Very useful ATTA Real Exam Questions at killexams.com

Fed up with reading bulky Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst publications? Keep in thought, you will nevertheless see strange queries in real ATTA which you never see within course books. The particular answer is in order to download ATTA dumps from killexams.com and remember all the queries and answers. Exercise with VCE sim and then you are ready for genuine ATTA exam.

ATTA Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst outline | http://babelouedstory.com/

ATTA outline - Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst Updated: 2024

Free Pass4sure ATTA braindumps question bank
Exam Code: ATTA Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst outline January 2024 by Killexams.com team

ATTA Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst

Exam ID : ATTA

Exam Title : Advanced Technical Test Analyst (ASTQB)

Number of Questions in test : 45

Passig Score : 65%

Exam Type : Multiple Choice Questions



- Summarize the generic risk factors that the Technical Test Analyst typically needs to consider.

- Summarize the activities of the Technical Test Analyst within a risk-based approach for testing activities.

- Write test cases from a given specification item by applying the Statement testing test technique to achieve a defined level of coverage.

- Write test cases from a given specification item by applying the Modified Condition/Decision Coverage (MC/DC) test technique to achieve coverage.

- Write test cases from a given specification item by applying the Multiple Condition testing test technique to achieve a defined level of coverage.

- Write test cases from a given specification item by applying McCabe's Simplified Baseline Method.

- Understand the applicability of API testing and the kinds of defects it finds.

- Select an appropriate white-box test technique according to a given project situation.

- Use control flow analysis to detect if code has any control flow anomalies.

- Explain how data flow analysis is used to detect if code has any data flow anomalies.

- Propose ways to Strengthen the maintainability of code by applying static analysis.

- Explain the use of call graphs for establishing integration testing strategies.

- Apply dynamic analysis to achieve a specified goal.

- For a particular project and system under test, analyze the non-functional requirements and write the respective sections of the test plan.

- Given a particular product risk, define the particular non-functional test type(s) which are most appropriate.

- Understand and explain the stages in an applications lifecycle where non-functional tests should be applied.

- For a given scenario, define the types of defects you would expect to find by using non-functional testing types.

- Explain the reasons for including security testing in a test strategy and/or test approach.

- Explain the principal aspects to be considered in planning and specifying security tests.

- Explain the reasons for including reliability testing in a test strategy and/or test approach.

- Explain the principal aspects to be considered in planning and specifying reliability tests.

- Explain the reasons for including performance testing in a test strategy and/or test approach.

- Explain the principal aspects to be considered in planning and specifying performance efficiency tests.

- Explain the reasons for including maintainability testing in a testing strategy and/or test approach.

- Explain the reasons for including portability tests in a testing strategy and/or test approach.

- Explain the reasons for compatibility testing in a testing strategy and/or test approach.

- Explain why review preparation is important for the Technical Test Analyst.

- Analyze an architectural design and identify problems according to a checklist provided in the syllabus.

- Analyze a section of code or pseudo-code and identify problems according to a checklist provided in the syllabus.

- Summarize the activities that the Technical Test Analyst performs when setting up a test automation project.

- Summarize the differences between data-driven and keyword-driven automation.

- Summarize common technical issues that cause automation projects to fail to achieve the planned return on investment.

- Construct keywords based on a given business process.

- Summarize the purpose of tools for fault seeding and fault injection.

- Summarize the main characteristics and implementation issues for performance testing tools.

- Explain the general purpose of tools used for web-based testing.

- Explain how tools support the practice of model-based testing.

- Outline the purpose of tools used to support component testing and the build process.

- Outline the purpose of tools used to support mobile application testing.



1. The Technical Test Analyst's Tasks in Risk-Based Testing

Keywords

product risk, risk assessment, risk identification, risk mitigation, risk-based testing
Learning Objectives for The Technical Test Analyst's Tasks in Risk-Based Testing
Risk-based Testing Tasks

- Summarize the generic risk factors that the Technical Test Analyst typically needs to consider

- Summarize the activities of the Technical Test Analyst within a risk-based approach for testing activities

1.1 Introduction

The Test Manager has overall responsibility for establishing and managing a risk-based testing strategy. The Test Manager usually will request the involvement of the Technical Test Analyst to ensure the risk-based approach is implemented correctly.
Technical Test Analysts work within the risk-based testing framework established by the Test Manager for the project. They contribute their knowledge of the technical product risks that are inherent in the project, such as risks related to security, system reliability and performance.

1.2 Risk-based Testing Tasks

Because of their particular technical expertise, Technical Test Analysts are actively involved in the following risk-based testing tasks:

• Risk identification

• Risk assessment

• Risk mitigation

These tasks are performed iteratively throughout the project to deal with emerging product risks and changing priorities, and to regularly evaluate and communicate risk status.

1.2.1 Risk Identification

By calling on the broadest possible demo of stakeholders, the risk identification process is most likely to detect the largest possible number of significant risks. Because Technical Test Analysts possess unique technical skills, they are particularly well-suited for conducting expert interviews, brainstorming with co-workers and also analyzing the current and past experiences to determine where the likely areas of product risk lie. In particular, Technical Test Analysts work closely with other stakeholders, such as developers, architects, operations engineers, product owners, local support offices, and service desk technicians, to determine areas of technical risk impacting the product and project. Involving other stakeholders ensures that all views are considered and is typically facilitated by Test Managers.

Risks that might be identified by the Technical Test Analyst are typically based on the [ISO25010] quality characteristics listed in Chapter 4, and include, for example:

• Performance efficiency (e.g., inability to achieve required response times under high load conditions)

• Security (e.g., disclosure of sensitive data through security attacks)

• Reliability (e.g., application unable to meet availability specified in the Service Level Agreement)

1.2.2 Risk Assessment

While risk identification is about identifying as many pertinent risks as possible, risk assessment is the study of those identified risks in order to categorize each risk and determine the likelihood and impact associated with it. The likelihood of occurrence is usually interpreted as the probability that the potential problem could exist in the system under test.

The Technical Test Analyst contributes to finding and understanding the potential technical product risk for each risk item whereas the Test Analyst contributes to understanding the potential business impact of the problem should it occur.

Project risks can impact the overall success of the project. Typically, the following generic project risks need to be considered:

• Conflict between stakeholders regarding technical requirements

• Communication problems resulting from the geographical distribution of the development organization

• Tools and technology (including relevant skills)

• Time, resource and management pressure

• Lack of earlier quality assurance

• High change rates of technical requirements

Product risk factors may result in higher numbers of defects. Typically, the following generic product risks need to be considered:

• Complexity of technology

• Complexity of code structure

• Amount of re-use compared to new code

• Large number of defects found relating to technical quality characteristics (defect history)

• Technical interface and integration issues

Given the available risk information, the Technical Test Analyst proposes an initial risk level according to the guidelines established by the Test Manager. For example, the Test Manager may determine that risks should be categorized with a value from 1 to 10, with 1 being highest risk. The initial value may be modified by the Test Manager when all stakeholder views have been considered.

1.2.3 Risk Mitigation

During the project, Technical Test Analysts influence how testing responds to the identified risks. This generally involves the following:

• Reducing risk by executing the most important tests (those addressing high risk areas) and by putting into action appropriate mitigation and contingency measures as stated in the test plan

• Evaluating risks based on additional information gathered as the project unfolds, and using that information to implement mitigation measures aimed at decreasing the likelihood or avoiding the impact of those risks

The Technical Test Analyst will often cooperate with certified in areas such as security and performance to define risk mitigation measures and elements of the organizational test strategy. Additional information can be obtained from ISTQB® Specialist syllabi, such as the Advanced Level Security Testing syllabus [ISTQB_ALSEC_SYL] and the Foundation Level Performance Testing syllabus [ISTQB_FLPT_SYL].

2. White-box Test Techniques

Keywords

API testing, atomic condition, control flow testing, cyclomatic complexity, decision testing, modified condition/decision testing, multiple condition testing, path testing, short-circuiting, statement testing, white-box test technique

Learning Objectives for White-Box Testing

2.2 Statement Testing

TTA-2.2.1 (K3) Write test cases for a given specification item by applying the Statement test technique to achieve a defined level of coverage

Decision Testing
TTA-2.3.1 (K3) Write test cases for a given specification item by applying the Decision test technique to achieve a defined level of coverage
2.4 Modified Condition/Decision Coverage (MC/DC) Testing
TTA-2.4.1 (K3) Write test cases by applying the Modified Condition/Decision Coverage (MC/DC) test design technique to achieve a defined level of coverage
Multiple Condition Testing
TTA-2.5.1 (K3) Write test cases for a given specification item by applying the Multiple Condition test technique to achieve a defined level of coverage
2.6 Basis Path Testing
TTA-2.6.1 (K3) Write test cases for a given specification item by applying McCabes Simplified Baseline Method
2.7 API Testing
TTA-2.7.1 (K2) Understand the applicability of API testing and the kinds of defects it finds
2.8 Selecting a White-box Test Technique
TTA-2.8.1 (K4) Select an appropriate white-box test technique according to a given project situation
2.1 Introduction
This chapter principally describes white-box test techniques. These techniques apply to code and other structures, such as business process flow charts.
Each specific technique enables test cases to be derived systematically and focuses on a particular aspect of the structure to be considered. The techniques provide coverage criteria which have to be measured and associated with an objective defined by each project or organization. Achieving full coverage does not mean that the entire set of tests is complete, but rather that the technique being used no longer suggests any useful tests for the structure under consideration.
The following techniques are considered in this syllabus:
• Statement testing

• Decision testing

• Modified Condition/Decision Coverage (MC/DC) testing

• Multiple Condition testing

• Basis Path testing

• API testing

The Foundation Syllabus [ISTQB_FL_SYL] introduces Statement testing and Decision testing. Statement testing exercises the executable statements in the code, whereas Decision testing exercises the decisions in the code and tests the code that is executed based on the decision outcomes.

The MC/DC and Multiple Condition techniques listed above are based on decision predicates and broadly find the same types of defects. No matter how complex a decision predicate may be, it will evaluate to either TRUE or FALSE, which will determine the path taken through the code. A defect is detected when the intended path is not taken because a decision predicate does not evaluate as expected.

The first four techniques are successively more thorough (and Basis Path testing is more thorough than Statement and Decision testing); more thorough techniques generally require more tests to be defined in order to achieve their intended coverage and find more subtle defects.

2.2 Statement Testing

Statement testing exercises the executable statements in the code. Coverage is measured as the number of statements executed by the tests divided by the total number of executable statements in the test object, normally expressed as a percentage.
Applicability

This level of coverage should be considered as a minimum for all code being tested.

Limitations/Difficulties

Decisions are not considered. Even high percentages of statement coverage may not detect certain defects in the codes logic.

2.3 Decision Testing

Decision testing exercises the decisions in the code and tests the code that is executed based on the decision outcomes. To do this, the test cases follow the control flows that occur from a decision point (e.g., for an IF statement, one for the true outcome and one for the false outcome; for a CASE statement, test cases would be required for all the possible outcomes, including the default outcome).

Coverage is measured as the number of decision outcomes executed by the tests divided by the total
number of decision outcomes in the test object, normally expressed as a percentage.
Compared to the MC/DC and Multiple Condition techniques described below, decision testing considers the entire decision as a whole and evaluates the TRUE and FALSE outcomes in separate test cases.
Applicability

The most useful checklists are those gradually developed by an individual organization, because they reflect:

• The nature of the product

• The local development environment

o Staff

o Tools

o Priorities

• History of previous successes and defects

• Particular issues (e.g., performance efficiency, security)

Checklists should be customized for the organization and perhaps for the particular project. The checklists provided in this chapter are meant only to serve as examples.

Some organizations extend the usual notion of a software checklist to include “anti-patterns” that refer to common errors, poor techniques, and other ineffective practices. The term derives from the popular concept of “design patterns” which are reusable solutions to common problems that have been shown to be effective in practical situations [Gamma94]. An anti-pattern, then, is a commonly made error, often implemented as an expedient short-cut.

It is important to remember that if a requirement is not testable, meaning that it is not defined in such a way that the Technical Test Analyst can determine how to test it, then it is a defect. For example, a requirement that states “The software should be fast” cannot be tested. How can the Technical Test Analyst determine if the software is fast? If, instead, the requirement said “The software must provide a maximum response time of three seconds under specific load conditions”, then the testability of this requirement is substantially better assuming the “specific load conditions” (e.g., number of concurrent users, activities performed by the users) are defined. It is also an overarching requirement because this one requirement could easily spawn many individual test cases in a non-trivial application. Traceability from this requirement to the test cases is also critical because if the requirement should change, all the test cases will need to be reviewed and updated as needed.

5.2.1 Architectural Reviews

Software architecture consists of the fundamental organization of a system, embodied in its components, their relationships to each other and the environment, and the principles governing its design and evolution. [ISO42010], [Bass03].
Checklists1 used for architecture reviews could, for example, include verification of the proper implementation of the following items, which are quoted from [Web-2]:

• “Connection pooling - reducing the execution time overhead associated with establishing database connections by establishing a shared pool of connections

• Load balancing – spreading the load evenly between a set of resources

• Distributed processing

• Caching – using a local copy of data to reduce access time

• Lazy instantiation

• Transaction concurrency

• Process isolation between Online Transactional Processing (OLTP) and Online Analytical Processing (OLAP)

• Replication of data”

5.2.2 Code Reviews

Checklists for code reviews are necessarily very detailed, and, as with checklists for architecture reviews, are most useful when they are language, project and company-specific. The inclusion of code-level anti-patterns is helpful, particularly for less experienced software developers.

Checklists1 used for code reviews could include the following items:.

1. Structure

• Does the code completely and correctly implement the design?

• Does the code conform to any pertinent coding standards?

• Is the code well-structured, consistent in style, and consistently formatted?

• Are there any uncalled or unneeded procedures or any unreachable code?

• Are there any leftover stubs or test routines in the code?

• Can any code be replaced by calls to external reusable components or library functions?

• Are there any blocks of repeated code that could be condensed into a single procedure?

• Is storage use efficient?

• Are symbolics used rather than “magic number” constants or string constants?

• Are any modules excessively complex and should be restructured or split into multiple modules?

2. Documentation

• Is the code clearly and adequately documented with an easy-to-maintain commenting style?

• Are all comments consistent with the code?

• Does the documentation conform to applicable standards?

3. Variables

• Are all variables properly defined with meaningful, consistent, and clear names?

• Are there any redundant or unused variables?

4. Arithmetic Operations

• Does the code avoid comparing floating-point numbers for equality?

• Does the code systematically prevent rounding errors?

• Does the code avoid additions and subtractions on numbers with greatly different magnitudes?

• Are divisors tested for zero or noise?

5. Loops and Branches

• Are all loops, branches, and logic constructs complete, correct, and properly nested?

• Are the most common cases tested first in IF-ELSEIF chains?

• Are all cases covered in an IF-ELSEIF or CASE block, including ELSE or DEFAULT clauses?

• Does every case statement have a default?

• Are loop termination conditions obvious and invariably achievable?

• Are indices or subscripts properly initialized, just prior to the loop?

• Can any statements that are enclosed within loops be placed outside the loops?

• Does the code in the loop avoid manipulating the index variable or using it upon exit from the loop?

6. Defensive Programming

• Are indices, pointers, and subscripts tested against array, record, or file bounds?

• Are imported data and input arguments tested for validity and completeness?

• Are all output variables assigned?

• Is the correct data element operated on in each statement?

• Is every memory allocation released?

• Are timeouts or error traps used for external device access?

• Are files checked for existence before attempting to access them?

• Are all files and devices left in the correct state upon program termination?

6. Test Tools and Automation

Keywords capture/playback, data-driven testing, debugging, emulator, fault seeding, hyperlink, keyword-driven testing, performance efficiency, simulator, test execution, test management

Learning Objectives for Test Tools and Automation

6.1 Defining the Test Automation Project

TTA-6.1.1 (K2) Summarize the activities that the Technical Test Analyst performs when setting up a test automation project

TTA-6.1.2 (K2) Summarize the differences between data-driven and keyword-driven automation

TTA-6.1.3 (K2) Summarize common technical issues that cause automation projects to fail to achieve the planned return on investment

TTA-6.1.4 (K3) Construct keywords based on a given business process

6.2 Specific Test Tools

TTA-6.2.1 (K2) Summarize the purpose of tools for fault seeding and fault injection

TTA-6.2.2 (K2) Summarize the main characteristics and implementation issues for performance testing tools

TTA-6.2.3 (K2) Explain the general purpose of tools used for web-based testing

TTA-6.2.4 (K2) Explain how tools support the practice of model-based testing

TTA-6.2.5 (K2) Outline the purpose of tools used to support component testing and the build process

TTA-6.2.6 (K2) Outline the purpose of tools used to support mobile application testing

6.1 Defining the Test Automation Project

In order to be cost-effective, test tools (and particularly those which support test execution), must be carefully architected and designed. Implementing a test execution automation strategy without a solid architecture usually results in a tool set that is costly to maintain, insufficient for the purpose and unable to achieve the target return on investment.

A test automation project should be considered a software development project. This includes the need for architecture documentation, detailed design documentation, design and code reviews, component and component integration testing, as well as final system testing. Testing can be needlessly delayed or complicated when unstable or inaccurate test automation code is used.

There are multiple tasks that the Technical Test Analyst can perform regarding test execution automation. These include:

• Determining who will be responsible for the test execution (possibly in coordination with a Test Manager)

• Selecting the appropriate tool for the organization, timeline, skills of the team, and maintenance requirements (note this
could mean deciding to create a tool to use rather than acquiring one)
• Defining the interface requirements between the automation tool and other tools such as the test management, defect management and tools used for continuous integration

• Developing any adapters which may be required to create an interface between the test execution tool and the software under test

• Selecting the automation approach, i.e., keyword-driven or data-driven (see Section 6.1.1 below)

• Working with the Test Manager to estimate the cost of the implementation, including training. In Agile projects this aspect would typically be discussed and agreed in project/sprint planning meetings with the whole team.

• Scheduling the automation project and allocating the time for maintenance

• Training the Test Analysts and Business Analysts to use and supply data for the automation

• Determining how and when the automated tests will be executed

• Determining how the automated test results will be combined with the manual test results

In projects with a strong emphasis on test automation, a Test Automation Engineer may be tasked with many of these activities (see the Advanced Level Test Automation Engineer syllabus [ISTQB_ALTAE_SYL] for details). Certain organizational tasks may be taken on by a Test Manager according to project needs and preferences. In Agile projects the assignment of these tasks to roles is typically more flexible and less formal.

These activities and the resulting decisions will influence the scalability and maintainability of the automation solution. Sufficient time must be spent researching the options, investigating available tools and technologies and understanding the future plans for the organization.

6.1.1 Selecting the Automation Approach

This section considers the following factors which impact the test automation approach:

• Automating through the GUI

• Applying a data-driven approach

• Applying a keyword-driven approach

• Handling software failures

• Considering system state

The Advanced Level Test Automation Engineer syllabus [ISTQB_ALTAE_SYL] includes further details on selecting an automation approach.
Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst
ASTQB Technical outline

Other ASTQB exams

ISTQB-Advanced-Level-1 ISTQB Advanced Level Test & manager Exam
ISTQB-Advanced-Level-2 ISTQB Advanced LevelTest Analyst Exam
ISTQB-Advanced-Level-3 ISTQB Advanced LevelTechnical Test
ISTQB-Level-1 American Software Testing Qualifications Board Level 1
TA12 ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Advanced Level - Test Analyst
TM12 ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Advanced Level - Test Manager
ATM Advanced Test Manager
ATTA Advanced Level Technical Test Analyst
TTA1 ISTQB-BCS Certified Tester Advanced Level- Technical Test Analyst
CTFL-2018 ISTQB Certified Tester Foundation Level (CTFL_2018) 2023
ASTQB-CMT ASTQB Certified Mobile Tester

Just go through our ATTA test Questions bank and feel confident about the ATTA test. You will pass your ATTA test at Full Marks or your money back. Most of people tried our braindumps and recommend our ATTA dumps to every one taking exam. Even 100% marks can be achieved with our ATTA dumps.
ATTA Dumps
ATTA Braindumps
ATTA Real Questions
ATTA Practice Test
ATTA dumps free
ASTQB
ATTA
Advanced Technical Test Analyst
http://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ATTA
Question: 59
Part 7 "Test Process & Incident Management"
As a technical test analyst, which documents would you typically create? 1 credit [K2]
A. Test plan, test design, test cases and test log
B. Test plan, test log, test design and test summary report
C. Test script, test log, incident report and test design
D. Incident report, test item transmittal report, test cases and test procedure
Answer: C
Question: 60
Part 7 "Test Process & Incident Management"
As a technical test analyst, you have found out during test case design that the design
document is incomplete. Which is an example of a good way to communicate that
problem in an email? 1 credit [K2]
A. E-mail: Until I have received an updated version of the design document, I will not
do any work on the test design.
B. E-mail: When will it be possible to receive the missing information? Test design is
impeded by a lack of clarity here.
C. E-mail: Here we go again. The developer gave us incomplete and ambiguous design
specifications. Typical.
D. Do not communicate the problem, just log the delaying effect of the information
problem and be ready to explain the delays to the test manager later.
Answer: B
Question: 61
Part 7 "Test Process & Incident Management"
As a technical test analyst, you are involved in a risk analysis session using the Failure
Mode and Effect Analysis technique. You are calculating risk priorities. Which of the
following are the major factors in this exercise? 1 credit [K2]
A. Severity and priority
B. Functionality, reliability, usability, maintainability, efficiency and portability
C. Likelihood and impact
D. Financial damage, frequency of use and external visibility
Answer: C
Question: 62
Part 7 "Test Process & Incident Management"
In which of the following test documents would you expect to find the preconditions to
start executing a set of test cases? 1 credit [K2]
A. Level test plan
B. Test procedure specification
C. Test design specification
D. Master test plan
Answer: B
Question: 63
Part 7 "Test Process & Incident Management"
Defects are discovered through test analysis and design because 1 credit [K2]
A. the tasks involve extracting information from the test basis
B. developers are involved in writing test cases
C. the cost of fixing a defect will increase if found later on
D. the author of the test basis will have made errors
Answer: A
Question: 64
Part 7 "Test Process & Incident Management"
The development manager asks you to identify suitable test coverage entry criteria for a
component test. Which TWO of the following would you recommend as appropriate for
entry criteria to a component testing phase? 2 credits [K3]
A. 100% statement coverage
B. No critical outstanding defects
C. Test log available
D. Code review completed
E. Static analysis shows no major violations
Answer: D, E
Question: 65
Identify the most significant risk introduced by this approach to incident management. 3
credits [K4]
A. Excel list may not be insynchronizationwith Word documents
B. Low level of usability
C. Spreadsheet/text files may not be complete
D. Does not map to IEEE 1044
Answer: A
For More exams visit https://killexams.com/vendors-exam-list
Kill your test at First Attempt....Guaranteed!

ASTQB Technical outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ATTA Search results ASTQB Technical outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ATTA https://killexams.com/exam_list/ASTQB Bitcoin (BTC) Technical Analysis

Risk Disclosure: Trading in financial instruments and/or cryptocurrencies involves high risks including the risk of losing some, or all, of your investment amount, and may not be suitable for all investors. Prices of cryptocurrencies are extremely volatile and may be affected by external factors such as financial, regulatory or political events. Trading on margin increases the financial risks.
Before deciding to trade in financial instrument or cryptocurrencies you should be fully informed of the risks and costs associated with trading the financial markets, carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience, and risk appetite, and seek professional advice where needed.
Fusion Media would like to remind you that the data contained in this website is not necessarily real-time nor accurate. The data and prices on the website are not necessarily provided by any market or exchange, but may be provided by market makers, and so prices may not be accurate and may differ from the genuine price at any given market, meaning prices are indicative and not appropriate for trading purposes. Fusion Media and any provider of the data contained in this website will not accept liability for any loss or damage as a result of your trading, or your reliance on the information contained within this website.
It is prohibited to use, store, reproduce, display, modify, transmit or distribute the data contained in this website without the explicit prior written permission of Fusion Media and/or the data provider. All intellectual property rights are reserved by the providers and/or the exchange providing the data contained in this website.
Fusion Media may be compensated by the advertisers that appear on the website, based on your interaction with the advertisements or advertisers.

© 2007-2024Fusion Media Limited. All Rights Reserved.

Thu, 04 Jan 2024 14:54:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.investing.com/crypto/bitcoin/technical
Fallout 76's Technical Data Explained No result found, try new keyword!Technical Data is a rare quest item in Fallout 76, and with the right knowledge, players can farm the rewards from this quest with ease. Players can find Technical Data in loot containers in ... Mon, 25 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 https://gamerant.com/fallout-76-technical-data-feature-rewards-farming-location-explained/ Compensation outline for economic damage from war extended

A compensation outline to assist businesses and their post-war impact has been extended to include war-related damages through the end of December 2023, Israeli media reported.

The Tax Authority will allow submission of online claims for the grant until the end of a period of 90 days from the date the system opens, on January 15, 2024. 

Mon, 01 Jan 2024 02:43:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.jpost.com/breaking-news/article-780316 EUR/USD Technical Analysis  

Get a EUR USD forecast recommendation - strong Buy, Buy, strong Sell, Sell or Neutral signals and gain access to a detailed EUR USD technical analysis through moving averages buy/sell signals (simple and exponential for 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 periods) and common chart indicators (RSI, Stochastics, StochRSI, MACD, ADX, CCI, ROC, Williams %R, Ultimate and more) Buy, Sell, Overbought, Oversold or Neutral signals. Also - pivot points levels for Standard, Fibonacci, Camarilla, Woodie's and Demark's are supplied. All technical studies are available in different time frames.

Thu, 04 Jan 2024 06:01:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.investing.com/currencies/eur-usd-technical
The Value of Repaying Good Technical Debt

Good technical debt is intentional, enables benefits for the organisation, and is controlled. Teams can use a disciplined approach for managing and repaying technical debt, for instance by using the wall of technical debt.

Marijn Huizendveld spoke about taming technical debt at OOP 2023 Digital.

We can partition technical debt into good versus bad, Huizendveld explained. Bad technical debt is the stuff that has been lingering around. The only attention it gets from the team is working around it, or fixing the fallout as a consequence of this bad technical debt. This type of technical debt limits the team, and as a consequence, the team members may feel hopeless, Huizendveld mentioned.

Not all technical debt has to be bad. Huizendveld shared that there’s a school of thought that identifies good technical debt. This type of debt has three characteristics:

  1. It is intentional; the technical debt is not just there because it happened to us, but because we made a conscious choice to take a shortcut
  2. It enables; the organisation benefits from taking on the debt initially because it allows us to generate more value
  3. It is controlled; we have tripwires that inform us when we are nearing the point where the interest we pay exceeds the value that we gained

Teams struggle to articulate the business value of repaying a particular instance of technical debt, Huizendveld mentioned. Many teams offer only a single way out of the bad situation, by suggesting a total rewrite of the system, rather than some small but meaningful first step:

If it is unclear what the value is to the organisation of addressing technical debt, and if the only presented solution is starting from scratch, then teams shouldn’t wonder that no budget is approved to address these lingering issues.

For managing technical debt, Huizendveld referred to the Wall of Technical Debt by Mathias Verraes. The elegance of this process is in its simplicity, as he explained:

Rather than doing a full account of all the debt you have, you start to collect data on what is hindering your progress. Each time you encounter a bit of technical debt that prevents you from moving faster, you capture it on a sticky note. You add a date to the note and you put a dot on it.

Every time you run into it again, you put another dot on that note. When the third time comes around, you have to act. You have proven that this has hindered progress 3 times, it will hinder you another 3 times, and then some more.

Huizendveld explained that the difficulty is in the discipline that you need to bring up, in order to act when you have encountered the same piece of technical debt for the third time. But acting consistently on each item will produce a radical change in your environment, he said. When a team commits to this process for at least three months: they realise a profound improvement in the ability to work with the software system:

I encourage people to try this approach and to exercise discipline by always acting on the third encounter. Introduce the process, and see how it improves your situation.

InfoQ interviewed Marijn Huizendveld about dealing with technical debt.

InfoQ: What keeps us from repaying technical debt?

Marijn Huizendveld: People will often say "the business", but in my experience that isn’t always an accurate representation of reality. Often the pressure that is perceived that keeps people from repaying technical debt is not real pressure. Teams will say something like: "That is not allowed here", but if you ask who would be the person that disallows paying back technical debt, then they tend to fail to point out the evil forces.

Now I’m explicitly acknowledging that there are organisations that keep their engineers from repaying technical debt, but in my experience, it is not as common as engineers lead us to believe. What I observe a lot when working with teams, is that many of these instances of technical debt have become so accepted, because of continued exposure to them, that teams simply do not register the problem anymore.

There is often this numbness to the pain, which is only recognized after the fact, once the technical debt has been removed. Only then the team realises how much attention was consumed by all these small issues. It’s like death by a thousand paper cuts; you don’t always realise it’s happening.

InfoQ: How should we act to repay technical debt?

Huizendveld: One of the ways to ensure that people act upon technical debt is by learning to come up with small improvements. A small improvement today is preferable over a better improvement next week.

The reason for that is that you get the compound interest of the improvements day by day, as well as a reduction in interaction effects between various pieces of technical debt. The positive side-effect is that teams learn to think in smaller improvements, which will help them with general feature work too.

Wed, 06 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.infoq.com/news/2023/12/repaying-good-technical-debt/
Colorado Technical University Reviews

ConsumerAffairs is not a government agency. Companies displayed may pay us to be Authorized or when you click a link, call a number or fill a form on our site. Our content is intended to be used for general information purposes only. It is very important to do your own analysis before making any investment based on your own personal circumstances and consult with your own investment, financial, tax and legal advisers.

Company NMLS Consumer Access #2110672 MORTGAGE BROKER ONLY, NOT A MORTGAGE LENDER OR MORTGAGE CORRESPONDENT LENDER

NOTICE TO VERMONT CONSUMERS:
THIS IS A LOAN SOLICITATION ONLY. CONSUMERS UNIFIED, LLC IS NOT A LENDER. INFORMATION RECEIVED WILL BE SHARED WITH ONE OR MORE THIRD PARTIES IN CONNECTION WITH YOUR LOAN INQUIRY. THE LENDER MAY NOT BE SUBJECT TO ALL VERMONT LENDING LAWS. THE LENDER MAY BE SUBJECT TO FEDERAL LENDING LAWS.

Home Warranty disclosure for New Jersey Residents: The product being offered is a service contract and is separate and distinct from any product or service warranty which may be provided by the home builder or manufacturer.

Consumers Unified, LLC does not take loan or mortgage applications or make credit decisions. Rather, we display rates from lenders that are licensed or otherwise authorized to work in Vermont. We forward your information to a lender you wish to contact so that they may contact you directly.

Copyright © 2024 Consumers Unified, LLC DBA ConsumerAffairs. All Rights Reserved. The contents of this site may not be republished, reprinted, rewritten or recirculated without written permission.

Mon, 01 Jan 2024 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.consumeraffairs.com/education/online-colleges/colorado-technical-university.html
Technical Writer Salary No result found, try new keyword!How Much Does a Technical Writer Make? Technical Writers made a median salary of $78,060 in 2021. The best-paid 25% made $98,840 that year, while the lowest-paid 25% made $61,830. Finding your ... Tue, 26 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 https://money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/technical-writer/salary ‘Morning Joe’ delayed nearly 15 minutes as MSNBC faces technical nightmare, bizarrely playing Lawrence O’Donnell rerun

It was no go for “Morning Joe.”

MSNBC faced a technical nightmare early Tuesday leaving viewers more baffled than usual while waiting nearly 15 minutes for its flagship breakfast show, “Morning Joe.”

Those tuning in at 6 a.m. were greeted with a shot of the Capitol building along with an extended play of The Who’s “Teenage Wasteland.”

Viewers were then met with a series of internal promotions and commercials played on a confusing loop until around 6:07 a.m.

Then, instead of the latest news, the station started playing a rerun of  “Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell” without any messages explaining that it was a rerun.

Finally, Mika Brzezinski started “Morning Joe” at 6:12 a.m. — without any real explanation for the lengthy delay.

“All right, thanks for bearing with us, everybody … getting started a little bit late this morning,”  Brzezinski said.

MSNBC played a shot of the Capitol building along with The Who’s “Teenage Wasteland” early Tuesday morning instead of “Morning Joe.” MSNBC
Mika Brzezinski began “Morning Joe” at 6:12 a.m. without explaining the delay. MSNBC
MSNBC eventually played a re-run of  “Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell” without any messages explaining that it was a rerun. MSNBC

The mystery glitch actually started earlier, with “Way Too Early” host Jonathan Lemire noting on X just after 5:30 a.m. that the station was experiencing “technical difficulties.”

“Stay with us @MSNBC, we hope to be broadcasting live again soon,” Lemire wrote just before 6 a.m.. and the delayed start of “Morning Joe.”

“Thank you for your patience,” he wrote.

MSNBC declined to comment when reached by The Post early Tuesday.

Tue, 12 Dec 2023 00:08:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://nypost.com/2023/12/12/news/msnbc-viewers-got-music-ads-and-reruns-instead-of-morning-joe/
Perseus Updates Yaoure Technical Report

Perseus Mining Limited

perth, Dec. 19, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- PERSEUS RELEASES UPDATED TECHNICAL REPORT FOR ITS YAOURÉ GOLD MINE

Perth, Western Australia/December 19, 2023/Perseus Mining Limited (ASX/TSX: PRU) is pleased to announce the release of the updated Technical Report for its Yaouré Gold Mine in Côte d’Ivoire, West Africa (“Yaouré”).

The Technical Report, with an effective date of September 18, 2023, was prepared in compliance with Canadian Securities Administrators’ National Instrument 43-101 and is available on www.perseusmining.com and www.sedarplus.ca.

The Report summarises the results of the updated Life of Mine Plan to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of an extended mine life at Yaouré, inclusive of a feasibility level study on an underground mine on the CMA orebody.

Please refer to News Release dated September 18, 2023 “Perseus extends life of Yaouré Gold Mine to 2035” for a summary of the material information contained in the Yaouré Technical Report.

This announcement was authorised for release by Jeff Quartermaine, Executive Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Mon, 18 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/perseus-updates-yaoure-technical-report-013300827.html




ATTA certification | ATTA study tips | ATTA testing | ATTA basics | ATTA study help | ATTA Study Guide | ATTA exam | ATTA reality | ATTA approach | ATTA test syllabus |


Killexams test Simulator
Killexams Questions and Answers
Killexams Exams List
Search Exams
ATTA exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List