small adult version for assisting clinicians with their lung ventilation protection strategies. This critical certification assures we maintain global presence."

About Mercury Medical

Mercury Medical is dedicated to delivering clinically differentiated critical care technology that saves lives throughout the world. The company is recognized as a leading provider of cutting-edge technology in the acute care and emergency markets both in the United States and globally. For over 58 years clinicians have relied on Mercury Medical as their resource for bringing a legacy of innovative products to critical care areas of neonatal, anesthesia, respiratory and EMS markets in over 60 countries. Mercury Medical's high-quality standards include ISO 13485, MDR, MDSAP and ISO 9001 certifications.

For more information:

Contact: Deb Olson
Phone: (727) 573-4980
E-mail Address: dolson@mercurymed.com
www.mercurymed.com

SOURCE: Mercury Medical

View source version on accesswire.com:
https://www.accesswire.com/709959/Mercury-Medical-Receives-EU-Quality-Management-Medical-Device-MDR-Certification

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/mercury-medical-receives-eu-quality-140000201.html
Killexams : That’s How These Brothers Roll: A Songwriter, An Engineer, And Their Innovative Approach To Wheelchair Safety

“His smile was as bright as the August sun / When he looked at me

As he struggled down the driveway / It almost made me hurt

Will don't walk too good / Will don't talk too good

He won't do the things that the other kids do / In our neighborhood”

Recorded by Martina McBride and co-written with Tom Douglas, Grammy-nominated songwriter Barry Dean’s first single God's Will was named to Rolling Stone's 40 Saddest Country Songs of All Time. It was inspired by the premature birth and mobility struggles of Dean’s daughter Katherine.

Katherine has inspired tens of millions of listeners who have been touched by the song, but she is also the catalyst for LUCI, an award-winning smart technology product that attaches to standard power wheelchairs. It improves safety with sensors that prevent the wheelchair from running into walls, people, or objects, and stops it before unexpectedly tumbling over a curb: hazards that are everyday realities for wheelchair drivers.

In 2003 there were more than 100,000 emergency department visits in the U. S. for wheelchair injuries and that number is likely closer to 200,000 in 2022. 55% of wheelchair riders report at least one tip or fall in the past three years. A drop of as little as two inches can cause significant injuries when a 300-pound wheelchair falls on its rider; most standard curbs are six inches. Power wheelchair crashes can be as forceful as car crashes, without the safety features of an automobile.

“We’re a young company and LUCI has only been on the market for a year, but we have users in over 40 states already and we have aggregated, anonymized data that show that over 10,000 collisions, drop offs or tips are prevented each week.” Barry Dean

Billed as “smart wheelchair technology for the most fearless people on Earth,” LUCI was founded by Dean and his engineer brother Jered Dean, a former professor at Colorado School of Mines, design consultant, and product developer of innovations as varied as complex weapons systems and medical devices. The danger of power wheelchair accidents hit close to home when a close friend’s mother was badly injured in a tipping accident, and Jered made it his mission to re-engineer Katherine’s wheelchair to be safer and smarter.

LUCI’s smart mobility technology has received innovation awards from prestigious organizations like Time, Popular Science, Fast Company, and CES. Not satisfied to stop at preventing mobility accidents, the Dean brothers have three new innovations they are launching this year: LUCI+AIR, a real-time, smart air cushion monitor that helps mitigate against potentially life-threatening pressure injuries; LUCI Ramp Assist, assistive technology that allows a wheelchair with LUCI to autonomously drive up narrow ramps like mobility vans; and LUCI View, which provides wheelchair users a 360-degree view. LUCI technology connects wheelchair users and caregivers via an app. It also works with Alexa and Google Assistant to alert them about the status of their battery life via voice command.

LUCI is an inspiring story of a father’s concern, an uncle’s love, and two brothers’ relentless pursuit of innovation to increase safety, independence, and quality of life.

You founded LUCI to provide smart wheelchair technology that improves safety, mobility, and independence for wheelchair users. Tell us more about the process of growing LUCI from a wish, to an obsession, to founding the world’s first and only smart technology platform for power wheelchairs.

Barry Dean: In our case we were turning a vision into a reality. I think a lot of times people start a company and then go look for a vision. In our case, we had a really clear view of the lived experience. We spent the first year developing what we call the “42 stories” of all the things we wanted the wheelchair to do in the next 20 years. We realized the pain points and got started on providing an answer. The pain point we see, and refer to most, is that the chair has not been living up to the potential of the person in the chair.

We took the time to understand the dreams and desires of people, then write those in story form. The intellectual property and technology were developed around that. So it’s been a clear vision and that pointed us towards the technology platform and then the creation of a company we knew we had to found.

Jered Dean: We didn’t do the textbook minimum viable product. It was more of really understanding what users and their teams were looking for and trying to create the technology platform and operating system that could support the future. The innovations are always serving the dreams of the 42 stories, which include not just the person in the chair, but their team. We know life is a team sport with their clinicians, their rehab engineer, and their caregivers. We really looked at that holistically because we have multiple customers, and we’re going to try to have that chair be an ally, a teammate.

“LUCI isn’t just ‘good tech for wheelchairs.’ LUCI is ground-breaking technology for anyone addressing advancements in robotics or mobility as a service, in factory situations and the unmapped world.” Barry Dean

Barry Dean: LUCI isn’t just “good tech for wheelchairs.” LUCI is ground-breaking technology for anyone addressing advancements in robotics or mobility as a service, in factory situations and the unmapped world. We’ve got a millimeter-wave radar Jered developed with Texas Instruments. We’ve developed a new way of doing ultrasonics. There’s sensor fusion with stereo vision cameras. To be able to stand up something this precise and durable that’s essentially powered by a boat battery, at this price point - the whole thing costs less than one lidar - is really something. Sometimes the story and mission overshadow the engineering accomplishments because it’s so cause oriented, but the engineering and technology developments stand on their own.

There is an inspiring video on your website that describes why each of your test chairs has a name. Tell us more.

Jered Dean: The names on our test chairs come from the users’ families we bought them from. We’re grateful they shared their stories with us. The people behind those names represent very different diagnoses, from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to multiple sclerosis to cerebral palsy. What we’re focused on is a lot more than the diagnosis, it’s the lived experience of being in a wheelchair and the team aspect of connecting and managing independent mobility and user health.

Barry Dean: If you’re working with the Bruce chair and you know Bruce’s story, you may have never met Bruce, but you’re inside that story of what he dreamed his wheelchair could do, and the ways that it could and should enrich his life.

I’ll supply you an example. One use case was about having a visualizer just like a car would have, that shows you around the space of your chair. In Katherine’s case, her spine is fused, and she can’t turn around. We were able to develop that and provide it as an over the air update.

Jered Dean: We started with the basics of turning a dumb wheelchair into a smart wheelchair, and now we’re in the fun phase where we’re continuing to make LUCI smarter and more capable and provide those upgrades with over the air updates.

You’ve inspired – and been inspired by – many people. Can you share some particularly touching stories of LUCI users?

Jered Dean: There was one eight-year-old boy, his parents had been trying to find a way to allow him to drive a power wheelchair and independently explore his world for five years. And they just hadn’t found a good way to do it. Training was difficult and safety was a concern. Within 15 minutes of using LUCI, he was successfully driving around in a clinic, talking to people. That ability to independently move himself is so important both for his confidence and his development. He finally had freedom to move around; before, somebody always had to move him.

We’ve seen that same kind of experience for some veterans who’ve had traumatic brain injuries. LUCI becomes the difference between being pushed around in a manual chair or being independent in their community in a power chair.

Barry Dean: I’m thinking of a young woman who was a very nervous driver and was afraid to be in public settings. She had been injured many times in her chair before LUCI. We learned that there are twice as many people going to the emergency room for wheelchair injuries than are injured in motorcycle accidents in the US each year. LUCI has not only helped keep her safe, which is awesome, but it has helped increased her confidence. That confidence has allowed her to get out in her community and she just got her first job.

We’re a young company and LUCI has only been on the market for a year, but we have users in over 40 states already and we have aggregated, anonymized data that show that over 10,000 collisions, drop offs or tips are prevented each week. Those are all potential injuries. To be able to have that impact is a pretty stunning thing.

Barry, you had a successful career as a songwriter to country music greats like Reba McEntire, Carrie Underwood, Tim McGraw, Luke Combs, and many more before founding LUCI. To what extent do you feel your experience in the creative arts contributes to the success of LUCI, and how does that balance with Jered’s engineering expertise?

Barry Dean: It’s been a real honor to get to work with Jered and I always say it would be a really short story if it was “songwriter wants to do something to help his daughter.” That would have been about the extent of that story without Jered and his team and what they’ve created.

We say internally that LUCI’s message about hope and joy and that you’re being heard. I think there are a lot of families like mine and users like my daughter and her friends who didn’t feel like they were being listened to or served. When you’re writing songs and creating music, listening and really understanding people, their stories and their lives, and connecting with them, is a big part of that. And so I think that music and LUCI share that aspect of listening, looking for the future and having an impact. I love writing songs and still do, but LUCI impacts the future at a scale that is just as important as music to me.

Jered Dean: One of the things I’ve learned from working with Barry is how much overlap there is in the creative processes. We look at it through different lenses between the technical creativity and artistic creativity but putting those two together has been amazing.

What obstacles and setbacks have you experienced, and what advice do you have for other founders working to bring technology to serve others?

Jered Dean: We launched during the pandemic, which was an interesting thing. LUCI is a piece of hardware that mounts to an existing power wheelchair, but then utilizes software and an operating system. Because there is that hardware component we needed to get into clinics and demonstrate it, show that it exists. The wheelchairs that we mount to weigh 350-450 pounds without a person, and they aren’t easily transported.

“We are always immediately looking for the door that’s open when other doors close.” Jered Dean

So, we used our connection to the music business. We realized performers’ tour buses were just sitting around during the pandemic. We loaded the wheelchairs and tools underneath and toured doing demos in some top clinic parking lots around the country. It allowed us to move forward cautiously and respectfully.

We are always immediately looking for the door that’s open when other doors close.

Barry Dean: I do think sometimes the mission overshadows how phenomenal and interesting the technology lift is. The other thing is that most people are not aware that this is a real market. You’ve got a million more people spending their lives in power and manual wheelchairs in the US than are driving electric vehicles. It’s a big group of people who had been overlooked. It is an industry that’s a little stuck in the status quo and ripe for disruption. And there’s a person in that chair who has been clamoring for real innovation, and we’re going to talk with that person and supply them the dignity of treating them as a customer.

We’re raising our first round of funding and that will close in the next couple of months. That’s been a whole new experience. We’re growing fast and we’re really excited about it.

One last question: what is the meaning of the name LUCI?

Barry Dean: Katherine is a huge Beatles fan, and her favorite song is Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds. In the very beginning, our cloud development team, led by Jared’s wife, named themselves Lucy, given the cloud/sky connection. It stuck.

The conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 14:30:00 -0500 Heather Wishart-Smith en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/heatherwishartsmith/2022/08/08/thats-how-these-brothers-roll-a-songwriter-an-engineer-and-their-innovative-approach-to-wheelchair-safety/
Killexams : Addressing medical disinformation Topic of new grant

UB is one of five universities nationwide that has been awarded a grant from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) to support teaching health sciences students how to dispel medical disinformation.

The grants are part of a national strategic initiative developed by the AAMC with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to increase confidence in COVID-19 vaccines and address medical misinformation and mistrust by educating health sciences students.

In 2019, the World Health Organization had already identified vaccine hesitancy as one of the top 10 threats to global public health — and that was before the pandemic.

“Achieving this national recognition is extraordinary for the University at Buffalo and an important step in stopping the spread of disinformation that negatively impacts efforts to combat COVID-19,” says Allison Brashear, vice president for health sciences and dean of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at UB. “Clinicians and learners across UB’s health sciences schools are uniquely positioned to work with their patients and public audiences to address health misinformation.”

The goal of the UB project is to develop an interprofessional education (IPE) experience for all of UB’s health sciences students in the Jacobs School, the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, the School of Nursing, the School of Dental Medicine and the School of Public Health and Health Professions.

UB students will begin the new training program as a pilot starting this fall.

The UB project was developed by co-principal investigators Nicholas M. Fusco, PharmD, clinical associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice in the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Alison M. Vargovich, clinical assistant professor in the Division of Behavioral Medicine in the Department of Medicine in the Jacobs School.

“Medical misinformation and vaccine hesitancy are touched on in each respective program’s curricula,” says Fusco. “What makes this program innovative is, it is interprofessional and provides students the opportunity to practice skills they are taught in a team-based environment.”

Health sciences students at UB will learn, together with their peers from other professions, about how they can work as a team to tackle medical misinformation and disinformation.

The goal is to ultimately Strengthen trust between health professions students and the patients and communities they serve. A key step is providing trainees with a framework to approach these conversations effectively and respectfully.

“The public may see or hear things that are misrepresented or false,” says Fusco. “Convincing them otherwise is challenging, given the emotional and politically charged relationship that has developed between health care and the public. It is a team effort to dispel medical misinformation and vaccine hesitancy, as well as a team effort to develop this educational innovation, which would not be possible without the creative expertise of our research team.”

Educational modules will focus on misinformation, interprofessional approaches, vaccine hesitancy and evidence-based communication practices. Students will be asked to apply this knowledge first to virtual simulation scenarios and then to in-person simulations using standardized patients to reinforce the information they have learned.

“Educating our health professions students to approach conversations with patients about vaccine hesitancy using specific evidence-based strategies reduces variability and strengthens patient outcomes,” says Patricia J. Ohtake, assistant vice president for interprofessional education and associate professor of rehabilitation science, School of Public Health and Health Professions. “Using an interprofessional approach ensures members of the health care team are consistent in their approach to discussing vaccine hesitancy and are able to support previous conversations patients may have had with other health care team members.”

“The idea is never to force a patient to change, in part because that doesn’t work,” Vargovich says, “but to learn how to have productive conversations that hopefully result in patients reconsidering their viewpoint, or at least being more open to continued discussion.

“From a personal perspective, I think all of us as health care providers have to navigate addressing misinformation with patients, loved ones and on social media, which is not an easy thing to do,” Vargovich notes. “What works best is to move away from logic and arguments, and lean into empathy and curiosity. By trying to understand their concerns and how they developed that point of view, rather than arguing against it, we are better able to address the root cause of the false belief.”

Two strategies are typically used when addressing misinformation and the development of false beliefs held by patients. One focuses on the information deficit model, where providing education may be all that is needed to help a patient update their beliefs, while the second strategy provides a framework for patients who are resistant to change and have more strongly held views related to misinformation.

“What we know is that shaming or belittling others never works, whether personally or professionally, so being able to have a conversation, but also knowing when to pull back, is important so we don’t cause others to become more deeply engrained in these misbeliefs,” Vargovich says.

The project is part of a larger effort at UB addressing medical misinformation and vaccine hesitancy. In the Jacobs School, the curriculum is undergoing a complete redesign and one of its primary pillars is a focus on scientific literacy and inquiry led by Vargovich and Robert Taylor, professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and assistant dean and director of the MD-PhD program.

In addition to Fusco and Vargovich, the UB team on the AAMC grant includes Kelly Foltz-Ramos, director of simulation and assistant professor, School of Nursing; Jessica Kruger, clinical assistant professor, Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, School of Public Health and Health Professions; and William A. Prescott Jr., chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 00:15:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.buffalo.edu/ubnow/campus.host.html/content/shared/university/news/ub-reporter-articles/stories/2022/08/aamc-disinformation-grant.detail.html
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