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Killexams : Amazon Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SOA-C02 Search results Killexams : Amazon Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SOA-C02 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Amazon Killexams : Get This FDA-Approved COVID-19 Rapid Test On Sale at Amazon Prime Day for Your Summer Vacation Killexams : Get This FDA-Approved COVID-19 Rapid Test On Sale at Amazon Prime Day for Your Summer Vacation | Entertainment Tonight Tue, 12 Jul 2022 23:29:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.etonline.com/get-this-fda-approved-covid-19-rapid-test-on-sale-at-amazon-prime-day-for-your-summer-vacation Killexams : Report: Amazon drone delivery crashes could cause another setback

After nearly a decade of promises, it appeared Amazon drone delivery was finally taking off with the rollout of commercial flights in California and Texas later this year. But the program could be coming crashing down to Earth.

Recent test crashes have caused yet another regulatory setback for the planned service, several people with knowledge of the situation told Insider

According to the sources, the crashes alarmed the Federal Aviation Administration enough that it withheld permission for Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) to begin test flights that must be completed in order to get the program off the ground. The FAA declined to comment.

Amazon must complete 7,000 test flights as part of a federal regulatory requirement for durability and reliability. According to an internal document, it had hoped to complete nearly all of them by the end of July. 

So far, the company has completed 3,000 flights — but none count toward the requirement because the FAA has yet to approve the tests, sources told Insider.

Amazon heavily disputed the claim that the FAA refused to sign off on test flights, calling the statements shared with Insider “wrong or purposely misleading.”

“Prime Air complies with all FAA requirements,” Maria Boschetti, an Amazon spokesperson, told Modern Shipper. “For example, the FAA has not counted any of the D&R [durability and reliability] campaign hours because that part of the broader type certification process has not started yet. It is false to claim the FAA has declined to sign off on it. In addition, we’re on track to launch our commercial operations — which are very much distinct from our experimental flight testing — in College Station and Lockeford later this year.”


Read: Amazon Prime Air drone deliveries finally getting off the ground in California

Read: Amazon drone delivery is coming to College Station, Texas


Sources told Insider the FAA is withholding approval in part due to concerns about crashes. A person with knowledge of a crash that took place July 2 said the drone “just blew apart when it hit the ground.” According to an FAA report Insider viewed, the drone hurtled 180 feet out of the sky.

Another current employee said the FAA has questioned whether all of Amazon’s drones meet the written specifications the company has provided.

If the reports are true, the regulatory holdup could put the drone delivery service months behind schedule. It’s just the latest in a string of setbacks that have plagued Amazon for years and kept the program taxiing on the runway.

In the past year alone, eight Amazon drones have ​​crashed during testing, including one that ignited a 25-acre brush fire in Oregon. Five of them took place over a four-month span. Reports also revealed the company tried to avoid investigations into the crashes by ducking FAA correspondences and even moving evidence at crash sites.



Adding to the headache, Amazon’s drone delivery arm has seen employee turnover north of 70% in latest months. It’s safe to say that isn’t what former CEO Jeff Bezos envisioned when he first announced the service in 2013.

Meanwhile, Amazon’s rivals have taken Bezos’ idea and flown with it.

Walmart has been operating a drone delivery service in Arkansas through a partnership with DroneUp for over a year. In May, it expanded the service to six states and nearly 4 million people. Another competitor, Alphabet’s Wing, launched commercial drone deliveries in Texas in April.

Amazon may have taken two steps forward with the news that its drone delivery service would be flying in California and Texas. But if reports about the FAA’s hesitancy are true, it also just took one giant step back.

Correction: The sources telling Insider that the FAA is withholding approval of test flights are not current FAA employees, as an earlier version of this story stated.

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Sun, 24 Jul 2022 23:42:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.freightwaves.com/news/report-amazon-drone-delivery-crashes-could-cause-another-setback
Killexams : Amazon-owned self driving firm Zoox seeks to test robotaxi in California

FREMONT, Calif, July 19 (Reuters) - (This July 19 story corrects name to "Jesse Levinson" instead of "Levison" in second paragraph)

Zoox, a self-driving technology firm owned by Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O), said on Tuesday it was gearing up to launch its robotaxi business, self-certifying that its vehicle with no pedals or steering wheel meets U.S. federal regulations and applying for a permit in California to test-drive it.

“We really invested the extra time and resources to build a vehicle that doesn't require exemptions and then that basically lets us control our own destiny and also deploy our vehicles at scale,” Jesse Levinson, Zoox’s co-founder and chief technology officer told Reuters.

Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Zoox’s vehicle, called VH6, has room for four passengers, with two facing each other - a layout that looks like startup Cruise’s Origin vehicle unveiled in January, 2020. Cruise is controlled by General Motors Co. (GM.N).

The VH6 is produced in Zoox’s "Kato" factory in Fremont, California, a city where Tesla also builds its cars.

Levinson said the factory has produced dozens of VH6s and the current location can produce tens of thousands of vehicles.

He said that the current economic slowdown has not affected the company and Zoox will increase its employee number to 2,000 this year from 1,400 at the start of the year. Levinson also said for now the company is focused on moving people, rather than packages, which is much more lucrative.

“We can compete with, for example, Uber and Lyft and make money and be very cost competitive even in the early days of this technology,” he said.

Generally self-driving tech companies with vehicles without a steering wheel or pedals have applied to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for an "exemption." Levinson said Zoox chose instead to self-certify according to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, acknowledging this was a higher bar that makes Zoox liable for the safety of the vehicle.

The NHTSA exemption usually limits the number of vehicles that can be manufactured as well as the period of production.

Cruise applied this year for a NHTSA exemption. A source close to the company said Cruise viewed that method as more responsible and gives regulators a clearer view into the technology.

Meanwhile Nuro, a self-driving startup backed by SoftBank, said it anticipates its next generation vehicle to "comply with all applicable federal standards at the time that it is deployed". Its current R2 vehicle with no pedals, steering wheel and room inside only for packages, were manufactured with an exemption from NHTSA.

Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Reporting By Jane Lanhee Lee; Editing by David Gregorio

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 21:34:00 -0500 Jane Lanhee Lee en text/html https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/amazon-owned-self-driving-firm-zoox-seeks-test-robotaxi-california-2022-07-19/
Killexams : Amazon drone delivery is coming to College Station, Texas

Amazon will begin delivering packages via drone to residents in College Station, Texas, later this year, the company announced Friday.

After nearly a decade of anticipation, Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN) last month announced that Prime Air drone deliveries would finally be getting off the ground in the town of Lockeford, California, later this year. It said “hundreds of residents” already have expressed interest in the service.

Now, Amazon customers in College Station should expect to hear from the company as it looks to add a second delivery hub. Amazon said it will work with both the city and institution that gave it its name, Texas A&M University, to launch the service in the coming months.

“Amazon’s new facility presents a tremendous opportunity for College Station to be at the forefront of the development of drone delivery technology,” said Mayor Karl Mooney. “We look forward to partnering with Amazon and Texas A&M and are confident that Amazon will be a productive, conscientious and accountable participant in our community.”

The news of Amazon drones coming to College Station is an even bigger deal than the initial announcement. While Lockeford has a population of about 3,500, College Station is a full-fledged city, with well over 100,000 residents. That will provide Amazon a larger demo size with which to test its drones.


Read: Amazon Prime Air drone deliveries finally getting off the ground in California

Read: Amazon now authorized to fly commercial delivery drones


Prime Air drone deliveries will use Amazon’s latest model, the hexagon-shaped MK27-2. The aircraft boasts a top speed of 50 mph and can cruise at an altitude of up to 400 feet, Amazon said. It can deliver up to 5 pounds of payload within an hour.

The MK27-2 flies autonomously beyond the pilot’s visual line of sight, hovering above the customer’s residence and releasing the package directly into their backyard. Its ability to fly beyond the visible range is a perk granted to Amazon by the Federal Aviation Administration, which certified the drone under its airworthiness criteria in February.

While Amazon drone deliveries have arrived later than expected, the company’s relationship with the FAA is better than most other drone firms. In 2020, it became the third U.S. drone company after Alphabet’s Wing, UPS Flight Forward to receive a Part 135 air carrier certificate, allowing it to operate its fleet in American airspace. Bay Area-based Zipline became the fourth recipient of that designation last month.

Despite the freedom granted to Amazon by the FAA, controversy has plagued the company’s drones. In 2022 alone, reports surfaced that the company’s drone delivery arm had a turnover rate as high as 70% and that it suffered five test crashes in a four-month span. One of those ignited a 25-acre brush fire in Oregon.

While it would appear that Amazon’s drone delivery struggles are in the rearview mirror, trouble may already be brewing in Lockeford. Residents spoke to the Washington Post about their frustrations with the program, which many said took them by surprise. Some even threatened to shoot down the drones.

“I don’t want drones flying around my house — we live in the country,” Amazon customer Greg Baroni, who lives close enough to College Station to sign up for the service, told the Post.



Area residents also have expressed concerns about the safety of drones in the heavily farmed Texas region.

“I have a large amount of livestock and horses, and a drone would easily frighten the animals,” Naydeene Koster told the newspaper. “Horses will run straight through a barbed wire or really any kind of fence when they think they’re in danger. I’ve seen horses kill themselves over a flying balloon, [so] I’d hate to see the damage a flying drone would cause coming into their area.”

Still other residents worry about the potential economic impact of the drones. Baroni and another College Station resident, Jennifer Hoy, said the service could take away jobs from people in the area.

With each misstep pushing Amazon further behind its rivals, the pressure to deliver has never been greater. Wing and UPS Flight Forward both launched expansive pilots during the pandemic — Wing in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area and Flight Forward in North Carolina. Wing also is looking to expand into Virginia.

Meanwhile, Walmart (NYSE: WMT), which doesn’t have a drone delivery arm but partners with DroneUp, has been operating two hubs in Arkansas since last year. At the end of May, the retailer said it would add six states and around 4 million people to its drone delivery network this year.

Even outside of those big players, the competition is fierce. Smaller U.S. drone delivery startups. such as Flytrex, Zipline and Flirtey, all have launched dedicated pilots of their services. And that still doesn’t account for foreign companies working to capture the American drone delivery market, like Wingcopter, Matternet or Manna.

Amazon did not immediately respond to Modern Shipper’s request for comment.

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The FREIGHTWAVES TOP 500 For-Hire Carriers list includes UPS (No. 2).

Mon, 18 Jul 2022 05:08:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.freightwaves.com/news/amazon-drone-delivery-is-coming-to-college-station-texas
Killexams : Amazon is quietly developing cancer vaccines in partnership with Fred Hutchinson and recruiting patients for a new clinical trial
  • Amazon is working with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center to develop personalized vaccines for breast and skin cancers.
  • The initiative is currently recruiting 20 patients to join the clinical trial.
  • The cancer vaccine project came out of Amazon's moonshot lab called Grand Challenge.

Amazon has an internal team developing cancer vaccines, in partnership with the Seattle-based Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center, and the initiative is currently recruiting patients to participate in an FDA-approved clinical trial, Insider has learned.

The clinical test aims to develop personalized vaccines for treatment of breast cancer and a form of skin cancer called melanoma, according to a public filing and people familiar with the efforts. 

If successful, the new vaccine would offer a more personalized, precise cancer treatment at a more affordable price, becoming a better alternative to chemotherapy, which takes a more generalized, one-size-fits-all approach.

Amazon and Fred Hutchinson first shared information about the test in late October, according to a summary posted on Clinicaltrials.gov, an online database of clinical studies run by the US National Library of Medicine. The real study start date was June 9, 2022 and the estimated primary completion date of the trial is November 1, 2023, according to the summary. 

The trial, which is in its early Phase 1 stage, is looking for 20 total patients over the age of 18 to test a "US FDA-regulated Drug Product," the summary page says. Fred Hutchinson is listed as the sponsor, while Amazon is listed as the "collaborator" of the study. 

A "personalized neo-antigen peptide vaccine" is being tested for safety to treat later stage (IIIC-IV) melanoma and "hormone receptor positive Her2 negative" breast cancer that has spread and been resistant to treatment, according to the study's summary page. 

Fred Hutchinson's spokesperson confirmed that the details of the clinical trial are accurate.

In an email to Insider, Amazon's representative confirmed the initiative, saying it's led by Fred Hutch. The spokesperson also hinted that Amazon is interested in partnering with other heatlhcare companies to work on similar projects.

"Amazon is contributing scientific and machine learning expertise to a partnership with Fred Hutch to explore the development of a personalized treatment for certain forms of cancer. It's very early, but Fred Hutch recently received permission from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to proceed with a Phase I clinical trial, and it's unclear whether it will be successful, "Amazon's spokesperson told Insider. "This will be a long, multi-year process—should it progress, we would be open to working with other organizations in health care and life sciences that might also be interested in similar efforts."

The cancer vaccine project is the latest indication of Amazon's growing interest in the healthcare sector. The giant online retailer has launched an online pharmacy service, a new primary care business, and an in-house diagnostics lab, as well as a health-tracking device called Halo in latest years. This is the first known case of Amazon testing its own drug of any kind.

During last year's internal all-hands meeting, Amazon's CEO Andy Jassy called the company a "significant disruptor" in the medical-care field, calling out its Amazon Care primary care business as one of the company's top priorities, as Insider previously reported.

The cancer vaccine project came out of Amazon's secretive moonshot lab called Grand Challenge, according to people familiar with the matter, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they're not authorized to speak publicly. 

Amazon's cancer research team, consisting of a small group of medical doctors and engineers from health tech, has shown enough progress to "graduate" from the Grand Challenge unit in latest years, these people said. It is now placed under VP of devices Robert Williams, who reports up to Dave Limp, the senior VP in charge of Amazon's Lab126 hardware arm that created the Alexa voice assistant and an array of Echo voice-activated devices, these people said.

The test is still several years away from officially launching. The FDA has stringent clinical trial requirements and each phase could potentially take years to complete. The personalized, DNA-sequencing-based cancer treatment Amazon wants to develop is a nascent field in cancer research, and other companies, like Germany's BioNTech, have also just recently launched similar efforts.

Do you work at Amazon? Got a tip?

Contact reporter Eugene Kim via the encrypted messaging apps Signal or Telegram (+1-650-942-3061) or email (ekim@insider.com).

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/amazon-is-developing-cancer-vaccines-with-fred-hutchinson-2022-7
Killexams : Amazon plans to start delivering packages by drone in Texas later this year

Amazon announced Friday it will soon begin making drone deliveries in College Station, Texas.

Amazon

Amazon said Friday it will begin delivering packages to shoppers by drone in College Station, Texas, later this year.

The eastern Texas town is the second location to see the launch of Prime Air drone deliveries. Last month, Amazon announced it would deliver some packages by drone later this year in the Northern California town of Lockeford.

Amazon said it will work with Texas A&M University, located in College Station, to deploy the drones. Amazon shoppers in Lockeford and College Station will be able to receive free drone delivery on thousands of everyday items, Amazon said.

The company said its drones are capable of delivering packages up to five pounds in less than an hour. Prime Air drones can fly up to 50 miles per hour and up to an altitude of 400 feet, Amazon said.

Its drones fly to a designated delivery location, descend to the shoppers' backyard, and hover at a safe height, the company said. The device releases the package, rises back up to altitude, and returns to base, Amazon said.

Amazon's drone delivery program has been slow going since 2013 when founder and then-CEO Jeff Bezos said the company was testing the technology and promised that half-hour shipping with Prime Air drones would arrive as soon as 2018.

In the years since, Amazon has made some progress on the effort, debuting an updated version of its Prime Air delivery drone in 2019 at its re:MARS conference in Las Vegas. At the time, Jeff Wilke, who was Amazon's consumer boss, proclaimed drones would be used "within months" to deliver packages.

Amazon reached a key milestone in August 2020 when the Federal Aviation Administration gave it approval to operate its fleet of Prime Air delivery drones.

But the drone delivery program has also reportedly experienced some setbacks, such as high turnover and numerous crashes, including one that caused a 20-acre brush fire in eastern Oregon, according to Business Insider.

Amazon spokesperson Av Zammit said the Business Insider report refers to events that took place during routine testing operations over a controlled, unpopulated area using a since-retired drone model. Amazon expects these types of events to occur in testing scenarios, and no one was injured as a result of those flights, he added. Each test is done in compliance with applicable regulations, Zammit said.

"The package delivery operations in College Station will not be experimental operations," Zammit said in a statement. "Instead, they will be conducted under an air carrier certificate issued by the FAA that enables commercial deliveries and shows that our comprehensive processes meet the FAA's high safety bar."

Amazon said it doesn't share turnover information. Prime Air continues to hire and retain talent, the company added.

WATCH: Amazon gets FAA approval to operate a fleet of delivery drones

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 11:21:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/07/15/amazon-to-start-delivering-packages-by-drone-in-texas-later-this-year.html
Killexams : Amazon-Owned Self Driving Firm Zoox Seeks to Test Robotaxi in California No result found, try new keyword!Amazon-Owned Self Driving Firm Zoox Seeks to Test Robotaxi in California (This ... applied to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for an "exemption." ... Tue, 19 Jul 2022 10:17:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/news/technology/articles/2022-07-19/amazon-owned-self-driving-firm-zoox-seeks-to-test-robotaxi-in-california Killexams : Amazon-owned self driving firm Zoox seeks to test robotaxi in California

(This July 19 story corrects in second paragraph, corrects name to "Jesse Levinson" instead of "Levison")

By Jane Lanhee Lee

FREMONT, Calif (Reuters) - Zoox, a self-driving technology firm owned by Amazon.com Inc, said on Tuesday it was gearing up to launch its robotaxi business, self-certifying that its vehicle with no pedals or steering wheel meets U.S. federal regulations and applying for a permit in California to test-drive it.

“We really invested the extra time and resources to build a vehicle that doesn't require exemptions and then that basically lets us control our own destiny and also deploy our vehicles at scale,” Jesse Levinson, Zoox’s co-founder and chief technology officer told Reuters.

Zoox’s vehicle, called VH6, has room for four passengers, with two facing each other - a layout that looks like startup Cruise’s Origin vehicle unveiled in January, 2020. Cruise is controlled by General Motors Co..

The VH6 is produced in Zoox’s "Kato" factory in Fremont, California, a city where Tesla also builds its cars.

Levinson said the factory has produced dozens of VH6s and the current location can produce tens of thousands of vehicles.

He said that the current economic slowdown has not affected the company and Zoox will increase its employee number to 2,000 this year from 1,400 at the start of the year. Levinson also said for now the company is focused on moving people, rather than packages, which is much more lucrative.

“We can compete with, for example, Uber and Lyft and make money and be very cost competitive even in the early days of this technology,” he said.

Generally self-driving tech companies with vehicles without a steering wheel or pedals have applied to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for an "exemption." Levinson said Zoox chose instead to self-certify according to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, acknowledging this was a higher bar that makes Zoox liable for the safety of the vehicle.

The NHTSA exemption usually limits the number of vehicles that can be manufactured as well as the period of production.

Cruise applied this year for a NHTSA exemption https://www.getcruise.com/news/seeking-nhtsa-review-of-the-origin. A source close to the company said Cruise viewed that method as more responsible and gives regulators a clearer view into the technology.

Meanwhile Nuro, a self-driving startup backed by SoftBank, said it anticipates its next generation vehicle to "comply with all applicable federal standards at the time that it is deployed". Its current R2 vehicle with no pedals, steering wheel and room inside only for packages, were manufactured with an exemption from NHTSA.

(Reporting By Jane Lanhee Lee; Editing by David Gregorio)

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 08:54:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/amazon-owned-self-driving-firm-220328967.html
Killexams : Amazon-owned self driving firm Zoox seeks to test robotaxi in California

Zoox’s vehicle, called VH6, has room for four passengers, with two facing each other

Zoox’s vehicle, called VH6, has room for four passengers, with two facing each other

Zoox, a self-driving technology firm owned by Amazon.com Inc, said on Tuesday it was gearing up to launch its robotaxi business, self-certifying that its vehicle with no pedals or steering wheel meets U.S. federal regulations, and applying for a permit in California to test-drive it.

(Sign up to our Technology newsletter, Today’s Cache, for insights on emerging themes at the intersection of technology, business and policy. Click here to subscribe for free.)

“We really invested the extra time and resources to build a vehicle that doesn’t require exemptions and then that basically lets us control our own destiny and also deploy our vehicles at scale,” Jesse Levison, Zoox’s co-founder and chief technology officer told Reuters.

Zoox’s vehicle, called VH6, has room for four passengers, with two facing each other - a layout that looks like startup Cruise’s Origin vehicle unveiled in January, 2020. Cruise is controlled by General Motors Co..

The VH6 is produced in Zoox’s “Kato” factory in Fremont, California, a city where Tesla also builds its cars.

Levinson said the factory has produced dozens of VH6s and the current location can produce tens of thousands of vehicles.

He said that the current economic slowdown has not affected the company and Zoox will increase its employee number to 2,000 this year from 1,400 at the start of the year. Levison also said for now the company is focused on moving people, rather than packages, which is much more lucrative.

“We can compete with, for example, Uber and Lyft and make money and be very cost competitive even in the early days of this technology,” he said.

Generally self-driving tech companies with vehicles without a steering wheel or pedals have applied to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for an “exemption.” Levinson said Zoox chose instead to self-certify according to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, acknowledging this was a higher bar that makes Zoox liable for the safety of the vehicle.

The NHTSA exemption usually limits the number of vehicles that can be manufactured as well as the period of production.

Cruise applied this year for a NHTSA exemption. A source close to the company said Cruise viewed that method as more responsible and gives regulators a clearer view into the technology.

Meanwhile Nuro, a self-driving startup backed by SoftBank, said it anticipates its next generation vehicle to “comply with all applicable federal standards at the time that it is deployed”. Its current R2 vehicle with no pedals, steering wheel and room inside only for packages, were manufactured with an exemption from NHTSA.

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 23:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/technology/amazon-owned-self-driving-firm-zoox-seeks-to-test-robotaxi-in-california/article65660964.ece
Killexams : Amazon-owned Zoox seeks to test self-driving robotaxis in California

FREMONT, Calif — Zoox, a self-driving technology firm owned by Amazon.com Inc, said on Tuesday it was gearing up to launch its robotaxi business, self-certifying that its vehicle with no pedals or steering wheel meets U.S. federal regulations and applying for a permit in California to test-drive it.

“We really invested the extra time and resources to build a vehicle that doesn't require exemptions and then that basically lets us control our own destiny and also deploy our vehicles at scale,” Jesse Levison, Zoox’s co-founder and chief technology officer told Reuters.

Zoox’s vehicle, called VH6, has room for four passengers, with two facing each other — a layout that looks like startup Cruise’s Origin vehicle unveiled in January, 2020. Cruise is controlled by General Motors.

The VH6 is produced in Zoox’s "Kato" factory in Fremont, California, a city where Tesla also builds its cars.

Levinson said the factory has produced dozens of VH6s and the current location can produce tens of thousands of vehicles.

He said that the current economic slowdown has not affected the company and Zoox will increase its employee number to 2,000 this year from 1,400 at the start of the year. Levison also said for now the company is focused on moving people, rather than packages, which is much more lucrative.

“We can compete with, for example, Uber and Lyft and make money and be very cost competitive even in the early days of this technology,” he said.

Generally self-driving tech companies with vehicles without a steering wheel or pedals have applied to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for an "exemption." Levinson said Zoox chose instead to self-certify according to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, acknowledging this was a higher bar that makes Zoox liable for the safety of the vehicle.

The NHTSA exemption usually limits the number of vehicles that can be manufactured as well as the period of production.

Cruise applied this year for a NHTSA exemption. A source close to the company said Cruise viewed that method as more responsible and gives regulators a clearer view into the technology.

Meanwhile Nuro, a self-driving startup backed by SoftBank, said it anticipates its next generation vehicle to "comply with all applicable federal standards at the time that it is deployed." Its current R2 vehicle with no pedals, steering wheel and room inside only for packages, were manufactured with an exemption from NHTSA.

Related video:

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 03:54:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.autoblog.com/2022/07/20/zoox-amazon-autonomous-robotaxi-california/
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