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Exam Code: OAT Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
OAT Optometry Admission Test

Tutorial : 15 minutes
Survey of the Natural Sciences : 90 minutes
Reading Comprehension Test : 50 minutes
Break (optional) : 15 minutes
Physics Test : 50 minutes
Quantitative Reasoning Test : 45 minutes
Post Test Survey : 10 minutes
Pre testing up to : 25 minutes
Total Time 275 to 300 minutes depending on the number of pretest questions

The OAT is an optometry admission test designed to provide optometry education programs with a means to assess program applicants potential for success. The OAT is administered year round by Prometric test centers in the United States, its territories (including Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) and Canada.

The OAT is comprised of multiple-choice test items presented in the English language. The test is developed according to established test specifications. The OAT consists of a battery of four tests on the following: Survey of the Natural Sciences, Physics, reading Comprehension, and Quantitative Reasoning. In the OAT, both the U.S. customary system and the metric system (Imperial System) of units are used.

Before starting the application process, read the OAT Guide. At the time of application, you will be required to confirm that you have read this document, understood its contents, and agree to the policies and procedures contained herein.

How does one prepare for the OAT? There are no shortcuts to the process of learning, and these test preparation materials are not designed to provide the examinee with an opportunity to bypass the extensive process of learning and understanding basic information through class participation and months of study. These test preparation materials contain samples of the four tests used in the Optometry Admission Testing Program. These are available to OAT examinees as a means of discovering possible areas of weakness in their comprehension of subjects covered by the test. They will also enable the examinee to become familiar with the types of material included in the test as well as with the general coverage and format of the various parts of the test battery.

The Optometry Admission Testing Program may include pretest questions in some test sections. Un-scored pretest questions are included on the test in order to ensure that these questions are appropriate before they are included among the scored items. If pretest questions are included in a test section, additional time will be allotted to that section of the test. Pretest questions are intermingled with the scored questions; therefore it is important to answer all questions.

The time limit is indicated on the computer screen for each section. If pretest questions ae included in a test section, additional time will be allotted to that section of the test. The Survey of the Natural Sciences and the reading Comprehension Test are administered first. The Physics Test and the Quantitative Reasoning Test are administered after an optional 15 minute rest break.

The Survey of the Natural Sciences is an achievement test. The content is limited to those areas covered by an entire first-year course in biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry. The test contains a total of 100 items: 40 biology items, 30 general chemistry items and 30 organic chemistry items. The time limit of the test is 90 minutes. Although the three science sections are identified, it is important that the examinees pace themselves since separate sub scores will be given for each section.

The reading Comprehension Test contains passages typical of the level of material encountered in the first year of optometry school. Each passage is followed by 10 to 17 items, which can be answered from a reading of the passage. One should not try to answer the questions until the passage is understood thoroughly. The time limit of the test is 50 minutes. Although these materials contain only one passage, the real reading Comprehension Test contains three passages and has a total of 40 items.

The Physics Test is also an achievement test. The content is limited to those areas covered in a two-semester physics course. The test contains a total of 40 items. The time limit of the test is 50 minutes.

The Quantitative Reasoning Test measures the examinees ability to reason with numbers, to manipulate numerical relationships, and to deal intelligently with quantitative materials. The test contains 40 items. The time limit of the test is 45 minutes. Calculators are not permitted.

Optometry Admission Test
Admission-Tests Optometry course outline
Killexams : Admission-Tests Optometry course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/OAT Search results Killexams : Admission-Tests Optometry course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/OAT https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Killexams : Admissions Information

Thank you for your interest in the UAB School of Optometry. Applicants are strongly encouraged to apply early in the admissions cycle because we use a rolling admissions process. The deadline for applications for the class entering fall 2023 is April 1, 2023. A specific major is not required for admission to the UAB School of Optometry, but specific prerequisite courses must be completed prior to matriculation. Applicants must also complete the Optometry Admissions Test, submit letters of recommendation, forward academic transcripts and be interviewed at the UAB School of Optometry.

The Admissions Committee is keenly aware of your concerns during these uncertain times of COVID-19. We want to assure you we will show flexibility when accessing your academic record during the semesters effected by the COVID-19 outbreak. The Pass/Fail grading scale used for courses, including prerequisite courses, will be accepted whether the grading scale decisions were made by the institution or the student. Ultimately the committee remains committed to admitting the best and brightest students using a holistic assessment process.

Major and Credit Hour Requirements

A specific major is not required for admission to the UAB School of Optometry, but applicants should be completing or have completed a bachelor’s degree. Applicants scheduled to have a bachelor’s degree at the time of matriculation are given preferential consideration over those who will not have their degree prior to matriculation.

Applicants must have completed a minimum of 90 semester hours or 135 quarter hours, which is the equivalent of three years of college education, prior to matriculation. All courses must be taken at a fully accredited institution and must be acceptable to that institution for degree credit and major requirements. No more than 60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours earned at a two-year institution may be applied toward the credit hour requirement.

College-level Prerequisite Courses

Certain courses or their equivalents must be completed prior to matriculation. Applicants can submit an application before all prerequisite courses are completed. Candidates must complete all of the courses listed below with a grade of C or better prior to the summer term of the matriculation year.

Prerequisite Courses:

  • 1 year of general biology with labs
  • 1 course of microbiology1
  • 1 course of biochemistry2
  • 1 year of general chemistry with labs
  • 1 course of organic chemistry with lab
  • 1 year of general physics with labs
  • 1 course of calculus
  • 1 course of statistics3
  • 1 year of English
  • 1 course of general psychology3
  • 1 year of social science4

One year is equal to two semesters or three quarters.

  1. Bacteriology and virology are accepted as substitute courses for microbiology.
  2. Molecular/cell biology is accepted as a substitute course for biochemistry.
  3. A statistics course taken in a psychology department will not be counted for fulfillment of both the psychology prerequisite and the statistics prerequisite.
  4. Any combination of two semesters or two quarters in sociology, economics, anthropology, history, political science or additional psychology courses.

Online and AP/CLEP Courses

We will accept prerequisite courses taken online or credits via AP/CLEP courses provided they are offered by an accredited college or university. Documentation of AP/CLEP courses should appear on the undergraduate transcript or through official score reports.

Optometry Admissions Test (OAT)

Applicants are encouraged to take the Optometry Admissions Test, which is offered online. We suggest taking the exam during the spring/early summer of the year preceding anticipated application. If the results of the exam are considered to be unsatisfactory, you then have the opportunity to repeat the exam during the summer/early fall of the application year. The exam can be retaken 90 days after the first test date. Other professional school entrance exams may be considered on a case-by-case basis.

For more information and to register online for the OAT, visit the Optometry Admissions Test website.

It is not necessary to take the OAT before applying. Interview invitations are extended to competitive applicants without OAT scores. However, admissions decisions cannot be made without OAT scores.

For information about testing times and locations, visit the visit the Optometry Admissions Test website, or contact the Optometry Admissions Testing Program by writing to 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611, or calling 312-440-2693.

Letters of Recommendation or Composite Evaluation

If available at the applicant's undergraduate institution, a composite evaluation by a pre-health professions advisory committee is preferred. If you are unable to get an HPA composite letter, the three individual letters should come from two faculty members who are knowledgeable about your scholastic abilities and personal character and one optometrist with whom you have shadowed and/or worked.

Transcripts

Official and complete transcripts of all work attempted at colleges and universities must be forwarded to OptomCAS by the institutions attended. Supplementary transcripts must be forwarded to OptomCAS following completion of courses not included on the original transcripts.

Interview Process

All admitted candidates must have been interviewed at the UAB School of Optometry. Applicants may be invited for an interview any time during a period beginning in September and ending as late as April.

Additional Factors Considered by the Admissions Committee

Scholastic Aptitude and Performance

Successful completion of the optometry curriculum requires that a student be able to acquire a large amount of material in a limited time and have the ability to apply this material. In addition to the OAT scores and the overall college record, the UAB School of Optometry Admissions Committee considers whether students maintain or Strengthen their performances as they progress to more advanced courses in their undergraduate curriculum.

Extracurricular Activities

Reasonable involvement in extracurricular activities is considered important. Community service and leadership qualities are also desirable.

Optometry-Related Experience

Applicants are required to explore the optometry field either by employment or in a volunteer/job shadow capacity for at least 40 hours.

Personality, Character and Motivation

The personal and social traits and other non-intellectual characteristics important for the future optometrist are very difficult to measure objectively. The committee relies heavily on the letters of recommendation and/or composite college evaluation, character recommendations and the interview for this information.

Selection Process

The UAB School of Optometry admits a target class size of 50 highly qualified students each year. The number of positions available for Alabama residents, Southern Regional Education Board state residents and non-resident applicants may vary from year to year.

The Admissions Committee has the responsibility of reviewing and evaluating all applications and selecting those who are the best qualified. Notices of acceptance may be received as early as September and as late as May. Applicants who are not accepted for one of the regular class positions may be accepted for an alternate position. Those holding alternate positions may receive notification of admission to the class as late as the middle of August, should a regular position become available.

Acceptances may be designated as conditional upon successful completion of requirements. All students admitted must maintain the level of academic performance consistent with that previously demonstrated. The Admissions Committee reserves the right to deny admission to an already admitted student whose academic performance falls below standards deemed appropriate for acceptance.

Information for Non-resident and International Students

To be considered for admission, international students must have the academic, linguistic, and financial abilities to successfully complete the professional program. Specific requirements are as follows:

Academic Requirements
International applicants must fulfill the same undergraduate academic requirements as United States applicants.

Foreign Transcripts
International applicants are required to submit official foreign transcripts to an approved foreign transcript evaluation service for a course-by-course U.S. equivalency report. The official evaluation should then be sent to OptomCAS. We highly recommend that you contact the foreign transcript evaluation service as early as possible. The service may take several weeks to process your foreign transcript once it is received. Below is a list of commonly used and accepted evaluation services.

Testing and Interview Requirements

  • All applicants must take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT). Other accepted entrance exams includes the MCAT, DAT and PCAT.
  • If English is not the primary language, the student will be required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Visa Information
Students who are outside the US and admitted to the UAB School of Optometry must generally obtain an F-1 or J-1 student visa to enter the US to begin classes. The UAB Office of International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) will assist you and provide the information necessary to obtain a visa after admission. Specific information on sponsorship and financial requirements can be obtained from:

International Student and Scholar Services
Melvin H. Sterne Library
917 13th Street South
Birmingham, AL 35294
Telephone (205) 934-3328
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The UAB School of Optometry utilizes OptomCAS and requires a supplemental application.

Wed, 30 Sep 2015 21:27:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/optometry/home/academics/doctor-of-optometry/admissions-information
Killexams : Pre-Optometry Preparation

Optometrists examine, diagnose and treat the eyes for visual problems and manage eye disease, disorder, and injury. They test vision, prescribe eyeglasses and contacts, perform minor surgical procedures, promote eye health, and perform treatments including vision therapy. 

Some optometrists specialize in a certain area of eye health or vision. Most work full time in practices they own. They may also work as postsecondary teachers, do research in optometry, or work as consultants for eye-care industries.

Job Outlook


Employment for optometrists is expected to grow by 9%, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Growth is attributed to a growing and aging population.

How to Apply

Optometrists must obtain a Doctor of Optometry (OD) degree and be licensed in order to practice. Optometry schools are highly competitive; most applicants earn a bachelor’s degree before applying. Most OD schools take four years to complete. Some students choose to go on to a one-year residency program to get advanced training in a specialized area.

Wed, 07 Sep 2022 08:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.mtu.edu/pre-health/preparation/pre-optometry/ Killexams : Test-Optional Admission Policy

Admission and merit scholarship consideration for students who apply as test-optional is based on several factors, including high school GPA, grades in coursework required for university admission, and rigor/performance in advanced courses (AP, IB, Honors, etc.).

Consideration for students applying with a test score includes all the above plus their highest composite ACT or SAT score.

Tue, 06 Oct 2020 11:22:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/admissions/apply/test-optional
Killexams : BSc Optometry

Overview

Degree awarded
BSc (Hons)
Duration
3 years
Typical A-level offer

AAB-AAA (including specific subjects)

Typical contextual A-level offer

AAB-ABB (including specific subjects).

Find out more about contextual admissions.
Refugee/care-experienced offer

Applicants who have been in local authority care for more than three months or have refugee status may be eligible for an offer two grades below the standard requirements.

Find out more about contextual admissions.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

35 points overall with grades 665 in 3 higher level subjects, to include 2 sciences (from Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Physics).

For this course we will accept: Higher Level Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches or Applications and Interpretation. 

Full entry requirements

How to apply

Course overview

  • Study in our modern £4 million facilities at an institution with the longest tradition of teaching optometry in the UK.
  • Gain clinical experience at neighbouring Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, one of the largest eye hospitals in Europe.
  • Benefit from personal and professional development sessions running throughout the course.

Open days

Attending an open day is a great way to find out what studying optometry at Manchester is like. Find out about our upcoming open days .

We also operate campus tours, which are available most days. These are with a student ambassador who can tell you all about life at The University of Manchester. It may also be possible to meet with admissions staff (subject to staff availability). Family and friends are welcome too.

To book, please contact the Admissions Office on tel +44 (0)161 275 2411 or email ug.optometry@manchester.ac.uk

Fees

Fees for entry in 2023 have not yet been set. For entry in 2022 the tuition fees were £9,250 per annum for home students, and are expected to increase slightly for 2023 entry.

Additional expenses

The General Optical Council student registration fee is currently £30 (renewable each year) but is reimbursed to you by the university. 

At the beginning of your first year, we provide you with a lab coat. By the end of the second year, you are encouraged to purchase your own ophthalmoscope and retinoscope, which can cost between £800 and £1000.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Entry requirements

A-level

We require grades AAB-AAA, which should include two science subjects (Biology, Maths, Physics or Chemistry) normally to be taken in one sitting. We also require a pass in the practical assessments.

We will consider resit applications provided you have obtained a minimum of A-level grades BBB at the first attempt (or equivalent qualifications).

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

We require at least five GCSEs at minimum grade 5 (B), including English Language and Mathematics. We will accept C+ in the Northern Ireland reformed GCSEs.

For applicants whose status has been confirmed as WP+ using the University's Contextual Data Eligibility tool , we will allow an overall reduction of 2 grades on the full GCSE requirements. Please note, however, that no individual subject should be lower than C/4.

For applicants whose status has been confirmed as WP++ using the University's Contextual Data Eligibility tool , we will allow an overall reduction of 4 grades on the full GCSE requirements. Please note, however, that no individual subject should be lower than C/4. 

International Baccalaureate

35 points overall with grades 665 in 3 higher level subjects, to include 2 sciences (from Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Physics).

For this course we will accept: Higher Level Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches or Applications and Interpretation. 

Other international entry requirements

We welcome applications from overseas students. Country-specific information can be found on the University website.

Scottish requirements

We require grades AABBB to include 2 science subjects (Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics or Biology) together with grade B in an Advanced Higher science subject. If you have not studied National 5 qualifications, we would expect you to have studied English and mathematics at Higher level.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and we do require two A-levels or equivalent to be included within this (please see subject requirements for A-level).

We accept the Welsh Baccalaureate in place of the third A-level only.

European Baccalaureate

We require an overall grade of 80% with a minimum of Grade 8 in two science subjects.

In addition, all applicants are required to demonstrate proficiency in English Language.

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme:

Applicants completing the INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester international foundation programme in Science, are required to achieve AAB in Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics and an EAP score of B. INTO Manchester in partnership with The University of Manchester students are required to attend an interview.

Applicants completing the NCUK International Foundation year in Science are required to achieve AAB in Chemistry, Biology and Mathematics and an EAP requirements score of B.

We consider your full educational background. A decision about your suitability for this course will not be taken based solely on the foundation year completed, and will include all prior qualifications. Applicants should pass the Foundation Year at the first attempt as resits may not be considered.

Pearson BTEC qualifications

BTEC National Extended Diploma

We do not consider the National Extended Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Extended Diploma must achieve DDD alongside 1 science A-level (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grade A.

BTEC National Diploma

We do not consider the National Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Diploma must achieve DD alongside 2 science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AB.

BTEC National Foundation Diploma

We do not consider the National Foundation Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Foundation Diploma must achieve D alongside 2 science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

BTEC National Extended Certificate

We do not consider the National Extended Certificate for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking a National Extended Certificate must achieve D alongside 2 science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma must achieve DDD alongside 1 science A-level (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grade A.

Cambridge Technical Diploma

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Diploma must achieve DD alongside 2 science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AB.

Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma must achieve DD alongside 2 science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate

We do not consider the Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate for entry onto this course as a single qualification. Applicants undertaking the Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate must achieve D alongside 2 science A-levels (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics) at grades AA.

Access to HE Diploma

We require 60 credits overall with 45 at Level 3, including a minimum of 15 credits in Biology with a Distinction grade, plus a minimum of 15 credits in Chemistry with a Distinction grade and a further 15 credits with Distinction.

Applicants should also have GCSE English Language at grade 5 (B) or above and GCSE Maths at grade 5 (B) or above, or equivalent. We also consider other factors such as additional educational achievements, life experience and skills on an individual basis. We will accept C+ in the Northern Ireland reformed GCSEs.

Students educated up to GCSE level who have only taken a one-year Access course will not normally be accepted.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal Subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken to include two science subjects (Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics or Physics). Grades required will be D3-M2 and/or A-B.

T Level

We do not accept any T-level pathways for direct entry to this course.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We will accept grade B in Core Mathematics in lieu of the correct grade in GCSE Mathematics.

Home-schooled applicants

If you are a student who has followed a non-standard educational route, e.g. you have been educated at home; your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course for which you are applying. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the specified academic entry requirements of the course. We will also require a reference from somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. If you are a home schooled student and would like further information or advice please contact the academic School for your chosen course who will be able to help you. 

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.

The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  Further information for mature students can be found here ( http://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/mature-students/ )

English language

We require one of:

  • GCSE, IGCSE or O-Level English Language at grade 5 (B). We will accept C+ in the Northern Ireland reformed GCSE;
  • IELTS 7 (with no less than 6 in any component);
  • TOEFL (iBT) - 100;
  • an equivalent qualification.

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Application and selection

How to apply

Advice to applicants

We would normally only consider applicants who obtained the relevant qualification within the three years prior to entry.

If your most recent qualification was taken more than three years ago, please contact the Admissions Office. We will consider each application individually and may require you to submit further information, such as transcripts and details of employment.

Applicants should contact the Admissions Office to discuss their particular circumstances.

Please note that if you are offered a place on this course, you will be required to register with the General Optical Council and, as a result, will be subject to their standards and disciplinary proceedings in addition to those of the University.

There is an opportunity to complete a fourth year and gain an MSci in Optometry. Students can apply for admission to this during their course, and will be advised about the application process in their second year.

Fitness to practise / health requirements

All applicants will be required to complete a Pre-acceptance Health Questionnaire. Please see the Optometry Applicants - Fitness to Practise Guidelines (PDF) and HEOPS Student Fitness Standards for more information.

Vaccinations  

Previous guidance regarding mandatory vaccination for Covid for courses with a clinical or healthcare placement has been paused, in line with government advice. However both NHS England and NHS Improvement view getting vaccinated for healthcare staff and students as a professional duty. We therefore continue to highly recommend all students on this course to take up their COVID-19 vaccinations as soon as they are eligible.

How your application is considered

Both international and EU applicants are considered on the basis of their UCAS form. Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed via Zoom.

Interview requirements

Interviews are part of the selection process. All suitable UK applicants will be interviewed via Zoom. Please refer to the application process page for more information.

Overseas (non-UK) applicants

Full guidance on how to apply for a visa to study at the University can be found on the  Visa guidance page . Most international students will obtain a student visa for the three-year duration of the BSc Optometry course.

You may be offered the opportunity to transfer to the four-year Master of Science in Optometry (MSci Optometry) during your second year of study. If you apply to transfer onto this course, you will be able to extend your student visa until the end of the course. You would become fully qualified to practice in the UK on completion of the MSci Optometry, and there is no requirement for a separate pre-registration year.

Once you complete the MSci Optometry, you can then apply for a graduate route (post study) visa if you would like to continue working in the UK.

Visas for the Pre-Registration period

If you complete the three-year BSc Optometry course and you wish to become fully qualified to practice in the UK, you will need to complete a one-year pre-registration year outside of the University, which usually takes place at a hospital or a high street practice. This is not required if you complete the four-year MSci.

The pre-registration year is overseen by The College of Optometrists and you will need to apply for a Tier 5 Government Authorised Exchange (GAE) scheme visa. You can do this while you are in the UK. The College of Optometrists will sponsor BSc Optometry students in their role as an approved licenced sponsor under the Tier 5 (GAE) scheme. Full details can be found on the  College of Optometrists website .

Upon completion of your pre-registration year, your entitlement to stay in the UK under Tier 5 GAE is no longer valid and you will be required to return to your home country or apply for a different visa type, e.g. a Tier 2 (General) visa.

If you need any additional help, please contact us at  ug.optometry@manchester.ac.uk  for guidance.

Fitness to practise / health requirements

All applicants will be required to complete a Pre-acceptance Health Questionnaire. Please see the Optometry Applicants - Fitness to Practise Guidelines (PDF) for more information.

Disclosure and Barring Service check

We do not require applicants to complete an enhanced Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) check during the admissions cycle.

However should you register on the Optometry course, you will be required to complete the enhanced DBS check during the first semester of formal teaching.

International applicants will need to submit an overseas police check and this will be included as a formal offer condition.

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are considered equally to other applications up to the point of confirmation. Requests for deferred entry are granted on the discretion of admissions staff, and are normally granted for one year only. Some English Language test results, such as IELTS or TOEFL, are only valid for two years from the test date.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

We will consider resit applications provided you have obtained a minimum of A-level grades BBC at the first attempt (or equivalent qualifications).

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course.If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Course details

Course description

Our BSc Optometry course will enable you to discover the scientific principles that underpin optometry, including the properties of light, the anatomy of the eye and the processing of vision in the brain.

We have strong links with Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, where you can take advantage of a one-week clinical placement and attend regular specialist clinics in your final year.

Students graduating with a BSc degree are usually able to register as an optometrist after a one year pre-registration placement. In order to progress to the pre-registration year you will need to achieve a 2:2, to demonstrate all of the GOC core competencies and maintain GOC student registration throughout your studies and achieve the required GOC patient experience. You will need to secure your own pre-registration placement and ensure you have the appropriate visa, if necessary (details can be found here ).

Some students are able to enrol onto our unique four-year undergraduate Master of Science in Optometry course. On completion of this course, successful graduates can automatically register to practice as an optometrist with the General Optical Council.

Special features

Unique clinical experience

Gain experience at Manchester Royal Eye Hospital - one of Europe's biggest eye teaching hospitals - to learn about the management and treatment of eye disease.

Early patient contact

Start to meet patients in the second semester of Year 1.

Close-knit student cohort

Join the active student-run Optometry Society to take part in formal and informal social activities.

Integrated master's option

Our undergraduate four year Master of Science (MSci) gives you the chance to complete an integrated master's where successful students complete pre-registration year as part of the degree. This leads to direct registration with the General Optical Council.

Teaching and learning

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, clinics and practical sessions. You will have around 20 hours of formally timetabled lectures and practical sessions every week.

Find out more about teaching and learning in optometry , including a typical Year 1 timetable.

Coursework and assessment

Units completed within a semester will be assessed at the end of that semester by a combination of coursework, practical examination and written examination.

Subjects taught throughout the year will be examined at the end of the second semester.

The final degree classification is based on marks obtained during all years of the course, weighted as follows:

  • Year 1 - 10%
  • Year 2 - 30%
  • Year 3 - 60%.

Course content for year 1

You will be introduced to the scientific principles that underpin optometry including the properties of light, the anatomy of the eye and the processing of vision in the brain. You will also learn about ophthalmic appliances such as lenses and instrumentation such as retinoscopes.

The clinical element of the course will introduce you to general eye examination techniques that you will initially carry out on fellow students followed by volunteer patients in Semester 2.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

Course content for year 2

You will cover a range of new subjects including human disease processes, pharmacology, contact lens practice and binocular vision. You will also further develop your knowledge of ophthalmic appliances, and optometric instrumentation.

The clinical element of the course will develop your skills so that you will have the confidence to examine members of the public under supervision by the end of the year.

You will spend a week in the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital on a full-time placement during the vacation between the second and third years of the course. This provides a wealth of clinical experience in a hospital department.

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

Course content for year 3

An even greater emphasis is placed upon the clinical element of your course during your final year. You will have several clinics each week including contact lenses, low vision, paediatric and orthoptic clinics - some of which take place at the Manchester Royal Eye Hospital.

You will visit the refractive surgery facilities of a leading eye-care organisation.

Topics at the cutting edge of technology and practice are discussed in final year lectures on emerging optometry.

You will be supported to apply clinical and scientific research to patient management through our evidence based practice unit.

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

What our students say

I have always wanted to be an optometrist, and am absolutely delighted to have had the opportunity to study at Manchester. The learning experience is remarkable, with first rate lectures and practical teaching delivered by practising optometrists, ophthalmologists, and researchers at the cutting edge of development in vision and optometric study.

Sean Matthews

The parts of the course I like most are the practicals. They are great for getting to know others in your year, and the majority of the supervisors are practising optometrists, so learning from them provides an invaluable insight into how it is done in practice. Having patients from the first year also vastly improves your clinical and communication skills, and the patients aren't as scary as you might think!

Sophie Godley

Find out more about what it's like to study at Manchester on the  Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog .

Facilities

You will learn in purpose-built facilities that include a dispensing clinic, 16 bespoke optometric examination rooms, numerous dedicated specialist clinic rooms and dedicated laboratories for non-clinical practical sessions.

You will also have access to the University's other facilities for undergraduates .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

Optometrists work in high street practice or hospital eye clinics, where they prescribe and dispense spectacles and contact lenses, provide low vision rehabilitation, treat problems with binocular vision, and monitor ocular disease.

Optometrists are now also involved in the primary care of patients with diseases such as diabetes and glaucoma and can also undertake postgraduate study become independent prescribers with the authority to treat a range of eye conditions.  

Most BSc Optometry graduates are successful and go straight on to do their pre-registration year and take the College of Optometrists' Scheme for Registration examinations, which, when successfully completed, allow entry to the General Optical Council register.

Alternatively, during your second year you can apply for a place on our undergraduate four-year Master of Science in Optometry (MSci) degree, on completion of which you can register directly with the General Optical Council. This opportunity is unique to The University of Manchester.

After registration with the General Optical Council you can take your career forward in private practice or within the National Health Service. Of our recent graduates, 95% are working in private practice and 5% in the NHS.

See a blog post from one of our graduates who is now working as an optometrist on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog.

Accrediting organisations

Optometry degrees are approved by the General Optical Council.

In order to be eligible for progress to the pre-registration year you need to achieve a 2:2, demonstrate all of the GOC stage 1 core competencies and maintain GOC student registration throughout your studies.

Sun, 20 Mar 2022 10:18:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2023/03571/bsc-optometry/all-content/
Killexams : Optometry Degrees, Becoming an Optometrist No result found, try new keyword!Layman acknowledges that there is some crossover between the tasks that ophthalmologists and optometrists perform, since ophthalmologists frequently conduct vision tests and prescribe corrective ... Tue, 07 Sep 2021 02:32:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/how-to-become-an-optometrist-and-tips-on-optometry-school Killexams : COE Admissions Outline Killexams : COE Admissions Outline

Fall Admissions Outline

Elementary & Special, Middle Grades, P-12 Art and Music Education Majors

  • December-January
  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June
  • July
  • Apply online.
  • Make sure you complete all forms within the application by the close of the admission window.
  • Refer back to your application to review feedback when a form is declined. Make sure you submit the necessary documentation ASAP.
  • Students applying for fall admissions must have a 2.75 overall GPA to enter the bachelor’s program, and this must be met by the end of the summer semester of your application year.
    • GPA's between 2.5 - 2.74 are considered, please contact coeundergrads@ung.edu for additional information.
  • If you are eligible for spring admittance and still finishing up your coursework, you will be “provisionally admitted” until grades are posted for the remaining incomplete courses (spring and summer). 
  • Upon admissions to the College of Education, the undergraduate admissions office requires that you must maintain a documented, overall (UNG and Transfer) grade point average of 3.0
  • You will be notified via UNG email regarding your admission status within 2 to 3 weeks after the application closes.
  • Refer to the UNG calendar for Winter Break information. No correspondence will be sent during this time.
  • Read all correspondence thoroughly from this point forward and immediately respond if contacted. Check your “junk mail” since UNG may not recognize an email from the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
  • Please note the application process has multiple steps with the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC):
    • Sign and return your admissions letter to accept your spot in the program.
    • Claim UNG as your program provider with the GaPSC when prompted through email.
    • Complete an online ‘Pre-service Application’ when prompted through email.
    • When issued, locate your Pre-Service Certificate through your MyPSC account.
  • Once each student has been notified of their acceptance status, their names will be shared with the Field Placement Director who will then begin the process of placing students.
  • Not all placements are sent out at the same time but our Field Placement Director will be in touch. This process takes time, and we thank you for your patience.
  • The Undergraduate Admissions Office will email information about major changes and course registration at the end of the month.
  • Do not worry if you are not registered for your fall College of Education sections by your assigned day and time, according to banner. Class totals are determined by the department, which means there is no concern of classes closing or your spot being lost.
  • Registration for content-specific courses for the Middle Grades Education Programs will be the student’s responsibility.
  • P-12 Music students will register for their courses based on advisor recommendations.
  • If accepted, you will be notified regarding which school / county you have been assigned to via email. Once your placement is made, you may not request to change your placement.
  • Not all placements are sent out at the same time but our Field Placement Director will be in touch. This process takes time and we thank you for your patience.
  • Take the time to review study aboard opportunities for senior year.
  • Please note: any students accepted into educator preparation programs that are not issued a Pre-Service Teaching Certificate; will ultimately be prohibited from entering the program.
  • A GPA and credit review will occur at the end of the spring semester for all student that applied for fall admissions. Student with concerns will be contacted individually.
  • Middle Grades Education: Be sure to check the class schedule and do not register for any content or core courses that might conflict with your program courses.
  • Once placements are made for ELE/SPED juniors, the Professional Development Community facilitator will contact you to attend a required orientation, which will prepare you for going into the schools for the fall semester.
  • Middle Grades Education juniors will be registered for MGED 3015. In this course, you will attend a fall orientation. Additional information will be sent via email from the Undergraduate Admissions Office.
  • Majors will be updated for students starting the fall semester. Review DegreeWorks after this change is made.
  • The Undergraduate Admissions Office will register students for all College of Education Sections listed on the plan of study in the summer.
  • All students accepted into educator preparation programs must pay the Field Placement Fee for each semester in which field–intensive course(s) are required in the program. This fee will be added to your invoice in addition to the regular tuition and fees assessed by the university.
  • Any students accepted into educator preparation programs that are not issued a Pre-Service Teaching Certificate; will ultimately be prohibited from entering the program.
  • A GPA and credit review will occur at the end of the summer semester for all student that applied for fall admissions. Student with concerns will be contacted individually.

Spring Admissions Outline

Secondary Education, Kinesiology with Teacher Certification and P-12 Music Education Majors

  • August
  • September
  • October
  • November
  • December
  • Apply online.
  • Make sure you complete all forms within the application by the close of the admission window.
  • Refer back to your application to review feedback when a form is declined. Make sure you submit the necessary documentation ASAP.
  • Students applying for fall admissions must have a 2.75 overall GPA to enter the bachelor’s program, and this must be met by the end of the summer semester of your application year.
    • GPA's between 2.5 - 2.74 are considered, please contact coeundergrads@ung.edu for additional information.
  • If you are eligible for spring admittance and still finishing up your coursework, you will be “provisionally admitted” until grades are posted for the remaining incomplete courses. 
  • Upon admissions to the College of Education, the undergraduate admissions office requires that you must maintain a documented, overall (UNG and Transfer) grade point average of 3.0.
  • You will be notified via UNG email regarding your admission status within 2 to 3 weeks.
  • Read all correspondence thoroughly from this point forward and immediately respond if contacted. Check your “junk mail” since UNG may not recognize an email from the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
  • Please note the application process has multiple steps with the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC):
    • Sign and return your admissions letter to accept your spot in the program.
    • Claim UNG as your program provider with the GaPSC when prompted through email. 
    • Complete an online ‘Pre-service Application’ when prompted through email. 
    • When issued, locate your Pre-Service Certificate through your MyPSC account.
  • Once each student has been notified of their acceptance status, their names will be shared with the Field Placement Director who will then begin the process of placing students.
  • If accepted, you will be notified regarding which school / county you have been assigned to via email. Once your placement is made, you may not request to change your placement.
  • Majors in secondary science programs will be updated for students starting the spring semester. Review DegreeWorks after this change is made.
  • Information about course registration is sent out to secondary programs. The Program Admissions Specialist (PAS) will register students for all College of Education sections listed on the plan of study.
  • Registration for content-specific courses for secondary education will be the student’s responsibility.
  • P-12 Kinesiology Teacher Certification students will register for their own courses based on advisor recommendations.
  • You will receive an email from the Undergraduate Admissions Office of when registration will occur since not all time tickets will open on the same date. Class totals are determined by the department, which means there is no concern of classes closing or your spot being lost. Do not worry if you are not registered by your assigned day and time, according to banner. 
  • You will receive an email after the change is made to your account or if there is a change to the registration time.
  • Registration for content-specific courses for secondary education will be the student’s responsibility.
  • All students accepted into educator preparation programs must pay the Field Placement Fee for each semester in which field–intensive course(s) are required in the program. This fee will be added to your invoice in addition to the regular tuition and fees assessed by the university.
  • Take the time to review study aboard opportunities for senior year.
  • Please note any students accepted into educator preparation programs that are not issued a Pre-Service Teaching Certificate; will ultimately be prohibited from entering the program.
  • A GPA and credit review will occur at the end of the fall semester for all student that applied for spring admissions. Students with concerns will be contacted individually.
  • Refer to the UNG calendar for Winter Break information. No correspondence will be sent during this time.

Disclaimer – The following outlines are subject to change based on PSC requirements.

Establishing Connection...

Tue, 07 Dec 2021 03:53:00 -0600 en text/html https://ung.edu/college-of-education/coe-admissions-outline.php
Killexams : What the GRE Test Is and How to Prepare No result found, try new keyword!be all set,'" says Dennis Yim, director of live online courses with ... being noisy during the test administration. Pierre Huguet, CEO and co-founder of H&C Education admissions consulting firm ... Mon, 25 Jun 2018 03:17:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/what-the-gre-test-is-and-how-to-prepare Killexams : DU Admissions: These Courses Emerge As Most Sought After

DU Admissions 2022: The registration process for undergraduate admission for Delhi University has been closed. Students now wait for their final go-ahead for the courses they applied at the Delhi University which will soon release the list of selected candidates. Thousands of students have applied for various courses at the Delhi University which opened its admission for 79 UG programs across 67 colleges, departments, and centres. The programmes include 206 combinations of BA courses.Also Read - Delhi University Admission 2022: DU Releases UG Academic Calendar For First Year, Check Schedule Here

DU Admissions – Which Courses Emerge Most Popular

According to data provided by DU, BCom and BCom (Hons) are the university’s most sought-after courses. So far, 35,187 aspirants have opted for B.Com at Delhi College of Arts and Commerce as one of their college-course preferences. The university began the admission process for undergraduate courses for the 2022-23 academic year in September.

DU Admissions 2022 – Key Things To know

Important Note: The mid-entry will not be allowed for performance-based programmes (BA(Hons) Music, BSc Physical Education, Health Education, and Sports), and ECA, Sports Supernumerary Quota.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 23:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.india.com/education/du-admissions-delhi-university-admissions-2022-these-courses-emerge-as-most-sought-after-5684290/ Killexams : Worst results in a generation from US college admission tests

Admission test results for students seeking places at US universities have hit their lowest level in more than 30 years.

Officials blamed disruption to learning caused by the pandemic for the drop in scores. The class of 2022 scored an average of 19.8 out of 36 in the American College Testing (ACT) exam, the first time since 1991 that the average has dropped below 20.

In 2021 the average was 20.3. The latest results mark a fifth consecutive year of declining scores and show 42 per cent of students who took the ACT failed to meet the minimum levels required in English, maths, reading and science.

The ACT creates benchmark scores to determine a student’s likelihood of success in their first year of university. Janet

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 18:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/worst-results-in-a-generation-from-us-college-admission-tests-vmmp0nkpk
Killexams : ACT test scores fall to lowest level in 30 years following pandemic

Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in recent years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was supply me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 09:50:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/act-college-admissions-test-scores-drop-pandemic-slide/
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