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Exam Code: HQT-4210 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
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Killexams : Hitachi Professional test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HQT-4210 Search results Killexams : Hitachi Professional test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/HQT-4210 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Hitachi Killexams : Teachers learn ways to EXCITE students

For two weeks out of the year in June and July, Pittsylvania County teachers get experience and shadow local businesses in order to bring that experience back to their students for preparation into the workforce.

EXCITE is a weeklong professional development program placing educators in business settings in order to connect the classroom to the workplace.

Dr. Julie Brown is the Director of Advanced Learning for the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research, and she explains this is the second time this has been held due to it not being put on in 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID pandemic.

“Excite has been doing this since 2019. It’s a program that was funded by the Danville Regional Foundation.”

She explains what the teachers can learn from this program.

“The expectation is to take what they have seen and learned and incorporate it into their lessons to their students. For every teacher that is exposed to local business, that one experience from a teacher can impact 50 students every year.”

Angela Rigney, director of Career and Technical Education for Pittsylvania County Schools, explained a little further stating, “The awareness teachers can bring back to the students to show them what they need to do to be successful in a career path they so choose.”

Brown calls it, “A bridge to connect educators to the private sector.”

Rigney said that employers also gain from the experience. 

“For them to be able to supply feedback, working with the teachers, gaps between the knowledge base of the teachers to strengthen their awareness to better enhance programs and to benefit our school system and our students," she said.

This is reinforced by EXCITE’s model.

“EXCITE is a week-long summer professional development program placing middle and high school educators in business settings in order to connect the classroom to the workplace. Educators will spend one or two days at each company visiting between two and four businesses over four days. The fifth day will include a debrief meeting with the program coordinator and peers to discuss lessons learned and ideas for classroom implementation.”

Participating educators earn an $800 stipend for successfully completing the program.

Brown wraps it up by saying it gives young people the most opportunity.

“We’ve taken all these collaborate efforts together under a framework to work together, “How are we connecting young people to all the opportunities in Virginia?” and they see the relevance, “Why am I learning this?”

Dana Wilson is the Work-Based Learning Program Coordinator for the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research and says for both weeks, different employers come in, so it is not the same experience.

Wilson said the feedback they get is vital for the continuation of the program, and its goal.

“We receive all kinds of feedback. Educators are asked to complete multiple documents, so we can see the jobs that are available in this area in order to have access to these opportunities. It’s a great line from employer to teacher to students.”

Wilson gave a bit of insight on one example of feedback, citing more businesses needing to participate.

“Since we are still in the program, we haven’t surveyed employers yet. The June cohort of educators had a lot of feedback, but ultimately, we need more businesses participating throughout the region. We need to promote the program more because it is extremely beneficial to all parties involved.”

Despite the challenges, Wilson is thinking bigger.

“The hardest part is getting businesses and educators to participate to build the program and have checkpoints along the way. After a big hiatus, I wanted to see what it looked like before we make any changes. I want to make it bigger and more regional.”

Businesses across Southside were encouraged to participate and 20 signed up from across Danville, Ringgold, Ridgeway, Martinsville, Chatham, South Boston and more. Businesses that applied for this program include: Hitachi Energy, Inframark, LLC, PRESS GLASS Inc., Danville Utilities, Comfort Systems USA MidAtlantic, LLC, Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History, Virginia Department of Forestry, Nucor Buildings Group. City of Danville IT Dept., Institute for Advanced Learning and Research-Applied Research Division, Patricia’s Child Care Center, Danville Public Schools Student Support Services, Owens Illinois, Danville Public Schools Curriculum & Instruction, Axxor NA, LLC, Space Buffalo Apparel, Legacy Wellness, Legacy Industries, Alderson Construction Inc. and Axton Tire.

Some businesses could not receive a placement due to location and availability.

“We get more participation from Danville and Pittsylvania County, but we are trying to where everyone across the region can participate,” Brown said.

Casey Kenealy was one of the participants. She teaches Agriculture at Dan River High School, and this was her second time doing the program. She shadowed The Institute, Owens-Illinois, Legacy Industries and Axton Tire. She states what she has learned.

“I learned about some opportunities right here in the area available for future former students and what the employers look for in the hiring process.”

She says what she hopes her students can take with them due to this exposure.

“I hope my students can strengthen their soft skills to prepare for the workplace,” Kenealy said. “So many students are lacking in soft skills. I would like to teach more about what soft skills are and what students can do to strengthen them. Businesses specifically said they need future employees to be able to problem solve.” Soft skills are defined as the personal qualities that help employees really thrive in the workplace.

To future participants, Kenealy states it is definitely worth the time and is very interesting to learn the local opportunities for students.

Travis Wood teaches welding at the Pittsylvania County Career and Technical Center, and he references soft skills again.

“By speaking with industry representatives, I was able to see first hand the soft skills that are highly sought after in the workplace,” he said. “The soft skills that are the core of a successful workforce. By teaching students like dependability and communication skills, students can then begin to progress in the workplace.”

Wood says this experience will benefit his lessons by building a more robust emphasis on workplace readiness beyond the technical skills needed.

“Students will have a higher success rate when finding and retaining jobs and moving forward to build a future for themselves,” he said.

Wood would like to see the program in the future, stating, “As a skill trades instructor, the value of this program goes far beyond what a company does but what a company is looking for in the labor market.”

Wood describes what he did during his time with the program.

“Comfort Systems in the pipe fabrication shop was the highlight of my experience,” he said. “I was able to see a former student using the technical skills that he learned in my classroom and how those skills were applied to the jobsite. I was able to see firsthand the assembly of piping that would be going out to the jobsite in the future.”

Wood wants to see more discussion on what skills employers are seeking from new hires and how employers can assist schools on teaching said skills.

Heather McDowell was another participant, teaching Business at Dan River High School. She states what she can take to her students through this experience.

“I am able to share with students current industry standards as they relate to several of my business classes as well as what some of the industries are expecting from newly graduated students whether directly from high school or college; a better understanding of the importance of critical thinking and testing as many industries I visited use testing to determine eligibility for employment.”

She recalls everything she did.

“I spent a day at Hitachi in South Boston, shadowing winding, cool assembly and welding. I spent a day shadowing the owner/office manager at Alderson Construction, which was helpful in relation to my personal finance class as well as computer information systems. On Wednesday, I spent the say at Owens Illinois with HR, safety manager and several floor managers. We toured their operations, which was very informative, also hot. The last day, I spent at Legacy in Martinsville. They were helpful in showing us their hiring process, which includes personality testing and explaining how they established several of their companies.”

She thinks she will most likely find ways to include more critical thinking activities and test taking strategies into her lessons.

She called the opportunity excellent and would definitely do it again in the future and offered what she would like to see offered for future programs.

“I benefitted most from the smaller companies as I could see more ways to relate what they do to my classes, so I would like to see smaller companies in the line up for next year,” she said. “It was very interesting to see the inside operations and day to day activities of so many companies in this area that you always hear about but really have no idea what goes on inside the building.”

For Southside Virginia, in addition to Pittsylvania County, Danville Public Schools participated in this program along with Halifax County Public Schools and Henry County Public Schools.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 01:11:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.chathamstartribune.com/news/article_b88e82f2-132d-11ed-92be-4f324f5db446.html
Killexams : Research Cores

Click on one of the buttons below to show only the Cores in that area

A.H. Ismail Center

Health and Human Sciences

The fitness center has aerobic and resistance machines that can be programmed to research protocols and capture exercise data.  Also available are dumbbells, cable station, and balance equipment for researchers to train and test subjects.  Fitness assessment labs house a metabolic cart, ECG, treadmill, and other equipment to assess body composition, muscular endurance & strength, and flexibility.  Trained and certified Ismail Center staff can  assist researchers.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Lane M. Yahiro

Website

Agronomy Center of Research and Education

Agriculture

field research on agronomic crops, soils, earth and plant imaging; solar agro-electric farming; agricultural robotics; field phenotyping or agronomic row crops

Location:
Recharge? Yes (Yes, depending on project)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Yes, if collaborating with Purdue University)
Contact: Jim Beaty

Website iLab Page - External

Amy Instrumentation Facility

Science

The Jonathan Amy Facility for Chemical Instrumentation (JAFCI) is dedicated to the fusion of engineering expertise with the quest for scientific knowledge to further research and instructional efforts in the Department of Chemistry and School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. Our team of scientists and engineers provide assistance in the design / construction of specialized instrumentation not commercially available along with repair / modification of commercial systems.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Dr. Michael Everly

Website

Animal Sciences Research and Education Center

Agriculture

The mission of the Animal Sciences Research and Education Center (ASREC) is to provide animals, facilities, technical assistance and labor to conduct research, provide instruction, and assist in extension educational activities. Research trials vary from basic to applied and involve many disciplines -- nutrition, physiology, behavior, genetics, reproduction, animal health, and product quality. Faculty utilize the Research and Education Center to facilitate teaching several Animal Sciences courses and to help provide hands-on experience for students. Some Extension education activities are held at the center.

Location: 5675 W. 600 N., West Lafayette, IN
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Craig Williams

Website

Arthur Fungarium and Kriebel Herbarium

Agriculture

An Herbarium is a collection of carefully preserved plant and/or fungal specimens; a Fungarium is a collection of carefully preserved fungal specimens. The Department of Botany and Plant Pathology at Purdue University houses two herbaria of immense historical and scientific value. The Arthur Fungarium (herbarium acronym PUR) is the largest specialized Fungarium, containing the most important collection of plant rust fungi (order Pucciniales), in the world. The Kriebel Herbarium (acronym PUL) contains non-rust fungi, vascular plants, lichens, algae and bryophytes, and is the oldest herbarium in the state of Indiana. Together the collections contain close to 250,000 specimens dating as far back as 1769 and gathered from across the globe. The collections are an important global resource for scientists and researchers in the fields of botany, mycology, plant pathology, forestry and biology. PUR and PUL arrange for loans of material to other herbaria and researchers around the world, accept material for deposition to voucher scientific studies, and serve as a resource for identifying rust fungi and their host plants from around the world.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: M. Catherine Aime

Website

Bioinformatics and Discovery Systems Lab

Technology

The lab is used to carry out common genomic biotechnology methods in collaboration w/ other groups on campus, as well as develop new methods for detecting DNA biomarkers and developing innovative information management systems in support of genomics research. The lab is equipped with a DNA microarray spotter, and DNA microarray scanner, most often used for gene expression studies.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Michael Kane

Website

Bioinformatics Core

Agriculture

Facilitate, amplify, and accelerate biological research and discovery through application of bioinformatics. Deliver high quality analysis and consultation in a timely and economical manner. Support workshops and learning activities. Support computational resources.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jyothi Thimmapuram

Website iLab Page - External

Biomolecular Cleanroom

Discovery Park

2,500 Sq. ft. Bio-Nanotechnology Integration Laboratory

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Guy Telesnicki

Website

Birck Nanotechnology Center BioNanotechnology Laboratories (BNC-BNL)

Discovery Park

BNC-BNL is located at the Birck Nanotechnology center. It provides researchers a place where they can take their drug delivery (e.g. BioMEMS/NEMS or Biosensor) device or nanoparticle-driven from idea stage to a viable prototype to invitro testing and basic sterility testing. A CTSI core facility.

Location: Birck Nano
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Steve Jurss

Website

Center for Analytical Instrumentation Development

Discovery Park

Develop the next generation of analytical instrumentation for chemistry, life science and point-of-need applications in medicine, industry, and public safety. Expand participation to other regional institutions. Prominent among these instrumental methods is the application of mass spectrometry to problems of national and world interest and the miniaturization of mass spectrometry to further those aims.

Location:
Recharge? Yes (Yes, for specialty prototype instruments)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Brandy McMasters

Website

Center for Comparative Translational Research (CTR)

Veterinary Medicine

The CTR deploys a cluster of core laboratories in the College of Veterinary Medicine to support biomedical research. The laboratories are the Pre-Clinical Research Laboratory, the Histology Research Laboratory, and the Veterinary Clinical Trials Support Service. These laboratories support both human and animal translational research for investigators in various academic departments on campus, in Discovery Park, and in the private-sector. CTR also provides opportunities for graduate, undergraduate and professional students with an interest in comparative biomedical research. The CTR component laboratories are all core facilities for the Indiana Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI).

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Gert Breur

Website

Center for Environmental and Regulatory Information Systems

Agriculture

The Center for Environmental and Regulatory Information Systems (CERIS) is a recognized center at Purdue University providing agricultural information resource technologies and applications in the form of searchable databases with web interfaces, collaborative web sites with updating, and dynamic map resources of pest survey and plant diagnostic data. Its content focuses on pest survey data, plant diagnostic data and pesticides and has collaborated with key federal and state agencies along with industry, extension and Purdue faculty. CERIS has worked extensively with Entomology and Plant Pathology faculty in creating the Purdue Plant Doctor series for both iOS and Android devices and provided the software support for the Isee App under the direction of a faculty member in Agronomy. Most recently, the BoilerApps program has been created as an extension of earlier applications development involving website and database design and iOS and Android Apps for the College of Agriculture to now service Purdue University.

Location:
Recharge? Yes (Yes, for some activities)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Mike Hill

Website

Center for Global Trade Analysis

Agriculture

Quantitative global economic analysis

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Dominique van der Mensbrugghe

Website

Center for Materials Processing and Tribology - Metrology Laboratory

Engineering

Surface and mechanical property characterization

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: James B. Mann

Website

Center for Materials under eXtreme Environment (CMUXE)

Engineering

Center for Materials under extreme environments (CMUXE) is a research unit at Purdue University aimed at promoting nuclear, material science, plasma research, and education. Members of CMUXE perform basic and applied research in wide variety of interdisciplinary fields. The major thrust area is the interactions of high-intensity, modulated energy beams: electromagnetic radiation, plasma, electrons, ions and other particle sources (i.e. clusters, molecules) with matter. The CMUXE combines both advanced integrated computational tools, i.e., HEIGHTS simulation package and state-of-the art experimental devices.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Ahmed Hassanein

Website

Center for Nursing Education and Simulation

Health and Human Sciences

The simulation lab has seven high-fidelity patient simulators, including a 6 month old baby, 7 year old child, a birthing mother, and fouradult models. These computerized, interactive manikins can be programmed to provide realistic patient responses to care. They breathe, vocalize, have changing vital signs and pulses, and have realistic heart, lung, and bowel sounds.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Beth Milanowski

Website

Christopher and Susan Burke Hydraulics and Hydrology Laboratory

Engineering

Mechanics of Water Transport Processes in Environmental and Engineering Flows; field and laboratory investigations of water quantity and quality.

Location:
Recharge? No (Currently No)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Available On Contractual Basis)
Contact: Cary Troy

Website

Clinical Research Center (CRC)

Health and Human Sciences

The Indiana CTSI Clinical Research Center (CRC) provides space, equipment, and support to conduct academic and industry sponsored clinical research studies for both inpatient and outpatient visits. The center maintains facilities at both Indiana and Purdue Universities and is available for use by researchers from both institutions. Medically trained staff provides services and support in phlebotomy, intravenous catheter placement, serial blood draws, infusions/injections, protocol development, and reference lab tests. The bionutrition staff supports CRC investigators' research by providing dietary expertise and nutrition research services including: budget consultation, diet development, meal preparation and service, nutritional counseling, dietary recalls and diaries, nutritional analysis, dietary homogenates, and facilities to support clinical research.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Available to Indiana University researchers)
Contact: Dennis Savaiano

Website

Community Clusters

ITaP

Information Technology at Purdue (ITaP) operates a significant shared cluster computing infrastructure. These community clusters are available for faculty to purchase access into and gain enormous benefits in computing capacity, professional system administration and user support.

Location: Young
Recharge? No (Some costs may apply)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Yes - only if partnering with a Purdue faculty member)
Contact: RCAC Cluster Purchase

Website

Computational Life Sciences and Informatics

Discovery Park

Development and application of computational tools to solve complex life science problems. The core has expertise in proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, structural biology—and other types of biological data.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Tiago Sobreira

Website

Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope

Science

Inverted Zeiss LSM 710 confocal laser scanning microscope with and environmental chamber appropriate for live cell imaging. Advanced methods available include spectral unmixing, time lapse, multi-target imaging, FRET, FRAP, photoactivation, and ratiometric imaging of ion indicator dyes.

Location: Lilly
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Don Ready

Website

Cyberforensics Lab

Technology

The cyberforensics Lab that was officially opened Summer '04 focuses on (1) education and training for students, faculty, and law enforcement, (2) leading edge research in cyberforensics, and (3) operational support for federal, state, and local law enforcement. A memorandum of understanding is in place with the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C), the Indiana State Police, the Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security (CERIAS/CS Department) and ITaP.

Location: Knoy 228
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Marcus Rogers

Website

Electron Microscopy

Discovery Park

Electron Microscopy facility at Birck has Thermo Fisher Themis Z Double Corrected and Monochromated S/TEM 60-300 kV, equipped with a SuperX EDS Detector and a Quantum 965 EELS Spectrometer;  Thermo Fisher Helios 4G UX Dual Beam FE-SEM/FIB, with an ultra-high brightness electron source equipped UC+ monochromator, electron beam deceleration, as well as  SE, BSE, and STEM detectors, multiChem Gas Delivery System to deliver precise repeatable doses of W, C and Pt as well as a mix of C and W, an integrated EasyLift Nanomanipulator for high precision site specific lift out sample preparation, and a Oxford EDS detector; Hitachi S4800 cold FE-SEM, equipped with and Oxford EDS detector and STEM capability; Thermo Fisher Apreo S HiVac Schottky FE-SEM, features beam deceleration and unique in-lens detection and equipped with SE and BSE detectors

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Rosa Diaz

Website iLab Page - Internal

Envision Center

ITaP

The mission of Envision Center for Data Perceptualization is to serve, support, and collaborate with faculty, students, and industry to be a leader in scientific visualization, immersive environments and human computer interaction, through learning, discovery, and engagement.

Location: STEW B001
Recharge? Yes (Yes - for some services)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: RCAC Info

Website

Epitaxy

Discovery Park

The Epitaxy recharge center consists of three deposition tools for thin film research as well as a high resolution x-ray diffractometer for thin film characterization. Equipment in recharge center: Nitride Sputter System (PVD Products), Oxide Pulsed Laser Deposition (PVD Products), High resolution x-ray diffractometer HRXRD (PANalytical), chemical vapor deposition, Laser annealing (Lambda Physik), Laser lift-off (Lambda Physik).

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Ron Reger

Website

Evaluation and Learning Research Center

Education

The mission of the Evaluation and Learning Research Center (ELRC) is to enhance learning by conducting original research and evaluation that pushes the boundaries of our understanding of education . The Center supports research, education and engagement projects through our expertise in educational theory, research methodology, evaluation, and project management.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Yes, if collaborating with Purdue University)
Contact: Wilella Burgess

Website

Flow cytometry and cell separation core facility

Discovery Park

The Bindley Bioscience Flow Cytometry and Cell Separation Core Facility provides advanced cell and particle analysis and sorting using flow cytometry based technology. The facility provides training in flow cytometry analysis and sorting techniques. The facility also provides expert consultation for assay and protocol development for flow cytometry analysis and cell separation.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jill Hutchcroft

Website iLab Page - External iLab Page - Internal

Food Science Pilot Laboratory

Agriculture

food product development, food processing, process optimization, food manufacturing systems

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Erik Kurdelak

Website

Gamma Irradiator

Radiological and Environmental Management (REM)

Provide gamma irradiation/sterilization for cells, media, etc.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Yes, when collaborating with Purdue faculty/staff)
Contact: Matthew Tang

High Performance Computer Graphics Laboratory

Technology

The research in the HPCG-Lab is divided into diverse projects, all having in common the use of High Performance Computer Graphics algorithms and tools as the means of providing high performance computation, real-time rendering, and scientific visualization research.

Location: Knoy
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Bedrich Benes

Website

High-Performance Computing and Cyberinfrastructure Research Lab

Technology

a focal point for education, research, and collaboration in the development, deployment, and use of supercomputing, grid computing, and cyberinfrastructure. The HPC-CRL is the first College of Technology Exploration Center, which is designed to support and enhance teaching, research, and collaboration among faculty, students, and industrial partners. The lab consists of three areas: research, collaboration, and education.

Location: Knoy 208
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Thomas Hacker

Website

ICP-OES for Elemental Analysis of Liquids

Agriculture

ICP-OES for Elemental Analysis of liquids or liquid extracts/digests of solid samples

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Linda Lee

IDEALab

Technology

The IDEALab is housed in Knoy Hall in room 376. Research conducted there focuses on animation, interactive media, serious games, visualization, simulation and innovative technologies for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. At the core of its activities is a desire to understand how the development and use of computer graphics impacts communication, education and learning.

Location: Knoy 376
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Nicoletta Adamo-Villani

Website

Impact Science Laboratory

Engineering

We develop innovative dynamic experimental techniques to determine the mechanical response of challenging materials and structures under impact loading conditions. We have extensive experiences in characterizing materials from as soft as gel rubbers to as hard as armor ceramics, from as small as a single spider silk to as large as instrumented concrete targets. A exact book (Split Hopkinson (Kolsky) Bar by Springer) documents some of our previous work.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Weinong Chen

Website

Interdepartmental NMR Facility

Science Pharmacy

The Purdue Interdepartmental NMR Facility (PINMRF) is a university-wide resource dedicated to supporting NMR spectroscopy and to making this analytical technique available to researchers at Purdue and elsewhere in the scientific community. PINMRF currently has ten NMR spectrometers located in four buildings on the Purdue campus, with additional laboratory locations under consideration. PINMRF is set up to allow individual researchers direct access 24/7 to the spectrometers, after appropriate training and testing has been completed. However, we will gladly provide spectra of submitted samples, either on a service basis or as part of a collaborative research project.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Dr. John Harwood

Website iLab Page - External

Laboratory for Renewable Resources Engineering (LORRE)

Engineering

Carries out research, training, and discovery in transforming renewable resources into biofuels and bioproducts. Couples fundamental research in renewable resources to the art and science of scale-up for purposes of design, prototyping, and operation of industrial systems that are economic, environmentally friendly, and sustainable. Provides research services in microbiology, fermentation, liquid chromatography and biomass analysis.

Location:
Recharge? Yes (Yes, for some activities)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Michael Ladisch

Website

Laser Research and Manufacturing Facilities, Mechanical Engineering

Engineering

High Power Femtosecond Laser System, Wavelength Coverage from 240 nm (UV) to 10,000 nm (Far IR)

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Robert Lucht

Life Sciences Electron Microscopy Facility

Agriculture

The LSMF is a full service electron microscopy core with both service and individual use options. Equipment includes two field-emission SEMs (Nova NanoSEM and Quanta3D FEG) equipped with cryo, EDX, low vacuum and ESEM capability, and tensile stage. The Quanta 3D FEG is a dual beam instrument with an ion beam for milling, slicing and deposition. The Quanta is equipped with an Omniprobe 200 lift-out system for TEM lamella preparation.? Also available are 2 TEMs (Tecnai T12 and a Tecnai G2 T20) each with great CCD cameras. The 200KV Tecnai has STEM with an HAADF detector. This instrument is also set up with software for automated electron tomography acquisition for 3D reconstruction. In addition the Tecnai T20 is equipped with a SDD x-ray detector for elemental analysis and mapping. The lab has ultramicrotomes (room temperature and cryo), a microwave processing system and a vibratome. For cryo preparation there is a high pressure freezing device and automated freeze substitution. The staff are knowledgeable and friendly and happy to discuss projects and work with you on your science questions.

Location: WLSR
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Christopher Gilpin

Website

Lilly Animal Care Facility

Science

Users are BME, SLHS, Vet School, Pharmacy, Endocyte, OnTarget, along with Biological Sciences.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Sylvia Schlegel

Macromolecular Crystallography

Science

Macromolecular crystallography laboratory; crystallization and X-ray Diffraction. A core facility of the Purdue Center for Cancer Research.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Tim Schmidt

Website iLab Page - External

Maha Fluid Power Laboratory

Engineering

Fluid Power System Testing and Development Systems

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Andrea Vacca

Website

Metabolite Profiling Facility (MPF)

Discovery Park

The laboratory utilizes gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for the analyses of small, biological molecules. We collaborate with research investigators who are conducting metabolomic studies, by providing technical assistance with sample preparation, data acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of experimental information. The lab performs both quantitative analysis and non-targeted molecular screening.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Bruce Cooper

Website iLab Page - Internal

Mobile Application Development Lab

Technology

Information systems are constantly evolving to use new technologies.? The types of technologies used in these systems now also include low-priced mobile computing and devices.? These mobile devices include smart phones, tablets, and other specialized hand-held computers.? These devices are being incorporated into modern information systems to collect and present data to workers who are otherwise too mobile to use a traditional PC. The mobile software development curriculum was established in fall 2002.

Location: Knoy 242
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Kyle Lutes

National Test Facility for Fuels and Propulsion

Technology

The National Test Facility for Fuels and Propulsion (NaTeF) was funded through a $2.7 million cooperative agreement with the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. ?The NaTeF facilities are located in the Niswonger Aviation Technology Building at the Purdue Airport, and include aircraft engine test cells and a Materials Testing Laboratory. The engine test cells are equipped to conduct exhaust emissions, collect engine operational data, and evaluate engine performance; the interaction and compatibility of new fuels with aircraft materials and components may be studied and evaluated in the Materials Testing Laboratory. The testing capabilities of these laboratories are currently focused on testing and development of new aviation fuels for both turbine (jet) engines and piston engine applications but may also be utilized in the future for testing of engine and aircraft hardware. NaTeF is the primary testing arm of the Air Transport Institute for Environmental Sustainability (AirTIES) Research Center at Purdue University, the overall mission of which is to support the development, testing, and implementation of new aviation fuels. AirTIES researchers are collaborating with faculty in other disciplines at Purdue and with industrial partners to advance the state of new, sustainable aviation fuels in projects that include identifying and optimizing candidate crops for bio-fuels, new processes to produce bio-fuels, economic and carbon footprint assessments of new fuels, and fit-for-performance testing of fuels in the NaTeF laboratories and test cells.

Location: Niswonger
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: David Stanley

Website

Optics and Spectroscopy

Discovery Park

Spectrophotometer Lambda 950; Micro-Sample Spectrometer; Raman Spectrometer T64000 with the excitation lasers: tunable Ar/Kr, CW 10 mW per wavlength, 10 wavelength accross the visible rangefemtosecond/picosecond regenerative amplifier-OPA system; Nanonics NSOM/ Luminescence Mapping with the excitations lasers: HeNe 633 nm, solid state 532 nm, Diode 785 nm.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Alexei Lagoutchev

Website iLab Page - Internal

Pankow Materials Laboratories

Engineering

Physical Structure, Serviceability, Durability and Non Destructive Testing of Infrastructure Materials

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jason Weiss

Website

Physiological Sensing Facility

Discovery Park

Cellular and tissue metabolism, cell-signaling, neurophysiology, environmental toxicology, biosensing, bionanomaterials, lab-on-a-chip systems, bioMEMS, biophysical sensing

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jenna Rickus

Website

Precision Machining

Science

Precision Machining in the Department of Chemistry is your one-stop-shop for the design and fabrication of mechanical parts in support of your research and teaching efforts.  We offer a wide range of services which include 3D modeling / drafting / printing in plastic and metal, conventional and CNC milling / turning, welding and soldering, surface grinding.  Parts can be fabricated from a wide range of materials including steel, aluminum, stainless steel, brass, copper, ceramics, and plastics. Vacuum chambers and high vacuum components are a specialty.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Dr. Michael Everly

Website iLab Page - External

Preparation and Characterization Recharge Center

Engineering

Specialized X-Ray Analysis, sample Preparation and Mechanical Testing

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jameson Root

Website

Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Center

Technology

The Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) Center is housed in Knoy 373. It is the hub for the product lifecycle management (PLM) activities in the College of Technology. It is linked to other College of Technology labs through high-speed network connections and through industry-class PLM suites of tools. Typical research activities in that lab include the areas of product lifecycle management, model-based definition, model-based enterprise, 3D data interoperability and collaboration, product data management methodologies, and workflows for the extended use of CAD data throughout the enterprise.

Location: Knoy 373
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Nathan Hartman

Website

Purdue Animal Behavior Core

EVPRP

The Purdue Animal Behavior Core (PABC), part of the Purdue Institute for Integrative Neuroscience (PIIN), is a core facility that provides behavioral and physiological assays to aid in preclinical research using in vivo models. Using cutting-edge automated technologies, the facility supports internal and external investigators by providing assistance designing and implementing rodent behavioral tests. The PABC assists in research design, training, data analysis and the writing of grant proposals. The PABC offers a wide range of behavior tests designed to model neurodevelopmental disorders, psychiatric illnesses, neurodegenerative diseases, pain and spinal cord and traumatic brain injuries. The PABC will train individuals to perform assays independently or PABC staff can perform the assays in their entirety. The core also offers a testing environment for developing novel devices and new cutting-edge imaging tools to examine brain functioning while the rodent is performing behavioral tasks.  

Location: MJIS B079, LSA 06 and 08
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Wendy Koss, Facility Director

Website iLab Page - External

Purdue Cryo Electron Microscopy Facility

Science

The PCEMF operates several high resolution transmission electron microscopes equipped for cryo-microscopy of biological assemblies.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Valorie Bowman

Website iLab Page - Internal

Purdue Genomics Core Facility

Agriculture

The Purdue Genomics Core facility has more than a decade of experience in DNA sequencing and provides Illumina DNA and RNA library construction and sequencing services via both Illumina Nova Seq and MiSeq instruments. Further, a "WideSeq" service offers low-cost sequencing of smaller (less than 300kb) double-strand DNA samples.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Phillip SanMiguel

Website iLab Page - External iLab Page - Internal

Purdue Imaging Facility

Discovery Park

We provide the instruments and expertise needed to visualize molecules in preparations ranging from single cells to entire animals. All facility users receive individualized instrument training as well as project specific advice for optimal data acquisition. Consultation on sample preparation, image rendering, and data analysis are also available as our knowledge base permits.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Andy Schaber

Website iLab Page - External iLab Page - Internal

Purdue Malware Lab - FBI Cyber Crime Task Force

Technology

The Purdue Malware Lab, under the direction of Prof. Jim Goldman, conducts applied research in the identification, analysis, reverse engineering, and defensive strategies of malicious software, more commonly referred to as malware. In addition, operational support is provided to the Federal Bureau of Investigation through Prof. Goldman?s appointment to the FBI Cyber Crime Task Force.

Location: ENAD 111
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jim Goldman

Purdue MRI Facility

Health and Human Sciences Engineering

The Purdue MRI Facility houses three research-dedicated MRI systems (two state-of-the-art 3T human MRI scanners and a 7T small animal MRI scanner) to facilitate the use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques for research at Purdue University. Support staff for users include two operations managers and an MRI Technologist, who are available to get researchers trained to use the equipment, or help with data acquisition. A large variety of coils are available, as well as advanced auxiliary equipment for fMRI and other research studies. Please visit the website for more information on location, contacts, and links to iLab scheduling.

Location: MRI1 (aka PMRI)
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Ulrike Dydak, Ph.D.

Website

Purdue Polytechnic Precision Measurement Center

Technology

The Purdue Polytechnic Precision Measurement Center at the statewide location in Columbus, Indiana, is an environmentally-controlled (20 degrees C plus/minus 0.5 degrees C, Positive Pressure; Humidity < 35%) laboratory that is certified annually. Examples of calibrated equipment include a Zeiss Coordinate Measuring Machine, an Instron tensile test machine, a Zeiss surface finish tester, a Fluke dead-weight tester for calibrating pressure gauges, and sets of English and metric gauge blocks. Additionally, there are tools for measuring torque, force, hardness, and mass as well as numerous hand and optical tools for dimensional measurement.

Location: Room 137; Advanced Manufacturing Center of Excellence; Columbus, Indiana
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Joe Fuehne

Website

Purdue Proteomics Facility

Discovery Park

PPF provides state-of-the-art proteomics resources to the research community for identification, quantification, and characterization of proteins in diverse biological samples. The major goal of the facility is to provide innovate services and encourage collaborations that apply the tools of proteomics to cutting-edge biological and biomedical research. The facility enables both targeted and global proteomic analyses. It is equipped with Thermo Scientific Orbitrap Fusion Lumos, Q Exactive Orbitrap HF, LTQ Orbitrap XL, TSQ Endura Triple-Quad MS and AB-SCIEX Triple TOF 5600 system, and all are coupled to nano-flow HPLC systems. With over $2 million funding support from the EVPRP instruments grants in the last 3 years, the core has dramatically improved its capability in accurately identifying and quantifying proteins including their modification and complex formation in a high throughput manner.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Uma K. Aryal

Website iLab Page - Internal

Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME)

Science

The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a research facility that provides measurements for long-lived radionuclides: 10Be (half-life 1,390,000 years), 14C (5700 years), 26Al (705,000 years), 36Cl (301,000 years), 41Ca (105,000 years), and 129I (16.7 million years). The isotopic abundances measured range from one part in 10^15 (a thousand million million) to one part in 10^11. Applications include geoscience and extraterrestrial studies of cosmic-ray-produced radionuclides, environmental tracer studies of radionuclides (soils and hydrology), and biomedical radionuclides. PRIME Lab also offers physical and chemical sample preparation of geologic and biomedical samples for all radionuclides. PRIME Lab also operates an ICP-OES, which is available for the measurement of ~ ppm level chemical abundances.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Marc Caffee

Website

Purdue Research Repository (PURR)

EVPRP ITaP Libraries

PURR utilizes HUBzero®, a software platform designed for scientific collaboration and sharing of research data on the web. Any Purdue student, faculty, or staff can create a project in PURR and receive a default allocation of storage. PURR provides capabilities currently required by the NSF and other funding agencies for digital data management such as workflows and tools for collaborating on data-driven research, publishing and archiving data, and ensuring data security, fidelity, backup, and mirroring. Purdue librarians consult with investigators to facilitate selection and ingestion of data with appropriate descriptive metadata and data standards and provide long-term digital preservation and stewardship. PURR comes with a set of default policies and functionality that addresses privacy and confidentiality, intellectual property, and access and use of research data. Datasets published using PURR are assigned Digital Objects Identifiers (DOIs) and exposed to the web using open standards to maximize their discoverability and scholarly reuse. Data producers receive reports of how often their published data are viewed, downloaded, and cited.

Location:
Recharge? No (No, but fees may apply depending on size of data requirements)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Yes, only if Purdue faculty/staff originate project)
Contact: Michael Witt

Website

Purdue Stable Isotope Facility

Science

The Purdue Stable Isotope Facility houses 4 isotope ratio mass spectrometers (IRMS), each accompanied by peripheral devices for conversion of various compounds into analyzable gases.  We also operate standalone instrumentation for both concentration and isotopic analysis.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Janine Sparks

Website iLab Page - External

Purdue Translational Pharmacology Facility

Discovery Park

in vivo pharmacology with swine model and unique PigTurn monitoring and sampling system

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Robyn McCain

Purdue University Reactor Number 1 (PUR-1)

Engineering

operational nuclear reactor for research and education

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Robert Bean

Website

Research Instrumentation Center

Science

The Research Instrumentation Center is a core facility in the Department of Chemistry that manages the shared departmental instrumentation. Most of our thirty instruments are made available to trained users on a walkup basis. We also specialize in quantification of trace elements by ICP-MS, with a variety of services performed by our expert staff. Please visit the website below for more information regarding our wide variety of instrumentation and services..

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Dr. Pat Bishop

Website iLab Page - External

Research Machining Services

EVPRP

Precision machine shop, open to all departments, with both standard and CNC machining equipment, welding, and design services. Work with wide variety of materials, including steels, aluminums, stainless steels, and brass plus special-order metals and high-performance plastics. Able to satisfy needs for plating, anodizing, and water jetting services, along with many other services through vendors. Specialize in one-of-a-kind research equipment and/or modifications.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Kris Davis

Website

Ross Biological Reserve

Science

67 acres of forest managed mainly as a natural area for ecological research with modest indoor facilities.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Jeffrey Lucas

Website

SAXS/USAXS Facility

Engineering

Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Ultrasmall Angle X-ray Scattering for characterization of nanoparticles, nanomaterials, polymers, and nanostructures

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: B. W. Boudouris

Scientific Glass Blowing Lab

Science

The Scientific Glass Blowing Lab in Chemistry is fully equipped to provide the services expected from a glass shop and more.  In addition to consulting / designing and fabricating scientific apparatus such as reaction vessels and Schinke lines, the shop has capacities to cast 3D forms, evacuate / back fill glass vessels, and apply protective coatings to glassware.  The shop also offers student instruction and artistic pieces for awards / gifts for special occasions.  Additional capabilities include: on-site repair, surface grinding / polishing, optical windows, lenses, sealing / evacuation / backfilling of vessels, surface treatments such as silvering and plastic coating. 

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Dr. Michael Everly

Website iLab Page - External

Scientific Solutions

ITaP

The Scientific Solutions group works with Purdue faculty and staff to develop proposals and research solutions through software development, integration, and application/project/web site hosting.

Location:
Recharge? Yes (Yes - for some services)
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Carol Song

Website

Scifres Nanofabrication Cleanroom

Discovery Park

25,000 sq. ft. Class 1-10-100 Nanofabrication Laboratory

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Ron Reger

Website iLab Page - External

Sensory Evaluation Laboratory

Agriculture

Sensory evaluation ( appearance, aroma, flavor, etc.) testing of food and beverages

Location: Food Science
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Dr. Andrea Liceaga

Website

Soft Materials Characterization Laboratory

Engineering

This lab is dedicated to the characterization and analysis of polymeric and other soft materials. It currently contains TA Instruments Q2000 Dynamic Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) capable of -180C to 700C operation, a TA Instruments Q800 Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) with humidity controller, and a TA instruments Q50 Thermogravimtric Analyzer (TGA).

Location:
Recharge? Yes ((Pending))
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Jeffrey Youngblood

Website

Statistical Consulting Service

Science

Provides free of charge statistical consulting services; addresses questions with statistical software, the design of experiments, and data analysis.

Location:
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? No
Contact: Bruce A. Craig

Website

Superresolution Imaging Lab

Veterinary Medicine

This facility in the Purdue Veterinary Medicine provides a high end confocal imaging system for versatile cell, whole mounted- tissue and animal microscope imaging. It provides 1) regular 5 color confocal imaging; 2) 4 channel multi-photon imaging; 3) forward and backward second harmonic generation; 4) 70 nM STED superresolution imaging; 5) Regular and resonnant scanners; 6) environmental control for temperature and gas controls; 7) anesthetic machine; 8) Imaris 3D-4D image analysis software

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Chang H Kim

Website

Transgenic and Genomic Editing Facility

Science

The Transgenic and Genome Editing Facility (TGEF) offers a variety of services to the Purdue University Center for Cancer Research community, including (1) Generation of Transgenic, Knock-Out, Knock-In and gene-edited mice and rats by pronuclear injection of DNA and/or CRISPR/cas9, (2) Gene Targeting of ES Cells, (3) Blastocyst Injection of ES Cells for the Generation of Knock-Out Mice, (4) Strain Rederivation, (5) In Vitro Fertilization, (6) Embryo Cryopreservation, (7) Sperm Cryopreservation, (8) Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast (MEF) Cell Line Production, (9) Speed Expansion, (10) Chromosome Counting, (11) Genotyping, (12) Mouse Production Colony.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Judy Hallett

Website

Videoconferencing

ITaP

Adobe Connect is a rich Web communication system that lets instructors reach an audience anytime with engaging multimedia content

Location: Web
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes (Yes - only if partnering with a Purdue faculty member)
Contact: Customer Service Center

Website

Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center

Libraries

The Karnes Center collects, preserves, and provides access to scholarly research collections of unique primary source material such as rare books, archival documents and manuscripts, photographs, and artifacts. The Center staff provides assistance to researchers in accessing and using the collections, including digitization of collections and facilitating permissions to use collections in scholarly publications. Collections and services are available to Purdue faculty, staff, and students as well as researchers worldwide and the general public.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Sammie Morris

Website

Water Quality Field Station

Agriculture

Studies of the impact of agriculture and agricultural inputs on water and air quality; 54 tiled and instruments drainage plots

Location: ACRE
Recharge? No
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Nicole DeArmond

Website

X-ray Crystallography

Science

The X-ray Crystallography Facility provides services and resources related to X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline materials for researchers at Purdue as well as off-site users and commercial customers. The facility offers full data collection and structure analysis services, and trains users to independently use the resources on site. Types of analysis include single crystal structure analysis for organic, inorganic, metal organic and hybrid materials (indexing, unit cell and structure determinations, absolute structure), powder and multicrystalline XRD (phase ID, Rietveld analysis, high temperature measurements, thin film measurements, X-ray reflectivity). Starting Fall 2019, we will also offer X-ray fluorescence analysis. - Panalytical Empyrean Powder X-ray Diffractometer. Equipped with both parallel beam and focusing optics, high speed PIXcel 3D Medipix detector and high temperature stage for analysis of powders, multicrystalline materials and thin films. - Two Bruker D8 Quest Single Crystal Diffractometers equipped with large Photon detectors and variable temperature devices. The Mo-wavelength instrument is ideal for fast, high throughput data collection of well to weakly diffracting samples, and for heavily absorbing samples. The Cu-wavelength microsource instrument is ideal for very weakly diffracting and small crystals and absolute structure determination.

Location:
Recharge? Yes
Accessible to Non-Purdue Users? Yes
Contact: Matthias Zeller

Website

Wed, 30 Mar 2022 03:10:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.purdue.edu/research/oevprp/centers-and-institutes/cores-list.php
Killexams : Metabo Corporation

1231 Wilson Drive

West Chester, PA 19380

Phone:(610) 436-5900

Toll Free:(800) 638-2264

Fax:(800) 638-2261

Metabo, a leading international manufacturer of professional grade portable electric power tools and abrasives for industrial, construction and welding applications, has international headquarters in Nurtingen, Germany and U.S. headquarters in West Chester, Pennsylvania. The company has focused its product development on technological advancements in electronic circuitry and mechanical design, which has resulted in high-performance, durable electric power tools. The name Metabo is German for "metal-boring," symbolic of the company's first tool -- a metal-boring tool -- manufactured in 1924.

Fri, 17 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.forconstructionpros.com/equipment/underground/vertical-drilling-equipment/company/10073859/metabo-corporation
Killexams : Mergers and Acquisitions

The M&A program provides a foundation for executives who are new to M&A and a refresher for those with experience. Being able to engage on the theoretical and strategic nature all the way through to the practical execution and integration was extremely helpful.

- Troy Shay, President & Chief Commercial Officer, Weber Stephen Products LLC


I like the course very much because it is well organized: great structure and content, excellent faculties who have great real-world experiences and are good at teaching, and Chicago Booth staff are supportive and helpful every day. I not only learned about the fundamentals in the quantitative parts but also pragmatic strategic framework that I can bring back to my work everyday.

- Haipeng Chen, Sr. Director, Corporate Development and Business Knowledge, Chiesi USA, Inc.


This is a great program for anyone working with M&A. Very well-rounded course materials and lectures. Very practical concepts and tools that can be put to use in my daily work. Great balance of classroom time and small group break-away time to help practice the concepts.

- Mike Huray, CFO, Lutheran Social Services of Minnesota


Well designed program packed with quality content and delivered efficiently. Inspiring faculty.”

- Suresh Vaidhyanathan, Group Chief Financial Officer, GA Group


The learning and networking experienced during the M&A Program at Chicago Booth has been invaluable for my career. The Chicago Booth program provides a broad range of cases and tools that I have been using on a daily basis.

- Gabriel Gosalvez T, Senior Manager, Deloitte LLP


The tenor and pace of the class, the very relevant and up-to-date materials, and most importantly the very diverse global make-up of the participants and teachers made my entire experience at Booth an exceptional week. I have recommended multiple courses to my colleagues and associates and plan to attend more courses relevant to my job in the future. I have stayed in contact with several of my classmates and intend to continue to do so in the future.

- Tom Heiser, Vice President & General Manager, Hitachi High Technologies America, Systems Products Division & New Business Development


The Chicago Booth M&A program was excellent and provided many insights which I now apply in my day-to-day work. The faculty was highly rich in industry experience and used case studies to elaborate principles. I believe this M&A program is one of the most practical and professional available for senior leaders to Strengthen their competencies around M&A. I do not hesitate to recommend this program to any participant who wants to Strengthen his/her knowledge of M&A.

- Sanjeewa Samaranayake, CFO, Group Finance, Hemas Holdings Plc


The Chicago Booth M&A program is ideal for practitioners involved in any facet of a transaction. I benefited from the quantitative evaluation of a deal, its tax implications, and approaches to ensuring a successful integration.

- Girish Rishi, Executive Vice President, Tyco


 

The program invigorated me. Quality of the professors was fantastic with real world experience that I valued. I really feel the content will help me tremendously in my day-to-day.

- David Bethoney, Senior Finance Director, Experian


The class afforded me the opportunity to see how the financial team views M&A as well as get more comfortable with their terminology. I appreciate the tools I’ve received to focus and hone my financial and business teams in our M&A activities.

- Adelle Mize, VP, Associate General Counsel, Freeman


It's been my experience that most of us involved in deal making tend toward the bias that purchase price and precise valuation outweigh all other components of the deal. This class has changed my thinking to be more balanced and given me tools to prove that strategy and integration are equally or more important than valuation in creating value.

- Tyler Jones, Business Development Manager, Performance Technologies, LLC


Great use of strategy and self-reflection, which drive M&A decisions, coupled with which tools can advantage you once you have made the decision to proceed.

- Chris Chrisafides, Sr. Commercial Director, The Dow Chemical Company


I was hesitant to return to academia, even for a week, but I found the course to be interesting, relevant, and highly collaborative. I would recommend it to colleagues.

- Valerie Matena, Senior Analyst, M&A, The Babcock & Wilcox Company


Such a great program that covers the essentials of strategy, valuation, tax, and integration. An absolute must for successful M&A execution.

- Rob Vassel, Director of Business Development, The Clorox Company


The course 110% met my expectations. It was very well done with the big picture always in mind. It was well worth the financial and time investment.

- Christopher Alsip, Director of Strategic Planning, Tyson Foods, Inc.


Overall I am extremely satisfied and enthusiastic about the experience. The quality of the faculty (and overall program management) is extremely high. I hope to be back soon for other programs. This course gave me a consolidated view of the M&A process and put all the pieces of the puzzle together in a very practical and pragmatic way. This week exceeded my expectations. Thank you.

- Denis Jaquenoud, Vice President of Operations, Richemont North America


Sat, 30 Apr 2022 01:12:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.chicagobooth.edu/executiveeducation/programs/finance/mergers-and-acquisitions?sc_lang=en
Killexams : X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Market is valued at USD 1944.7 Million at a CAGR 5.04% during the forecast period 2028

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Market research report delivers a comprehensive analysis of the market structure along with a forecast of the diverse segments and sub-segments of the market. The base year for calculation in the report is taken as 2020 and the historic year is 2019 which will tell how the market is going to perform in the forecast years by informing what the market definition, classifications, applications, and engagements are. The report gives helpful insights which assist while launching a new product. it is a professional and detailed report focusing on primary and secondary drivers, market share, leading segments, and geographical analysis.

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market is expected to gain market growth in the forecast period of 2021 to 2028. Data Bridge Market Research analyses that the market is growing with the CAGR of 5.04% in the upcoming forecast period with the estimation of USD 1,312.24 Million in 2020 and is estimated to reach USD 1,944.7 Million by 2028. The rising growth in the global disease burden and increase in the demand for better quality control options providing aid in escalating the growth of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market.

X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an accessible, non-destructive, chemical analysis procedure with a wide range of implementations in industries which includes geology, environment, mining and cement production, glass and ceramics, food, forensic science, and health care. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry utilizes non-destructive X-rays emanated under high-energy X-ray radiation to analyze and trace amounts of pathological components, without demolishing or destructing the sample composition under test. Despite that, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is not very widely occupied in analyzing biological samples, as the procedure requires vacuum conditions that can possibly dehydrate or destruct biological samples. It can be used broadly in the analysis and quality control of pharmaceutical and health care materials.

Get sample PDF Copy: – https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/request-a-sample/?dbmr=global-x-ray-fluorescence-xrf-market

X-ray Fluorescence (XRF)Market Scope and Market Size

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market is segmented on the basis of product type and application. The growth amongst these segments will help you analyse meagre growth segments in the industries, and provide the users with valuable market overview and market insights to help them in making strategic decisions for identification of core market applications.

Based on product type, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market is segmented into handheld, desktop.

Based on application, the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market is segmented into cement, mining and metals, petroleum, chemicals, environmental, food and pharmaceutical.

X-ray Fluorescence (XRF)Market Country Level Analysis

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market is analysed and market size insights and trends are provided by country, product type and application as referenced above.

The countries covered in the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market report are the U.S., Canada, Mexico in North America, Germany, France, U.K., Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium, Russia, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Rest of Europe in Europe, China, Japan, India, South Korea, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Rest of Asia-Pacific (APAC) in the Asia-Pacific (APAC), Saudi Arabia, U.A.E, South Africa, Egypt, Israel, Rest of Middle East and Africa (MEA) as a part of Middle East and Africa (MEA), Brazil, Argentina and Rest of South America as part of South America.

North America dominates the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market because of the high adoption of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers, presence of superior health care infrastructure, and favorable reimbursement scenario in the region.

The country section of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market report also provides individual market impacting factors and changes in regulation in the market domestically that impacts the current and future trends of the market. Data points such as consumption volumes, production sites and volumes, import export analysis, price trend analysis, cost of raw materials, down-stream and upstream value chain analysis are some of the major pointers used to forecast the market scenario for individual countries. Also, presence and availability of global brands and their challenges faced due to large or scarce competition from local and domestic brands, impact of domestic tariffs and trade routes are considered while providing forecast analysis of the country data.

Get TOC Details of the Report @ https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/toc/?dbmr=global-x-ray-fluorescence-xrf-market

Competitive Landscape and Healthcare X-ray Fluorescence (XRF)Market Share Analysis

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market competitive landscape provides details by competitor. Details included are company overview, company financials, revenue generated, market potential, investment in research and development, new market initiatives, global presence, production sites and facilities, production capacities, company strengths and weaknesses, product launch, product width and breadth, application dominance. The above data points provided are only related to the companies' focus related to X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market.

The major players covered in the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) market report are Olympus Corporation, SUZHOU LANScientific Co.,Ltd., Hefei Jingpu Sensor Technology Co.,Ltd., HORIBA, Ltd., Hitachi, Ltd., Fischer Technology Inc., Elvatech Ltd., DFMC, The British Standards Institution, Bruker, Bourevestnik, SPECTRO Analytical Instruments GmbH, Rigaku Corporation, FAST ComTec GmbH, Baltic Scientific Instruments, Elvatech Ltd., Oxford Instruments, Malvern Panalytical Ltd, PERSEE ANALYTICS, INC., EC21 Inc., Shimadzu Corporation, Skyray Instrument Inc., AMETEK.Inc., Eurocontrol Technics Group Inc. DBMR analysts understand competitive strengths and provide competitive analysis for each competitor separately.

Customization Available : Global X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Market

Data Bridge Market Research is a leader in advanced formative research. We take pride in servicing our existing and new customers with data and analysis that match and suits their goal. The report can be customized to include price trend analysis of target brands understanding the market for additional countries (ask for the list of countries), clinical trial results data, literature review, refurbished market and product base analysis. Market analysis of target competitors can be analyzed from technology-based analysis to market portfolio strategies. We can add as many competitors that you require data about in the format and data style you are looking for. Our team of analysts can also provide you data in crude raw excel files pivot tables (Fact book) or can assist you in creating presentations from the data sets available in the report.

Browse In-depth Research Report @ https://www.databridgemarketresearch.com/reports/global-x-ray-fluorescence-xrf-market

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Tue, 02 Aug 2022 01:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/x-ray-fluorescence-xrf-market-is-valued-at-usd-19447-million-at-a-cagr-504-during-the-forecast-period-2028-2022-08-02
Killexams : Potting Electronics With Silicone

If you want to Strengthen the reliability of your electronics, just cover them in silicone or epoxy. Potting, as this technique is called, protects your project from impact and loose wires, but most of the time ends up as a gloppy mess. [Charles] figured out an awesome way to make pro-looking potted electronics using silicone and a few supplies from the emergency room.

On one of [Charles]’s trips to the ER, a nurse put Tegaderm on a wound and he noticed his skin could breathe. Figuring Tegaderm would also allow silicone to breathe, he asked for a sample and went back to the lab. After putting a few globs of silicone on a PCB, [Charles] wrapped the whole thing in Tegaderm. Much to his surprise, the silicone cured and made a smooth, glossy protective covering on his board.

[Charles] put up a Picassa album of his Tegaderm/silicone potted electronics, and we’ve got to say they’re looking very professional. This technique could also be applied to [Charles]’ glass PCB touch sensor, allowing for the creation of clear (or at least tranlucent) PCBs.

After the break, you can check out [Charles] potting his ATtinyISP board in silicone with Tegaderm. One word of warning, though: don’t use a silicone that uses acetic acid to cure – that’s a death sentence to electronics. Luckily, there’s an easy test to see if your particular brand of silicone produces acetic acid while curing. Just squeeze a bit of silicone on a piece of scrap, and if it smells like vinegar after a while, don’t use it.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Brian Benchoff en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2012/06/04/potting-electronics-with-silicone/
Killexams : Applying exact A1C Recommendations in Clinical Practice

Recent A1C Guidelines

American Diabetes Association's Summary of Revisions: Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes-—2018: In 2018, the ADA guidelines were updated to reflect potential limitations in A1C measurements due to hemoglobin variants, assay interferences, ethnicity, age, and conditions associated with altered RBC turnover, all of which may necessitate the use of an alternative form of diagnostic glucose testing. In the case of assay interference, marked disconcordance between measured A1C and observed plasma glucose concentrations should prompt an investigation into the presence of hemoglobin variants that may interfere with test results.[5]

The diagnosis of DM is made when the A1C values are >6.5% (48 mmoL/moL) based on an NGSP-certified test. Prediabetes is defined by an A1C of 5.7% to 6.4% (39–47 mmoL/moL). Patients with prediabetes should be tested yearly in order to determine whether they have converted to diabetic status. Plasma glucose concentrations are recommended over A1C testing for diagnosing T1DM patients who have overt symptoms of hyperglycemia, most of whom are pediatric patients. On the other hand, A1C, fasting plasma glucose, and 2-hour plasma glucose values obtained during oral glucose tolerance testing are equally beneficial in diagnosing T2DM in both younger and older patients.[18]

Table 2 identifies patient-specific factors that interfere with A1C testing.[2,5,19–38] Plasma glucose concentrations (or other alternative glycemic assessments, such as fructosamine and glycated albumin) may be recommended over A1C testing in these patient populations.[18]

Table 3 lists a few common hemoglobin variants and hemoglobinopathies that interfere with A1C assays.[40,41] A genome-wide association study involving approximately 160,000 people of European, African, East Asian, and South Asian ancestry recently found that there are 60 genetic variants that can influence A1C.[42]

In general, there are five different types of assay methods for measuring A1C: enzymatic, immunoassay, boronate affinity, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis.[3,43] A current list of FDA-approved immunoassays is available.[44] A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with A1C measurement has been published.[45]

Patient-specific factors that affect A1C concentrations are race and age. African Americans have higher A1C concentrations for any mean glucose concentration compared with non-Hispanic whites.[18,46] These higher A1C concentrations may occur in the presence of similar fasting and postglucose load glucose concentrations.[18] Glucose concentrations increase as glucose intolerance worsens.[33] Similar findings have been observed when fructosamine and glycated albumin, which are alternative methods to assess glycemic status, are employed.[18] Elevated A1C concentrations have also been found in other racial groups.[47] African Americans', Hispanics', and Asians' A1C concentrations are 0.37%, 0.27%, and 0.33%, respectively—higher compared with those of whites.[25]

With regard to age, A1C testing is not recommended to diagnose T1DM in pediatric patients.[18]

The ADA guidelines recommend that A1C testing be performed at least twice yearly in patients who have achieved stable glycemic control. For those patients who are not at goal or for whom therapy recently changed, quarterly A1C testing is recommended. The guidelines also caution that A1C does not measure glycemic variability or hypoglycemic risk, although hypoglycemia is less common among patients with A1C values of <7.0% to 7.5% (53–58 mmoL/moL).[12] The ADA offers guidelines for initiating and escalating therapy based on A1C concentrations.[48]

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology Consensus Statement on the Comprehensive Type 2 Diabetes Management Algorithm (2018 Executive Summary): At the same time that the ADA released its guidelines on the management of DM, the AACE/ACE disseminated its recommendations.[16] Similar to the ADA, AACE/ACE advises that A1C targets be individualized based on age, life expectancy, comorbid conditions, duration of DM, risk of hypoglycemia, or adverse consequences from hypoglycemia. However, if individualized A1C targets can be achieved safely, AACE/ACE identifies an A1C concentration of ≤6.5% as the optimal glycemic goal for patients with exact DM onset and no clinically significant cardiovascular disease. It also states that higher glycemic goals (>6.5%) may be appropriate for some patients (Table 4). These goals may change for the individual patient over time. Algorithm-based recommendations are provided for treatment options based on the initial A1C value.

American College of Physicians' Guidance Statement on A1C Targets for Glycemic Control With Pharmacologic Therapy for Nonpregnant Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The most contentious of these diabetic guidelines are those issued by the ACP.[17] The ACP reviewed six clinical practice guidelines from other organizations in which A1C goals were used to manage antidiabetic therapy.[49–54] The group then released four guidance statements that recommended deintensification of hypoglycemic therapy for nonpregnant adults with T2DM. The ACP advocates that clinicians personalize goals for therapy based on the risk versus benefit of pharmacotherapy, treatment burden, and cost. It also recommends glycemic goals of 7% to 8% in most patients with T2DM. For patients who have achieved A1C concentrations of <6.5%, the guidance advises deintensification of drug therapy. This liberalization of glycemic control is advocated because, according to ACP, such low concentrations have not been associated with improved clinical outcomes but are related to increased cost, patient burden, and adverse events. Lastly, the ACP encourages clinicians to minimize hyperglycemic symptoms rather than target A1C concentrations in patients with a life expectancy of <10 years due to advanced age, nursing home residence, or the presence of chronic diseases (Table 4) because harm may outweigh benefit in these patients.

The authors of the guidelines argue that intensive glycemic control is associated with small absolute reductions in the risk of microvascular surrogate events (e.g., retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination or nephropathy defined by the presence of albuminuria) and that A1C concentrations of <7% have not consistently shown reductions in clinical microvascular events, such as loss or impairment of vision, end-stage renal disease, or painful neuropathy.[17]

Additionally, A1C targets of <7% (compared with 8%) were not associated with decreased deaths (either all-cause or cardiovascular-related deaths) or reductions in macrovascular events over a 5- to 10-year treatment period. Further, the authors point out that in all studies that randomized patients to more intensive therapy to lower the A1C, there were higher rates of adverse events, including death, compared with more liberal treatment goals. They caution that it takes a long time to achieve the benefits associated with more intensive glycemic control, and such restrictive regimens may be best for patients with life expectancy in excess of 15 years. Finally, the authors believe that there was insufficient evidence to evaluate clinical outcomes for A1C concentrations between 6.5% and 7.0%.

The Endocrine Society, ADA, AACE, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the Joslin Diabetes Center have openly criticized the loosening of glycemic goals.[55–57] They take ACP to task because their recommendations contradict the findings of DCCT, UKPDS, ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes), ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation), and VADT (Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial), all of which associated lower A1C concentrations with reduced microvascular complications.[7,8,58–60] Further, ACP's recommendations do not take into account the younger T2DM patient, who may be at greater risk for long-term complications, such as cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, amputations, and kidney disease, if the higher A1C targets are implemented. The ACP has also been faulted for failure to recognize the positive impact that newer classes of hypoglycemics, such as the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, have had on both improved cardiovascular outcomes and glycemic control while having a low risk of hypoglycemia. There is also concern that these more relaxed glycemic targets may become performance measures for health plans.[55–57,61,62]

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/905033_2
Killexams : Shogun Bond

What is Shogun Bond?

Shogun bond is a type of bond that is issued in Japan by foreign entities, including corporations, financial institutions and governments, and denominated in a currency other than yen.

Key Takeaways

  • A Shogun Bond is a bond issued in Japan by a foreign entity in a currency other than the yen.
  • Foreign currency Shogun bonds issued in Japan are available to both Japanese and foreign investors.
  • The first Shogun bond was issued in 1985 by the World Bank and was denominated in U.S. dollars (USD).

Understanding Shogun Bond

Shogun bonds were named after the Japanese word for the traditional military leader of the Japanese army. A Samurai bond is similar to a Shogun bond, but samurai bonds are denominated in yen, while Shogun bonds are issued in foreign currency. An example of a Shogun bond would be a Chinese company issuing a renminbi-denominated bond in Japan. Foreign currency Shogun bonds issued in Japan are available to both Japanese and foreign investors.

The first Shogun bond was issued in 1985 by the World Bank, in consideration of the Japanese government’s effort to broadly internationalize the Japanese yen and liberalize the nation’s capital markets. The bond was denominated in U.S. dollars (USD). Southern California Edison became the first U.S. corporation to sell dollar-denominated Shogun bonds, also in 1985.

Early in its history, the Shogun bond market was restricted to supranational organizations and to foreign governments. Tax revisions by the U.S. in 1986 incited some early interest in the bond, as the subsequent easing of rules relating to the bonds gave greater flexibility to private companies in the Shogun bond market.

Early Challenges for Shogun Bonds

After peaking in 1996, Shogun bonds struggled to gain traction in Japan for a number of reasons, such as:

  • Japan wanted to focus on high-quality yen-denominated bonds instead of those issued in a foreign country.
  • Japanese investors at the time had little knowledge of how international markets worked and were particularly risk averse, and thus shied away from an investment they didn’t yet understand.
  • Registration period for issuing Shogun bonds was extremely long and the documentation requirements were extremely difficult, especially in comparison to Samurai bonds.

As a result, Shogun bond issuance hovered at near-zero levels for many years, before reaching a new high in 2010.

Motivations for Shogun Bond Issuance

Corporations, governments, and institutions cite multiple reasons for issuing Shogun bonds. Here are four exact historical examples that describe their specific reasons for using Shogun bonds as a borrowing resource:

  • In 2011, Daewoo issued Korea’s first Shogun bonds, drawn by lower borrowing costs in Japan amid market turmoil in Europe and the U.S. The company also stated that the Shogun issuance would help diversify its sources of funding. Daewoo also planned to use the proceeds for investment in resources exploration projects and for general corporate purposes.
  • In 2012, Hitachi Capital issued the first Hong Kong-dollar (HKD) Shogun bond. The company used the sale to finance its business expansion, including mortgage loans, as well as for general corporate purposes.
  • In 2016, the World Bank issued the first Shogun Green Bond, using the funds to support lending for eligible projects that seek to mitigate climate change or help affected nations adapt to it.
  • In 2017, South Korean credit card company Woori raised $50 million via its sale of Shogun bonds, using the proceeds from the sale to repay its maturing debt, among other reasons.
Wed, 13 Jun 2018 06:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/shogunbond.asp
Killexams : Clinical Importance of Gamma Glutamyltransferase in the Ankara-Pursaklar Region of Turkey

Methods

This is a descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study performed in the Pursaklar regional hospital, which is a metropolitan hospital of Fatih University Medical School.

Patients

The study involved 100 patients with high serum GGT levels who had been seen in the Family Practice and Internal Medicine clinics in the Ankara-Pursaklar region (within our hospital's Pursaklar department) between July 2000 and July 2002. All were from the Ankara-Pursaklar region, a suburban/rural area. Detailed history, physical examination, and laboratory and ultrasonographic evaluations of the patients were performed. The study was conducted by the family physicians and certified from internal medicine and biochemistry departments.

Methods

Serum ALP, ALT, and GGT levels were measured spectrophotometrically with the Hitachi 912 (Roche Diagnostics Co., Mannheim, Germany).

GGT levels were measured by a standard method recommended by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC). GGT in serum specimens transfers the gamma-glutamyl group of L-gamma-glutamyl-3-carboxy-4-nitroanilide to glycylglycine. The amount of 5-amino-2-nitrobenzoate liberated is proportional to GGT activity and can be measured photometrically. The laboratory results, which are periodically inspected and accredited by international laboratories, were interpreted by the faculty laboratory personnel. Serum GGT levels between 11 and 50 U/L were considered within reference values.

Patients' serum ALP and ALT levels were also studied. ALP levels were measured by an optimized standard method recommended by the Deutschen Gesellschaft fur Klinische Chemie (German Society of Clinical Chemistry). With regard to this process, in the presence of magnesium and zinc ions, p-nitrophenyl phosphate is hydrolyzed by phosphatases to form phosphate and nitrophenol. The p-nitrophenol released is proportional to the ALP activity and is measured photometrically. Reference values for ALP were determined as 0-270 U/L, whereas this range was between 0 and 42 U/L for ALT. ALT levels were measured by a standard method recommended by IFCC that depends on the activation of pyridoxal phosphate. In this method, ALT in the serum catalyzes the reaction between alpha-ketoglutarate and L-alanine, in which the products are L-glutamate and pyruvate. The pyruvate increase is measured in a subsequent indicator reaction that is catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The rate of decrease in NADH is directly proportional to the rate of pyruvate formation and, thus, the activity of ALT. The reference values were determined in light of the values stated on the kits provided by the companies.

The GGT/ALT and ALP/GGT ratios of all the patients were calculated. The results were confirmed by testing blood samples several times in laboratory analyses. Laboratory staff was blinded to the clinical features of the patients.

All the patients were then evaluated for age, gender, previous diseases, drugs in use, and other diseases in their family. A radiologist performed the ultrasonographic examinations and the results were recorded in detail. The patients who were thought to have hepatic etiologies were studied through total viral hepatitis tests (HbsAg, AntiHbs, Anti HCV, Anti-HAV IgM and IgG), and the diagnosis of chronic hepatitis was based on the results of liver biopsy. In addition to the hepatic profiles, antinuclear antibody, antimitochondrial antibody, serum copper, ceruloplasmin levels, and serum ferritin levels were studied for the patients suspected of having nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis was established through the previous diagnosis of gastroenterology clinic, hepatic computed tomography, and the results of liver biopsy. The diagnoses of cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis were established through abdominal ultrasonography or the results of the endoscopic biliary studies that were performed at another center before the patients' application to our center. The diagnoses of acute and chronic cholecystitis were based on the findings of clinical examination and biochemistry and previously established gastroenterology diagnoses. For each etiology other than that of hepatobiliary origin, illness-specific diagnostic criteria were used. The drugs used and personal habits of each patient were scrutinized.

In light of the results of the laboratory tests and physical examination, the most probable etiologies underlying high GGT levels were identified as "hepatic," "biliary," and "others." The patients were classified into 6 age groups: 19 years of age or younger; between 20 and 29 years of age; between 30 and 39 years of age; between 40 and 49 years of age; between 50 and 59 years of age; and 60 years of age or older.

Statistical Analyses

GGT, ALP, and ALT levels and GGT/ALT and ALP/GGT ratios of 3 diagnostic groups were compared with Mann-Whitney-U test. The correlations of the parameters of the age groups were also evaluated through multivariate analysis. A P value of < .05 was considered statistically significant; all tests were 2-tailed. The statistical analyses were performed with SPSS for Windows.

Tue, 21 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/467020_2
Killexams : Startup-Circle: How the significance of meta verse is growing in india No result found, try new keyword!ITLH has pledged to redefine the professional skill development of ... before the course gets completed with the help of just the practice elements they learn and implement during their live ... Fri, 22 Jul 2022 02:41:00 -0500 text/html https://www.ciol.com/startup-circle-significance-meta-verse-growing-india/
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