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Killexams : HUAWEI HCNP-VC(Huawei action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/H11-861-ENU Search results Killexams : HUAWEI HCNP-VC(Huawei action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/H11-861-ENU https://killexams.com/exam_list/HUAWEI Killexams : U.S. investigates claims Huawei is spying on military communications

China’s Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. is being actively investigated by the U.S. Department of Commerce over fears that it could be using equipment installed on cell towers to spy on nearby military bases and missile silos.

The concern is that Huawei could somehow use this equipment to capture sensitive information about the U.S. military’s activities and pass it along back to Chinese officials.

Reuters said Thursday that the probe was launched shortly after U.S. President Joe Biden took office in early 2021, citing sources familiar with the matter. A 10-page document seen by Reuters shows the Commerce Department issued a subpoena to learn more about how Huawei shares information with foreign parties.

The investigation is centered on cell towers located close to Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana, which were once fitted with Huawei’s communications technology. Investigators are looking into concerns that data from phones that used the towers could somehow reveal important information about what the U.S. military is up to, including its troop movements, Reuters said. The report adds there are also concerns about two intercontinental missile silos, in Nebraska and Wyoming, that are located close to cell towers fitted with Huawei’s tech.

“There’s a very real concern that some of that technology could be used as an early warning system if there happened to be, God forbid, an ICBM missile strike,” said Federal Communications Commission Chairman Brendan Carr.

When asked by Reuters, the Commerce Department refused to confirm or deny an ongoing investigation. A spokesperson said simply that “protecting U.S. persons’ safety and security against malign information collection is vital to protecting our economy and national security.” It’s not clear what action the agency might be able to take against Huawei if it does deem it to be a danger to national security.

Huawei did not respond when asked for a comment, but a spokesperson from the Chinese embassy in Washington D.C. said that the U.S. government abuses the concept of national security to “suppress Huawei” and other Chinese telecommunications firms, without offering genuine proof that they constitute a security threat.

Huawei is familiar with these kinds of allegations. The U.S. first accused the company of using its equipment to spy on communications in 2018. That year, former President Donald Trump signed a defense bill that prohibited the U.S. government and its contractors from using the company’s technology. Later, Huawei was added to an export blacklist maintained by the U.S.

Huawei has repeatedly professed its innocence, but the U.S. sanctions have had a pretty significant impact on the company. In 2021 it reported a 28.6% downturn in revenue, and it has also suffered from shortages of high-end computer chips for its smartphones. Recently, it was reported that Huawei has even reached out to employees asking them for ideas on how to transform the company in light of the sanctions it faces.

Photo: schwarzweisz/Pixabay

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Thu, 21 Jul 2022 12:09:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://siliconangle.com/2022/07/21/u-s-investigates-claims-huawei-spying-military-communications/
Killexams : Why Indonesia Has Embraced Huawei

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

China is neither liked nor trusted in Indonesia. Yet Chinese tech firms—particularly Huawei and ZTE—have become trusted cybersecurity partners for the country. They provide the tech and the training for much of the workforce and the government officials charged with Indonesia’s cybersecurity. These Chinese tech successes in Indonesia offer sobering lessons for the United States, its allies, and its partners—not just in Indonesia, with a population of more than 270 million, but in the broader Indo-Pacific as well.

Unless policymakers in Washington take some pages from the Huawei and ZTE playbook, these Chinese tech titans will not face any serious competition as they maneuver to train vast swaths of the 21st century’s digital workforce. After all, the United States and its allies and partners have for years been in the business of walling themselves off from the perceived security vulnerabilities of dependence on Chinese technology.

Starting in the early 2010s, staunch U.S. allies such as Australia began limiting Huawei’s involvement in critical information communications technology infrastructure. This eventually culminated in strong restrictions—and sometimes outright exclusions—for Huawei and its peers such as ZTE.

But for much of the developing world, the story could not be more different.

With a few notable exceptions including Vietnam and India, the developing world still welcomes Chinese tech companies as providers of sorely needed communications infrastructure and training. Huawei and ZTE have experienced among their warmest embraces in Indonesia. First entering the Indonesian market in the late 1990s and early 2000s, these companies have emerged as integral suppliers both of Indonesia’s essential communications infrastructure and the training that will empower the workforce of the country’s booming digital economy. Huawei, for example, already has by a wide margin the largest share of Indonesia’s telecom carrier equipment market.

As with many other developing countries, the relatively low price point of Huawei and ZTE kits is a big part of the appeal. By some estimates, Chinese communications infrastructure is as much as 30 percent cheaper than its competitors’.

Yet in setting out to document how senior Indonesian government officials approach the risks of technological reliance on Chinese companies for our new report, Localization and China’s Tech Success in Indonesia, we found that the reasons for the expansive role of China’s tech companies are more complex and numerous than price point. As our interviews with a wide range of Indonesian officials and experts made plain, Chinese tech companies are seen as partners to both realize Indonesia’s big digital economy goals and navigate its daunting cybersecurity challenges.

Although the digital economy is central to the Indonesian government’s plans for catapulting the country into the top 10 global economies by 2030, the country also faces a massive skills shortage in the field of information communications technology, with the World Bank projecting that it will need 9 million additional such workers by 2030.

Meanwhile, Indonesia is among the countries most vulnerable to cyberattacks globally. According to Indonesia’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency, the country experienced 1.4 billion cyberattacks or web traffic anomalies in 2021. In 2017, when the number of cyberattacks was closer to 200 million, they were estimated to have cost the country $34.2 billion.

Despite deep suspicion of Chinese tech companies among rich liberal democracies, Huawei and ZTE have presented themselves as the solution to Indonesia’s twin challenges of an impending tech skills shortfall and pervasive cyberattacks.

In 2020, Huawei pledged to train 100,000 Indonesians in essential digital skills, including cloud computing and 5G. Despite the ambitiousness of the move, Huawei is backing its pledges with resources.

We found that Huawei is partnering with local Indonesian universities to offer free short courses and certifications in app development and other key skills. One Indonesian academic we spoke to shared emails showing that Huawei is expanding its outreach by seeking to partner with more local universities and education providers.

Huawei is offering training to the Indonesian government as well, with the company reportedly having trained 7,000 officials since 2019. Indonesia has long been a victim of China’s sophisticated cyber-espionage. Despite this, Indonesia sees the training offered by Chinese tech companies as a solution to many of the country’s most severe cybersecurity challenges.

For Indonesia, the threat of state-based cyber-espionage is far down the list of security concerns when compared to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors, misinformation, and disinformation. In addition to financial losses for Indonesian companies and identity theft and fraud for ordinary Indonesians, these threats endanger the country’s social and political stability.

With Chinese tech companies offering the training, technology, and security practices to reduce vulnerabilities to cybercrime committed by nonstate actors and the skills and technology needed to manage the information domain, the Indonesian government sees firms like Huawei as partners. As a testament to this, the country’s National Cyber and Crypto Agency signed a memorandum of understanding with Huawei on cybersecurity capacity building in 2019. This agreement was then upgraded to a three-party agreement with a leading Indonesian technology institute in 2021.

For the United States or Australia, the notion that a cybersecurity agency would sign such an agreement with Huawei might seem absurd—especially considering that the Chinese government can compel Chinese companies to assist with its intelligence efforts.

But for Indonesia, these concerns about state security are trumped by the training and technology benefits that companies like Huawei provide. As one senior Indonesian government official said to us: “If we’re constantly afraid, our development will stagnate.”

If the United States and its allies and partners want to compete with China in developing countries such as Indonesia, then, much like Huawei, they need to get themselves in the business of offering tangible benefits that respond to real needs.

The U.S. government should partner with its leading tech companies to offer free or at least highly subsidized technical training programs in Indonesia and elsewhere in the Indo-Pacific. As well as subjecting the offerings from Chinese companies to some healthy competition, such initiatives would be welcomed by key U.S. allies and partners.

Countries such as Japan, Australia, and India are similarly concerned about the rise of Chinese tech companies across the Indo-Pacific and would strongly support such a U.S. initiative. Moreover, these countries could bolster such a U.S.-led effort by providing additional know-how, funding, and technology. Such a so-called minilateral initiative could also potentially be rolled into exiting Quad efforts to provide more public goods in the Indo-Pacific.

Rhetoric from the United States and like-minded countries about the rules-based international order and a free and open Indo-Pacific isn’t bad. But it won’t persuade developing countries to turn down tangible benefits like technology and training. To shift decision-making in Jakarta and elsewhere, Washington will need to step up with technology and training offers that provide a more appealing value proposition.

None of this is to say that strategic competition with China is the only reason for offering tech training programs in Indonesia and other developing countries in the Indo-Pacific.

Helping to upskill future generations of tech workers in the region is an unambiguously good thing. Many Indo-Pacific countries and their young populations will need these skills to realize their development goals in the global economy’s digital future.

But as well as the clear development rationale for providing these kinds of opportunities, there is a compelling realpolitik reason. Without training funded and supported by the United States and its allies and partners, Huawei and other Chinese tech companies will only increase their already strong influence over Indonesia’s—and the broader region’s—technology landscape.

The United States and its allies and partners have been missing in action on tech training in Indonesia and other key developing economies in the Indo-Pacific. It is time for them to get back in the game.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 00:31:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://foreignpolicy.com/2022/07/28/indonesia-china-huawei-tech-cybersecurity/?tpcc=recirc_latestanalysis062921
Killexams : Huawei launches updated operating system HarmonyOS 3, new ride-hailing platform

Huawei Technologies Co has released an upgraded version of its own operating system, as the Chinese telecommunications giant pushes forward with its Android replacement amid ongoing US sanctions.

HarmonyOS 3, Huawei's third-generation operating system, is designed to provide a more seamless experience across devices, including smartphones, tablets, printers, cars and smart home devices such as televisions, company representatives said at an online launch event on Wednesday.

Huawei also announced the launch of Petal Chuxing, a ride-hailing platform that pulls together third-party service providers. Running on HarmonyOS 3, the new app is compatible with several Huawei devices, including smartphones, watches and tablets, the company said.

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While Huawei said that Petal Chuxing "does not aim to compete with anyone", the app marks the company's entrance into a field led by Didi Chuxing, which was recently fined US$1.2 billion by Chinese regulators following a year-long cybersecurity investigation.

Pedestrians walks past a Huawei flagship store in Shanghai. Photo: Bloomberg alt=Pedestrians walks past a Huawei flagship store in Shanghai. Photo: Bloomberg>

Huawei's decision to carry on with its self-developed operating system and introduce a ride-hailing service comes as the company struggles to revive its consumer business, which has been crippled by US sanctions.

Huawei debuted the original HarmonyOS in August 2019, three months after the firm was added to Washington's trade blacklist, preventing it from buying software, chips and other technologies from American companies. Soon after the ban was announced, Google stopped providing its suite of mobile software services to Huawei.

Without access to Google apps and advanced chips made with US technologies, global sales of Huawei smartphones nosedived, forcing the Shenzhen-based giant to explore alternative business opportunities, such as convincing other hardware makers to adopt HarmonyOS.

The first device to launch with HarmonyOS was a smart television unveiled in August 2019 by Huawei's then-subsidiary Honor.

HarmonyOS 2.0, Huawei's second-generation operating system, was adopted by the firm's smartphones last year, while the car-specific HarmonyOS Smart Cockpit can be found on an electric vehicle launched in China earlier this year, co-developed with domestic automotive brand Seres.

To date, over 300 million Huawei devices have been equipped with various versions of HarmonyOS, Richard Yu Chengdong, chief executive of Huawei's consumer business group, said on Wednesday.

HarmonyOS 3 will be made available to more devices starting September, the company said.

However, Huawei's efforts to persuade third-party smartphone and gadget makers to adopt HarmonyOS remain an uphill battle. Android is still the world's most popular mobile operating system with a 72 per cent share in July, according to data from StatCounter.

Shoppers at Huawei's flagship store in Shanghai. Photo: Bloomberg alt=Shoppers at Huawei's flagship store in Shanghai. Photo: Bloomberg>

Huawei's total sales last year shrank by nearly a third from 2020 to reach 636.8 billion yuan (US$100 billion), its worst annual sales performance on record. Its consumer business, made up mostly of smartphone sales, was the worst-hit, with revenue plunging by half to 243.4 billion yuan.

Despite the challenges, Huawei continues to invest in HarmonyOS amid Beijing's call for Chinese companies to develop home-grown computer operating systems and reduce dependence on foreign rivals, such as Microsoft Windows and Google's Android.

Additional reporting by Che Pan

This article originally appeared in the South China Morning Post (SCMP), the most authoritative voice reporting on China and Asia for more than a century. For more SCMP stories, please explore the SCMP app or visit the SCMP's Facebook and Twitter pages. Copyright © 2022 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

Copyright (c) 2022. South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

Tue, 26 Jul 2022 21:30:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/huawei-launches-updated-operating-system-093000179.html
Killexams : Huawei Mobile Services and Kumu announce collaborative partnership via AVOW agency to enhance users' experiences through strategic advertisements

TMCNet: Huawei Mobile Services and Kumu announce collaborative partnership via AVOW agency to enhance users' experiences through strategic advertisements

SINGAPORE, July 29, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Kumu, the popular live-streaming social media platform in the Philippines has entered into a long-term collaboration with HUAWEI Ads. Represented by their ad agency AVOW, a mobile OEM advertising specialist, who handles all of their user acquisition activities through mobile OEMs, Kumu has seen a significant increase in its number of users and downloads following a successful pilot program with HUAWEI Ads in August 2021.

The suite of features offered by HUAWEI Ads through AVOW, aligned with Kumu's needs to increase reach and engagements on their platform. On Huawei ecosystem apps, Kumu successfully boosted its visibility which allowed the app to achieve 60% average engagement rate and 57% improvement in cost-per-download (CPD).

"Thanks to the delivery of premium advertisements on HUAWEI Ads, Kumu has grown to be one of the highest grossing applications in the markets. Our partnership with HUAWEI Ads have helped us to generate leads far greater than our initial campaign goals," said Alex Tshering, Chief Growth Officer at Kumu.

Reaching Untapped User Audiences with HUAWEI Ads

Kumu experienced exponential growth within a short period of 9 months due to the extensive global user base within the Huawei mobile ecosystem. This portfolio is driven by Huawei's "1+8+N" strategy, which uses the smartphone as the main entrance, and 8 commonly used terminal devices such as speakers, tablets, PCs, and watches as auxiliary entrances, and then uses 1 + 8 to connect all smart IoT devices. This all-connected ecosystem serves over 730 million users worldwide.

HUAWEI Ads also offers a wide selection of display, search and app distribution platform advertising formats. In this campagn, AVOW made use of the various ad solutions offered such as AppGallery, Petal Search and display ads to balance out their ad placements to generate the best results. Additionally, incorporating HUAWEI Ads multiple targeting options such as location, demographics and user behaviour into Kumu's ad strategy brought about greater brand exposure to a diverse audience base. These features collectively amplified Kumu's presence and audience conversion rates.   

Optimise Ad Performance

HUAWEI Ads Data Management Platform (DMP) provided Kumu with insights on the campaign performance through a comprehensive breakdown of key metrics. This information allows Kumu to make targeted improvements that will optimise their future ad strategies, with the help of their partner agency - AVOW.

Based on activity data gathered from algorithms across all Huawei devices, HUAWEI Ads identified and recommended potential audiences who fit Kumu's target profile, which ultimately helped them broaden their target audience and user base. In addition to growing Kumu's user base and maximising its ad performance, the algorithm detects and filters out fraudulent inventory, effectively countering the issue of inflated ad performance metrics.

"Our partnership with Kumu highlights our commitment to delivering high quality ads that drive user growth and engagement. We have dedicated teams that work closely with our clients to get the best returns on their investment. We greatly look forward to deepening our strong partnership with Kumu, and to continue working as one team to meet their business objectives," shared Rei Xiao, Director of Mobile Ecosystem Business Growth, Huawei Asia Pacific Region.                        

Fostering Strong Partnerships

Maintaining a close working relationship with AVOW and Kumu has allowed Huawei to better understand and adapt to Kumu's advertising needs. At the same time, Huawei was able to ensure that campaigns ran smoothly by taking immediate action to resolve issues that arose. Huawei believes that consistent and transparent communication is the key to driving successful ad campaigns for its clients. 

For more information, please visit: https://ads.huawei.com/

About HUAWEI Ads

HUAWEI Ads is the digital advertising marketplace designed for Huawei devices. The service interacts with Huawei devices' underlying algorithms and architecture, making it the most effective platform for reaching Huawei's global user base of over 730 million people across devices like smartphones, PCs, and tablets. 

About Kumu

Kumu is a powerful social media platform that brings the voices of Filipinos from all over the globe at the forefront. Aside from presenting users with real-time earning opportunities as a live streamer, chances to win prizes in various game shows, and engagement in campaigns, Kumu also fosters communities that ignite relevant discussions among Filipinos. According to mobile-app performance company App Annie, Kumu is not only the first Filipino app to be the #1 top-grossing social app in the Philippines, but one of the highest-grossing social apps in the world, ranking in the top 10 in multiple markets' app stores, including in Canada, Australia, the Middle East, Europe, Hong Kong, and Singapore. For more information, please visit www.kumu.ph.

About AVOW

AVOW is the global app growth company, specializing in alternative app store inventory. The company provides brands a unique opportunity to access untapped mobile advertising inventory at scale and invest their advertising spend across alternative channels for incremental user growth and engagement. For more information, please visit https://avow.tech/

SOURCE Huawei Mobile Services

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Wed, 27 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 text/html https://www.mobilitytechzone.com/wimax/news/2022/07/28/9647347.htm
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