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Killexams : Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems

Overview

An engaging course specialising in improving remote sensing and GIS employability and professional skills.

Summary

This online course delivers contemporary content on remote sensing and GIS integrating theoretical and practical learning activities encompassing acquisition, analysis and interpretation of geospatial data. Course participants will develop skills in a range of areas including:

  • Remote sensing and photogrammetry
  • Analysis of active and passive remote sensing data
  • GIS, spatial data management and analysis
  • Programming for GIS and remote sensing
  • Applications of remote sensing and GIS in marine studies or environmental management

We are an established provider of online distance learning postgraduate courses. With 25 years' experience of teaching GIS, and nearly 20 years via online distance learning, we have a long and successful track record in GIS education. We enjoy imparting knowledge, skills and confidence that enhance employment prospects with our innovative and career-focused modules and research.

Ask yourself these simple questions: Are you a fresh graduate desiring to enter remote sensing/GIS-related employment for the first time, or add remote sensing and GIS to your skillset to enhance employability, qualification or change career? Are you a professional already in remote sensing/GIS-related employment and want to broaden and deepen your remote sensing and GIS knowledge and skills with a view to making better use of spatial technologies, or want to enhance your career and promotion prospects, or even just qualification?

If you answered yes to any of these, then good news – this course is for you!

Our remote sensing and GIS programme offer flexible learning through part-time education – while each module has coursework deadlines, you study at a time and pace that suits you.


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About this course

About

The demand for remote sensing and GIS professionals has been steadily increasing within government, business, education and voluntary sectors, whereas rapid growth in availability of spatial data, mainly via remote sensing satellites and other big data sources provide a huge potential to map, monitor and understand systems and change in terrestrial and marine environments. Skills in remote sensing and GIS enables analysis across global or local scales on a rapid basis in vast application areas spanning both physical and human geography – climate change, agriculture, forestry, natural resource management, marine planning, sustainable urban development, epidemiology and crime analysis are to name a few. This course aims to provide training in capturing, storing, analysing and interpreting big earth data.

Modules are taught online via Blackboard Virtual Learning Environment that provides access to lectures, practical exercises, practicing and additional study materials. Communication tools (discussion boards, video-conferencing and email) are integrated within Blackboard and all modules are supported by experienced lecturers and tutors. Progress is assessed entirely online – there are no formal sit-in examinations.

Key features:

  • Access to a fully online course! You can study from almost anywhere and there is no need to travel to classes – choose the times you study each week to suit yourself.
  • Up-to-date skills and experience to deal with geospatial data and methods.
  • A free copy of ArcGIS Pro, the remote sensing package Erdas Imagine, and the data analysis package SPSS.
  • Support and advice from experienced lecturers, tutors, librarians, e-learning and IT staff.
  • Access to online resources such as e-books, digital lectures and podcasts, discussion boards and video-conference tools all within a dedicated e-learning platform.
  • Improved employability, professional and academic skills, and gain extensive hands-on practice with key software.
  • An experience of conducting a substantial independent research project (MSc only), written in the form of a research journal article (which may, with agreement of your supervisor, be submitted for publication).

Attendance

This course is fully online and part-time. You do not need to visit Ulster at any stage to successfully complete this course. You have greater control over your learning journey when you study part-time - balance work and other commitments and study at a pace that suits you.

You can choose your own hours of study; however, you should expect to dedicate an average of 17-20 hours to the course per week.

Start dates

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

This course is delivered through a teaching platform (Virtual Learning Environment, VLE), called Blackboard, through which we provide teaching materials, assignment instructions, links to electronic library resources and other practicing materials, as well as discussion boards and other communication tools. Teaching materials consist mainly of lectures in various formats (e.g. as illustrated documents or podcasts) and practical exercises (written instructions with screenshots or screencasts), which may be supplemented by additional practicing or video content, tutorial exercises, quizzes, etc. The format of delivery provides you with the flexibility to study at your own pace, any place and at any time, and you are not required to attend the campus at any stage during the course.

Learning is supported by lecturers and e-tutors via discussion forums, email, phone or video-conferencing tools. Discussion forums encourage participation from the whole class and offer opportunities for you to learn about issues and problems from different perspectives as well as getting to know your fellow students.

Assessment involves a mixture of methods including practical reports, problem analysis, research projects, presentations, blogs, online tests and group work. The Master’s element of the course takes the form of a substantial independent research project, written up in the form of an academic paper, which may subsequently be considered for submission to a scientific journal. You will be assessed by coursework only and there are no sessional examinations.

Once registered, you will be able to use the University's extensive online library resources of electronic journals, e-books and databases. In addition, you will also gain access to different remote sensing, GIS and statistics software packages.

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until near the start date and may be subject to change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days of attendance will often be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Masters courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be via one method or a combination e.g. examination and coursework . Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have four learning outcomes, and no more than two items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6 (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Masters degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Academic profile

Main teaching staff:

Robert McNabb

Sally Cook

Saad Bhatti

Learning is also supported by several experienced e-tutors.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (20%) or Lecturers (55%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advanced HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and supply a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2021-2022.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Photogrammetry and Advanced Image Analysis

Year: 1

This module covers advanced Topics in visible remote sensing and image analysis, including photogrammetry and digital elevation models, image processing and manipulation, advanced classification techniques such as object-based image analysis (OBIA), and time series analysis using Google Earth Engine. It builds on the Topics covered in EGM713, complements the Topics covered in EGM722, and provides a foundation for further study in remote sensing.

Principles of GIS

Year: 1

This module introduces the theory and practice of Geographic Information Systems, and is intended to provide an understanding of the breadth of potential GIS applications and to equip students with key concepts and skills relating to the input, management, manipulation, analysis and output of spatial data. Lecture-based teaching of key concepts is reinforced by linked practical exercises which allow students to develop competence in ESRI's ArcGIS package. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Introduction to Remote Sensing

Year: 1

This postgraduate module offers students the opportunity to study the principles and applications of remote sensing and image analysis and to explore links between remote sensing and GIS. Students will become familiar with theoretical foundations of remote sensing and will develop technical skills through a series of software-based practical exercises and assignments using ERDAS Imagine.

Programming for GIS and Remote Sensing

Year: 1

This module develops programming skills using the python programming language. The module seeks to provide students with key skills in the development of repeatable, automated analyses of GIS applications. The module also aims to develop academic writing skills in preparation for the MSc degree.

Year two

Advanced Active and Passive Remote Sensing

Year: 2

This module covers advanced Topics in active and passive remote sensing, including the highly sought-after Topics of hyperspectral and microwave remote sensing, covering both active and passive microwave applications. It also covers thermal and below-surface (i.e., ground-penetrating radar) remote sensing techniques. It builds on the Topics introduced in EGM713 and provides a framework for more detailed modules covered later in the course, as well as the (optional) research topic.

Spatial Data Management

Year: 2

This module builds on the knowledge and practical skills gained in EGM711 to provide students with further experience in the acquisition, manipulation and analysis of spatial data. Methods for generating and collecting digital spatial data from primary and secondary sources are considered, and data processing, selection, integration and analysis extensively practiced. Lecture and practical sessions include digitising, geo-registration, GPS, accessing and using secondary sources, spatial join and overlay, network analysis and 3D modelling, and incorporate experience of a variety of large and small scale vector and raster datasets. The module also incorporates practice in statistical analysis and interpretation. Development of GIS software skills focuses on ArcGIS and extensions.

Marine Remote Sensing

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module first introduces the underlying concepts of marine remote sensing and its applications within the framework of ocean properties and seafloor characteristics. It introduces students to different datasets and spatial data management tools for ocean remote sensing and aim to help them develop an appreciation of mapping scales, data resolution and density. Lastly the module focuses on the effective integration of relevant datasets in the context of specific users' and stakeholders' requirements. The module is a combination of theoretical and practical based sessions using both commercial and open source software. Guest lectures and contributions from world-leading experts in the field will form an integral component of the module.

Web-based GIS

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module examines the role of programming within the GI industry. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for programming skills that can be used to customise and develop applications. A range of programming skills is introduced which equip the student with knowledge of the potential and scope of programming within various applications.

Spatial Analysis

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module builds on the introductory material of EGM711 and EGM712, covering advanced concepts of spatial data analysis and modelling, and providing extensive practical experience of ESDA and spatial analysis and modelling within a GIS environment.

GIS for Environmental Management

Year: 2

This module is optional

This optional module examines the application of GIS to environmental management, modelling and impact assessment. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for properly researched information to support strategic and operational environmental management decisions, and to be aware of the means by which such information can be obtained and evaluated.

Year three

Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Project

Year: 3

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of research in an area of particular interest to the student. The student will be assessed on their project proposal and two progress reports, together with the final research paper.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

Entry Requirements

As a normal requirement, applicants must hold an Honours degree (2:2 or above) with a substantial component of geography, environmental science, computing or other numerate discipline. Applicants with other equivalent and relevant qualifications or experience can also be considered on an individual basis.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Remote sensing, GIS and geospatial technologies underpin a rapidly growing, multi-billion-dollar industry, and are becoming increasingly mainstream within both the public and private sectors, resulting in a need for graduates who have a combination of theoretical knowledge and practical skills. Participants and graduates of this course could seek employment in a variety of remote sensing/ GIS-related roles such as analysts, scientists, consultants, project managers, surveyors, data specialists, technicians, mapping officers, development, sales and marketing, customer support, GIS training, lecturing and research (including funded PhD projects). The breadth of potential uses of remote sensing and GIS ensures a great diversity of job opportunities; for example, our GIS graduates have found employment with mapping agencies, GIS and SatNav companies, environmental consultancies, ecological and marine resource management and environmental agencies, renewable energy companies, forestry, fisheries, town planning departments, heritage agencies, health and emergency services, housing authorities, local government, aid agencies, countryside recreation, rural development, retail analysis, utilities and infrastructure, Further and Higher Education, mining and mineral exploitation and the oil industry, among others. Knowledge and understanding of geospatial data are also increasingly required in a variety of jobs outside of the GI profession, making remote sensing and GIS qualifications valuable for enhancing employability in a range of fields.

Fees and funding

Important notice - fees information

Fees illustrated are based on academic year 22/23 entry and are subject to an annual increase.

If your study continues into future academic years your fees are subject to an annual increase. Please take this into consideration when you estimate your total fees for a degree.

Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees.

Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply.

Fees (total cost)

The price of your overall programme will be determined by the number of credit points that you initiate in the relevant academic year.

For modules commenced in the academic year 2022/23, the following fees apply:

Fees
Credit Points NI/ROI/GB Cost International Cost
5 £178.50 £426.65
10 £356.10 £853.30
15 £534.15 £1,279.95
20 £712.20 £1,706.60
30 £1,068.30 £2,559.90
60 £2,136.60 £5,119.80
120 £4,273.20 £10,239.60
180 £6,409.80 £15,359.40

NB: A standard full-time PGCert is equivalent to 60 credit points per year. A standard full-time PGDip is equivalent to 120 credit points per year.

Where the postgraduate course selected offers multiple awards (e.g. PG Cert, PG Dip, Masters), please note that the price displayed is for the complete Masters programme.

Postgraduate certificates and diplomas are charged at a pro-rata basis.

Find out more about postgraduate fees

Scholarships, awards and prizes

A prize - 'GES Academic Excellence Award for Remote Sensing and GIS research' - will be awarded to an outstanding piece of research.

Additional mandatory costs

This course has very few additional mandatory costs and the majority of practicing material is available free of charge via the University's electronic library resources. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of online books and journals but you will be expected to purchase a small number of textbooks during the course. However, costs are kept as low as possible and are not likely to exceed £150 in total.

The latest version of Microsoft Office is available to get for current students, free of charge. You can run Office on up to five desktop Mac or Windows. You can also run Office Mobile on up to 5 mobile devices (on supported mobile operating systems). Other software programs required for this course are either freely available (open source), or provided free of charge under academic licence (e.g. ESRI's ArcGIS Pro, the remote sensing package Erdas Imagine and SPSS for statistical analysis).

You will need a PC or laptop with a minimum of 4 GB RAM (preferably higher) and a CPU speed of at least 2.2 GHz. As ArcGIS Pro and Erdas Imagine only run on Windows, a Windows-based PC or laptop (rather than Mac) is required.

Please contact the course team in case you need more information.

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot certain the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.
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Killexams : Environmental Management with Geographic Information Systems

Overview

This innovative course combines teaching of Environmental Management techniques with skills in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Summary

The PgDip/MSc programme in Environmental Management with GIS aims to provide an advanced education in Environmental Management. It provides specialist training in Environmental Impact Assessment, Biodiversity Management, Pollution Monitoring and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course aims to teach students the principles and practice of environmental management, the contribution of empirical and case study scientific research, and the manipulation and analysis of spatial environmental data.


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About this course

About

This course aims to teach how environmental management and data handling tools, such as impact assessment, site conservation planning, environmental management systems, ecological monitoring and GIS are applied in making knowledge based decisions on managing the environment. This is considered in the context of environmental legislative/policy frameworks within which industry, government and voluntary bodies work.

Specific objectives are to:

  • Understand the importance of evidence-based approach to environmental policy and strategic decision-making
  • Apply quantitative techniques to assess the effects of environmental management
  • Use GIS as a framework for collating, manipulating and managing spatial data relating to the environment
  • Produce environmental impact statements and advise on implementing environmental management systems
  • Apply structured planning principles to site biodiversity management and ecosystem restoration
  • Monitor pollution and assess its environmental effects.

Students will be provided with a student copy of Esri ArcGIS software free of charge.

To take this course, you will need access to a computer with a fast internet connection. The course uses the Blackboard learning environment and the modules are delivered using online lectures, including practical and tutorial material. Students and staff interact via email, discussion boards and online chat. You will find that this course is much more flexible than traditional on-campus university courses as you can study using your own computer and the internet, at your own pace, any place and any time (within given timeframes).

Studies will study the following modules;

Pollution Monitoring

This module provides the knowledge and skills necessary to monitor pollution of the environment. The Topics included are: the key elements of the monitoring programmes for air, water and land; sample collection; chemical methods of analysis, including quality assurance; biological methods of analysis, including toxicity tests and bioassessment; use of environmental models; statistics, data analysis and assessing compliance and; critical loads. The student gains experience through lectures, supporting documents, directed practicing and practicals.

Environmental Impact Assessment

Environmental management plays an important part in policy, planning and decision making in government and industry. Students intending to follow careers in environmental management need to be aware of how technical, economic and environmental considerations are taken into account in the planning and operation of projects through the use of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), Environmental Audits and Environmental Management System (EMS). This module develops the specific skills needed to perform these key environmental management roles in business and industry.

Biodiversity Management

This module will explores how human activities affect global biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, and how this in turn can affect the delivery of multiple ecosystem services. Students will investigate the combined ecological, social and economic factors that need to be considered when developing biodiversity management plans.

MSc Project

This module, which is compulsory for students proceeding to the MSc in Environmental Management, allows students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate abilities in Masters level research relevant to the field of Environmental Management. Knowledge and understanding of the subject area, together with academic, analytical and technical skills taught and practiced in the PgDip modules, are further developed in the course of this module.

Principles of GIS

This module introduces the theory and practice of Geographic Information Systems, providing the foundation for subsequent modules, in particular those focusing on data management, spatial analysis and GIS applications. Lecture-based teaching of key concepts is reinforced by linked practical exercises which allow students to develop competence in ESRI's ArcGIS package, which is widely used by government, business and academia. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Spatial Data Management

This module builds on the knowledge of GIS concepts and principles and the practical skills gained in EGM711, equipping students with the expertise necessary to acquire, manipulate, process and analyse primary and secondary spatial data from a variety of sources, working independently and in a problem-solving context. The module helps develop the knowledge and confidence needed for entering a professional GIS environment and provides a strong foundation for independent work and the more specialist GIS applications introduced in later modules.

Attendance

Fully online - part-time by distance learning. You do not need to visit Ulster at any stage to successfully complete this course.

The Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) Environmental Management with GIS and the Master of Science (MSc) Environmental Management with GIS are linked courses. You must successfully complete the PgDip (120 credit points) before transferring to the MSc (a further 60 credit points), i.e.to get the full MSc you complete 180 credit points in total.

The five taught modules which constitute the Postgraduate Diploma are taken over two years (4 semesters). Modules are available on a two year rotational basis so the order in which they are studied is dependent upon when you start the course.

For the MSc an additional two semesters are required to complete the project module i.e. three years in total part-time (6 semesters).

Start dates

  • September 2022
  • January 2023

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Assessment is 100% by course work with no sessional examinations. There is a mixture of methods including practical reports, problem analysis, projects, literature reviews and essays, class tests, group work and a research project.

Students are able to use the University's extensive online resources of electronic journals, books and databases.

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until near the start date and may be subject to change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days of attendance will often be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Masters courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be via one method or a combination e.g. examination and coursework . Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have four learning outcomes, and no more than two items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6 (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Masters degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Academic profile

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (20%) or Lecturers (55%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advanced HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and supply a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2021-2022.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Biodiversity Management

Year: 1

Biodiversity managers make decisions based on understanding ecosystems and by applying ecological principles to achieve their objectives. This module covers key scientific topics, which are crucial for developing effective biodiversity management plans in different ecosystems. It exemplifies how ecological-social-economic factors interact to influence our ability to conserve and manage biodiversity.

Pollution Monitoring

Year: 1

This module provides the knowledge and skills necessary to monitor pollution of the environment. The Topics included are: the key elements of the monitoring programmes for air, water and land; sample collection; chemical methods of analysis, including quality assurance; biological methods of analysis, including toxicity tests and bioassessment; use of environmental models; statistics, data analysis and assessing compliance and; critical loads. The student gains experience through lectures, supporting documents, directed practicing and practicals.

Year two

GIS in Business and Society

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module investigates the GI industry from the perspective of the GI professional, the GI customer/user and the various functions and processes behind the successful implementation of GIS in real world scenarios. The module aims to supply students a firm understanding of GIS in the commercial world, an appreciation of the economic and social value of spatial data and the importance of decision-based techniques in spatial analysis within GIS applications. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Web-based GIS

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module examines the role of programming within the GI industry. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for programming skills that can be used to customise and develop applications. A range of programming skills is introduced which equip the student with knowledge of the potential and scope of programming within various applications.

Spatial Analysis

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module builds on the introductory material of EGM711 and EGM712, covering advanced concepts of spatial data analysis and modelling, and providing extensive practical experience of ESDA and spatial analysis and modelling within a GIS environment.

GIS for Environmental Management

Year: 2

This module is optional

This optional module examines the application of GIS to environmental management, modelling and impact assessment. It aims to enable students to appreciate the need for properly researched information to support strategic and operational environmental management decisions, and to be aware of the means by which such information can be obtained and evaluated.

Environmental Impact Assessment

Year: 2

This module is optional

This module introduces the concepts and requirements of environmental impact assessment, the methodology of planning and carrying out an environmental audit and the use of environmental management systems.

Year three

Principles of GIS

Year: 3

This module introduces the theory and practice of Geographic Information Systems, and is intended to provide an understanding of the breadth of potential GIS applications and to equip students with key concepts and skills relating to the input, management, manipulation, analysis and output of spatial data. Lecture-based teaching of key concepts is reinforced by linked practical exercises which allow students to develop competence in ESRI's ArcGIS package. The module assumes no prior knowledge or experience of GIS.

Environmental Management Project

Year: 3

This module provides students with the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of research in an area of particular interest to the student. The student will be assessed on their project plan, a literature review, a poster/presentation and a research paper on an area agreed with the student's supervisor.

Spatial Data Management

Year: 3

This module is optional

This module builds on the knowledge and practical skills gained in EGM711 to provide students with further experience in the acquisition, manipulation and analysis of spatial data. Methods for generating and collecting digital spatial data from primary and secondary sources are considered, and data processing, selection, integration and analysis extensively practiced. Lecture and practical sessions include digitising, geo-registration, GPS, accessing and using secondary sources, spatial join and overlay, network analysis and 3D modelling, and incorporate experience of a variety of large and small scale vector and raster datasets. The module also incorporates practice in statistical analysis and interpretation. Development of GIS software skills focuses on ArcGIS and extensions.

Introduction to Remote Sensing

Year: 3

This module is optional

This postgraduate module offers students the opportunity to study the principles and applications of remote sensing and image analysis and to explore links between remote sensing and GIS. Students will become familiar with theoretical foundations of remote sensing and will develop technical skills through a series of software-based practical exercises and assignments using ERDAS Imagine.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

Entry Requirements

Entry to the PgDip:
You must hold a degree in a science or other suitable discipline or demonstrate your ability to undertake the course through the accreditation of prior experiential learning.

Entry to the MSc:
You initially register for the Postgraduate Diploma (PgDip) and if you complete the PgDip with an overall mark of 50% or higher can proceed to the MSc programme.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Careers & opportunities

Career options

The majority of students on the course are already working in industry or public services and taking the course has helped them to gain promotion and/or change careers as a result of their new skills.

Key skills which will be developed are:

  • Biodiversity management plans and site restoration design
  • Ecological monitoring
  • Environmental management systems
  • Research analysis and data interpretation techniques
  • Management, processing, analysis, interpretation and presentation of geo-spatial data
  • Operation and use of Geographic Information Systems.

Apply

Start dates

  • September 2022
  • January 2023

Fees and funding

Important notice - fees information

Fees illustrated are based on academic year 22/23 entry and are subject to an annual increase.

If your study continues into future academic years your fees are subject to an annual increase. Please take this into consideration when you estimate your total fees for a degree.

Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees.

Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply.

Fees (total cost)

The price of your overall programme will be determined by the number of credit points that you initiate in the relevant academic year.

For modules commenced in the academic year 2022/23, the following fees apply:

Fees
Credit Points NI/ROI/GB Cost International Cost
5 £178.50 £426.65
10 £356.10 £853.30
15 £534.15 £1,279.95
20 £712.20 £1,706.60
30 £1,068.30 £2,559.90
60 £2,136.60 £5,119.80
120 £4,273.20 £10,239.60
180 £6,409.80 £15,359.40

NB: A standard full-time PGCert is equivalent to 60 credit points per year. A standard full-time PGDip is equivalent to 120 credit points per year.

Where the postgraduate course selected offers multiple awards (e.g. PG Cert, PG Dip, Masters), please note that the price displayed is for the complete Masters programme.

Postgraduate certificates and diplomas are charged at a pro-rata basis.

Find out more about postgraduate fees

Scholarships, awards and prizes

Information on funding for postgraduate study can be found at www.ulster.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/funding

Additional mandatory costs

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot certain the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.

Testimonials

Eric

The Environmental Management with GIS course is very good programme and I have never regretted doing it.

First and foremost, the programme enables you to work on your own pace though with deadlines of submission of assignments and projects, but it is very good for people who may not be able to do full time learning. Second, I did really enjoy all the modules and they are tailored to meet the right skills and knowledge needed to do my work. I was actually not working on Environmental industry at the time I was enrolled, but it has equipped me with the knowledge and skills which I am applying at the school I am teaching especially the GIS modules. Third, the environmental management project (research project) equipped and prepared me with the knowledge,skills and experience required for further research projects and I am currently looking forward to pursue my Ph.D. Finally, I like the method of delivering lessons, they were effective and manageable as a distance student. I learnt a lot from the group assignments and the virtual system that enables students to communicate or contact one another for discussion. You will not feel like you are left alone. The materials provided by all the lecturers were very current and helpful with lots of references or other practicing lists. The administration team were very supportive and respond promptly with any query when you call them.

David

The course was important for my career and I hope that it will help me to progress in my company in the future. Distance learning was very important for me as I would have had no chance of getting a masters without it! But it can be a long slog! However, the support of
staff was very important and the most helpful for me personally is simply being able to email any questions directly to the relevant member of staff. The modules were very relevant although additional modules on ecology or ecological systems might be interesting. The project module is very useful in that you can specialise in something which is relevant to your work thus meeting any shortfall in the rest of the course. I had a positive experience of the course and would recommend it to others- particularly those who can work well on their own.

Thu, 14 Jan 2021 21:17:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.ulster.ac.uk/courses/202223/environmental-management-with-geographic-information-systems-28225
Killexams : Planetary Geoscience

For many years, planetary science has been taught as part of the astronomy curriculum, from a very physics-based perspective, and from the framework of a tour of the Solar System - body by body. Over the past decades, however, spacecraft exploration and related laboratory research on extraterrestrial materials have given us a new understanding of planets and how they are shaped by geological processes. Based on a course taught at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, this is the first textbook to focus on geologic processes, adopting a comparative approach that demonstrates the similarities and differences between planets, and the reasons for these. Profusely illustrated, and with a wealth of pedagogical features, this book provides an ideal capstone course for geoscience majors - bringing together aspects of mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry, volcanology, sedimentology, geomorphology, tectonics, geophysics and remote sensing.

  • Focuses on geological processes, adopting a comparative approach that demonstrates the similarities and differences between planets, and the reasons for these
  • Provides an ideal capstone course for geoscience majors, bringing together aspects of mineralogy, petrology, geochemistry, volcanology, sedimentology, geomorphology, tectonics, geophysics and remote sensing
  • Includes chapter summaries providing a quick review of basic concepts and important relations; sets of questions to help students digest and synthesize the Topics covered; lists of further practicing providing students with additional and more detailed coverage of the subject and noting why they are significant; and a glossary of terms
Read more

Reviews & endorsements

'Planetary Geoscience provides a comprehensive overview of what Earthlings know about the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of solid worlds beyond Earth, from stardust to Venus. It clearly presents key concepts with a combination of beautiful illustrations, well-written text, and only essential equations. This is probably the best introductory planetary textbook for geoscience majors.' Alfred McEwen, University of Arizona

'The first comprehensive textbook on the geological processes that have shaped the extraordinary diversity of planetary and other bodies in the Solar System. With accessible prose and fine illustrations, this will be essential practicing for undergraduate courses and a rich resource for readers wanting an up-to-date overview of the latest insights into our neighborhood in space.' Sanjeev Gupta, Imperial College London

'Planetary Geoscience is at the vanguard in showing how Earth science and planetary science are forever linked by a diversity of processes giving rise to their similarities and differences, with applications almost certainly extending everywhere that planets are found.' Richard Binzel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

'The book is profusely illustrated with full color diagrams and photographic renderings of many geochemical and geophysical particulars. Each chapter concludes with key references and study questions. Overall, this work provides a good and very up-to-date account, from acknowledged experts, of how traditional ways of doing geology are now being extended to understand a diverse array of bodies throughout the solar system.' B. M. Simonson, Choice

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Product details

  • Date Published: August 2019
  • format: Hardback
  • isbn: 9781107145382
  • length: 350 pages
  • dimensions: 284 x 223 x 20 mm
  • weight: 1.25kg
  • contains: 148 b/w illus. 152 colour illus.
  • availability: In stock

Table of Contents

Preface
1. Exploring the Solar System
2. Toolkits for the planetary geoscientist: imaging and spectroscopy
3. More toolkits for the planetary geoscientist: chronology, mapping, geophysics, and laboratory analysis
4. Solar System raw materials
5. Assembling planetesimals and planets
6. Planetary heating and differential
7. Unseen planetary interiors
8. Planetary geodynamics
9. Planetary structures and tectonics
10. Planetary igneous activity
11. Impact cratering as a geologic process
12. Planetary atmospheres, oceans, and ices
13. Planetary Aeolian processes and landforms
14. Planetary fluvial and lacustrine landforms: products of liquid flow
15. Physical and chemical changes: weathering, sedimentology, metamorphism, and mass wasting
16. Astrobiology: a planetary perspective on life
17. Integrated planetary geoscience: a case study (Mars)
Epilogue: geologic processes in other Solar Systems?
Glossary
Index.

Authors

Harry Y. McSween, Jr, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Harry Y. McSween is Chancellor's Professor Emeritus of Planetary Geoscience at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He holds degrees from The Citadel (B.S.), the University of Georgia (M.S.), and Harvard University (Ph.D.). His research focuses on meteorites and has resulted in the publications of hundreds of scientific papers on the subject. He has also authored three popular books on planetary science, as well as textbooks in geochemistry and cosmochemistry. He has served as co-investigator for many NASA spacecraft missions, including Mars Pathfinder, Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Odyssey orbiter, and Dawn asteroid orbiter. McSween has been elected President of the Meteoritical Society and of the Geological Society of America and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is the recipient of the Leonard Medal (Meteoritical Society), the J. Lawrence Smith Medal (US National Academy of Sciences), and the Whipple Award (American Geophysical Union), and is the namesake for asteroid 5223 McSween.

Jeffrey E. Moersch, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Jeffrey E. Moersch is Professor of Planetary Science at at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He holds degrees from Cornell University (B.A. and Ph.D.) and Arizona State University (M.S.). His research focuses on remote sensing, planetary surface geology, instrument development, and terrestrial analog field work. He has served on the science teams for many NASA spacecraft missions, including the Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Science Laboratory, and Mars Odyssey. Along with Professor McSween, he originally developed the planetary geology course from which this book is derived. Professor Moersch has authored and co-authored more than eighty peer-reviewed scientific articles and book chapters, and served for five years as the Mars editor for the scientific journal Icarus.

Devon M. Burr, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Devon M. Burr is Associate Professor of Planetary Science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She holds degrees from the United States Naval Academy (B.S), St. John's College, Santa Fe (M.A.), University of Iowa (M.S.), and University of Arizona (Ph.D.). Her research has been focusing on planetary geomorphology and she currently conducts research on fluvial, aeolian (wind-driven), and tectonic landscapes and processes on planetary bodies, using image analysis and wind tunnel experiments (featured on the cover of National Geographic magazine for kids, entitled Dr E's Super Stellar Solar System!). Burr is the lead editor of the book Megaflooding on Earth and Mars (Cambridge, 2009). She is also a member of the Geological Society of American (and former member of the GSA Planetary Geology Division management board), the AAS Division of Planetary Sciences (serving as Science Organizing Committee Chair for DPS 2018), the American Geophysical Union, and the namesake of asteroid DevonBurr.

William M. Dunne, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
William M. Dunne is Professor of Geology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in geology from the University of Bristol. His research concerns the development of mountain belts and characterization of fracture networks in rocks. The latter interest has practical importance with regard to hydrocarbon exploration, and groundwater remediation efforts, leading to collaborations with civil engineers. Dunne serves as an editor of the Journal of Structural Geology, is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America (GSA), and has served as chair of the GSA Structural Geology and Tectonics Division and the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Engineering Research Council. He has received teaching awards from the department, college and university.

Joshua P. Emery, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Joshua P. Emery is the Lawrence A. Taylor Associate Professor of Planetary Science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He received a B.S. from Boston University and a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona. His research focuses on investigating the formation and evolution of the Solar System and the distribution of organic material. As an observational planetary astronomer, he applies the techniques of reflection and emission spectroscopy of primitive and icy bodies in the near- (0.8 to 5.0 micron) and mid-infrared (5 to 50 micron). Current projects include The Jupiter Trojan asteroids, Kuiper Belt objects, icy satellites, and other asteroids. He is leader of the Thermal Analysis Working Group on the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission and the Surface Composition Working Group on the Lucy Trojan asteroid flyby mission.

Linda C. Kah, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Linda C. Kah is Professor of Carbonate Sedimentology and Geochemistry at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She received concurrent B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, followed by a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Her research integrates sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochemistry, and paleobiology to understand the evolution of the Earth's biosphere. Current projects include reconstructing the ocean-atmospheric oxygenation and the redox structure of Mesoproterozoic shallow marine systems, exploring the effects of changing ocean circulation on the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE), and characterizing microbe-mineral interactions in the mineralization of Holocene lacustrine microbialites. In addition to Earth-based research projects, she also investigates potential habitable environments as co-investigator on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission.

Molly C. McCanta, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Molly C. McCanta is Associate Professor of Mineralogy and Petrology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She received her B.S. from the University of Oregon and concurrent M.Sc. and Ph.D. from Brown University. Her research focuses on the record of igneous processes retained in mineral grains as a means of better understanding geologic processes in planetary interiors. Current projects include experimentally investigating mineral and melt redox conditions as a function of planetary evolution, constraining the timing of eruptive hazards at several Costa Rican volcanoes, determining weathering geochemistry on the surface of Venus, and identifying cryptotephra layers in deep sea drill cores.

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 08:50:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cambridge.org:443/us/academic/subjects/earth-and-environmental-science/planetary-science-and-astrobiology/planetary-geoscience
Killexams : Nevada Online

Many people assume working with computers, robots, CNC machines and automation will never be an option for them. As a result, they miss significant opportunities. Our Computational Literacy for Modern Careers Certificate aims to change this. If you are willing to put in the effort, we will take you on a journey where you will learn how computers think, how they operate and how you can use them to solve problems. In addition to learning hard skills, you’ll develop important soft skills, including the ability to focus, pay attention to detail, communicate, solve problems, use logic and make correct decisions, persevere and adapt to changing conditions.

If you have the capability to learn and the desire to grow, this training program is for you. Throughout the program, students use a virtual robot to solve various simple tasks. This allows students to learn essential skills such as how to identify repeating patterns and how to break complex problems into simpler ones. Upon completing the program, students will have acquired the mindset and skills needed to successfully deal with automation and intelligent machines.

Wed, 12 Aug 2020 13:31:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/degrees/online-programs
Killexams : Majoring in Global Islamic Studies

Global Islamic Studies focuses upon the analysis of the cultural, political and religious influence Muslims have in the globalized world by examining their past and present. You study how Islam became a fast-growing world religion and how perceptions of Muslims and Islam impact policies and conceptions of citizenship in both Muslim-majority and non-Muslim-majority countries throughout the world. Our faculty have specialized experience in Europe, South Asia, North Africa and the Middle East.

Language study

Language and culture are inherently intertwined. As a Global Islamic Studies major or minor, you are required to undertake advanced language study—two semesters at the intermediate level or higher in the same language related to the focus of your GIS studies. You can choose from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Russian, or Spanish, although another language may be selected with the approval of your faculty adviser. Students may also participate in the Structured Independent Language Study (SILS) program to study other languages such as Bengali, Colloquial Arabic, Hindi, Persian (Farsi), Turkish, and Urdu.

Study abroad

You will be encouraged to seek a study away program tailored to your particular interests. You might choose to study in Russia, Germany, Jordan, Morocco, India or another country . You will also work with a team of faculty and career advisers to find or develop a skill-building internship, in the U.S. or abroad, that relates to your studies and career goals. 

Fri, 21 Jan 2022 18:39:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.conncoll.edu/academics/majors-departments-programs/majors-and-minors/global-islamic-studies/ Killexams : Online Master of Public Health Program Handbook

All MPH students must complete a minimum of 45 graduate level credits: 21 credits from the MPH core courses, 18 credits in the concentration area (Public Health Practice), and a culminating experience that includes a 3-credit practicum (field studies course) and a 3-credit integrative learning experience (capstone course).

Required prerequisite coursework

Completion of an undergraduate or graduate course in statistics is required prior to admission into the MPH program.

Sample curriculum for Public Health Practice emphasis

The following represents a suggested curriculum and course progression for the Public Health Practice emphasis. Students should consider this an example only, consult their advisor and check the current course catalog. 

VIEW THE COURSE CATALOG

Public Health Core Courses (21 credits)

All students receiving an MPH in any specialization are required to take the following seven core courses. Substitution of transfer course credits from other institutions must be reviewed and approved by faculty and the Program Director. The Graduate Credit Transfer Evaluation Request form must be completed and emailed to the Online Program Director for consideration of transfer credits. The Transfer Evaluation Request must be accompanied by a syllabus of the course requesting to be transferred.

Public Health core courses (21 credits)

  • CHS 700 Research Methods for Public Health (3) (CHS 747 for On-Campus Programs)
  • CHS 701 Social and Behavioral Dimensions of Health (3)
  • CHS 712 Epidemiology in Public Health (3)
  • CHS 725 Health and the Environment (3)
  • CHS 755 Health Policy (3)
  • CHS 756 Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Health Services (3)
  • CHS 780 Biostatistics in Public Health (3)

Public Health Practice emphasis courses (18 credits)

  • CHS 702: Program Development in Public Health Practice (3)
  • CHS 716: Public Health Finance (3)
  • CHS 733: GIS and Spatial Analysis in Public Health (1)
  • CHS 734: Project Management Principles for Public Health (1)
  • CHS 735: Public Health Emergency Preparedness (1)
  • CHS 748: Epidemiologic Surveillance (3)
  • CHS 761: Public Health Law (3)
  • CHS 762: Public Health Information Systems and Data Management (3)

Practicum (3 credits)

The practicum is an important element of the MPH curriculum where the student obtains experience in a public health setting (150 hours) appropriate to the development of professional practice skills.

  • CHS 798: Field Studies in Public Health (3)

Integrative Learning Experience (3 credits)

All MPH students will complete an integrative learning experience that demonstrates synthesis of foundational and specialization competencies. This will be achieved by writing and presenting an MPH Capstone paper.

  • CHS 796: MPH Capstone (3)

Sample course progression

In addition to the six- and seven-semester program progressions, the online program also offers an eight-semester, two-courses per semester option. In this option, each semester has two courses (except for the semesters with field studies), and students begin field studies in the fifth semester instead of the four semester.

X-Term: Course progression for students matriculating in spring or fall of odd years (e.g., 2021, 2023) or in summer of even years (e.g., 2020, 2022).

Y-Term: Course progression for students matriculating in spring or fall of even years (e.g., 2020, 2022) or in summer of odd years (e.g., 2021, 2023).

Six-semester course progression

Seven-semester course progression

Eight-semester course progression

MPH internship

The purpose of the internship requirement is to provide each MPH student with significant practical public health experience in an agency outside of the University. There are a wide variety of organizations that qualify as an internship site locally, nationally, and internationally.

The MPH student is expected to find an organization to complete the internship opportunity. The Internship Instructor and other faculty can provide support through their various connections in the communities, but it is up to the student to arrange an internship that best fits with his or her area of interest. The identification and approval of possible internship sites should begin in the semester prior to being enrolled in CHS 798 Field Studies in Public Health.

Students must register for a total of three credit hours of CHS 798 and complete a minimum of 150 total work hours. Students may meet the hour requirement at their own pace, upon approval from their field studies preceptor and the field studies instructor, with the understanding that the hours should be completed over one to three semesters.

When determining an internship site, emphasis should be placed on arranging an internship experience that will provide the student with new skills and experiences, where the student will be working in a professional capacity. Once a site and preceptor (site supervisor) have been identified and arranged, the student will work with all parties to complete the Student Learning Contract (SLC), which outlines student goals, objectives, and competencies to be addressed during the Internship. Competencies are defined by CEPH as: Competencies clearly define what the student will do to demonstrate learning for a workforce-related need. The course objective specifies what the institution intends to do to achieve its course goals.”

The SLC is due the semester before the internship begins. The SLC must be signed by all parties and submitted to the internship instructor prior to the start of any internship hours. Preceptors must have significant education and/or work experience in public health to qualify as a preceptor. Final determination of preceptor qualification will be made by the Field Studies Instructor or appropriate faculty in the program. 

Students enrolled in the 6-semester option should plan on enrolling in 1 credit of CHS 798 each semester beginning in their third semester and ending in their fifth (penultimate) semester. Students work with the Field Studies Instructor in the Field Studies Resource Center (FRC) during their second semester to prepare for the field studies experience.

Students in the 7-semester option enroll in 1 credit hour of CHS 798 beginning in their fourth semester and ending in their sixth (penultimate) semester. Students work with the Field Studies Instructor in the Field Studies Resource Center (FRC) during their third semester to prepare for the field studies experience.

Students in the 8-semester option enroll in 1 credit hour of CHS 798 beginning in their fifth semester and ending in their seventh (penultimate) semester. Students work with the Field Studies Instructor in the Field Studies Resource Center (FRC) during their fourth semester to prepare for the field studies experience.

Interprofessional education (IPE) didactic and practice sessions, a core component of the CHS 798 course, take place throughout the internship. Attendance in IPE exercises is required as part of the CHS 798 course.

Background checks policy for University programs

Some states, as well as federal laws, now require that any individual who regularly provides services to certain segments of the population (generally, those deemed “vulnerable” or “special,” including but not limited to children and the sick) must submit to a criminal background check in order to obtain and maintain privileges in clinical and/or educational settings. Additionally, many sites affiliated with the University of Nevada, Reno have adopted this requirement for educational purposes. 

It is not University policy to perform background checks on all University students, and University does not certify or vouch for the background of the students who participate in an internship. Accordingly, an organization must conduct its own background check or require the student to obtain a background check, if the organization wants to determine fitness for duty using that information. It shall be the organization’s responsibility to evaluate the results of such background check and determine the student’s fitness for duty.

Students must be aware that:

  • If a criminal background check is required for placement at any internship or clinical facility, the expense for the check will be borne by the student or requesting agency. 
  • Student’s responsibilities: Each student required to provide a criminal background check must provide documentation that they have completed the fingerprinting and criminal background check as required by the facility.  Students may need to provide this information prior to beginning the internship. 
  • Results of a criminal background check will not be the property of the University. The University will not require the submission of results to the School of Public Health or the University.
  • If a student fails to pass a criminal background check, they may be ineligible for participation in the internship experience, which may impede their ability to progress in their coursework.
  • The School of Public Health or the University does not accept responsibility for any student being ineligible for coursework or continued enrollment in the School of Public Health for any reason, including failure to pass a criminal background check.

MPH capstone course: Professional paper and presentation

According to the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), all MPH students must demonstrate skills and integration of knowledge through a culminating experience.  A culminating experience is one that requires a student to synthesize and integrate foundational and concentration competencies.  Students will complete an MPH capstone paper that represents the culmination and mastery of the MPH curriculum. 

The MPH capstone course will provide the structure students need to complete the capstone paper and presentation. Students will provide and receive peer evaluation on their paper and presentation in the capstone course. Students will receive points in the capstone course for meeting paper and presentation deadlines and the quality of ALL submissions. The student’s paper must be of sufficient academic rigor to demonstrate mastery of the curriculum and competencies. 

Students should plan on taking CHS 796 in their last semester of the program. The focus of the capstone paper will vary based on the student’s interest, and generally derives from the field studies experience. In addition to the competencies identified by the capstone course instructor, students will choose one additional foundational competency and two additional Public Health Practice competencies that they will achieve with their paper and presentation.

In addition to providing the structure for completion of the MPH capstone paper and presentation, the capstone course will also address planning for lifelong learning and professional service.

Graduation process

MPH students graduate in the semester that they complete all requirements of the MPH degree, usually in the same semester they complete the MPH capstone course. Students have a total of 6 years to complete all degree requirements. Students graduating in Summer semesters may participate in the Hooding and Commencement Ceremonies in (1) Spring preceding graduation, or (2) Fall following graduation. Students graduating in Fall semesters may participate in the Hooding and Commencement Ceremonies in the Fall semester or in the Spring following graduation.

The student should purchase a graduation application by the posted deadline. The Graduate School will review each application and email the students within 3 to 8 weeks with the result of their graduation review. All candidates for graduation should communicate with the Program Director or the Academic Advisor to confirm expectations for the final semester. Important dates, deadlines, and milestones are located on the University’s graduation and deadlines website. 

The MPH Hooding Ceremony is the highlight of the Graduation Process – all family and friends are invited. The timing of this allows for MPH students to attend the University's Graduate Student Commencement as well.

Mon, 08 Nov 2021 04:27:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/public-health/academics/online-mph/online-mph-handbook
Killexams : Alumni Email

Baylor provides former students with an email account that allows them to continue to show their Baylor affiliation through their email address.

Availability

Alumni accounts are established one or two semesters prior to graduation so that students can begin to transition their contact information to the alumni address. The new address is similar to that of a standard Baylor student email account: Your_Bear_ID2@alumni.baylor.edu. Alumni email can be accessed at www.outlook.com/alumni.baylor.edu using either the Web or the Outlook email client. The service includes familiar Outlook features such as calendar, contacts, and provides 50 GB of email storage.

When you receive your Baylor alumni email account, we encourage you to add your mobile phone number so that you can reset your password as needed. Call the Help Desk at (254) 710-4357 to add your mobile number to your Baylor alumni email account.

Baylor student email accounts (e.g., Your_Bear_ID2@baylor.edu) remain active for one full term after either graduation or the last day of attendance. Several notifications are sent to each student prior to deactivating their student email account.

Usage of any email address provided by Baylor University is subject to the terms and conditions of the Technology Usage Policy. These accounts are also subject to the Microsoft Code of Conduct. This alumni email benefit and process may be subject to re-evaluation, modification, and termination by the University in its sole discretion in the future.

Support

This is a free service that provides 50 GB mailboxes. The system includes calendar and contacts features and has the look and feel of Outlook Web Access (OWA) used by Baylor students to access their university email accounts. Also, this allows proud Baylor Bears to display their continued affiliation with the university through the "@alumni.baylor.edu" account name!

If you established a mobile number on your Baylor alumni email account, you can reset your password by requesting to receive a code on your mobile device. If you do not have your mobile number registered on your Baylor alumni email account, please call the Help Desk at (254) 710-4357 and an associate will help you reset your password. Be sure to identify yourself as a former student with a question about your alumni account.

During the time when both your @baylor.edu and @alumni.baylor.edu accounts are active, you should notify as many people as possible with whom you correspond regularly of your new address, as well as update your address on sites like Facebook and Twitter. During this time, you should also move the mail messages you want to keep to your new account. Another way to tell folks about your new account is to set an out-of-office message on your student @baylor.edu account indicating your new @alumni.baylor.edu address.

Baylor has no way to notify the various entities where you may have listed your student email address as contact information, so please notify your contacts of your new address by setting an out-of-office message after you graduate with your alumni email information.

There is no automated process for moving calendar and contact entries from the student email account to the new alumni email account. However, if you can format your contacts into a .csv file, they can be imported into the alumni account by following instructions on the "Import your contacts..." link on the My Account page from the Options menu. During the migration, you may see errors when your calendar/contact information attempts to migrate, which is normal behavior in our migration process.

Yes. The new account can be accessed on your mobile device by setting up the account using your account name and password similar to other email accounts (e.g., Exchange, Gmail). NOTE: If you choose to use IMAP for your connection setting on a mobile device, please use outlook.office365.com for both your incoming and outgoing server settings.

If you need assistance or further information, visit this helpful Microsoft Outlook resource, contact the Help Desk at (254) 710-4357, or email helpdesk@baylor.edu

Wed, 27 Oct 2021 08:24:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.baylor.edu/helpdesk/index.php?id=982094
Killexams : Meet the Library Team

Jonathan Zittrain, George Bemis Professor of International Law and Vice Dean, Library And Information Resources, Harvard Law School; Faculty Director, Berkman Klein Center For Internet And Society; Professor of Computer Science, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Professor, Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government
Jocelyn Kennedy, Executive Director
Lesliediana Jones, Associate Director for Public Services
Teresa Mosley, Financial Assistant
Gail Fagerstrom Harris, Projects Manager
Theresa Knapp, Executive Assistant & Event Coordinator
Jess Rios, Assistant Director, Digital Content & UX

Brian Sutton, Access Services Manager
Melanie Evans, Access Services Coordinator
Ella Galinovsky, Collection Management Specialist
Michael Mellor. Access Services Coordinator
Ryan Miniot, Access Services Coordinator
Nilesh Rana, Collection Management Specialist
Jayvanti Rana, Binding, End Processing, And HD Processing Coordinator

Rachel Gordon, Case Writer and Research Associate

Stephen Wiles, Collection Development Librarian for Foreign, Comparative & International Law
Caroline Walters, Collection Development Librarian for U.S. & the Materials Budget
Gayle Fischer, Librarian for Islamic Law
Mariko Honshuku, Librarian for Japanese Law
Eve Lauria, Islamic Law Library Assistant
Lori Schulsinger, Collection Development Coordinator
QingRong Wei, Library Assistant
Nongji Zhang, Bibliographer for East Asian Law

Elke Piontek, Manager, Continuing Resources And Acquisitions
Erin Britt, Library Assistant
Jennifer Burton, Library Assistant
Todd Moody, Library Assistant
Lori Ellen Rocha, Library Assistant
Patty Sutton, Library Assistant
Maria Woods, Library Assistant

Jessica Chapel, Librarian/Archivist for Digital Projects
Paul Deschner, Applications Developer
Chris Spraker, Archivist for Special Projects

Laura Morrison-Westphal, Electronic Resources Coordinator

Arevik Avedian, Director of Empirical Research Services

KB Beck, Manager, Historical & Special Collections & Rare Books Curator
Edwin Moloy, Curator of Modern Manuscripts
Mary Person, Rare Books Cataloger / Reference Librarian
Lesley Schoenfeld, Public Services & Visual Collections Administrator
Sarah Wharton, Access Services Coordinator & Curatorial Associate

Jack Cushman, Director
Catherine Brobston, Outreach and Support
Matteo Cargnelutti, Senior Developer
Rebecca Cremona, Web Developer
Liza Daly, Technologist in Residence
Harmony Eidolon, LIL Program Coordinator
Sabelo Mhlambi, Technologist in Residence
Clare Stanton, Communications and Outreach for Perma.cc
Ben Steinberg, DevOps Engineer

Thomas Ma, Cataloging Manager
Dan Belich, Library Assistant
Sean Bustard, Technical Services Library Assistant
Noah Cohen, Library Assistant
John Hostage, Senior Continuing Resources Cataloger
Olga Strakhov, Library Assistant

Terri Messina, Conservation Technician

Faculty Research & Scholarly Support Services

Deborah Ginsberg, Manager, Faculty Research and Scholarly Support Services
Deanna Barmakian, Faculty Research Librarian
Maya Bergamasco, Faculty Research & Scholarly Support Librarian
Alethea Jones, Faculty Research and Information Delivery Assistant
Rachel Parker, Faculty Research and Information Delivery Assistant
Lisa Lilliott Rydin, Faculty Research Librarian

Student & Instructional Services

Mindy Kent, Manager, Reference & Student & Instructional Research Services
Jennifer Allison, Librarian for Foreign, Comparative, & International Law & Instructional Designer
Catherine Biondo, Research Librarian
AJ Blechner, Research Librarian & Instructional Designer
Juan Andres Fuentes, Librarian for Foreign, Comparative, & International Law
Anna Martin, Research Services Assistant
Michelle Pearse, Senior Research & Data Librarian

Library Administration

Photo of Jonathan ZittrainJonathan Zittrain

Vice Dean, Library And Information Resources, Faculty Co-Director, Berkman Center For Internet And Society, Professor Of Computer Science, SEAS
a2jz@law
617-496-2108 (Griswold) 617-496-5243 (Langdell)
View faculty profile

Photo of Jocelyn KennedyJocelyn Kennedy

Executive Director
jokennedy@law
617-496-2108
LinkedIn

Jocelyn Kennedy is the Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Library, where she oversees the day to day operations and provides strategic leadership for the Library. The HLS Library combines tradition with innovation and is renowned for its unique and exceptional print and electronic collections, its deep historical and archival collections and its expert research and reference staff. In addition, the Library has built programs to assist with curricular support (the Case Studies program), tech development to solve complex information access issues (Perma.cc; H20; Caselaw Access Project), and in-house, large-scale digitization.

Jocelyn is an expert in legal research, management, and working in complex organizations.  She presents on Topics related to management, mindfulness, and communication. Jocelyn is a member of the Law Librarians of New England; the American Association of Law Libraries, where she serves as the Chair of the Standing Committee on the Economic Status of Librarians and is a member of the Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section newsletter committee; and is a member of the American Association of Law Schools (AALS). Jocelyn is also a member of the New Hampshire Bar Association.

Prior to joining the Library in 2016, Jocelyn served in leadership positions at UCONN Law and Michigan Law. She is a former clerk for the New Hampshire Trial Court, and worked for a US Congressman prior to attending law school. Jocelyn holds a B.A. from the University of New Hampshire, a J.D. from the University of New Hampshire-Franklin Pierce Law Center, and an M.L.I.S. from the University of Washington.

Lesliediana smiling at the beachLesliediana Jones

Associate Director for Public Services
ljones@law

Teresa Mosley

Financial Assistant
tmosley@law
617-998-2765

Photo of Gail Fagerstrom HarrisGail Fagerstrom Harris

Projects Manager
gharris@law
617-495-4510

Gail Fagerstrom Harris is our Project Manager overseeing a variety of projects including the Library’s Professional Development Program that ensures our staff keep their skills and knowledge current. She also doubles as an event planner, organizing behind the scenes to make our events run smoothly.

Gail found a love of the law while working for a legal services nonprofit in Gainesville, FL. She holds an A.A. in Psychology, and is a Certified Professional in Training Management (CPTM). She loves to craft, garden, cook, and sing to her dog, Miles. She and her dog-trainer partner rescue dogs in their spare time.

Theresa Knapp

Executive Assistant and Event Coordinator
tknapp@law
617-495-5069

Jess Rios

Assistant Director, Digital Content & UX
jrios@law
617-495-2306

Access Services

Brian Sutton

Access Services Manager
bsutton@law
781-795-2628

Melanie Evans

Access Services Coordinator
mevans@law
617-495-4567

Ella Galinovsky

Collection Management Specialist
galinovs@law
617-496-8265

Michael Mellor

Access Services Coordinator
mmellor@law

Ryan Miniot

Access Services Coordinator
jminiot@law
617-496-5510

Ryan Miniot, Access Services Coordinator, joined the Library in 2014. Ryan welcomes visiting library researchers who have questions about access and acquiring materials, answers queries about library access, handles Scan & Deliver services at the Library, and trains and oversees our student workers at the circulation desk. Ryan holds a B.A. in History from Trinity University (Texas), an M.A. in History, and an  M.L.S. from Simmons College. Outside of work, Ryan’s passions include basketball (Go Nets!) and punk rock music.

Nilesh Rana

Collection Management Specialist
nrana@law
617-496-1942

Jayvanti Rana

Binding, End Processing, And HD Processing Coordinator
jyrana@law
617-496-6917

Case Studies

Rachel Gordon

Case Writer And Research Associate
ragordon@law
617-384-6552

Collection Development

Stephen Wiles on beach in WaikikiStephen Wiles

Collection Development Librarian For Foreign And International Law
wiles@law
617-495-5804

Caroline Walters smilingCaroline Walters

Collection Development Librarian for U.S. & the Materials Budget
cwalters@law
617-495-5166

Caroline joined the HLS Library in 2012 as the Collection Development Librarian for U.S. Law and Materials Budget, responsible for the selection of U.S. law materials and managing the collections budget. She also leads negotiation for new electronic resources and serves as a coordinator for university-wide negotiations.
Caroline is passionate about consumer advocacy and building partnerships with vendors to create greater discovery of their materials, to ensure preservation of electronic historical legal research, to ensure digital accessibility, and to develop better business practices.
Prior to joining the HLS Library Caroline was the Acquisitions and Serials Librarian at Suffolk University Law Library for many years. Caroline holds a B.A. in English from Suffolk University and a M.S. in Library and Information Science from Simmons College
She is an active member of AALL, LLNE and NELLCO.

Gayle Fischer

Librarian for Islamic Law
gfischer@law
617-384-8495

Photo of Mariko Honshuku

Mariko Honshuku

Librarian for Japanese Law
mhonshuk@law
617-496-4581

Mariko Honshuku, Librarian for Japanese Law is responsible for selecting and managing HLS Library materials for Japanese law and interdisciplinary subject areas in all formats. As a liaison librarian to the East Asian Legal Studies programs at HLS, she provides special research assistance to faculty, students, and visiting scholars including reference, research consultation, bibliographic instruction, and assistance with interlibrary loan. She is also responsible for creating library collection analysis reports using the Harvard Cognos Library Reporting System. Mariko has served on several committees and working groups for the North American Coordinating Council on Japanese Library Resources (NCC) and the Council on East Asian Libraries (CEAL). She holds an M.L.S. from Simmons Graduate School of Library & Information Science and an M.M. in Organ Performance from The New England Conservatory of Music. In her spare time, Mariko enjoys learning new programing languages.

Photo of Eve Lauria

Eve Lauria

Islamic Law Library Assistant
elauria@law
617-495-3871

Eve Lauria is the Islamic Acquisitions Assistant, responsible for ordering, receiving, and cataloging Middle Eastern, North African, and Islamic Law, primarily in Islamic and Persian. Eve studied Psychology, Religion, and Women’s Studies at Oberlin College and holds an M.L.I.S. from Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science.  She is currently serving as a Board member and long-time volunteer at Eastern Massachusetts Abortion Fund, she sings in her church choir, and spends the rest of her free time reading.

Photo of Lori SchulsingerLori Schulsinger

Collection Development Coordinator
lschulsinger@law
617-495-3827

Lori joined the HLS Library in 2006 and is our Collection Development Coordinator. In her role, Lori supports two bibliographers, monitors the library materials budget, and co-administers the HLS Library wiki page. Lori holds a B.S. in Marketing from Syracuse University and actively participates in several library teams/committees. In her spare time, Lori volunteers at Food Link, a food rescue organization, and the Road to Recovery-American Cancer Society, where she provides transportation to and from treatment for people with cancer.

QingRong Wei

Library Assistant
qwei@law

Photo of Nongji ZhangNongji Zhang

Bibliographer For East Asian Law
zhang4@law
617-495-4016

Nongji Zhang, Ph.D., Bibliographer for East Asian Law, has been with the Library since 1990, first as a library assistant before moving into her current position. Before working for HLS, Nongji was a researcher at the Institute of Science and Technology Policy and Management at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. When in China, she did research on science and technology law and provided legal services to local high tech companies.

As an area studies librarian at HLS, Nongji provides research services to faculty members and research consultations to faculty, students, and other patrons. She selects and manages Chinese and Korean law materials for the Library. A 2004 Douglas W. Bryant Fellowship recipient, Nongji has published works on Chinese law and library collection development including Resources on East Asian Law in the United States (1 J. of East Asian & Int’l L. 311). Her forthcoming book, The Pioneer Legal Schools and Their Scholarship in the People’s Republic of China, will be published by the East Asian Legal Studies Program. Nongji received a Ph.D. in Law, Policy and Society from Northeastern University, a M.L.S. from Simmons College, and an LL.M. from Peking University. In her free time, she enjoys traveling, photographing, gardening, and crafting.

Continuing Resources & Acquisitions

Elke Piontek

Manager, Continuing Resources And Acquisitions
epiontek@hbs
617-496-2105

Erin Britt

Continuing Resources & Acquisitions Library Assistant
ebritt@law
617-495-4002

Erin Britt joined the library in 2014. In her role as the Continuing Resources & Acquisitions Library Assistant, she is responsible for the receipt and payment of continuing resources. Prior to joining the HLS Library Erin worked as an Assistant Catalog Librarian at a rare book library and prior to that as a Technical Services Project Coordinator at a software company. Erin holds an M.L.I.S. from Simmons College and a B.A. in Journalism and Mass Communication from Saint Michael’s College. In her spare time, Erin enjoys teaching and practicing yoga.

Jennifer Burton

Library Assistant
jburton@law
617-495-3172

Todd Moody

Library Assistant
tmoody@law
617-495-3871

Lori Ellen Rocha

Library Assistant
lrocha@law
617-495-4489

Patty Sutton

Acquisitions Assistant
pross@law
617-495-3737

Patty Sutton, Acquisitions Assistant, secures rush orders for our patrons, orders monograph and monograph series, communicates with vendors, and connects other departments with technical services. She holds a B.A. in French Language and Literature from the University of Washington, and an M.L.S. from Southern Connecticut State University. Patty is fluent in French, is familiar with Spanish, and can transliterate Cyrillic alphabets. Prior to her work at Harvard, Patty was a bank teller and taught French to middle school students. Patty grew up in Alaska, enjoys running marathons and rock climbing, and reads math history books in her spare time.

Maria Woods

Library Assistant
mwoods@law
617-495-4002

Digital Lab

Jessica Chapel

Librarian/Archivist for Digital Projects
jchapel@law
617-384-7712

Paul Deschner

Applications Developer
deschner@law
617-384-9799

Chris Spraker

Archivist for Special Projects
cspraker@law
617-496-9732

Electronic Resources & Serials

Laura Morrison-Westphal

Electronic Resources Coordinator
lmorrison@law
617-495-3829

Empirical Research Services

Photo of Arevik AvedianArevik Avedian

Director of Empirical Research Services
aavedian@law
617-495-5268

Arevik Avedian is the Director of Empirical Research Services (ERS). ERS provides empirical research support for the Harvard Law School faculty. Arevik is a Lecturer on Law at HLS, teaching quantitative methods. She holds a Ph.D. in World Politics and Methods, an M.A. in Economics from Claremont Graduate University, and a dual B.A/M.A., summa cum laude, in International Relations from David Anhaght University of Armenia. Before joining HLS, she taught courses on statistics and international relations at University of California, Riverside and California State University, Fullerton. Her research focuses on armed conflict, inequality and corporate governance. Some of her current methodological interests include geographic information systems (GIS), text mining and location analytics.

Historical & Special Collections (HSC)

KB Beck KB Beck

Manager, Historical & Special Collections & Rare Books Curator
kbeck@law
617-496-2107

KB Beck is the Harvard Law School Library’s Manager of Historical & Special Collections. “HSC” is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing historical materials in all formats with researchers around the world. KB contributes to the HLS Library’s social media, and helps plan and participate in outreach activities to connect students, faculty, and the broader community with the library’s collections and services. She has worked in academic law libraries in many capacities, including reference and research services, instruction, and collection development. KB is an active member of Harvard’s special collections community, and is a member of the American Association of Law Libraries, Law Libraries of New England, and the Rare Books and Manuscript section of the American Library Association. She has a BA in English from Pomona College, a JD from the University of Southern California, and a Masters in Library Science from UCLA. Away from the library, Karen loves to dance, kayak, visit museums, and walk through the Public Garden.

Edwin Moloy

Curator Of Modern Manuscripts
emoloy@law
617-496-8080

Photo of Mary PersonMary Person

Rare Books Cataloger / Reference Librarian
person@law
617-495-3258

Mary Person, Rare Books Cataloger and Reference Librarian, catalogs rare books and early manuscripts, making them accessible to the world. Mary also provides research support and expertise to researchers in our Historical & Special Collections (HSC). She specializes in early English legal works, execution broadsides, French customary law, and early printing and publishing in general. She is also an expert on HSC’s byzantine system of call numbers and shelving arrangements. Mary was a pastry chef for several years before she joined HLS Library in 1987. She holds a B.A. in History and Anthropology from Marlboro College, an M.L.S. from Simmons, and has also taken a number of courses at Rare Book School at Columbia and University of Virginia. Mary reads French, Spanish, and some Latin. Away from the Library, Mary is a passionate gardener and walker, and loves being outdoors.

Lesley Schoenfeld

Public Services & Visual Collections Administrator
lschoenf@law
617-495-4689

Sarah Wharton

Access Services Coordinator & Curatorial Associate
swharton@law
617-496-4616

Library Innovation Lab

Jack Cushman

Director
jcushman@law
617-495-5106

Catherine Brobston

Outreach and Support
cbrobston@law

Matteo Cargnelutti

Senior Developer
mcargnelutti@law

Rebecca Cremona

Web Developer
rcremona@law
617-496-5232

Liza Daly

Technologist in Residence
ldaly@law

Harmony Eidolon posing with hand under chinHarmony Eidolon

LIL Program Coordinator
heidolon@law
phone number coming soon

Sabelo Mhlambi

Technologist in Residence
smhlambi@law

Clare StantonClare Stanton

Communications and Outreach for Perma.cc
cstanton@law
617-384-6776

Clare joined the Library Innovation Lab (LIL) in 2018. She leads the way in exploring and expanding the user group of Perma.cc, a service that creates indelible links for web citation. Prior to joining LIL, Clare worked at The Forum for Growth and Innovation, a research community lead by Professor Clay Christensen at Harvard Business School. Clare holds a B.A. in Art History from Wake Forest University and is an M.S. student at Simmons School of Library and Information Science.

Photo of Ben Steinberg

Ben Steinberg

DevOps Engineer
bsteinberg@law
617-495-1268

Ben Steinberg, DevOps Engineer, joined our Library Innovation Lab (LIL) in 2016. Ben holds a B.A. in English from Amherst College and an M.S. from Simmons College. Prior to HLS, Ben worked at the Brookline Public Library and Harvard’s Office for Scholarly Communication.

Metadata Creation for Professional Schools

Thomas Ma

Cataloging Manager
tma@law
617-496-2109

Tom Ma, Cataloging Manager, holds an M.A. and an M.L.I.S. Tom first worked for Harvard libraries in 1999.

Dan Belich

Library Assistant
dbelich@law
617-998-2608

Sean Bustard

Technical Services Library Assistant
sbustard@law

Noah Cohen

Library Assistant VI
ncohen@law
617-496-3793

Noah Cohen, Library Assistant VI, is responsible for cataloging and monograph receipts. Noah holds a B.A. in Classical Languages from the University of California at Berkeley, and an M.A. in Classical Philology from Harvard University, and knows ancient and modern Greek, Latin, and German.

Photo of John HostageJohn Hostage

Senior Continuing Resources Cataloger
hostage@law
617-495-3974
LinkedIn

John Hostage, Senior Continuing Resources Cataloger, joined the Library in 1982 and is responsible for cataloging serials, loose-leaf publications, various electronic resources, training catalogers in the creation of authority records and reviewing their work, as well as solving cataloging problems.

In addition to his work at the library, John is actively involved with the American Library Association (ALA), the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL), is a former chair of AALL Cataloging and Classification Committee, formerly served on the International Federation of Library Archives (IFLA) Cataloging Section, and IFLA Classification and Indexing Section.

John holds a B.A. from Columbia University, and M.A.s in German and Library Science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He received the Renee D. Chapman award from AALL in 2014. John speaks German fluently, as well as French, Spanish, Swedish, Norwegian.

Olga Strakhov

Library Assistant
ostrakhov@law
617-495-5045

Preservation, Conservation, & Digital Imaging

Terri Messina

Library Assistant
tmessina@law617-496-7296

Reference & Research Services

Faculty Research & Scholarly Support Services

Photo of Debbie GinsbergDeborah Ginsberg

Manager, Faculty Research & Scholarly Support Services
dginsberg@law
617-495-8689
LinkedIn |Twitter

Debbie Ginsberg, Faculty Services Manager, oversees faculty research and support for the Library.  She supervises FRIDA and three research librarians.  She came to Harvard in 2021.  She likes questions about legal technology and blockchain.  Debbie holds a B.A. from Brown University, a B.F.A. from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, a J.D. from the University of Illinois (Champaign-Urbana), and an M.L.S. from Dominican University (River Forest).  She is an inactive member of the Illinois Bar.  Debbie has studied Russian, French, Japanese, German, and Latin but has pretty much forgotten them.  Debbie has served as chair of CS-SIS (now LIT-SIS) and was actively involved in CALL. She currently is technology co-chair for LLNE.  She previously was Educational Technology Librarian at Chicago-Kent, where she worked since 2002.  She also was the AIDS advocacy attorney for the (now defunct) Cook County Legal Assistance Foundation and clerked for Justice Warren Wolfson of the Illinois Appellate Court.  Debbie has two teens who at this point probably know more about tech than she does, two photogenic cats, and way too much yarn.  Debbie likes drawing on her iPad while listening to as many free audiobooks as she can get from the public library.

Photo of Deanna BarmakianDeanna Barmakian

Faculty Research Librarian
dbarmakian@law
617-496-2129
Make an appointment

Deanna Barmakian, Faculty Research Librarian, provides research and reference support to our faculty, students, and staff. Deanna holds a B.A. in International Relations from Brown University, a J.D. from Boston University and an M.L.I.S. from Simmons. Deanna first joined the Library in 1997, left in 2006, and happily returned in 2017. She gets a charge out of helping researchers find sources they might not have found otherwise. She has learned (and mostly forgotten) French, Italian, and Spanish and is currently trying her hand at Korean. She has participated in law librarian professional organizations at the local and national level, chairing and serving on many committees. Outside of work, she’s hanging out with her retired HLS librarian husband and her two over-scheduled sons.

Maya Bergamasco smilingMaya Bergamasco

Faculty Research & Scholarly Support Librarian
mbergamasco@law
617-496-1059
LinkedIn

Maya Bergamasco, Faculty Research & Scholarly Support Librarian, provides reference and research support to the Harvard Law School community. She is the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Diversity Resident Librarian for 2019-2021. Maya holds a B.A. in English literature with a concentration in creative writing. She received her M.L.I.S. with a concentration in user instruction from Simmons University, where she was an American Library Association (ALA) Spectrum Scholar. Maya’s research interests include critical data studies, digital scholarship, and community outreach and engagement. She has intermediate proficiency in Spanish, and has studied Russian and Korean. In her free time, she works as a community organizer, plays ultimate Frisbee, and visits local bookstores.

Alethea Jones

Faculty Research & Information Delivery Assistant
aljones@law
617-496-5510

Rachel Parker

Faculty Research & Information Delivery Assistant
rparker@law
617-496-2124

Rachel Parker supports the Faculty Research and Information Delivery Assistance (FRIDA) service, providing research support to Faculty and SJD students. She also supports the Faculty Bibliography Project and helps coordinate Faculty Book Talk events. She holds a B.A. in English Literature from Mount Holyoke College and an M.L.I.S. from Simmons School of Library and Information Science. Prior to her work as FRIDA Assistant Rachel worked at Houghton Library and the Harvard Botany Libraries.

Lisa Lilliott RydinLisa Lilliott Rydin

Faculty Research Librarian
lrydin@law
617-496-2123
LinkedIn

Lisa Lilliott Rydin, Faculty Research Librarian, provides research support to library patrons, teaches research skills and strategy to students, and serves as Library Liaison to designated faculty members, clinics, and journals. She specializes in business, corporate, and tax-related research.  Lisa holds a B.A. in Economics and Government from Colby College, a J.D. from Harvard Law School, and an M.L.I.S. from Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science. Lisa joined the Reference & Research Services team full-time after three years serving in a variety of roles at Harvard including Reference, Faculty Services, and Scholarly Communications, while completing her M.L.I.S. Before librarianship, Lisa had a career as an ERISA/Employee Benefits attorney. She began her career at Goodwin & Procter (now Goodwin Procter) and Hale & Dorr (now WilmerHale) and then moved in-house, spending the majority of her career in the financial services industry focusing on qualified and non-qualified retirement plans. Lisa is a member of the Massachusetts Bar, the American Association of Law Libraries, the Law Librarians of New England, and the Special Libraries Association. Lisa likes to unwind with a good mystery book and currently recommends Louise Penny and Tana French as her authors of choice.

Student & Instructional Services

Photo of Mindy KentMindy Kent

Manager, Reference & Student & Instructional Research Services
mkent@law
617-495-4454
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Mindy Kent, Manager, Research Services, manages our team of research librarians and enjoys helping faculty and students with research questions herself. She particularly likes questions about legal history. Mindy holds a B.A. in History from Yale College, a J.D. from Boston College Law School, an M.L.I.S. from Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science, and she is a member of the Massachusetts Bar. She has some practicing knowledge of French and has done coursework in Russian, Latin, Attic Greek, and Old English. Mindy is involved with the American Association of Law Libraries and the Law Librarians of New England, of which she is a past president. Prior to joining the HLS Library in 1998, Mindy practiced corporate law in Boston. Her second, concurrent career is Chief of Staff for an extremely busy terrier. Her hobbies include genealogy, hiking, knitting, sewing, and restoring vintage toy sailboats. Mindy’s super power is walking and practicing (usually murder mysteries) at the same time.

Jennifer Allison smilingJennifer Allison

Librarian for Foreign, Comparative, & International Law & Instructional Designer
jallison@law
617-495-4543
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Jennifer Allison has served as a Librarian for Foreign, Comparative, and International Law at the Harvard Law Library since 2012. She specializes in German-language jurisdictions, and has responsibilities for both research and collection development. She earned her J.D. from Pepperdine Law School in Malibu, California in 2007 and is admitted to the California bar (inactive status). She also holds a Master’s in Library and Information Science (San Jose State University, 2010), and an LL.M. from the University of Würzburg in Germany (2018). The Topic of her LL.M. thesis was the protection of fundamental rights in cases of privatization of public functions and services under the German Basic Law. She returns to Würzburg regularly as a visiting lecturer to teach substantive courses in U.S. law, including criminal procedure, administrative law, remedies, and alternative dispute resolution. Her scholarly interests include social justice, correctional law, critical legal studies, the intersection of law and language, and the navigation of the acculturation process by foreign students. In her spare time, she likes to watch and play ice hockey.

Catherine Biondo

Student Services Research Librarian
cbiondo@law
617-495-4531
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Catherine Biondo, Research Librarian, provides research and reference support to Harvard’s students, faculty and staff, with a concentration on student services.  She also teaches legal research as part of the first year LRW program.  Prior to becoming a librarian, Catherine practiced law in New York and was a research law clerk for the Connecticut Superior Court. Catherine holds an A.B. in Government from Cornell University, a J.D. from St. John’s University School of Law, and an M.S. in Library Science from Simmons College. She is a past president of the Law Librarians of New England, and is currently co-chair of the organization’s Government Relations Committee.  She is also actively involved with the American Association of Law Libraries, and is a member of its Government Relations Committee.  She is admitted to the New York and Connecticut bars.

Photo of AJ BlechnerAJ Blechner

Student Services Research Librarian & Instructional Designer
ablechner@law
617-495-9491
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AJ Blechner is the Library’s Research Librarian and Instructional Designer. They coordinate and participate in teaching legal research, lead the design and development of instructional materials and assess our teaching and educational needs and offerings. AJ’s research specialties include Disability Law, Gender and Sexual Minorities Law, Cyberlaw, Intellectual Property, Health Law, Administrative Law, Political Communication, and Instructional Design.

AJ holds a B.A., cum laude, from Emerson College, a J.D. from Villanova University School of Law, and an M.L.I.S. with a Special Certificate in Law Librarianship from the University of Washington. They also received a certificate in Learning Design and Technology from the Harvard Extension School. AJ is an active member of the American Association of Law Libraries, chairing the SR-SIS Standing Committee on Disability Issues and serving on the Government Relations Committee. AJ publishes and presents on library instruction, sexuality and gender, and disability and inclusion. In their spare time, AJ participates in volunteer work and community activism. They hike, ski, and camp in the New England woods, and are an avid board gamer and Marvel movie enthusiast.

Juan Andres Fuentes

Photo of Juan Fuentes Librarian for Foreign, Comparative & International Law
jfuentes@law
617-496-2152

Juan Andres Fuentes serves as a Librarian for Foreign, Comparative & International Law.  He earned a Bachelor of Law from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru, a Master of Law from the University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law and a M.S. in Library Science from the University of North Texas. He is a member of the Lima Bar and practiced international law prior to becoming a librarian. While in practice, he received the National Order of Merit of the Peruvian Diplomatic Service “Jose Paz Soldan” in the Degree of Commander.  He is the 2021 AALL George A. Strait Scholarship & Fellowship Award Recipient and serves as chair of the AALL Latin American Law Interest Group.  Juan Andres is fluent in English, French & Spanish, and he has a strong interest in Consumer Law and Public International Law.

Anna Martin

Research Services Assistant
amartin@law

Michelle Pearse

Senior Research & Data Librarian
mpearse@law
617-496-2102
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Michelle Pearse, Senior Research and Data Librarian, focuses on research assistance generally and data-related research. She has a wide range of library experience across subject areas and functions (often including emerging areas of library activities), and has growing expertise on finding and working with data.  Throughout her career, Michelle has been active in professional organizations. She is currently co-chair of the Communications and Technology Committee and a member of the Government Relations Committee in Law Librarians of New England. She has chaired American Association of Law Libraries (AALL) committees, including the Indexing and Placements and Grants Committees. She served on the Local Arrangements Committees the last two times that the AALL annual meeting has taken place in Boston. In addition, she co-chaired an AALL Academic Law Libraries Special Interest Section task force that write a report on scholarly communication issues in libraries. Michelle is also involved in government relations including advocacy and education around the Uniform Electronic Legal Materials Act (UELMA).

In addition, Michelle serves on university committees and task forces, most recently those related to data acquisitions, accessibility of web archives, and e-resources selection. She co-founded the Data Discussion group at Harvard Library.  Michelle has published in the Michigan Law Review and Law Library Journal. In addition to her own presentations on Topics related to collection development, open access, and data, she has helped organize programs such as Implementing the Durham Statement: Best Practices for Open Access Law Journals and Law.gov.  Michelle joined the Library in 2003. Her previous positions at HLS include Research Librarian for Open Access & Scholarly Communication, Bibliographer for Anglo-American Law, and a stint in our collection services department in the late 1990s. She has worked for the Boston Public Library, Emmanuel College Library, Northeastern University School of Law Library and the University of Connecticut School of Law Library.

Michelle holds an M.L.S. and J.D., and is admitted to practice law in Massachusetts. She has a dual B.A. in English and Political Science, and studied abroad at Oxford University during her undergraduate years. She has practicing knowledge of French. Follow her on Twitter at @aabibliographer.

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 05:29:00 -0500 en text/html https://hls.harvard.edu/library/about-the-library/staff-directory/
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