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C.P.M. Module 4: Management
ISM Management action
Killexams : ISM Management action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/630-008 Search results Killexams : ISM Management action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/630-008 https://killexams.com/exam_list/ISM Killexams : Most U.S. companies still hiring and growing, ISM finds, but ‘sales are slowing’

The numbers:  An ISM barometer of U.S. business conditions at companies such as hotels and restaurants dipped to 56.7% in September. Yet the survey also showed steady growth and rising employment in a sign the economy is still expanding.

Numbers over 50% are viewed as positive for the economy, and anything over 55% is considered exceptional.

Economists polled by The Wall Street Journal had expected the index to drop to 56%. The survey is produced by the institute for Supply Management.

The snapshot of the economy painted by the service sector index contrasted with a similar ISM survey of manufacturers that showed deteriorating business conditions.

The closely followed ISM reports are the first major indicators of each month and offer clues on how well the economy is performing.

Big picture: The economy is still plowing ahead, but the future looks dimmer.

The Federal Reserve is raising interest rates sharply to squelch the worst inflation in 40 years, but higher rates usually slow the economy and sometimes can even trigger a recession. Many economists predict a downturn is likely by next year.

“Sales at our restaurants seasonally trend down from August to October, and this year seems to be more severe compared to before the pandemic,” an executive at a restaurant told ISM.

“Business activity has improved over last month but is still trending flat to slightly down versus the same period last year,” a wholesale executive told ISM.

Key details:

  • The new orders index fell 1.2 points to 60.6%.
  • The production gauge slipped 1.8 points to 59.1%
  • The employment barometer rose 2.8 points to 53%. Yet some companies said they would be more cautious about hiring and rely more on temporary labor in case a recession ensues.
  • The prices-paid index, a measure of inflation, fell 2.8 points to 68.7%. That marks the fifth straight decline and the lowest level since the start of 2021. Prices are still high and rising, executives said, but they are not rising as rapidly as they were earlier in the year.

Looking ahead: “All the details in this month’s report are encouraging, and they are consistent with our view that the economy was not in a recession in the first half of 2022, nor is it heading into one in the second half,” said money market economist Thomas Simons of Jefferies in a note to clients.

Market reaction: The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +1.86% and S&P 500 SPX, +2.65% fell in Wednesday trades.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 05:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/story/most-u-s-businesses-still-expanding-and-hiring-ism-finds-11664978922
Killexams : Key Inflation Figures From The Institute For Supply Management (ISM) That Investors Need To See

Key takeaways

  • The ISM Manufacturing Index is a leading indicator that shows the health of the manufacturing industry.
  • Current signs are pointing to inflation beginning to ease slowly.
  • Investors should pay attention to key economic indicators to gauge inflation, future interest rates, and adjust their portfolios accordingly.

Many investors know about reports that help the Federal Reserve shape interest rates. The most prominent is the U.S. Consumer Price Index (CPI), but not many investors know there are additional reports available. These reports don't get much news coverage, but they are just as important.

The ISM Manufacturing Index is one such report. It offers a wealth of knowledge when it comes to the health of the manufacturing industry in the U.S. Let’s explore who generates this report, as well as the data it contains and what that signifies for inflation and the economy at large.

What is the Institute for Supply Management?

The Institute for Supply Management is the world's largest non-profit professional supply management organization. It was founded in 1915 and certifies, educates, and develops leaders for the supply chain industry. It also surveys purchasing managers and releases the ISM Manufacturing Index.

What is the ISM Manufacturing Index?

The ISM Manufacturing Index is a leading economic indicator for the level of economic activity in the manufacturing sector in the United States. This means the results of this report indicate or predict what will happen in the economy in the future.

The stock market is another leading economic indicator. The market can rally if investors expect positive economic times ahead. On the other hand, it can sink into a bear market if they expect the economy to sour in the near term.

There are also lagging indicators, which reveal trends in hindsight. These are reports that come out after the boom or bust cycle of the economy has begun. For example, the National Bureau of Economic Research will formally state the U.S. economy is in a recession a few months after the economy enters the recession.

Overall, there are a handful of leading and lagging indicators that, when put together, provide analysts a more complete picture of the economy's health.

Are we moving in the right direction?

The latest collection of data from the PMI from August 2022 are a mixed bag. On the positive front, the prices paid component of the ISM Manufacturing Index is moving sharply lower, which is a good sign. It points to a stronger balance between supply and demand, which benefits consumers by slowing the rise in prices.

During the inflationary spikes in the 1970s and 1980s, a downturn in prices paid was a leading indicator of lower inflation rates. If the same holds true today, we might see an easing on the inflation front in the coming months.

The negative side of the report’s findings is that factory growth remains slow and production has slowed. There is still a dark cloud looming over the outlook for the economy, and experts continue to debate whether the U.S. will end up in a recession. While the consumer continues to remain strong, businesses are being cautious.

Gas prices

Gas prices in the U.S. have dropped to an average of $3.677/gallon, a decline of more than 25% from their all-time high in mid-June; prices are at their lowest levels in six months. This is another good sign for both the consumer and the economy.

As it becomes more affordable to drive, people can travel more and have more money to spend on things other than gas. However, the question is whether the low prices will last. While the fall driving season brings a cheaper blend of gas to manufacture, there will colder weather to deal with soon enough.

Freight rates

Global container freight rates have hit a 16-month low, down 52% from their peak. This is still four times higher than pre-pandemic levels but moving in the right direction. For many months, demand outpaced supply as lockdowns and supply chain issues caused delays. Now that the supply of goods and demand for shipping them have evened out, prices have come down.

The supply chain still has a long way to go to catch up to demand entirely, but signs indicate it is heading in the right direction.

What indicators are investors watching?

As an investor, what indicators should you pay attention to for clues to the economy's health? There are a few key indicators to look at, both leading indicators and lagging indicators.

Pay attention to the stock market, retail sales, and manufacturing activity for leading indicators. While there are others, these three provide you a good baseline on how the economy is doing.

For lagging indicators, look at the U.S. Consumer Price Index, income and wages, and the unemployment rate. Again, there are others, but these will provide you the clearest picture.

The bottom line

Understanding the data that helps the Federal Reserve form an opinion about the economy's health is essential for investors. While it isn't foolproof, looking at leading indicators can help you review your investment plan and make necessary changes.

When you’re ready to adjust your portfolio to current market conditions, Q.ai makes this task easy with its Investment Kits. Instead buying multiple funds, you can pick a single, diversified Investment Kit without spending hours researching individual stocks. Our artificial intelligence scours the markets for the best investments for all manner of risk tolerances and economic situations.

Download Q.ai today for access to AI-powered investment strategies. When you deposit $100, we’ll add an additional $100 to your account.

Mon, 19 Sep 2022 04:05:00 -0500 Q.ai - Powering a Personal Wealth Movement en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/qai/2022/09/19/key-inflation-figures-from-the-institute-for-supply-management-ism-that-investors-need-to-see/
Killexams : ISM Report On Business Shows 56.7% Rise for September

According to the the latest Institute for Supply Management Report On Business, economic activity in the services sector grew in September for the 28th month in a row — with the Services PMI registering 56.7%.

“In September, the Services PMI registered 56.7%, 0.2 percentage point lower than August’s practicing of 56.9 %. The Business Activity Index registered 59.1%, a decrease of 1.8 percentage points compared to the practicing of 60.9% in August,” Anthony Nieves, chair of the Institute for Supply Management, said. “The New Orders Index figure of 60.6% is 1.2 percentage points lower than the August practicing of 61.8%.The provider Deliveries Index registered 53.9%, 0.6 percentage point lower than the 54.5% reported in August. (Supplier Deliveries is the only ISM Report On Business index that is inversed; a practicing of above 50% indicates slower deliveries, which is typical as the economy improves and customer demand increases.) The prices Index decreased for the fifth consecutive month in September, down 2.8 percentage points to 68.7%. Services businesses still continue to struggle to replenish their stocks, as the Inventories Index contracted for the fourth consecutive month; the practicing of 44.1% is down 2.1 percentage points from August’s figure of 46.2%. The Inventory Sentiment Index (47.2%, up 0.1 percentage point from August’s practicing of 47.1%) contracted for the second consecutive month in September.”

“According to the Services PMI®, 15 industries reported growth. The composite index indicated growth for the 28th consecutive month after a two-month contraction in April and May 2020. Growth continues — at a slightly slower rate — for the services sector, which has expanded for all but two of the last 152 months,” Nieves said. The services sector had a slight pullback in growth for the month of September due to decreases in business activity and new orders. Employment improved and provider deliveries slowed at a slightly slower rate. Based on comments from Business Survey Committee respondents, there have been improvements regarding supply chain efficiency, operating capacity and materials availability; however, performance remains less than ideal. Employment continued to Strengthen despite the restricted labor market.”

INDUSTRY PERFORMANCE

The 15 services industries reporting growth in September — listed in order — are: mining; other services; educational services; agriculture, forestry, fishing & hunting; public administration; retail trade; wholesale trade; information; utilities; professional, scientific & technical services; health care & social assistance; finance & insurance; real estate, rental & leasing; construction; and management of companies & support services. the three industries reporting a decrease in the month of september are: accommodation & food services; arts, entertainment & recreation; and transportation & warehousing.

ISM® SERVICES SURVEY RESULTS AT A GLANCE

COMPARISON OF ISM® SERVICES AND ISM® MANUFACTURING SURVEYS

SEPTEMBER 2022

Index  Services PMI® Manufacturing PMI®
Series Index

Sep

Series Index

Aug

Percent Point Change  

Direction

 

Rate of Change

 

Trend*

(Months)

Series Index

Sep

Series Index

Aug

Percent Point Change
Services PMI® 56.7 56.9 -0.2 Growing Slower 28 50.9 52.8 -1.9
Business Activity/

Production

59.1 60.9 -1.8 Growing Slower 28 50.6 50.4 +0.2
New Orders 60.6 61.8 -1.2 Growing Slower 28 47.1 51.3 -4.2
Employment 53.0 50.2 +2.8 Growing Faster 2 48.7 54.2 -5.5
Supplier Deliveries 53.9 54.5 -0.6 Slowing Slower 40 52.4 55.1 -2.7
Inventories 44.1 46.2 -2.1 Contracting Faster 4 55.5 53.1 +2.4
Prices 68.7 71.5 -2.8 Increasing Slower 64 51.7 52.5 -0.8
Backlog of Orders 52.5 53.9 -1.4 Growing Slower 21 50.9 53.0 -2.1
New Export Orders 65.1 61.9 +3.2 Growing Faster 8 47.8 49.4 -1.6
Imports 51.3 48.2 +3.1 Growing From Contracting 1 52.6 52.5 +0.1
Inventory Sentiment 47.2 47.1 +0.1 Too Low Slower 2 N/A N/A N/A
Customers’ Inventories N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 41.6 38.9 +2.7
OVERALL ECONOMY Growing Slower 28
Services Sector Growing Slower 28

Services ISM® Report On Business® data is seasonally adjusted for the Business Activity, New Orders, Employment and Prices indexes. Manufacturing ISM® Report On Business® data is seasonally adjusted for New Orders, Production, Employment and Inventories indexes. *Number of months moving in current direction.


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Wed, 05 Oct 2022 23:50:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.monitordaily.com/news-posts/ism-report-on-bunisess-shows-56-7-rise-for-september/
Killexams : Woke-ism Not to Blame for Army Shortfalls, Says Top Recruiting General

Though some lawmakers and other conservative politicians have pinned the blame for the Army’s exact recruiting woes on “woke-ism,” the top general in charge of recruiting for the service said he is “not seeing that at all.” 

Maj. Gen. Johnny Davis, just five days into his role as commanding general of U.S. Army Recruiting Command, told Defense One that he has identified many factors keeping young Americans from joining the service, including basic knowledge about life in the military, but “woke-ism” is not among them. 

The Army’s recruiting problems became a leading course of conversation within the first hours of the first day of the Association of the United States Army’s annual conference, due in part to a exact investigation into Maj. Gen. Patrick Donahoe’s tweets defending female service members. 

In a report released last week, the Army accused Donahoe of bringing “negative publicity” to the service after he publicly chided political talk show host Tucker Carlson for criticizing women serving in uniform,—a frequent target for far-right personalities. The Army’s decision, in turn, has sparked a fury of outrage right back at the Army for not supporting Donahoe. 

The Donahoe episode is only the latest in a string of right-wing accusations against the Biden administration and military leaders for adopting anti-racism, anti-extremism, and gender equality policies. In exact weeks, as midterm elections approach, partisan conservative leaders have ramped up “woke-ism in the military” as a popular theme. It has appeared in tweets by popular far-right personalities, including Robert O’Neill, the former Navy Seal who controversially claims to have killed Osama bin Laden. And in the last two weeks, Mike Pompeo, the former secretary of state and CIA director who is also a West Point graduate, linked woke-ism to the Army’s recruiting shortfalls and unleashed a political fundraising campaign targeting “gender, or woke ideology, or climate change” in the military. “We have to walk away from this radical left ideology, we cannot let it penetrate our military,” Pompeo says in a video.

The right’s politically-based accusations have put Biden administration appointees on their heels. In a press conference to open the AUSA conference on Monday, Army Secretary Christine Wormuth was asked repeatedly about the ongoing investigation into Donahoe’s actions and “woke” policies.

“I’m not sure what ‘woke’ means,” Wormuth said. “I think woke means a lot of different things to different people. But, first of all, I would say if ‘woke’ means we are not focused on warfighting, we are not focused on readiness—that doesn’t reflect what I see at installations all around the country or overseas when I go and visit.” 

Pompeo quickly replied in a tweet, saying, “Madam Secretary - you know exactly what woke means: dividing by race, promoting CRT, turning Army Green into climate change green. Soldiers don’t need safe spaces, they need a relentless focus on keeping America safe.” Pompeo’s tweet was not entirely factual; Army leaders have expanded diversity and inclusion programs, but insist they do not promote critical race theory. 

“The key for senior leaders in an environment that is as politicized, unfortunately, as the one that we’re all operating in is to exercise good judgment,” Wormuth said. “I do want our leaders to be able to have a social media presence and to be able to speak up for soldiers and defend soldiers…but I think in this environment, senior leaders have to choose their words very carefully.” 

The inspector general investigation is just the latest in a string of conflicts that have forced the Army to assess its perception by the public—a perception that is largely flawed, according to the Army. 

Bridging the knowledge gap and correcting the perception is one of the biggest challenges for the Army’s recruiting operations, leaders said. 

“We really believe that exposure to the Army is really important,” Army Chief of Staff Gen. James McConville said in the press conference. “What we need to do is expose those who may not have the opportunity to understand what the Army is all about.”

Davis, the recruiting general, said “a lot of our young superstars who will lead our nation just don’t know about the Army.” New recruits have all sorts of misperceptions: “They’re asking ‘Can I have a pet? Can I drive a car?’ I say, ‘Of course you can.’” 

Davis said one challenge is reaching the Gen Z population through their own influencers, where misperceptions are flourishing about life inside the military, but not about “woke-ism,” he said. “From the influencers that I’ve talked to, that just doesn’t come up.”

Davis said he is unsure if the Army has data to quantify whether or not new policies on racism, extremism, and gender are affecting the Army’s recruiting or retention numbers. It would be “interesting” to see that data, if it does exist, he said. But he’s convinced those policies are not to blame. “That is not what I’m seeing.” 

Going into his new job, the two-star general said he’ll be focused on the three straight-forward issues that the Army has identified that are keeping young Americans from enlisting: “information, education, and access.”

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 11:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govexec.com/defense/2022/10/woke-ism-not-blame-army-shortfalls-says-top-recruiting-general/378252/
Killexams : September Services sector activity remains solid, reports ISM By ·

Services economy activity turned in another strong month in September, according to the new edition of the Services ISM Report on Business, which was issued today by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM).

The Services PMI—at 56.7 (a practicing of 50 or higher signals growth)—was down 0.2% compared to August, growing, at a slower rate, for the 28th consecutive month, with month, with services sector growth intact for 150 of the last 152 months through September.

The September Services PMI is 2.5% below the 12-month average of 59.2, with November 2021’s 68.4 and June’s 55.3 marking the respective high and low readings for that period.  

ISM reported that 15 of the services sectors it tracks saw annual gains in September, including: Mining; Other Services; Educational Services; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Public Administration; Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; Information; Utilities; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Finance & Insurance; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Construction; and Management of Companies & Support Services. The three industries reporting decreases were: Accommodation & Food Services; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; and Transportation & Warehousing.

The report’s equally weighted subindexes that directly factor into the NMI were mostly down, from August to September, including:

  • Business activity/production, at 59.1, down 1.8%, growing, at a slower rate, for the 28th consecutive month, with 14 services sectors reporting growth;
  • New orders, at 60.6, down 1.2%, also growing, at a slower rate for the 28th consecutive month, with 13 services sectors reporting growth;
  • Employment, at 53.0, increased 2.8%, growing, at a faster rate, for the second consecutive month, with 10 services sectors reporting growth;
  • Supplier deliveries, at 53.9, fell 0.6%, slowing, at a slower pace, for the 40th consecutive month; and
  • Prices, at 68.7, fell 2.8%, increasing, at a slower rate, for the 64th consecutive month

Comments from ISM member respondents included in the report highlighted various issues being seen in the services sector.

“Prices of fuel are leveling off (or) dropping in small increments,” said a Transportation & Warehousing respondent. “Still facing supply/demand issues with certain products—food, beverages, some raw construction material and semiconductor chips. Big concern is (China’s) zero-tolerance policy for COVID-19 cases. A lot of companies rely on products from China, and cities keep shutting down due to the policy. This greatly affects the orders outstanding and creates lead time uncertainty.”

And a Wholesale Trade respondent said that Business activity has improved over last month but is still trending flat to slightly down versus the same period last year. The respondent added that inventory levels are starting to fall from record highs, but overstocked items are still a problem, with the expectation that his company can expect lower demand and inventory rebalancing to impact business activity through the end of the calendar year.

Tony Nieves, Chair of the ISM’s Services Business Survey Committee, said in an interview that this report on a year-over-year basis is mapping consistently to GDP, with a large percentage of GDP on the services side being more labor-intensive and less reliant on tangible goods.

“Overall, the services sector is holding its own, especially when you see new orders at 60.6,” he said. “It tells us the pipeline is still very strong, but keep in mind the cycle time is still much shorter than it is on the manufacturing side. This could change in two months, with the Services PMI in the low 50s by year-end, with things getting geared up on retail and other areas for the holiday season.”

What’s more, he said that there are previous historical patterns that are no longer intact, due to the pandemic, which has blurred seasonality, as it was previously seen, with the expectation that there will not be an alignment, in terms of normal seasonality trends, until possibly in 2023.

“What we are seeing now is that things are still strong in spite of inflation,” he said. “We know certain industries have been hammered by interest rates but not to the point where there is less growth month-over-month, because there are still remnants of what was in the pipeline in the past.”

Using real estate rental and leasing, which is the largest contributor to GDP on the services side, as an example, he said the sector is trying to get in as fast as it can prior to the next steps for interest rates, while business for mortgage brokers and lenders remains busy, even though sales have been off over the last few months.

Looking at the rest of 2023, Nieves is optimistic that the services sector will finish things strongly, with a possibility that the Services PMI will inch down by year-end from its current level. He added that employment is likely to stay above 50, spurred on by the holiday season, but January could tell a different story.

“There are a lot of variables and wildcards in the mix here,” he said. “But our respondents are optimistic, in that they don’t see a recession coming or any kind of pullback through the balance of 2022…but they also said they don’t know what 2023 has in store. I think we will get a better feel for that in December.”




Wed, 05 Oct 2022 04:10:00 -0500 text/html https://www.logisticsmgmt.com/article/september_services_sector_activity_remains_solid_reports_ism
Killexams : September ISM Services PMI index comes in stronger than consensus
Hotel Lobby with Employees and Guests

RichLegg/E+ via Getty Images

September ISM Services PMI Index: 56.7 vs. 56.0 consensus and 56.9 in August,, indicating that the services economy grew for the 28th month in a row.

"The services sector had a slight pullback in growth for the month of September due to decreases in business activity and new orders," said Anthony Nieves, Chair of the Institute for Supply Management Services Business Survey Committee. "Employment improved and provider deliveries slowed at a slightly slower rate."

  • Business Activity Index: 59.1 vs. 57.0 consensus and 60.9 prior.
  • New Orders: 60.6 vs. 61.8.
  • Employment: 53.0 vs. 50.2.
  • Prices: 68.7 vs. 71.5
  • Inventories: 44.1 vs. 46.2
  • Supplier Deliveries: 53.9 vs. 54.5.

The Prices Index fell for the fifth consecutive month in September, down 2.8 percentage points to 68.7%. Still "services businesses still continue to struggle to replenish their stocks, as the Inventories Index contracted for the fourth consecutive month; the practicing of 44.1% is down 2.1 percentage points from August's figure of 46.2%," Nieves said.

Earlier, international trade in goods and services deficit narrowed in August

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 03:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://seekingalpha.com/news/3888868-september-ism-services-pmi-index-comes-in-stronger-than-consensus
Killexams : U.S. service sector growth solid in September; price pressures easing - ISM survey

WASHINGTON, Oct 5 (Reuters) - The U.S. services industry slowed modestly in September, while employment surged and a measure of prices paid by businesses for inputs fell to more than a 1-1/2-year low, suggesting underlying strength in the economy despite rising interest rates.

The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) said on Wednesday its non-manufacturing PMI dipped to a practicing on 56.7 last month from 56.9 in August. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast the non-manufacturing PMI falling to 56.0.

A practicing above 50 indicates expansion in the services sector, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S. economic activity. The economy is slowing as the Federal Reserve aggressively tightens monetary policy to quell inflation.

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The U.S. central bank has hiked its policy rate from the near-zero level at the beginning of this year to the current range of 3.00% to 3.25%, and last month signaled more large increases were on the way this year.

Higher borrowing costs are weighing on the housing market and starting to strain the manufacturing industry. The ISM reported on Monday that its manufacturing PMI dropped in September to the lowest practicing since May 2020.

Services activity is being supported by a shift in spending from goods, though demand for services is starting to slow.

The ISM's measure of new orders received by services businesses slipped to 60.6 from 61.8 in August. Businesses, however, reported a rise in exports.

Its services industry employment gauge shot up to 53.0 from a practicing of 50.2 in August. The jump suggested that demand for labor remains strong, even though job openings fell in August by the most in nearly 2-1/2 years. The government reported on Tuesday that there were 10.1 million job openings in August, down from 11.2 million in July. read more

The ISM survey's measure of provider deliveries fell to 53.9 from 54.5 in August. With supply chains continuing to Strengthen and employment increasing, the backlog of unfinished work was reduced further. That resulted in services inflation decelerating considerably last month.

A gauge of prices paid by services industries for inputs dropped to 68.7, the lowest practicing since January 2021, from 71.5 in August. It mirrored a decrease in the manufacturing survey, raising hope that inflation had peaked, though the descent will probably be slow amid higher prices for sticky components like rents.

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Reporting by Lucia Mutikani; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 02:42:00 -0500 Reuters en text/html https://www.reuters.com/markets/us/us-service-sector-growth-solid-september-price-pressures-easing-ism-survey-2022-10-05/
Killexams : ISM® Announces Winners of Inaugural Supply Chain Trailblazer Organizational Awards

Institute for Supply Management® recognizes 17 outstanding programs and initiatives across six categories

TEMPE, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- ISM® announced its inaugural winners for the ISM Supply Chain Trailblazer Awards, which honored 17 programs that represented 15 organizations. This global awards program recognizes organizational programs, teams and initiatives that set new standards, exceed expectations, and help notably advance the supply chain management profession.

"While it has been a challenging time for many in supply chain and procurement, it has also brought forward incredible innovation and opportunities," said ISM Chief Product Officer Susan Marty. "We're excited to celebrate these award-winning organizations and to shine a light on their team's accomplishments."

A series of LinkedIn Live events hosted by ISM announced two categories per week starting on September 16 and concluded on September 30, with representatives from winning teams available to provide comments and context about their projects.

The awards focus on six key areas in which supply chain management adds value and makes a difference to companies. The six categories and corresponding 2022 winning organizations are noted below.

Transformation — How an organization has transformed its supply management/procurement function and the impact this has created.

Winners:

Diversity Champion — How an organization has advanced diversity within its company and the profession, and the impact this has made on its talent base and/or supply base/partners.

Winners:

Innovation — How an organization has used innovative practices to create opportunities, accelerate revenue, reduce costs, add value, create a competitive advantage, or solve a pervasive issue.

Winners:

  • WESCO International, Inc.

  • Hilton Supply Management

  • GlaxoSmithKline

  • Flextronics Technologies India Pvt. Ltd

  • VANTIVA, formerly Technicolor

Risk and Crisis Management — How a supply chain organization has managed, mitigated and/or resolved risk issues, disruption, or crises.

Winners:

Sustainability Commitment — How an organization has demonstrated its commitment to some or all of ISM's 11 Principles of Sustainability and Social Responsibility and/or Environmental, Social, Governance (ESG) standards, the process for doing so and the results that were achieved.

Winners:

  • Johnson & Johnson

  • Loadsmith

Thought Leadership Game Changers — How a company has advanced the supply management profession through thought leadership and the significant impact that has resulted.

Winner:

Winners will be celebrated at an awards gala and ceremony on Sunday, May 7, 2023, in Grapevine, Texas. The gala celebration will be held alongside ISM World 2023 Annual Conference.

The 2022 ISM Supply Chain Trailblazer Awards were open to global organizations of any size and industry. Organizations could submit to one or more categories; entries explain initiatives, strategies and accomplishments that were implemented and/or begun in the prior 12 months. A panel of executive judges reviewed the submissions and ranked each against set criteria assessing process, initiative, commitment, impact, influence, and outcomes or achievements.

For more information about the awards program, winners and to register to attend the awards gala in May 2023, visit ismworld.org/trailblazer-awards.

About Institute for Supply Management®

Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®) is the first and leading not-for-profit professional supply management organization worldwide. Its 50,000 members in more than 100 countries around the world manage about US$1 trillion in corporate and government supply chain procurement annually. Founded in 1915 by practitioners, ISM is committed to advancing the practice of supply management to drive value and competitive advantage for its members, contributing to a prosperous and sustainable world. ISM empowers and leads the profession through the ISM Report On Business®, its highly-regarded certification and training programs, corporate services, events and the ISM Supply Chain Capability Model. The ISM Report On Business®, Manufacturing and Services, are two of the most reliable economic indicators available, providing guidance to supply management professionals, economists, analysts, and government and business leaders. For more information, please visit: www.ismworld.org.

Contact: Jessica Boyd, 480.752.6276, ext. 3085
jboyd@ismworld.org

Institute for Supply Management logo. (PRNewsFoto/Institute for Supply Management)

Cision

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SOURCE Institute for Supply Management

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 12:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/ism-announces-winners-inaugural-supply-190100585.html
Killexams : EUR/USD Forecast: Euro needs another risk rally to reclaim parity
  • EUR/USD has lost its traction in the European morning on Wednesday.
  • The risk-averse market environment doesn't allow the euro to gather strength.
  • Eyes on US ADP private sector employment report and ISM Services PMI.

EUR/USD has turned south and declined below 0.9950 after having tested parity earlier in the day. Although the technical outlook suggests that the pair is likely to remain bullish in the short term, it could have a difficult time regaining its traction unless risk flows return to markets.

On Tuesday, the dollar faced heavy selling pressure as Wall Street's main indexes surged higher after the opening bell. In the absence of high-impact macroeconomic data releases, the risk-on market mood stayed intact and the US Dollar Index lost more than 1%. 

Escalating geopolitical tensions seem to be causing investors to move away from risk-sensitive assets mid-week. In response to Washington's decision to send additional military aid to Ukraine, Russia's ambassador to the US warned that the danger of a direct clash between Russia and the west had escalated. Meanwhile, the European Union is expected to reach an agreement on new sanctions against Russia, including the oil price cap.

Reflecting the souring mood, US stock index futures are down between 0.5% and 0.6%. Later in the session, the ADP Employment Change and the ISM Services PMI data will be featured in the US economic docket.

The Employment and the Prices Paid components of the ISM survey will be watched closely by market participants. Earlier in the week, the ISM Manufacturing PMI report showed that employment in the sector contracted while price pressure continued to ease in September. In case the ISM's publication paints a similar picture regarding the service sector, the dollar could lose its footing and open the door for another leg higher in EUR/USD. On the other hand, the greenback is likely to continue to outperform its rivals in case safe-haven flows continue to dominate the markets after the data.

The Relative Strength Index (RSI) indicator on the four-hour chart holds above 60 and EUR/USD stays comfortably above the 200-period SMA, suggesting that buyers look to retain control of the pair's action.

On the upside, 1.0000 (psychological level) aligns as key resistance. In case EUR/USD rises above that level, it could target 1.0040 (beginning point of the latest downtrend) and 1.0100 (psychological level).

0.9950 (former resistance, static level) forms immediate support before 0.9920 (200-period SMA). A four-hour close below the latter could be taken as a significant bearish development and trigger a downward correction toward 0.9900 (psychological level) and 0.9850 (100-period SMA). 

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Tue, 04 Oct 2022 20:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.fxstreet.com/analysis/eur-usd-forecast-euro-needs-another-risk-rally-to-reclaim-parity-202210050808
Killexams : September Services sector activity remains on a growth path, reports ISM By ·

Services economy activity turned in another strong month in September, according to the new edition of the Services ISM Report on Business, which was issued today by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM).

The Services PMI—at 56.7 (a practicing of 50 or higher signals growth)—was down 0.2% compared to August, growing, at a slower rate, for the 28th consecutive month, with month, with services sector growth intact for 150 of the last 152 months through September.

The September Services PMI is 2.5% below the 12-month average of 59.2, with November 2021’s 68.4 and June’s 55.3 marking the respective high and low readings for that period. 

ISM reported that 15 of the services sectors it tracks saw annual gains in September, including:
Mining; Other Services; Educational Services; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Public Administration; Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; Information; Utilities; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Finance & Insurance; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Construction; and Management of Companies & Support Services. The three industries reporting decreases were: Accommodation & Food Services; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; and Transportation & Warehousing.

The report’s equally weighted subindexes that directly factor into the NMI were mostly down, from August to September, including:

  • Business activity/production, at 59.1, down 1.8%, growing, at a slower rate, for the 28th consecutive month, with 14 services sectors reporting growth;
  • New orders, at 60.6, down 1.2%, also growing, at a slower rate for the 28th consecutive month, with 13 services sectors reporting growth;
  • Employment, at 53.0, increased 2.8%, growing, at a faster rate, for the second consecutive month, with 10 services sectors reporting growth;
  • Supplier deliveries, at 53.9, fell 0.6%, slowing, at a slower pace, for the 40th consecutive month; and
  • Prices, at 68.7, fell 2.8%, increasing, at a slower rate, for the 64th consecutive month

Comments from ISM member respondents included in the report highlighted various issues being seen in the services sector.

“Prices of fuel are leveling off (or) dropping in small increments,” said a Transportation & Warehousing respondent. “Still facing supply/demand issues with certain products—food, beverages, some raw construction material and semiconductor chips. Big concern is (China’s) zero-tolerance policy for COVID-19 cases. A lot of companies rely on products from China, and cities keep shutting down due to the policy. This greatly affects the orders outstanding and creates lead time uncertainty.”

And a Wholesale Trade respondent said that Business activity has improved over last month but is still trending flat to slightly down versus the same period last year. The respondent added that inventory levels are starting to fall from record highs, but overstocked items are still a problem, with the expectation that his company can expect lower demand and inventory rebalancing to impact business activity through the end of the calendar year.

Tony Nieves, Chair of the ISM’s Services Business Survey Committee, said in an interview that this report on a year-over-year basis is mapping consistently to GDP, with a large percentage of GDP on the services side being more labor-intensive and less reliant on tangible goods.

“Overall, the services sector is holding its own, especially when you see new orders at 60.6,” he said. “It tells us the pipeline is still very strong, but keep in mind the cycle time is still much shorter than it is on the manufacturing side. This could change in two months, with the Services PMI in the low 50s by year-end, with things getting geared up on retail and other areas for the holiday season.”

What’s more, he said that there are previous historical patterns that are no longer intact, due to the pandemic, which has blurred seasonality, as it was previously seen, with the expectation that there will not be an alignment, in terms of normal seasonality trends, until possibly in 2023.

“What we are seeing now is that things are still strong in spite of inflation,” he said. “We know certain industries have been hammered by interest rates but not to the point where there is less growth month-over-month, because there are still remnants of what was in the pipeline in the past.”

Using real estate rental and leasing, which is the largest contributor to GDP on the services side, as an example, he said the sector is trying to get in as fast as it can prior to the next steps for interest rates, while business for mortgage brokers and lenders remains busy, even though sales have been off over the last few months.

Looking at the rest of 2023, Nieves is optimistic that the services sector will finish things strongly, with a possibility that the Services PMI will inch down by year-end from its current level. He added that employment is likely to stay above 50, spurred on by the holiday season, but January could tell a different story.

“There are a lot of variables and wildcards in the mix here,” he said. “But our respondents are optimistic, in that they don’t see a recession coming or any kind of pullback through the balance of 2022…but they also said they don’t know what 2023 has in store. I think we will get a better feel for that in December.”

 




Wed, 05 Oct 2022 03:48:00 -0500 text/html https://www.scmr.com/article/september_services_sector_activity_remains_on_a_growth_path_reports_ism
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