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CLSSMBB Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt

Exam Code : CLSSMBB
Exam Name : Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt

The ASQ Master Black Belt (MBB) certification is a mark of career excellence and aimed at individuals who possess exceptional expertise and knowledge of current industry practice. Master black belts have outstanding leadership ability, are innovative, and demonstrate a strong commitment to the practice and advancement of quality and improvement. Obtaining an ASQ MBB is acceptance and recognition from your peers.

The target audience for the ASQ MBB certification are candidates who are or have been employed as MBBs within their organization, or well qualified certified Six Sigma Black Belts (CSSBB) who have substantial experience in each of the major syllabu areas within the portfolio.

To become certified as an ASQ MBB, a candidate must successfully meet all requirements. To be eligible to apply for the MBB examination, a candidate must hold a current ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt certification (CSSBB) and pass the MBB portfolio review process. Within the portfolio, a candidate must have one of the following experience levels:
1) At least 5 years of experience in the role of a SSBB or MBB.
OR
2) Completion of 10 Six Sigma Black Belt projects.

Candidates must be able to meet these minimum eligibility requirements in order to have their portfolio reviewed

The Certified Master Black Belt (CMBB) is aimed at individuals who possess exceptional expertise and knowledge of current industry practice. Master Black Belts have outstanding leadership ability, are innovative, and demonstrate a strong commitment to the practice and advancement of quality and improvement. Obtaining an ASQ Master Black Belt is acceptance and recognition from your peers.

The Master Black Belt certification is an exam that consist of 110 multiple choice items and a performance-based assessment that measures comprehension of the MBB Body of Knowledge. 100 of the multiple-choice questions are scored and 10 are unscored. The performance-based portion of the exam includes situation specific materials that candidates will be directed to evaluate and respond to. It is offered in English. Total appointment time is five-and-a-half hours, exam time is 5 hours and 18 minutes.The second portion is a performance-based assessment that measures comprehension of the CMBB Body of Knowledge. It includes situation-specific materials that candidates will be directed to evaluate and respond to. This portion is two-and-a-half hours long and is also an open book format.

Topics in this body of knowledge (BoK) include descriptive details (subtext) that will be used by the exam Development Committee as guidelines for writing test questions. This subtext is also designed to help candidates prepare for the exam by identifying specific content within each syllabu that may be tested. The subtext is not intended to limit the subject matter or be all-inclusive of what might be covered in an exam but is intended to clarify how the subjects relate to a Master Black Belt’s role. The descriptor in parentheses at the end of each entry refers to the maximum cognitive level at which the syllabu will be tested. A complete description of cognitive levels is provided at the end of this document.

I. Enterprise-wide Planning (20 Questions)A. Strategic Plan Development Describe and use strategic planning tools and methods such as Hoshin Kanri, X Matrix, SWOT, PEST, PESTLE, Ansoff Matrix, Porter’s Five Forces, TQM, Business Process Reengineering, Balanced Scorecard, and business excellence models (Baldridge, EFQM, ISO, Shingo) and their utilization in developing enterprise planning. (Apply)B. Strategic Plan Alignment1. Strategic deployment goals Describe how to develop strategic deployment goals. (Apply)2. Project alignment with strategic planDescribe how to align projects to the organizational strategic plan. (Analyze)3. Project alignment with business objectives Describe how to align projects with business objectives. (Analyze)C. Infrastructure Elements of Improvement Systems Describe how to apply the following key infrastructure elements. (Apply)1. Governance (quality councils or process leadership teams)2. Assessment (organizational readiness and maturity models)3. Resource planning (identify candidates and costs/benefits)4. Resource development (train and coach)5. Execution (deliver on project results)6. Measure and Improve the system (drive improvement into the systems, multiphase planning)D. Improvement Methodologies Demonstrate an advanced understanding of the following methodologies, including their associated tools and techniques. (Apply)1. Six Sigma (DMAIC)2. Design for Six Sigma (DMADV)3. Lean (PDCA, Kaizen)4. Theory of constraints

5. Business systems and process management 6. Other problem-solving methods (8 disciplines, root cause analysis)E. Opportunities for Improvement1. Project identification Facilitate working sessions to identify new project opportunities that can be prioritized. (Apply)2. Project qualification Determine the elements of a well-defined project (e.g., business case, charter), the process for approving these projects, and tools used in project definition (process maps, value stream maps, QFD, FMEA, critical-to-x where x can be customer, design, cost, and quality). (Apply)3. Stakeholder managementDescribe how to identify, engage, and strategically align stakeholders. (Analyze)4. Intervention techniques Describe techniques for intervening across levels to prevent potential project failures. (Apply)5. Creativity and innovation tools Use creativity and innovation tools to develop concept alternatives (divergent thinking). (Apply)F. Pipeline Management1. Pipeline creationCreate, manage, and prioritize a pipeline of potential projects for consideration. (Create)2. Pipeline life-cycle managementCreate a selection process that provides a portfolio of active improvement opportunities that are clearly aligned and prioritized to meet/exceed strategic goals. Monitor, re-evaluate, consolidate, and retire pipelines as needed. (Create)3. Regulatory impact on pipelineAssess the impact of regulatory statutes on prioritization/management of pipeline of potential projects. (Understand)4. Pipeline risk managementUse risk management and analysis tools to analyze organizational elements, to appraise portfolios and critical projects, and to identify potential problem areas. (Evaluate)
8Certified Master Black BeltII. Organizational Competencies for Deployment (20 questions)A. Organizational Design 1. Systems thinkingApply systems thinking to anticipate the effect that components of a system can have on other subsystems and adjacent systems including emergent properties. Analyze the impact of actions taken in one area of the organization and how those actions can affect other areas or the customer, and use appropriate tools to prevent unintended consequences. (Analyze)2. Organizational culture and maturityDescribe the implications organizational culture and maturity levels can have on improvement program implementation, including potential barriers. (Analyze)B. Executive and Team Leadership Roles1. Executive leadership rolesDescribe the roles and responsibilities of executive leaders in the deployment of improvement programs in terms of providing resources, managing change, and communicating ideas. (Analyze)2. Leadership for deploymentCreate action plans to support optimal functioning of Master Black Belts, Black Belts, Green Belts, champions, and other participants in the deployment effort. Design, coordinate, and participate in deployment activities, and ensure that project leaders and teams have the required knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes to support the organization’s improvement program. (Create)C. Organizational Challenges1. Organizational dynamicsUse knowledge of human and organizational dynamics to enhance project success and align cultural objectives with organizational objectives. (Apply)2. Intervention stylesUse appropriate intervention, communications, and influence styles, and adapt those styles to specific situations (i.e., situational leadership). (Apply)3. Interdepartmental conflictsAddress and resolve potential situations that could cause the program or a project to under-perform. (Apply)D. Organizational Change Management1. Change management modelsDescribe different change management models (Kotter’s 8 Steps, ADKAR, Competing Values Framework). (Apply)2. Techniques to gain commitmentDescribe how to gain commitment from the organization’s leadership for the improvement effort. (Understand) 3. Techniques to overcome organizational barriersDescribe various techniques to overcome barriers to successful organizational deployment. (Apply)4. Necessary organizational structure for deploymentDevelop the inherent organ-izational structure needed for successful deployment. (Apply)5. Communications with managementDescribe elements of effective communications with management regarding organizational benefits, failures, and lessons learned. (Apply)6. Organizational culture change techniquesAssess culture of the organization and its ability to problem-solve and improve. Describe techniques for changing an organizational culture, such as rewards and recognition, team competitiveness, communications of program successes, and appropriate cascading of goals throughout the organization. (Apply)
9Certified Master Black BeltE. Organizational Feedback 1. Voice of the customer and voice of the processAssess the appropriate collection of Voice of the Customer and Voice of the Process data, both internal and external. (Evaluate)2. Capturing and assessing feedbackDevelop a customer-focused strategy for capturing and assessing customer feedback on a regular basis. (Evaluate)F. Organizational Performance Metrics1. Financial measuresDefine and use financial measures, including revenue growth, market share, margin, cost of quality (COQ), net present value (NPV), return on investment (ROI), cost-benefit analysis, direct costs, indirect costs and opportunity cost, project cash flow, and breakeven time performance. (Analyze)2. Business performance measuresDescribe various business performance measures, including Balanced Scorecard, key performance indicators (KPIs), and the financial impact of customer loyalty, and describe how they are used for project selection, deployment, and management. (Analyze)III. Project Portfolio Management (15 questions)A. Project Management Principles and Life Cycle1. Project management principlesOversee critical projects and evaluate them in terms of their scope, goals, time, cost, quality, human resources requirements, communications needs, and risks. (Evaluate)2. Project management life-cycle elementsApply phases of project manage-ment life cycle (initiation, planning, execution, control, and closure). (Analyze)B. Project Portfolio Infrastructure and Management 1. Governance methods and toolsDevelop governance documents, tracking tools, and other methodologies that will support project success. (Create)2. Cross-functional project assessmentAppraise interrelated projects for scope overlap and refinement, and identify opportunities for leveraging concomitant projects. Identify and participate in the implementation of multidisciplinary redesign and improvement projects. (Evaluate)3. Executive and midlevel management engagementFormulate the positioning of multiple projects in terms of providing strategic advice to top management and affected midlevel managers. (Create)4. PrioritizationPrioritize projects in terms of their criticality to the organization. (Evaluate)5. Performance measurement Design, support, and review the development of an overall measurement methodology to record the progress and ongoing status of projects and their overall impact on the organization. (Evaluate)6. MonitoringApply appropriate monitoring and control methodologies to ensure that consistent methods are used in tracking tasks and milestones. (Analyze)7. Status communicationDevelop and maintain communication techniques that will keep critical stakeholders and communities apprised of project status, results, and accountability. (Create)
10Certified Master Black Belt8. Supply/Demand managementGenerate accurate project supply/demand projections, associated resource requirements analysis, and mitigate any issues. (Create)9. Corrective actionFacilitate corrective actions and responses to customers about the corrective action and its impact. (Analyze)C. Project Portfolio Financial Tools1. Budgets and forecastsAssess and explain budget implications, forecasting, measurement, monitoring, risk analysis, and prioritization for portfolio level projects. (Evaluate)2. Costing conceptsDefine the concepts of hard and soft dollars and use cost of poor quality, activity-based costing, and other methods to assess and prioritize portfolios. (Apply)IV. Training Design and Delivery (10 questions)A. Training Needs AnalysisAssess the current level of knowledge and skills in each target group in relation to the skills and abilities that are needed. Determine the training requirements for each target group by using tools such as a gap analysis to compare actual performance with potential or desired performance. (Evaluate) B. Training Plan ElementsDesign training plans to close the knowledge and skills gaps. Refine the plans based on the number of people needing to be trained in a particular technique or skill, and whether multidisciplinary or multi-level competency training is appropriate. (Create)

C. Training Materials and Curriculum Development1. Training material sourcesDetermine whether to outsource the training or develop in-house, including considerations such as cost, availability of internal subject matter experts, and timing. (Analyze)2. Adult learning theoryDevelop or select training methods and resources that adhere to adult learning theories. (Analyze)3. IntegrationEnsure that the training harmonizes and leverages other tools and approaches being used and that it is aligned with the organization’s strategic objectives and culture. (Evaluate)4. Training deliveryMonitor and measure training to ensure that it is delivered effectively and efficiently by qualified individuals. (Apply)D. Training Program Effectiveness Develop an evaluation plan to assess, verify, and Improve the acquisition of required knowledge and skills within schedule, budget, and other constraints. (Create)V. Coaching and Mentoring Responsibilities (10 questions)A. Executives and Champions1. Scoping and resourcingCollaborate with executives and champions on scoping projects and selecting individuals and assignments for various projects. (Evaluate) 2. Executive reviewsCollaborate with executives and champions on reviewing projects, including timing, questions to ask, and setting expectations for project timing and completion. (Create)3. Leadership and communicationCoach executives and champions on the need for constancy of purpose and message, and the importance of using clear communication techniques and consistent messages. (Evaluate)4. FeedbackUse constructive techniques to provide feedback to champions and executives. (Evaluate)B. Teams and Individuals1. Belt coaching and mentoringDevelop a career progression ladder for belts. Assess their progress and provide constructive feedback to enable them to work effectively on team projects. Use coaching, mentoring, and intervention skills as needed, including canceling or reassigning projects if necessary. (Create)2. Project reviewsCreate guidelines and expectations for project reviews, and perform them in a timely manner. Assist project leaders in selecting appropriate content for presentation to management. (Create)3. Team facilitation and meeting managementPractice and teach meeting control, analyze team performance at various stages of team develop-ment, and support appropriate interventions for overcoming team challenges, including floundering, reviewing, and diagnosing failing projects. (Create)4. Non-belt coaching and mentoringDevelop information that will help non-belt project participants to advance their understanding of improvement initiatives and develop the necessary skills and knowledge to become effective belts. (Evaluate)
12Certified Master Black Belt12Certified Master Black BeltVI. Advanced Data Management and Analytic Methods (25 questions)A. Measurement Systems Analysis (MSA), Process Capability, and Control1. Propagation of errorsUse propagation of errors to evaluate measurement systems based on calculated values from multiple inputs. (Evaluate)2. Attribute (discrete) measurement systemsUse appropriate tools and methods (e.g., percent agreement, Kappa, Kendall, intra-class correlation coefficient) to analyze and interpret discrete measurement systems. (Evaluate)3. Variables (continuous) measurement systemsUse appropriate tools and methods (e.g., X – R, X – s, individual and moving range) based on control samples to analyze and interpret continuous measurement systems. (Evaluate)4. Destructive measurement systemsUse appropriate tools and methods to assess a destructive measurement system. (Analyze)5. Process capability for non-normal dataCalculate capability using Weibull and other methods for non-normal data. (Apply)6. Automated process control (APC) and statistical process control (SPC)Recognize when to use APC instead of or in conjunction with SPC. (Understand)B. Measuring and Modeling Relationships Between Variables1. Autocorrelation and forecastingIdentify autocorrelated data, including time-series modeling (e.g., ARIMA) and forecasting. (Analyze) 2. Multiple regression analysisApply and interpret multiple regression analysis, including using variance inflation factors (VIFs) to identify collinearity issues. (Analyze)3. Logistic regression analysisApply and interpret logistic regression analysis, including binary, ordinal, and nominal data considerations. (Analyze)4. Model fitting for nonlinear modelsApply and interpret fits of models that are nonlinear in the parameters. (Apply)5. General linear models (GLM)Apply and interpret GLMs such as ANOVA results (crossed, nested, and mixed models), simple linear regression, multiple regression, ANCOVA (analysis of covariance) and continuous MSA. (Apply)6. Components of variationSelect, calculate, and interpret components of variation and nested design studies. (Evaluate)7. SimulationApply simulation tools such as Monte Carlo, dynamic process simulation, and queuing theory. (Apply)8. Linear programmingUnderstand how linear programming principles, such as critical path analysis, can be used in modeling diverse types of problems (e.g., planning, routing, scheduling, assignment, design) to optimize system performance. (Understand)9. Reliability modelingUse reliability modeling and tools to enhance reliability of a product or process. (Apply)10. Qualitative analysisUse appropriate qualitative analysis tools (affinity diagrams, force field analysis) and analyze the results. (Analyze)
13Certified Master Black Belt13Certified Master Black BeltC. Design of Experiments (DOE)1. Factor relationship diagramApply and interpret factor relationship diagrams. (Apply)2. Complex blocking structuresRecognize other designs for handling more complex blocking structures, including Latin squares and balanced incomplete block designs (BIBD). (Understand)3. DOE approachesRecognize when to apply approaches such as screening designs (including Definitive Screening Designs), response surface methodology (RSM), mixture experiments, evolutionary operations (EVOP), split-plot designs, Taguchi designs, and computer-generated designs (e.g. D-optimal designs). (Understand)D. Data Management and Analytics1. Enterprise data managementRecognize and understand data management elements such as data governance, data architecture, data life-cycle management, data quality (accuracy, timeliness, consistency, completeness, uniqueness, validity, conformity, precision), meta data, master data, data privacy, and data security. (Understand)2. Data analyticsRecognize when to apply predictive analytic approaches such as decision trees (including random forest, boosted forest), neural networks, partial least squares, text analytics, image recognition, and pattern recognition (structured and unstructured data). (Understand)E. DFSS (Design for Six Sigma)DFSS tools: Recognize and understand tools such as QFD, TRIZ, morphology box, and axiomatic design to generate design concepts. (Understand)

Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt
GAQM Master plan
Killexams : GAQM Master plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CLSSMBB Search results Killexams : GAQM Master plan - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CLSSMBB https://killexams.com/exam_list/GAQM Killexams : Chitungwiza residents want master plan

The Herald

Yeukai Karengezeka Herald Correspondent

Chitungwiza residents are pressing the municipality to formulate a master plan urgently that will guide developments in Zimbabwe’s third largest urban council, which has about 25 000 illegal properties that are prejudicing the municipality of millions of dollars in unpaid revenue.

According to a exact statement by Harare Metropolitan Provincial Affairs and Devolution Permanent Secretary Tafadzwa Muguti, Harare province has 52 000 illegal homes of which 25 000 are in Chitungwiza.

Residents who spoke to The Herald castigated Chitungwiza Municipality for allowing such a menace and have called the council to consider regularising some of the structures while preparing the master plan.

Chitungwiza and Manyame Rural Residents Association (CAMERA) director Mr Marvellous Khumalo said the process of coming up with a new master plan should involve all stakeholders.

“It is a pity that the municipality has more than 25 000 properties that are said to be ‘illegal’. I am not sure what criteria is council using to come with a conclusion that these properties are illegal,” he said.

“It is worrisome how council has been allocating stands and allowing beneficiaries to develop in the absence of a master plan and what has been informing the way how the town is growing?”

Council should consider regularising some of the so-called illegal properties and urgently come with a master plan.

“This masterplan should come out of an inclusive consultative process where major stakeholders will be involved so that there will be a buy-in so that it will be implementable,” said Mr Khumalo.

“The ideal was for the master plan to have been in place first, then development comes following the pattern prescribed in the master plan.”

Mr Khumalo said Chitungwiza Municipality, which was bankrupt, could actually resuscitate its finances through proper regularisation.

“The best way for council to raise revenue is through the regularisation of the so-called illegal properties that do not violate development control measures such as those outside road servitudes, those not under electricity pylons, those not on top of sewer lines or those not on areas such as wetlands,” he said.

“Council will generate millions of dollars through this regularisation.”

Harare Residents Trust director, Mr Precious Shumba, said crafting a master plan should be the top priority for Chitungwiza Municipality, while implementing recommendations made by investigative commissions that dealt with the affairs of the local authority.

“The Chitungwiza Municipality has to initially implement the provisions of the Regional, Town and Country Planning Act which is the main law governing town planning in Zimbabwe,” he said.

“Developing their master plan is a top priority that they should focus on.

“In the meantime, the municipality should implement all the recommendations made by investigating committees into land sales in the municipality, including the findings of the report of the Justice Tendai Uchena Commission which we understand local authorities were given.”

Land barons involving councillors and officials have reigned supreme in the local authority with minimal interference from the local authority, hence if resources permit, they should simply reclaim their land taken over by the land barons and safeguard wetlands and recreational spaces which have all gone.

Chitungwiza Residents Trust (Chitrest) director Alice Kuvheya said it was important for council to implement recommendations that they received from residents.

“Not having a master plan is the main reason why this town is not developing as land barons and some council officials continue to parcel out land illegally,” she said. “Council is not engaging us as residents in its operations right now.

“Last week they had a strategic meeting out of the Harare, but we were not invited. Central Government should ensure that Chitungwiza comes up with this master plan instead of just interfering in other matters.”

Responding to the calls from residents, Chitungwiza acting Mayor Kevin Mutimbanyoka said plans were in progress to come up with a master plan.

“In terms of classifying the illegal stands, no detailed audit was done to establish how many stands are commercial and how many are residential,” he said.

“However, there is a council resolution that we must have a master plan and recently two stakeholder meetings were held as the roadmap of master plan being formulated and an inception report is being prepared and resources are being mobilised.”

Clr Mutimbanyoka said council was going to conduct a regularisation exercise for some of the illegal properties.

“Illegal stands in servitudes, wetlands and other undesignated sites will be removed through regularisation process, and others permitted will be regularised,” he said.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 12:37:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.herald.co.zw/chitungwiza-residents-want-master-plan/
Killexams : Here's your chance to help shape Braintree's future master plan

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 22:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.patriotledger.com/story/news/2022/10/13/discussion-saturday-discuss-development-braintree-master-plan/10479646002/
Killexams : Chi-Town residents demand a master plan

The Herald

Yeukai Karengezeka Herald Correspondent

Chitungwiza residents have mounted pressure on the local authority to urgently formulate a master plan that will guide developments in the town which has about 25 000 illegal properties that are prejudicing the municipality millions of dollars in terms of revenue.

Residents who spoke to The Herald castigated Chitungwiza Municipality for allowing such a menace to happen under their watch. They called on the council to consider regularising some of the structures while preparing the master plan.

Chitungwiza and Manyame Rural Residents Association (CAMERA) director Mr Marvellous Khumalo said the process of drafting a new master plan should involve all stakeholders.

“It is worrisome how council has been allocating stands and allowing beneficiaries to develop in the absence of a master plan. This must be addressed immediately. This master plan should come out of an inclusive consultative process where major stakeholders are involved so that it becomes implementable,” said Mr Khumalo.

He said regularizing the illegal properties would be a smart way of increasing council revenue.

Harare Residents Trust (HRT) director, Mr Precious Shumba said Chitungwiza Municipality should implement recommendations made by various investigative commissions that dealt with the affairs of the local authority.

“The Chitungwiza Municipality has to initially implement the provisions of the Regional, Town and Country Planning Act (Chapter 29.12) which is the main law governing town planning in Zimbabwe. Developing their master plan is a top priority that they should focus on. The municipality should implement all the recommendations and findings of the Justice Tendai Uchena Commission Report, among others,” said Mr Shumba.

He added that land barons, including councillors and officials, have reigned supreme in the local authority with minimal interference from the local authority.

“Resources permitting, they should simply reclaim their land taken over by the land barons and safeguard wetlands and recreational spaces which have all gone.”

Chitungwiza Residents Trust (Chitrest) director Ms Alice Kuveya said it was important for council to engage residents and implement their recommendations on matters of development.

Responding to the calls of the residents Acting Mayor Kevin Mutimbanyoka said plans were in progress to come up with a master plan.

“There is a council resolution that we must have a master plan. Recently, two stakeholder meetings were held as the roadmap of the master plan is being formulated. An inception report is being prepared and resources are being mobilised,” he said.

Acting Mayor Mutimbanyoka said Chitungwiza Municipality would conduct a regularisation exercise for illegal properties that were not in servitudes, wetlands, and other undesignated sites.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:10:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.herald.co.zw/chi-town-residents-demand-a-master-plan/
Killexams : What is Eric Adams’ internet master plan?

A self-professed “tech geek,” cryptocurrency enthusiast and former COBOL programmer, New York City Mayor Eric Adams is an unabashed techie. Adams has been a vocal cheerleader for moving more city services online, diversifying the local tech ecosystem and making the city’s own technology offices more efficient.

But when it comes to expanding broadband internet access – something that will allow New Yorkers to participate in the technological evolution Adams champions – some lawmakers and civic technologists warn that despite the well-intentioned goal of getting the least connected New Yorkers wired up, the administration is so far prioritizing quick wins over the long-term goal of universal, affordable and reliable broadband.

Last month, Adams and Matt Fraser – the chief technology officer appointed to lead the city’s consolidated tech offices under the Office of Technology and Innovation – announced Big Apple Connect, a new program that commits to offering free in-home internet and basic cable subscriptions to 300,000 public housing residents in over 200 developments by the end of 2023. The program, starting out in more than 100 New York City Housing Authority developments, is essentially a subsidy program. The administration is bulk purchasing internet and cable packages from two large internet service providers – Charter Communications and Altice – at a cost of under $30 per month under three-year agreements. Negotiations are ongoing with the city’s third cable franchisee, Verizon. The program is estimated to cost the city $30 million per year, though that will depend on how many residents sign up.

While few disagree that NYCHA residents are most urgently in need of high-speed, affordable broadband, the launch of Big Apple Connect highlighted the fact that New York City already had a comprehensive plan for expanding broadband internet – a plan that the Adams administration has indefinitely shelved.

The Internet Master Plan, released in January 2020 under the de Blasio administration, outlined the existing barriers to greater broadband adoption in New York City. Although the vast majority of the city has access to broadband internet, affordability is a major barrier to adoption. Many people living outside of high-income areas only have an option of one or two providers, and fiber optic infrastructure, which can provide higher speeds, is far from ubiquitous. The report found that 29% of households in the city lack a broadband subscription at home.

The Internet Master Plan’s prescription for high-quality and affordable universal broadband included the creation of a competitive marketplace with a diverse range of providers, the utilization of city-owned assets like rooftops and lampposts for providers to install broadband equipment, and an investment in new publicly owned fiber optic infrastructure. The plan included an initial $157 million investment to build new publicly owned infrastructure in underserved areas that could be used by private companies, reducing the city’s reliance on privately owned internet infrastructure.

Just before leaving office last fall, former Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that a dozen companies were selected to participate, including some minority-owned or minority-led companies. A pilot program related to the plan had previously tasked a handful of providers with offering low- or no-cost internet plans at 18 NYCHA developments. Those pilots are still going on, but the $157 million has yet to be touched.

With Big Apple Connect – a program that so far relies on only two legacy cable service providers and their existing internet infrastructure – several people who worked on the Internet Master Plan said the city was missing an opportunity to diversify the market and build publicly owned infrastructure.

I am deeply concerned that OTI was not able to provide any details on longer-term plans to connect New Yorkers to the internet.

– New York City Council Member Jennifer Gutiérrez

I am deeply concerned that OTI was not able to provide any details on longer-term plans to connect New Yorkers to the internet.

The Adams administration has said that moving ahead with Big Apple Connect while the Internet Master Plan is still on pause is about “stopping the bleeding.”

“While the Master Plan contemplated a multiyear long and very expensive $157 million investment, Big Apple Connect will help citizens immediately,” Brett Sikoff, executive director of franchise administration at the Office of Technology and Innovation, said at a City Council hearing last month. Because Charter, Altice and Verizon already have existing internet infrastructure that can serve NYCHA buildings and are already cable franchisees, the city office only sent a request for proposals to participate in Big Apple Connect to those three providers. Now it’s just a matter of getting residents signed up.

City officials acknowledged that creating a more competitive market is critical to affordable and reliable internet access. “We will continue to discuss ways to partner with M/WBEs in the future on other telecommunications projects,” Office of Technology and Innovation spokesperson Ray Legendre said in an emailed statement.

But at the September hearing, employees from the office were unable to provide a timeline for when additional providers, including MWBEs, might be brought in to participate in Big Apple Connect, or how they would be able to compete for customers with Charter and Altice if those companies have already signed up large swaths of NYCHA residents.

Silicon Harlem was selected as one of the 12 providers in the Internet Master Plan last year. CEO Clayton Banks told City & State that he hasn’t been contacted by the Adams administration about either the Internet Master Plan or about participating in Big Apple Connect. “We’re very curious what the future looks like,” Banks said. “My experience in the last couple of years of putting together the Internet Master Plan, getting an RFP out and having 12 companies identified as competitive ways of making sure everyone gets connected – (Big Apple Connect) was just a little bit of a surprise.”

Some proponents of the Internet Master Plan view it as an obvious way for the Adams administration to achieve its stated goal of creating a more competitive and diverse marketplace. “If they were trying to build a more inclusive tech ecosystem in New York City, they were handed it on a silver platter,” said one person who worked on the Internet Master Plan and was granted anonymity to speak freely.

Given that the Internet Master Plan isn’t moving forward, some lawmakers said the Adams administration doesn’t appear to have a master plan of its own in the works to replace it. Following last month’s hearing, New York City Council Member Jennifer Gutiérrez, who chairs the Technology Committee, called for a “robust roadmap” and not “pop-up programs” to expand broadband access and adoption across the city. “I am deeply concerned that OTI was not able to provide any details on longer-term plans to connect New Yorkers to the internet beyond the Big Apple Connect program, which was announced the morning of the hearing,” Gutiérrez said in a statement. “While I celebrate a program that expediently provides internet access for our NYCHA developments, it’s unacceptable that OTI does not have a comprehensive plan that works to connect more New Yorkers to the internet.”

At that September hearing, Sikoff said the office was continuing to “reevaluate” the Internet Master Plan, which was the same answer that Fraser gave when asked about the plan in May. Sikoff suggested that in addition to its cost, officials were concerned that the Internet Master Plan would duplicate new build-outs of fiber that have happened since the plan was released in 2020. It’s unclear what part of the Internet Master Plan was still being evaluated, though Sikoff left open the possibility that unspecified aspects of the plan could be “leveraged” in the future.

Asked about whether the Adams administration had a master plan of its own for expanding broadband access, Legendre said the administration was “action-oriented when it comes to meeting the digital needs of our lower-income communities, immigrant communities, and communities of color.” He pointed to Big Apple Connect, new 5G connectivity at LinkNYC kiosks and the administration providing access to devices and digital skills training to “New Yorkers who have been left behind in the digital age.” He also pointed to Connected Communities, a de Blasio-era program that provided devices and digital literacy training in historically underserved areas.

At the September council hearing, Gutiérrez said that it was ironic to hear concerns about the Internet Master Plan duplicating existing work when the new Big Apple Connect program can be seen as a duplication of an existing federal benefit to subsidize internet service.

Under the federal government’s Affordable Connectivity Program, all public housing residents are eligible for a $30 per month credit toward internet service. Council Member Julie Menin has piloted a program at NYCHA developments in her district in which she negotiated low-cost plans with Verizon and Spectrum that are fully covered after the federal benefit.

At the exact council hearing, Menin repeatedly questioned why the Office of Technology and Innovation wasn’t scaling up a program like this that offers free internet plans at no cost to taxpayers, instead of committing to a three-year program estimated to cost $30 million per year. Sikoff said residents who sign up for Big Apple Connect could apply the federal internet benefit to their mobile internet plans.

“I support any effort to be able to provide free broadband access to those who do not have it, period,” Menin later told City & State. “However, I still don’t understand why we’re spending $90 million when we have a model that does not cost any city money and that is scalable. That question really wasn’t answered.”

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 09:37:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cityandstateny.com/policy/2022/10/what-eric-adams-internet-master-plan/378284/
Killexams : Master Plan forum sees unplanned growth, graying population as challenges

SOUTHWICK — The Master Plan Advisory Committee hosted its first Community Visioning Session Thursday evening to supply residents a chance to supply direct input into what the town’s strengths, weaknesses, and needs are.

A couple dozen Southwick residents were separated into two groups Thursday to discuss what Pioneer Valley Planning Commission Consultant Ken Comia called a “SWOT analysis” of the town. SWOT stands for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, and Comia said it is a way to organize what works and does not work about a town as they try to come up with a 20-year Master Plan.

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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 05:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.masslive.com/westfieldnews/2022/10/master-plan-forum-sees-unplanned-growth-graying-population-as-challenges.html
Killexams : The power of a master plan

Landscape architecture program : youtube.com/watch?v=qpchoaGAOjM

On the approach to the Cape Henlopen State Park in late August, beach-goers stopped in their tracks for a few seconds and audibly wondered what was going on over at the beach house picnic area.

There, a dozen and a half young adults were holding reels of tape measure, recording the size of each other’s feet, as well as arms, legs, total height, and width of gait.

Students practiced measuring on the deck of the Cape Henlopen State Park Bath House.

What seemed like an out-of-place activity for the popular beach spot was in fact a purposeful exercise on anthropometry or measuring how humans fit and use the landscape.

The visit at Cape Henlopen was part of a weekend getaway for new and transfer students enrolled in the University of Delaware’s bachelor of landscape architecture (BLA) program. For the past four years each August, the program’s faculty organize a two-day adventure, known as the Bridge Program, through notable Delaware landscapes, all the while asking their students to  consider cultural values as well as design and functional features of a successful public space. One important consideration is how humans interact in places like public parks.

“As designers, students need to understand the human scale in the landscape and how people experience and comprehend the elements and space around them,” said Zachary Hammaker, Instructor who led an exercise he called, “Anthropometry or Human Scale?” “Students recorded their own personal dimension to build awareness of comfortable measurements for things like walkways, seating, and ideal view heights.”

Students gathered for a class photo atop an elevated grass mound located in the heart of the Oudolf Meadow Garden.

The goal of the Landscape Architecture Bridge Program is for students to consider (or reconsider) local landscapes through a critical eye. The program included a tour of White Clay Creek State Park, a visit to an indigenous landscape project in Kent County and a journey to the coastal plain of Southern Delaware.

One day began at the UD College of Earth, Ocean and Environment Hugh R. Sharp Campus in Lewes, where students evaluated the suitability of four separate tracts for a future outdoor classroom. Led by Eric Bardenhagen, associate professor of landscape architecture, students weighed the proximity and function of the other buildings on campus, building system sounds, nearby road noise, existing campus walkways, gardens and paths, sun exposure and shadows and topography.

After lunch at the Lewes CanalFront Park and listening to the career experiences of UD Class of 2018 landscape architecture alumna Maggie Heffernan, the group biked through trails over to Cape Henlopen State Park to complete their human scale activity.

That day concluded with an informal dinner hosted by Rodney Robinson, who is a CANR graduate and adjunct professor of landscape architecture. Robinson is a founding partner of Robinson Anderson Summers, Inc. | Landscape Architects. Robinson’s firm designed a master plan for the Delaware Botanic Garden at Pepper Creek in Dagsboro, which was the first stop scheduled for day two.

After their welcome, the class began their tour in the Piet Oudolf Meadow Garden.

From what was once raw agricultural land, 37-acres in all, framed on the east by 1,000 feet of tidal waterfront, students observed how far along the initial plan designed in 2017 evolved. The progress is impressive.

Students walked through the paths they were seeing on paper, and directly experienced the master plan’s written goals as a garden “unique among American public gardens in that they will represent a true grass-roots effort to create a place of horticultural splendor.”

Sue Barton is a professor and Cooperative Extension specialist of ornamental horticulture.

“Students hear what Delaware Botanic Garden has implemented from their master planning process and get a chance to engage in a master planning exercise to try their hand at planning what their next steps might be based on the mission and objectives the DBG board has outlined for their future,” Barton said.

Each student received a copy of the Delaware Botanic Garden master plan and explored how the design vision was implemented.

After a warm welcome from DBG’s staff, students strolled on a crushed granite pathway surrounded by a spectacular meadow garden designed by renowned Dutch Plantsman Piet Oudolf.

“This is an excellent opportunity for BLA students to learn how master planning helps build a major endeavor like establishing a botanic garden from the ground up,” Barton said.

The tour featured winding woodland paths leading to a living shoreline — a large waterfront at Pepper Creek. As they exited the woods, students came upon the DBG’s existing feature, a specially designed public restroom in contention for a national design award for a public restroom. Yes, there are awards even for restrooms.

The Piet Oudolf Meadow Garden is expansive.

Afterward, students and the faculty soaked in the unique landscape of Trap Pond State Park in Laurel. Because public parks are created to be experienced, they paired off and paddled in canoes through the Cypress Swamp, home to America’s most northern stand of cypress trees.

The Bridge Program weekend ended with a visit to the Fort Branch tribal land restoration project for the Lenape Indian Tribe of Kent County. In exact years, landscape architecture students identified goals that include removing invasive plants and replacing them with native plants that are edible or that have a spiritual significance to the Lenape Tribe.

A goal of the program was to put students at ease, and introduce them to instructors, professors and the curriculum in a creative way. Fiona Gorman said she looked forward to meeting the new students.  

“I'm going to be working with them in the future and get them excited to be a part of our community and our major,” Gorman said.

Gorman is scheduled to graduate in 2024 and serves as a teaching assistant for the program.

“This has been a weekend of discovery and really getting to know my major more and getting my feet into the whole experience and getting closer with my classmates,” said Sakhi Phen, a sophomore.” “Landscape architecture was a exact discovery for me. What attracted me to it was the amount of creativity and my personality that I can put into my work.”

For first-year student Chase Correll, choosing a career in landscape architecture gives him an opportunity to creatively impact the environment.

“This weekend was a good introduction to the program itself,” Correll said. “It was good to meet everybody and some of my professors. It’s nice to be able to see what it's going to be like in the next few years.”

An hour-long exploration by canoe proved an ideal way to experience a unique stand of cypress trees in the swampland at Trap Pond State Park in Laurel.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 10:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.udel.edu/udaily/2022/october/landscape-architecture-student-introduction-bridge-program/
Killexams : A new master plan could help transform Boston Common into a ‘better version’ of itself

Those are just a few of the big changes that could be coming over the next decade to the nation’s oldest public park, according to a new master plan for the Common that was released by the city and Friends of the Public Garden on Wednesday.

The grand reimagining calls for both ambitious new projects and more subtle improvements, with a goal of making the Common even more inviting and navigable. So, dog owners would have an enclosed park to let their pets run free. The Parkman Bandstand would have a ramp for people with disabilities. And the athletic fields would welcome soccer and basketball players for the first time.

“This really is a park for the entire city, not just a neighborhood park,” said Liz Vizza, president of the Friends of the Public Garden, a nonprofit that collaborated with the Boston Parks and Recreation Department to craft the Boston Common Master Plan. “Which is why we need it to be the best version, the most resilient version, of itself in order for it to play this role into the future, and be the highest quality it can be.”

A timetable has not been established for completing any of its components, Vizza said, although she said work would likely begin first on projects that would Improve accessibility. For now, the blueprint is meant to establish a vision of how officials intend to transform the park in the next 10 or so years.

The release of the 362-page document comes as the Common prepares to welcome a monument to Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife, Coretta Scott King, called “The Embrace.” The large bronze sculpture, set to be installed on MLK Day in January, will be located between the visitor center and the Parkman Bandstand, where King led an antisegregation rally in 1965.

In a statement, Mayor Michelle Wu celebrated the proposed improvement, which she said “honors the Common’s history, reflects the community’s vision, and creates a space that will be more accessible, more resilient, and more inclusive for generations to come.”

Wu shared details of the longterm project during a press conference on the Common Wednesday.

Among the more dramatic changes people could expect to see in coming years is the renovation of the athletic fields along Charles Street, where the adjoining baseball and softball diamonds would be transformed into a multi-use area that for the first time includes two basketball courts and a soccer pitch.

And next to those athletic fields would be roughly 15,000 square feet of enclosed space for dog owners. Once the dog park is operational, the city would phase out the current practice of letting people’s pets roam off-leash elsewhere on the Common.

As for the Frog Pond, the plan includes installing a new splash pad dotted with fountains and a second-floor space at the existing pavilion — complete with a restaurant. After facing years of pressure to follow the lead of parks elsewhere in Boston and other cities, officials also envision the sale of beer and wine at the site.

The nearby Tadpole Playground, meanwhile, would be outfitted with modern play equipment, and expand from 5,500 to 15,000 square feet.

The Common would also see a number of long-sought improvements for visitors with disabilities, including a wheelchair ramp located by the Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Memorial on Beacon Street. Another ramp would lead up to the platform on the Parkman Bandstand.

To address a common complaint, officials would install a series of new restrooms throughout the park, including near the athletic complex, inside an expanded Visitor Information Center, at the Frog Pond, and by a new public plaza.

An emphasis on improved navigation would also help direct visitors, and a “Landmark Loop” — an oval-shaped network of pathways modeled after the Freedom Trail that lead to major destinations in the park — would be established through maps, signage, and sidewalk markers.

The proposal comes three years after former mayor Martin J. Walsh announced the city would take a fresh look at how to Improve the Common after dedicating $28 million to the park from the sale of a city-owned downtown parking garage where the Winthrop Center skyscraper is under construction. Around $5 million has been set aside in a trust fund for day-to-day maintenance, leaving $23 million for improvements.

Roughly 10,000 people shared their hopes and priorities for the park at a series of public meetings, driving many of the changes outlined in the plan, said Vizza.

Since the money from the garage sale won’t cover anywhere near all the improvements sketched out in the blueprint, Vizza said the city and Friends group will have to look elsewhere, including city money, revenues from programs and events, and user fees.

“We will need to be raising money and leveraging what we already do to bring more money into this park in every way possible,” Vizza said. “We all would love things to happen quicker than they can, but it really is contingent on getting the funds and being able to move through the process.”

New event infrastructure, including sound and electrical hookups and designated areas for stages, would be intended to take some of the pressure off of the Parade Ground, where large events often take a toll on the park’s grass. Hardtop courts would serve an additional function as backstage areas for performances and speeches.

“That place gets beat to death,” Vizza said. “So we have recommended that there be other parts of the park that are available for those uses, so that we can spread activity around.”

While the highly researched proposal is extensive, the new additions are hardly set in stone. Vizza said it may be tweaked over the next decade to meet the city’s needs.

During a 45-day public comment period that runs from through Nov. 30, Bostonians will be invited to share their thoughts on the document and advocate for the projects the park should tackle first.

“It’s going to be important to be as strategic as possible,” Vizza said. “We’ll definitely be interested to see what people have to say, and we hope that people will weigh in. Because $23 million goes in a heartbeat.”


Spencer Buell can be reached at spencer.buell@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @SpencerBuell.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 05:26:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/10/12/metro/new-master-plan-could-help-transform-boston-common-into-better-version-itself/
Killexams : Beulah Master Plan process delayed again as Escambia seeks to attract more bidders

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Tue, 11 Oct 2022 06:38:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.pnj.com/story/news/local/escambia-county/2022/10/08/dpz-codesign-only-bidder-write-beulah-master-plan-escambia/8205583001/
Killexams : Southwick seeks residents’ input for Southwick 2040 master plan

SOUTHWICK — After 55 years, the town is updating its master plan to help guide its development over the next two decades and it is asking its residents for input.

The town’s masterplan, named “Southwick 2040,” will lead Southwick in making decisions on land development, land preservation programs, zoning changes, capital enhancements, improvements to the downtown area and opportunities to increase economic vibrancy.

To get residents involved, the Southwick Master Plan Advisory Committee will be hosting two “Community Visioning Sessions” this week, to provide residents a chance to talk about what they would like to see implemented in the plan.

“The world is changing and it is going to affect Southwick and its residents. How can you help your community prepare for the future?” the town asks on a website about Southwick 2040.

The town currently has an outdated master plan which dates back to 1967. It worked on an update in the 1990s, but no official plan was adopted.

A plan to develop a new master plan was decided in the summer of 2022. From June to the end of August 2022, a survey was available for the residents to share their thoughts on what they would like to see in the town’s future.

Resident and member of the master plan advisory committee Maryssa Cook-Obregon, who reviewed the survey, said 80.5% of the survey participants want to see agricultural development take place and 49.5% want to see minimal residential development.

She added 80% of the participants want a limit on the maximum square footage for the new buildings and 73% want to see a maximum expansion size for existing buildings.

On the Master Plan Advisory Committee’s Facebook page, the advisory committee shared one result of the survey, which asked resident where they would like to see new housing built.

Of the respondents, 25% said they supported the development of new subdivisions where new roads would have to be built and 18.7% voted for areas of concentrated development.

The town’s Planning Board has been given permission to spend up to $25,000 from the Community Housing reserve to help with the master plan’s creation.

A consultant will develop a housing plan under a contract and budget that will be used as the housing element of the master plan, identifying and analyzing present and predicted housing requirements.

All residents, homeowners, and business owners are welcome to attend the vision meetings. Attendees who are unable to attend the vision session in person will be provided a Zoom link.

The first session is set for Thursday at 6:30 p.m. The second session will be held on Saturday, beginning at 9 a.m.

Cook-Obregon said following the vision sessions, there will be focus groups that will go more in-depth in developing solutions for different parts of town.

“The Master Plan Advisory Committee will work with the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission to analyze the responses from these sessions and how those ideas can be translated as data to be incorporated into the draft of the master plan document,” Cook-Obregón said.

Both sessions will be hosted at Town Hall, located at 454 College Highway.

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Mon, 10 Oct 2022 11:20:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.masslive.com/news/2022/10/southwick-seeks-residents-input-for-southwick-2040-master-plan.html
Killexams : Master plan calls for upgrades, changes throughout historic Boston Common

Changes are in the works for Boston Common, America's oldest public park and a beloved hub of activity for both visitors and residents in the city. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu's administration on Wednesday released the new Boston Common Master Plan, a 362-page document outlining the city's vision for the "People's Park." Development of the plan was led by the city's Parks and Recreation Department and Friends of the Public Garden. Design firm Weston & Sampson was hired to merge park needs with community input and draft the plans. According to a draft of the plan reviewed by NewsCenter 5, recommendations include changes for the Frog Pond and its neighboring Tadpole Playground, expanding the Visitor's Center, accessibility improvements and testing restrooms in several locations. Those are in addition to the bronze memorial honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King, which is already taking shape. Throughout the Common, plans call for adding more seating and planting new trees. Many of the new trees would be located along pathways. Improvements planned for the Frog Pond include a new two-story pavilion, a new splash pad and an improved wading pool. Upgrades at the playground would include a second entrance, new play features, and nearly tripling the playground's footprint. Plans indicate that an expansion of the Visitor's Center would include adding restrooms and creating an interior space with grab-and-go vending options. At the Parkman Bandstand, plans call for creating an accessible new ramp, improving the pathways and adding new seating. Upgrades planned for the nearby concession plaza would reconfigure the area, add more seating and create a new pathway to the ordering window. Athletic facilities would also be redesigned. The current twin baseball and softball fields would be replaced by a multi-use ballfield and a multi-use soccer field, and the existing tennis courts would be replaced by basketball courts. Those changes would also create an enclosed dog recreation area. "Future park users will find improvements throughout the Common with increased flexibility, better use of space, new features, and enhanced visitor orientation and interpretation," said Ryan Woods, Commissioner of the Boston Parks and Recreation Department.Work on the plan, which began in 2019, is not over. The process now moves to a 45-day public comment period that ends on Nov. 30, 2022. City officials say they will be asking the public to weigh in on which projects to prioritize. “Please send your thoughts in because this is going to be a work in progress,” Wu said at the press conference. “While this is a comprehensive vision that really shows what this space can be for the next generations, we do have to make some choices about prioritization, where we start and any changes that we might want to make as well.”No proposed timeline or comprehensive price estimate for these efforts was included in the master plan, but officials said the first project could be in the next capital budget. The first $23 million in funding, however, came from the exact sale of the Winthrop Square Garage. “It is our plan to put our first project in for this year,” said Chief of Environment, Energy, and Open Space Rev. Mariama White-Hammond. “We file, begin our capital budget planning in December.”As the signs say, Boston Common was established in 1634 after colonists purchased rights to the 44 acres from the first European settler of the area. It was originally used as "common land" for the grazing of livestock but also served as a site for Puritanical punishments and was a camp during the British occupation in 1775. In the 1860s, the Common was used for Civil War recruitment and hosted anti-slavery meetings. Improvements were designed in 1913 by the sons of Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Boston's Emerald Necklace."We're excited to be sharing a plan that honors the Common’s history, reflects the community’s vision, and creates a space that will be more accessible, more resilient, and more inclusive for generations to come," Wu said in a statement.

Changes are in the works for Boston Common, America's oldest public park and a beloved hub of activity for both visitors and residents in the city.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu's administration on Wednesday released the new Boston Common Master Plan, a 362-page document outlining the city's vision for the "People's Park."

Development of the plan was led by the city's Parks and Recreation Department and Friends of the Public Garden. Design firm Weston & Sampson was hired to merge park needs with community input and draft the plans.

According to a draft of the plan reviewed by NewsCenter 5, recommendations include changes for the Frog Pond and its neighboring Tadpole Playground, expanding the Visitor's Center, accessibility improvements and testing restrooms in several locations.

Those are in addition to the bronze memorial honoring Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King, which is already taking shape.

Throughout the Common, plans call for adding more seating and planting new trees. Many of the new trees would be located along pathways.

Improvements planned for the Frog Pond include a new two-story pavilion, a new splash pad and an improved wading pool. Upgrades at the playground would include a second entrance, new play features, and nearly tripling the playground's footprint.

Plans indicate that an expansion of the Visitor's Center would include adding restrooms and creating an interior space with grab-and-go vending options.

At the Parkman Bandstand, plans call for creating an accessible new ramp, improving the pathways and adding new seating. Upgrades planned for the nearby concession plaza would reconfigure the area, add more seating and create a new pathway to the ordering window.

Athletic facilities would also be redesigned. The current twin baseball and softball fields would be replaced by a multi-use ballfield and a multi-use soccer field, and the existing tennis courts would be replaced by basketball courts. Those changes would also create an enclosed dog recreation area.

"Future park users will find improvements throughout the Common with increased flexibility, better use of space, new features, and enhanced visitor orientation and interpretation," said Ryan Woods, Commissioner of the Boston Parks and Recreation Department.

Work on the plan, which began in 2019, is not over. The process now moves to a 45-day public comment period that ends on Nov. 30, 2022. City officials say they will be asking the public to weigh in on which projects to prioritize.

“Please send your thoughts in because this is going to be a work in progress,” Wu said at the press conference. “While this is a comprehensive vision that really shows what this space can be for the next generations, we do have to make some choices about prioritization, where we start and any changes that we might want to make as well.”

No proposed timeline or comprehensive price estimate for these efforts was included in the master plan, but officials said the first project could be in the next capital budget. The first $23 million in funding, however, came from the exact sale of the Winthrop Square Garage.

“It is our plan to put our first project in for this year,” said Chief of Environment, Energy, and Open Space Rev. Mariama White-Hammond. “We file, begin our capital budget planning in December.”

As the signs say, Boston Common was established in 1634 after colonists purchased rights to the 44 acres from the first European settler of the area. It was originally used as "common land" for the grazing of livestock but also served as a site for Puritanical punishments and was a camp during the British occupation in 1775. In the 1860s, the Common was used for Civil War recruitment and hosted anti-slavery meetings. Improvements were designed in 1913 by the sons of Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed Boston's Emerald Necklace.

"We're excited to be sharing a plan that honors the Common’s history, reflects the community’s vision, and creates a space that will be more accessible, more resilient, and more inclusive for generations to come," Wu said in a statement.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wcvb.com/article/boston-common-master-plan-announcement-2022/41587512
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