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Exam Code: CCBA Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
CCBA Certification of Competency in Business Analysis

To earn the CCBA designation, candidates must:

Complete a minimum of 3,750 hours of Business Analysis work experience in the last 7 years.
Within these 3750 minimum hours required, a minimum of 900 hours must be completed in each of 2 of the 6 BABOK® Guide Knowledge Areas OR, a minimum of 500 hours must be completed in each of 4 of the 6 BABOK® Guide Knowledge Areas.
Complete a minimum of 21 hours of Professional Development within the last 4 years.
Provide references.
Agree to Code of Conduct.
Agree to Terms and Conditions.
Pass the exam.

The CCBA certificate is for:

Individuals with an ECBA™ designation
Product Managers
Non-BA consultants
Trainers
Hybrid Business Analysis professionals, including: Project Manager, Testers, Quality Assurance (QA) professionals, Change/Transformation Managers, and Designers

Business Analysis Planning and Monitoring 12%
Elicitation and Collaboration 20%
Requirements Life Cycle Management 18%
Strategy Analysis 12%
Requirements Analysis and Design Definition 32%
Solution Evaluation 6%

Modifies rules: Encounters situations where there is confidence to modify the guidelines that have been provided for addressing the challenge.
Recommends actions: Although generally works independently on smaller, well scoped challenges, still relies on expert help for more complex work. Skills, knowledge and confidence have developed to the level where appropriate actions are identified.
Applied knowledge: Has practiced the competency and skills have evolved working on small, less complex challenges or with guidance on large, more complex work.

Plan Business Analysis Approach
- Skilled: Recommends action for selecting the business analysis approach.
- Skilled: Recommends action forlevel of business analysis formality.
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying business anlaysis activities.
- Skilled: Recommends action for the timing of business analysis work.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing complexity, size, and risk factors.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of gaining stakeholder understanding and agreement.

Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication: Adapt communication style to the needs of the situation and the individual.
Listening: Use active listening and discovery skills to understand “real” issues/needs and build chemistry.

Plan Stakeholder Engagement
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of stakeholder analysis.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of stakeholder collaboration.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying stakeholder collaboration needs.

Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Listening: Use active listening and discovery skills to understand “real” issues/needs and build chemistry.

Plan Business Analysis Governance

- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying an effective decision-making process. - Skilled: Applied knowledge of developing an effective change control processes. - Skilled: Applied knowledge of developing an effective prioritizaion process. - Skilled: Recommends action for planning an effective approval process.
Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.

Plan Business Analysis Information Management

- Skilled: Applied knowledge of how to oganize business analysis information.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of determining the appropriate level of abstraction.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of traceability.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of planning for requirements reuse.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of storing and accessing business analysis information.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge on attributes for requirements and design management.

Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Business Analysis Tools & Technology: Leverage appropriate business analysis tools.

Identify Business Analysis Performance Improvements

- Skilled: Recommends action for reports on business analysis performance. - Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying business analysis performance measures. - Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing business analysis performance measures. - Skilled: Applied knowledge of recommending business analysis performance improvements.
Creative Thinking: Think creatively and help others to think creatively to identify innovative solutions.
Learning: Demonstrate an ability to learn quickly and willingly.
Adaptability: Adapt to and embrace changing situations as an opportunity, rather than an obstacle.

Prepare for Elicitation
- Skilled: Modifies rules for the elicitation scope
- Skilled: Modifies rules for selecting appropriate elicitation techniques
- Skilled: Modifies rules for setting up logistics for elicitation activities
- Skilled: Modifies rules for preparing supporting elicitation materials
- Skilled: Recommends action on stakeholder preparation for elicitation activities


Learning: Demonstrate an ability to learn quickly and willingly.
Organization & Time Management: Organize activities and manage time efficiently to adhere to commitments and changing priorities.
Adaptability: Adapt to and embrace changing situations as an opportunity, rather than an obstacle.
Teaching: Teach and ensure comprehension of new concepts.
Conduct Elicitation
Skilled: Modifies rules for guiding the elicitation activity
Skilled: Modifies rules for capturing capturing the outcomes of the elicitation activity.
Conceptual Thinking: Ability to put the pieces together.
Adaptability: Adapt to and embrace changing situations as an opportunity, rather than an obstacle.
Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication: Adapt communication style to the needs of the situation and the individual.
Listening: Use active listening and discovery skills to understand “real” issues/needs and build chemistry.
Facilitation: Use facilitation skills to encourage participation from all attendees.
Confirm Elicitation Results
- Skilled: Recommends action on comparing elicitation results against source information.
- Skilled: Recommends action on comparing elicitation results against other elicitation results.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Leadership & Influencing: Influence others to drive action.
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution: Resolve conflicts and negotiate to reach
Communicate Business Analysis Information
- Skilled: Recommends action on determining objectives and format of communication.
- Skilled: Recommends action for communicating the appropriate level of detail.

Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication: Adapt communication style to the needs of the situation and the individual.
Written Communication: Demonstrate well prepared, stakeholder-focused written communication.
Listening: Use active listening and discovery skills to understand “real” issues/needs and build chemistry.
Manage Stakeholder Collaboration
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of gaining stakeholder agreement.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of monitoring stakeholder engagement.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of collaborative stakeholder relationships.

Organization & Time Management: Organize activities and manage time efficiently to adhere to commitments and changing
priorities. Adaptability: Adapt to embrace changing situations as an opportunity, rather than an obstacle.
Teamwork: Foster a collaborative working environment.
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution: Resolve conflicts and negotiate to obtain agreement.

Trace Requirements
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of value and relationship considerations while tracing requirements.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying the relationships to track to effectively manage traceability.
- Skilled: Applied kowledge of determining and appropriate traceability repository.

Conceptual Thinking: Ability to put the pieces together.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Business Analysis Tools & Technology: Leverage appropriate business analysis tools.
Maintain Requirements
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of maintaining requirement and design information.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of managing attributes.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of managing requirements for long-term reuse.

Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Business Analysis Tools & Technology: Leverage appropriate business analysis tools.
Prioritize Requirements
- Skilled: Recommends action for determining the appropriate basis for prioritizing requirements.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of guiding stakeholders through prioritization changes.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of prioritizing new information.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Business Acumen & Industry Knowledge: Demonstrate the ability to incorporate business and industry knowledge into work.
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution: Resolve conflicts and negotiate to reach agreements.
Assess Requirements Changes
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing the formality of the assessment process.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of completing impact analysis activities.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of guiding impact resolution activities.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Approve Requirements
- Skilled: Applied knowlege of stakeholder roles and authority levels.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of managing conflicts and resolving issues.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of using appropriate methods to gain consensus about key business analysis information.
- Skilled: Recommends action for tracking and communicating approval decisions.

Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication: Adapt communication style to the needs of the situation and the individual.
Listening: Use active listening and discovery skills to understand “real” issues/needs and build chemistry.
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution: Resolve conflicts and negotiate to reach agreements.

Analyze Current State
- Skilled: Recommends action for defining business needs.
- Skilled: Recommends action for the organizational structure and culture.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of the organizational capabilities and processes.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of the technology and infrastructure utilized by the organization.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of organizational policies and business rules.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of the organization's business architecture.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of the organization's internal assets
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of external influencers.

Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Business Acumen & Industry Knowledge: Demonstrate the ability to incorporate business and industry knowledge into work.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Define Future State
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of articulating business goals and objectives.
- Skilled: Recommends action for determining the solution scope.
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying constraints.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying potential changes to organizational structure and culture.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying new capabilities and business processes.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying new technology and infrastructure.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying new organizational policies and business rules.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of ensuring business architecture is respected.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing resource alignment for future state and transition to future state.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying assumptions related to the future state.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of evaluating the potential value for the future state.

Creative Thinking: Think creatively and help others to think creatively to identify innovative solutions.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Assess Risks
- Skilled: Applied knowlege of identifying unknowns.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying and managing constraints, assumptions and dependencies.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of quantifying the impact of risk factors.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing stakeholder and organizatoinal risk tolerances.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of recommending an effective course of action.

Creative Thinking: Think creatively and help others to think creatively to identify innovative solutions.
Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Business Acumen & Industry Knowledge: Demonstrate the ability to incorporate business and industry knowledge into work.
Define Change Strategy
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying the appropriate solution scope.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of performing gap analysis.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of completing the enterprise readiness assessment.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of developing an effective change strategy.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of developing appropriate transition states and completing release plans.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.

Specify and Model Requirements
- Skilled: Recommends action for modeling requirements and designs.
- Skilled: Recommends action for analyzing requirements and designs.
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying information for requirements and designs.
- Skilled: Recommends action for developing the appropriate level of abstraction to meet various needs.

Learning: Demonstrate an ability to learn quickly and willingly.
Visual Thinking: Communicate complex concepts and data as understandable.
Written Communication: Demonstrate well prepared, stakeholder-focused written communication.
Verify Requirements
- Skilled: Recommends action for applying the characteristics of requirements and designs quality.
- Skilled: Recommends action for performing verification activities throughout the work.
- Skilled: Recommends action for using appropriate checklists for quality control.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Validate Requirements
- Skilled: Applied knowledge in identifying assumptions in order to manage risks.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of defining measurable evaluation criteria to assess the success of the change.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of evaluating alignment with solution scope to support value delivery.

Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Define Requirements Architecture
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of using requirements viewpoints and views effectively.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of leveraging templates to develop the solution architecture.
- Skilled: Recommends action for ensuring the set of requirements is complete
- Skilled: Recommends action for ensuring requirements relate to each other by identifying requirements relationships.
- Skilled: Recommends action for defining the business analysis information architecture.

Problem Solving: Use a structured approach to problem solving.
Conceptual Thinking: Ability to put the pieces together.
Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies
Define Design OPtions
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying appropriate solution approaches.
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying improvement opportunities.
- Skilled: Recommends action for allocating requirements to solution components and releases.
- Skilled: Recommends action for developing design options aligned with the desired future state.

Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Conceptual Thinking: Ability to put the pieces together.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organization's nuances and how to get things done.
Analyze Potential Value and Recommend Solution
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying the expected benefits of a potential solution.
- Skilled: Recommends action for identifying the costs associated with a potential solution.
- Skilled: Recommends action for determining the value of a solution to key stakeholders.
- Skilled: Recommends action for assessing design options and recommending the appropriate solution.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.

Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Solution Knowledge: Leverage an understanding of the organization to identify the most effective means of implementing
change.
Measure Solution Performance
- Skilled: Applied knowledge in identifying appropriate measures for assessing solution performance.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of validating selected performance measures with key stakeholders.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge in collecting appropriate performance measures to assess solution performance.

Solution Knowledge: Leverage an understanding of the organization to identify the most effective means of implementing a change. Methodology Knowledge: Demonstrate capability in multiple analysis methodologies.
Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication: Adapt communication style to the needs of the situation and the individual.
Office Productivity and Communication Tools & Technology: Demonstrate proficiency in using office applications to document, track, and communicate information and artifacts.
Analyze Performance Measures
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of examining collected performance easures to assess solution performance.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of highlighting identified risks.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying relevant trends.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of testing and analyzing performance measures to ensure accuracy.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying the root cause of performance variances and recommending actions.

Learning: Demonstrate an ability to learn quickly and willingly.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Business Acumen & Industry Knowledge: Demonstrate the ability to incorporate business and industry knowledge into work.
Assess Solution Limitations
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of identifying internal solution component dependencies.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of performing problem analysis to identify the source of solution limitations.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of performing impact assessment activities to quantify factors that affect solution performance

Learning: Demonstrate an ability to learn quickly and willingly.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Business Acumen & Industry Knowledge: Demonstrate the ability to incorporate business and industry knowledge into work.
Assess Enterprise Limitations
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing enterprise culture.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of completing stakeholder impact analysis.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of assessing solution impact on organizational structure.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of performing operational assessment.

Learning: Demonstrate an ability to learn quickly and willingly.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Business Acumen & Industry Knowledge: Demonstrate the ability to incorporate business and industry knowledge into work.

Recommend Actions to Increase Solution Value
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of ensuring appropriate solution performance measures are being used.
- Skilled: Applied knowledge of providing substantiated recommendations.

Decision Making: Make and help others make the best decision based on appropriate criteria, such as:
business need, opportunities, risk, compliance, and ability to achieve the desired outcome.
Systems Thinking: Leverage holistic view of people, processes and technology to understand the enterprise.
Organization Knowledge: Demonstrate an understanding of the organizations nuances and how to get things done.

Certification of Competency in Business Analysis
IIBA Certification techniques
Killexams : IIBA Certification techniques - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CCBA Search results Killexams : IIBA Certification techniques - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CCBA https://killexams.com/exam_list/IIBA Killexams : how much is a business analyst certification cost?

Application Fee (non-refundable and non-transferable)Exam FeeMember, Non-Member, Corporate MemberMemberECBA™$60$110CCBA®$125$325CBAP®$125$325

Communicating and negotiating well are essential for them. Good at using a variety of business intelligence tools to create interactive reports. It would be extremely beneficial to obtain a certification from the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA), such as Certified Business Analysis Professional (CBAP).

  • Business Data Analytics (CBDA) is an IIBA certification program.
  • CFLBA (IQBBA Certified Foundation Level Business Analyst) IQBBA Certified Foundation Level Business Analyst (CFLBA) IQBBA Certified Foundation Level Business
  • Certified Professional in Requirements Engineering (CPRE) by the International Requirements Engineering Board (IREB).
  • Professional in Business Analysis (PBA) is a designation awarded by the Project Management Institute.
  • SimpliLearn's Business Analyst Masters Program teaches you everything you need to know about being a business analyst.
  • How do I become a certified business analyst?

  • A guide to getting your CBAP Certification.
  • Be honest with yourself about what it will take to crack it...
  • Set a deadline for the exam.
  • Set a plan in motion.
  • Make BABOK a friend of yours.
  • Select the most appropriate Question Bank.
  • Make good use of the question bank.
  • Prepare for the exam by exercising.
  • How long does it take to get a business analyst certification?

    Candidates for the CBAP® designation must have completed at least 7,500 hours of business analysis work in the previous ten years. A minimum of 900 hours in four of the six BABOK® Guide Knowledge Areas were completed as part of this experience, for a total of at least 3,600 hours out of a total of 7,500 required.

    How do I become a certified business analyst?

  • Prepare for the CBAP® certification exam by getting trained and meeting the eligibility requirements.
  • Take the CBAP® exam to become a Certified Business Analyst Professional.
  • You can become a certified Senior Business Analysis Professional by passing the CBAP exam.
  • What can you do with a business analyst certification?

  • Analyst of data.
  • Consultant on business matters.
  • Analyst for operations research.
  • Analyst for the budget.
  • An analyst who uses quantitative methods.
  • Analyst in charge of information security.
  • Manager of a project.
  • Systems analyst with expertise in computer systems.
  • How much does the Ecba cost?

    Certification costs $60, which is nonrefundable. ECBA exam fees are $60, ECBA certification fees are $60, and IIBA memberships are $60. It costs $235 to take the exam for the first time, and $195 to retake it if you fail. You'll also have to pay for the required PD hours, which vary greatly depending on the course.

    Is Ecba certification useful?

    Yes, ECBA certification is worthwhile because there are few industry-accepted certificates that validate foundation-level business analysis knowledge and understanding. So, if you're sitting in an interview, just because you're industry certified, you'll have an advantage over your peers.

    Is the CBAP exam difficult?

    There are 150 multiple-choice questions on the exam, some of which are extremely difficult, some of which are moderately easy, and the majority of which are challenging. CBAP and CCBA tests, which are intensive, typically start with a set of difficult questions.

    What certificate is needed for business analyst?

    A business analyst can earn the highest level of competency- based certification from the IIBA by earning the CBAP. It demonstrates mastery of business analysis as well as leadership abilities. Applicants must have 7,500 hours of business analysis experience, 35 hours of professional development, and pass an exam to be considered.

    How much does it cost to get a CBAP certification?

    IIBA® membership fee: $95 USD
    Application Fee $125 USD
    Exam Fee – for IIBA®Members $325 USD
    Exam Fee – for non-IIBA® Members $450 USD

    How do you become a certified business analyst?

  • In the last ten years, you must have completed at least 7,500 hours of business analysis work.
  • The total hours completed for this experience must equal 900 hours across four of the six BABOK® Guide Knowledge Areas, for a total of at least 3,600 out of the required 7,500.
  • How much does it cost for a CBAP certification?

    Application Fee (non-refundable and non-transferable) Exam Fee
    CCBA® $125 $325
    CBAP® $125 $325
    IIBA®AAC $250
    IIBA®CBDA $450

    What certificates are required for business analyst?

  • (IIBA) is an organization that provides business analysis.
  • The International Qualification Board for Business Analysts (IQBBA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to certifying business analysts around the world.
  • The Project Management Institute (PMI) is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving project management practices
  • In 1989, the International Requirements Engineering Board was established.
  • Is CBAP certification worth?

    Because of their skill sets and expertise in business analysis, companies have been hiring more CBAP recipients in exact years. A CBAP designation holder also earns more money than a non-credentialed business analyst, so you'll have more job opportunities, more money, and global recognition with a CBAP designation.

    How do I get a CBAP certificate?

  • Simplilearn is an IIBA Endorsed Education Provider that offers formal CBAP training.
  • For a total of $450, you can join the IIBA and apply for the CBAP exam online.
  • CBAP certification is awarded by IIBA to those who pass the exam.
  • How long does it take to get business analyst certificate?

    To be considered for the CBAP®, you must have 5 years (7,500 hours) of business analysis experience, as defined by the BABOK® Guide, as well as 900 hours of experience in at least 4 of the 6 knowledge areas.

    Wed, 20 Jul 2022 09:49:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.ictsd.org/business/how-much-is-a-business-analyst-certification-cost/
    Killexams : The Best Lifting Techniques to Move Heavy Stuff

    Lifting heavy items should be done carefully in order to prevent injury.

    In fact, 38.5% of work-related musculoskeletal issues are related to back injury, with improper lifting being one of the main causes.

    Therefore, it’s important to learn proper lifting techniques to keep yourself safe at work and at home.

    This article discusses proper lifting techniques and common lifting problems, and provides useful tips.

    The best lifting technique is to squat down and use the strength of your legs — instead of your back — to lift the object off of the ground.

    That said, you should only lift items that you’re comfortable lifting. If you’re unsure, it’s best to ask another person for help or use other machinery (e.g., a lift).

    If you’ve decided that it’s safe to lift the item by yourself, you’ll want to follow the proper lifting technique guidelines outlined by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

    1. Plan ahead

    Before moving something heavy, it’s important to think and plan first.

    First, look at the item that you’re about to lift and ask yourself these questions:

    • How heavy is it?
    • Is it awkward to carry for one person?
    • Where am I planning on putting this item? Am I going to be carrying it a far distance? Are there doors that will need to be opened when I’m carrying it?
    • Are there proper handles? Do I need safety gloves?
    • Do I have equipment (e.g., a lift) that can do this job safely?
    • Should this be carried by more than one person?
    • Are there any obstructions that should be moved first?

    Taking note of your environment, the item you plan to lift, and other considerations can help you decide if this item is a one- or two-person job or requires other assistance, such as machinery.

    2. Stretch

    Just like you’d warm up before a workout, you should also warm up and stretch your muscles before lifting.

    Ideally, spend a few minutes doing some dynamic stretching (e.g., lunges, lower back rotations, arm circles) to prepare your muscles and get your blood flowing.

    3. Lift

    To lift safely, you first want to make sure that you’re in the right positioning.

    You’ll also want to make sure that you bend your knees, squat down to grab the item, and use the strength of your legs to do most of the lifting. This can help to lower back and other muscular injury.

    Here are the steps to safely lift a heavy item:

    1. Stand as close to the item as possible. This will prevent you from overstraining your back. Stand in front of the item with a wide base of support (feet at least shoulder width apart).
    2. Bend your knees and keep your back upright, shoulders back, and head looking straight forward. There should be a natural curve in your lower back. This will help ensure you’re using your legs rather than your back to lift the item.
    3. Place both hands on the handles or sides of the item.
    4. When ready, look straight forward and push into the balls of your feet as you slowly straighten your legs. Avoid twisting your back.
    5. Hold the item as close to your body as possible around belly button level, with your elbows to your sides.

    4. Carry

    If needed, slowly take small steps to walk to the spot you plan to put the item. If it’s far, you should consider placing the item on a cart or other form of transportation.

    If you need to change directions, lead with your hips and ensure your shoulders stay aligned with your hips. Continue to keep the load as close to your body as possible.

    5. Set down

    Setting an item down is the same movement as lifting but in reverse:

    1. Stop walking and stand squarely in front of the spot you intend to place the item.
    2. Slowly bend your knees and squat as you lower toward the ground. Keep the item close to your body, brace your core, and keep your head looking straight forward.
    3. Place the item on the ground fully before lifting up again.

    If the item will be placed above the ground (e.g., on a counter or table), walk up to the surface and place it gently on top. If it’s slightly lower than hip level, be sure to still bend your knees and lower your body to place the item down safely.

    While no one intends to hurt themselves, it’s quite common to injure yourself while lifting heavy objects. The most common lifting problems include:

    • lifting with your back
    • bending forward and keeping your legs straight to pick up an item
    • twisting while lifting or carrying a heavy item
    • lifting a heavy item that’s above shoulder height
    • carrying an item that’s too heavy or large
    • using a partial grip (e.g., two fingers)
    • lifting items when you’re tired, fatigued, or already injured
    • holding your breath
    • trying to lift and move the item too quickly

    By lifting properly and avoiding these common lifting problems, you can help lower your risk of injury.

    To prevent injury, consider these helpful tips:

    • When in doubt, ask for assistance.
    • Make a plan from start to finish (lifting to placing down).
    • Brace your core when lifting.
    • Always bend your knees to lift an item, even if it looks light.
    • Check the weight of the item by memorizing the weight on the label (if possible).
    • Ideally, use a lifting device to assist you.
    • If you’re going to move the item a far distance, use a cart, vehicle, or other piece of machinery.
    • Always stretch and warm up before lifting. Your safety comes before work or other obligations.
    • Use personal protective equipment (e.g., steel-toed shoes, gloves), as needed.
    • Take breaks if you’re tired or plan to move multiple objects.
    • Avoid holding an item for a long period of time.
    • If needed, ask a person to open any doors or move obstructions out of the way.

    To ensure your safety, always practice safe lifting techniques.

    The best lifting techniques involve using your legs to lift heavy objects instead of your back, since your legs are some of your strongest muscles while your back is more susceptible to injury.

    You’ll also want to make sure that you’re planning ahead, only lifting objects you feel comfortable lifting by yourself, and being just as mindful when you place the item down as when you lift it.

    And remember, you should always ask for assistance if you have any concerns. It’s better to be safe than to risk injuring yourself.

    Wed, 21 Sep 2022 03:32:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.healthline.com/health/lifting-techniques
    Killexams : Headed to a combat training center? These tips will help.

    If Army captains headed to one of the major combat training centers are looking for pointers, the officers who will challenge and evaluate them there recently shared a few.

    At last month’s Maneuver Warfighter Conference on Fort Benning, Georgia, observer/controllers from each of the three major centers shared what they’ve seen, both good and bad, in units they face off against in simulated combat.

    Capt. Galen King from the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California; Capt. Andrew Mueller from the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, Louisiana; and Capt. David Conser from the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Germany listed key tips they hope company commanders might consider before their next rotation in the box.

    “Units consistently struggle to accomplish basic tasks that enable success or survivability on the battlefield,” Conser said. Leaders, regardless of their echelon level, “do not clearly articulate the commander’s intent or concept of operation.”

    Conser stressed that a CTC rotation is a rare chance for commanders to road test their unit; coming prepared and having thought through and rehearsed every detail of their mission is vital to a successful rotation.

    Mueller told the audience that at the company level he’s seen a host of positive trends and challenges that seem common across formations.

    On the positive side, more units are not using roads and are improving their use of high explosives. Units really know how to employ their weapons systems, and their understanding of small unit tactics has increased over past rotations, Mueller explained.

    Common challenges included a lack of routine security measures, poor troop-leading procedures, a failure to prioritize tasks, and the ineffective use of terrain to conceal or maneuver. Many also had essentially nonfunctional command posts, Mueller added, and they failed to fight to, through and beyond the objective, misunderstanding the difference between movement and maneuver.

    Essentially, movement is getting units and equipment, with associated logistical support, to a predetermined location. That could happen rolling down an interstate and pulling off to a sideroad before parking trucks at a range.

    But maneuver uses the terrain features to gain a tactical advantage, remaining concealed until the opportune time to strike or execute a portion of the mission, whether that’s making contact with the enemy force or retaining a reconnaissance position to observe and collect information.

    “Leaders aren’t comfortable maneuvering; they don’t understand transitions from movement to maneuver,” Mueller said. “So units will just do these charges across open ground and not use terrain to mask movement and stay concealed.”

    Mueller advised future captains to train the doctrine at home station, ensure they’re delivering clear and concise communication, and practice that before their rotation. It’s also important to build preformatted products, such as checklists, to refer to in a pinch.

    For his part, King reminded soldiers that their next rotation likely won’t be similar to the one during the counterinsurgency wars given the modern battlefield is transparent; you can see and be seen. Planners must design their process to account for brigade and division rotations, and the pace of logistics is going to strain expectations set from some Afghanistan and Iraq deployments, where everything needed was quickly available.

    To replicate the operational environment the Army expects to see in future conflict, King underscored how much simulated fires have increased for units at the centers. The blue force in one rotation conducted 27 howitzer fire missions, sending more than 800 artillery rounds down range, another 400 rounds of 120mm mortars and 550 rockets from the M270 Multiple Launch Rocket System.

    The red force sent more than 2,100 artillery rounds, along with nearly 500 mortar rounds and 1,827 rockets of the 122mm variety.

    That’s a bit more than many saw on deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Todd South has written about crime, courts, government and the military for multiple publications since 2004 and was named a 2014 Pulitzer finalist for a co-written project on witness intimidation. Todd is a Marine veteran of the Iraq War.

    Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.armytimes.com/news/2022/10/12/headed-to-a-combat-training-center-these-tips-will-help/
    Killexams : Kristi & family get training tips for ‘Rocky’

    CLEVELAND, Ohio (WJW) — Fox 8’s Kristi Capel recently added a new member to the family named “Rocky” and while life with the puppy is going well, Kristi and her husband Hal are hungry for some helpful training tips. Jennifer Topalian is the owner of ‘The Grateful Dog‘ and she spent some time with the family to offer advice on potty training, nipping, discipline and more. To learn more about The Grateful Dog click here.

    Fri, 14 Oct 2022 09:28:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://fox8.com/morning-show/kristi-family-get-training-tips-for-rocky/
    Killexams : Tips & Techniques: How To Remove Stripped Or Stuck Screws

    The tiny Torx- or Allen-head screws used on scope mounts have an annoying habit of stripping at just the wrong time. (Not that there is ever a right time.) This is particularly true when removing a scope mount that’s been on a gun for many years. The screws might be a little rusty, and there’s usually a bit of corrosion between the screw and the threads in the receiver. Also, it’s possible that the screws were over-tightened during installation, which can damage the head of the screw. All this adds up to screws that are very tough to remove.

    When trying to remove scope mounts, using the Allen wrenches that come with new scope rings is asking for trouble. They are generally of soft steel and may strip and round the edges. They are barely acceptable for new installations when everything is new with clean threads and you are in charge of how much torque will be applied to complete the job. But when removing old screws, all bets are off. These cheap wrenches are a poor choice. Use only a good, high-quality hardened steel bit in a large-diameter screwdriver handle, like those found in the Wheeler Engineering 89-Piece Professional-Plus Gunsmithing Screwdriver Set available from Midway USA. Using a multi-bit screwdriver also allows you to keep the torque centered on the axis of the screw. With the L-shaped Allen wrenches, the tendency is for the torque to be directed off-center, that causes the wrench to tip in the screw, which leads to slipping and stripped screws and rounded wrenches.

    You are only going to get one shot at this, so take the time required to get it right. Mount the gun in a gun vise so it won’t slip. Select an Allen bit that is in good shape without rounded or worn edges. Make sure the hex pocket in the screw head is clean and free from debris so the bit can enter all the way to the bottom. Insert the bit into the screw and tap it into place with a plastic-tipped hammer. A few solid whacks with the hammer on the screwdriver handle not only seats the Allen bit in the screw, but may also help loosen the screw. If the fit is at all sloppy, put a little Drive Grip or powdered rosin on the bit. Using two hands, push straight down on the top of the screwdriver with one hand, and turn with the other. Keep the screwdriver perfectly in line with the center of the screw; do not allow it to tip. Be careful about how much torque you apply, as these are small, rather delicate, screws. If the screw doesn’t loosen, back off. Try again while tapping on the screwdriver handle with a plastic hammer and applying constant torque to the handle. This is easier if you have some help. One person taps on the handle with the hammer, while the other keeps the screwdriver straight and applies the torque.

    If just one of the screws is a problem, remove the rest of them first. Sometimes there is a misalignment of parts, so that puts pressure on one particular scew when all of them are tight. Removing the rest of them will often relieve that pressure, allowing the last screw to be removed.

    If the screw is in a scope base that sits on a flat receiver, you can sometimes use a plastic hammer to tap on the base and turn it on the gun enough to loosen the screw. Remove all the other screws, and then tap the corner of the base so that it will drive the base counter-clockwise. It’s not necessary to turn it very far—just a partial turn will often break the screw free. Sometimes working the base back and forth with the hammer a few times will also break the screw free. Be careful about doing this on rounded receivers like the Remington 700, as tapping the mount will cam it against the receiver, jamming the screw tighter or breaking it off.

    Sometimes you can do everything right, yet the screw still strips. The base I recently removed from a Remington 700 in .35 Whelen is a perfect example. The scope was installed sometime back in the late ’80s. The first three screws came free just fine—a testament to the fact that I use only high-quality bits for this kind of work—but the opening in the head of the last one stripped. I thought it could handle the amount of pressure I was applying, but it had been damaged during installation, and the head stripped.

    I switched to a bit designed for a Torx-head screw that was slightly larger than the stripped hole in the screw. Keeping it straight, I tapped the screwdriver with a hammer to drive the Torx bit into the screw, effectively cutting new splines in the metal with the bit. That allowed me to remove the screw. Of course, the screw is no good anymore, and it sometimes damages the Torx bit, but a new bit is only a couple dollars at most, far less than the cost or time necessary to drill out the broken screw and re-tap the hole. I always keep a supply of screws on hand anyway, because it’s very common to need a replacement.

    Sometimes nothing will work, and you must drill out the screw. Clamp the gun in a vise and use a drill press, which will supply you a lot more control than a hand-held drill. Select a bit that is slightly smaller than the head of the screw. Drill just far enough to remove the head from the screw. Once the drill bit hits the bottom of the opening, it should be centered, as it will drill to the shank of the screw. This removes the head from the shank, freeing up the base. If you are lucky, it will leave a small amount of the screw shank sticking out from the gun. If it still will not come out easily and if you have time, it wouldn’t hurt to keep this screw saturated with penetrating oil for a few days before attempting to remove it.

    Use a new pair of small and high-quality Vise-Grips to clamp the screw, and try to remove it. Use a new pair, so that the teeth are clean, sharp and the jaws are perfectly aligned. Sometimes you get lucky and this works.

    Drilling out the screw and re-tap ping the hole is a last resort. This is a bit tricky, and I don’t recommend that a hobby gunsmith try it on a rifle receiver until he has some experience with less-critical applications. If you lack experience with drilling out broken screws and rethreading the screw holes, a rifle receiver is not the place to learn. Take the rifle to someone who has the knowledge and the proper equipment. I have seen several ruined receivers and more than one hole drilled through the barrel by people who didn’t heed that advice.

    Sat, 24 Sep 2022 22:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.americanrifleman.org/content/tips-techniques-how-to-remove-stripped-or-stuck-screws/
    Killexams : What Are Grounding Techniques?

    Source: Jandré van der Walt / Unsplash

    Co-authored by Zamfira Parincu and Tchiki Davis

    Sometimes life throws you a curveball and you find yourself overwhelmed. Maybe you experienced a loss. Perhaps you find yourself pondering the meaning of life. Or maybe the current state of world affairs makes you feel lost. Whenever you find yourself feeling anxious or stressed, you can use grounding techniques to reconnect with yourself and the present moment. This research-based strategy may be helpful for anxiety, panic attacks, flashbacks, or even dissociation.

    Grounding techniques work by “grounding” you in the present moment and pulling you away from intrusive thoughts or feelings. This refers not only to having your “feet on the ground” but also your “mind on the ground.” When you turn your attention away from thoughts, memories, or worries, you can refocus on the present moment (Fisher, 1999).

    Grounding techniques are useful because they help you distance yourself from an emotional experience. When you experience negative emotions—for example, perhaps you accidentally remember a painful memory—the brain's natural instinct is to start the involuntary physiological change known as the “fight or flight” response. Although this response keeps you safe by preparing you to face, escape from, or fight danger, memories do not present a tangible danger. If you find yourself in moments like these, grounding techniques can help the body calm itself and return to the present moment.

    The 5-4-3-2-1 Technique

    This is one of the most common grounding techniques. It helps by grounding you to the moment and reconnecting you to all five senses by naming:

    • 5 things you can see. Look around you and name five things you can see. It can be anything that’s in front of you such as the phone or the wall. It can also be things that are further away, such as the buildings or sky.
    • 4 things you can feel. This is important because it makes you pay attention to your body. You can think about how your hair feels on your back, how your feet feel in your shoes, or even how the fabric of your clothes feels on your skin.
    • 3 things you can hear. Pay attention to your environment: Do you hear birds, construction noise, the AC working? Say any three things that you can hear.
    • 2 things you can smell. Smelling is a powerful sensation, yet sometimes we move through life without paying that much attention to it. If you can, walk around a bit and notice the smells. If you can’t smell anything or can’t move, you can just name two smells that you particularly like.
    • 1 thing you can taste. Can you still taste lunch, coffee, or gum? If you want, grab a candy or mint and acknowledge how the flavors taste.

    The next time you feel anxious or that you are overthinking a problem, try the 5-4-3-2-1 technique to become more present in the moment.

    Do a Meditation Exercise

    Guided meditation is a powerful grounding technique to reduce stress, depression and anxiety, and it can help you get out of your head and reconnect to your body. There are many types of meditation, such as the body scan, moving meditations, or loving-kindness meditation, so it’s important to try to determine which one works best for you. Meditation has been shown to reduce stress, make you calmer, promote happiness (Mineo, 2018), and even reduce symptoms of PTSD in studies with the U.S. military (Seppälä et al., 2014)

    Focus on Your Breath ​

    Many clinical professionals use breathing exercises to help patients be present in the moment. Focusing on breathing is a great tool for reducing stress and anxiety (Stefanaki et al., 2015). Breathing exercises work because they help you disengage from your mind and not pay attention to distracting thoughts. You can do the simple exercise below before bed, when you wake up in the morning, or before an important meeting:

    First, find a comfortable and quiet place to sit or lie down. Breathe in slowly through your nose, and notice how your chest and belly rise as you fill your lungs. Then, breathe out slowly through your mouth. Do this a few times until you start to calm down.

    In Sum

    Grounding techniques are strategies that can reconnect you with the present and may help you overcome anxious feelings, unwanted thoughts or memories, flashbacks, distressing emotions, or dissociation. You can try as many techniques as you want: The more you try, the higher the chance you’ll find at least one that works for you.

    Adapted from an article published by The Berkeley Well-Being Institute.

    Thu, 01 Sep 2022 11:23:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/click-here-happiness/202208/what-are-grounding-techniques
    Killexams : Kristi's family gets some puppy training tips for 'Rocky'

    Fox 8's Kristi Capel recently added a new member to the family named "Rocky" and while life with the new puppy is going well, Kristi and her husband Hal are hungry for some helpful puppy training tips. Jennifer Topalian is the owner of 'The Grateful Dog' and she spent some time with the family to offer advice on potty training, nipping, discipline and more. To learn more about 'The Grateful Dog' visit https://www.thegratefuldog.org/

    Fri, 14 Oct 2022 03:38:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://fox8.com/video/kristis-family-gets-some-puppy-training-tips-for-rocky/8074987/
    Killexams : 9 Potty Training Resistance Techniques For Your Strong-Willed Toddler © Provided by Romper

    There was a time when I was absolutely, 100% convinced that I would be that legendary mother whose child actually went to college in diapers. Both of my children were late to potty train, but one of them particularly showed major potty training resistance, to the point where I was close to tears with every pack of Pull-Ups I bought. Sound familiar? Then rest assured: You're not alone, you're not a bad parent, and there are (believe it or not) ways to get even the most stubborn toddler to use the toilet.

    Just realizing that there's a wide range of "normal" when it comes to the timing of toilet training can be a relief. Most children begin to show initial signs of toilet readiness around 24 to 30 months of age, as certified potty training consultant Jacklyn Gravel tells Romper.

    However, it's not at all unusual for kids to start later. "Some kids just don't want to use the potty," parenting expert Tanya Altmann, M.D., tells Romper. Dr. Altmann, a spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), adds that trying to pressure your older child to train — say, because your chosen preschool has an underwear-only policy, there's a baby on the way, or you're just done with the whole diaper thing — will only make your toddler resist even more.

    Hoping to end the training struggle? Here are some expert tips that can help your resistant child join the potty party.

    Make toileting convenient

    © Provided by Romper

    Dr. Altmann notes that toddlers are often too preoccupied with their playing to bother getting up and going to the bathroom. If you suspect that's the case, then try putting the potty chair in the room where your child usually plays. Better still, put a couple of them around the house (and even in the yard during warm weather) to make it easy for your child to go when they feel the urge.

    Try a gradual approach

    Some children are fine with a steady diapers-to-Pull-Ups-to-underwear training progression; others need extra help with the transition. Begin by talking with your toddler about your expectations in simple terms.

    “For example, ‘On this day we are saying goodbye to your diapers and all pee and poop will go in the potty!’” Anneliese Schlachter, a certified potty training consultant, explains to Romper. “Make everything as fun, upbeat, and exciting as possible. You want your child to feel like you're on their team and you're mastering this skill together. Then when it's time to ditch the diapers, stay as consistent as possible and make sure you as the parent [or] caregiver have realistic expectations. You're looking for progress, not perfection.”

    Don't let constipation get in the way

    "Make sure your child's stools are soft," Dr. Altmann advises in her book, Baby and Toddler Basics: Expert Answers to Parents' Top 150 Questions. "If he is constipated and his stools are hard, he won't want to go in the potty because pooping hurts." This can lead not only to more training delays, but also to health issues if the stool becomes impacted. Offer plenty of fiber-filled foods such as broccoli, beans, apples with skin, oranges, and oatmeal to keep your child regular, and ask your pediatrician about giving a child-safe laxative if your toddler is becoming constipated.

    Give your little one some kudos.

    © Provided by Romper

    This is a big one, as positive support can go a long way, especially if you’re dealing with potty training resistance by a 4-year-old who is feeling behind. “I also like to remind parents to try and look for any opportunity you can to praise your child,” Gravel says. “Try to make it as specific as possible. Something like, ‘I know sometimes it feels scary for you to use the potty, but it was so brave of you to try sitting on the big potty today! Maybe tomorrow you'll get some pee in the potty too!’”

    Try going commando

    "Often, if a child is older, you know they know what to do, and they just aren't ready, spending a week at home naked and encouraging them when they have success is the best thing you can do," says Dr. Altmann. Pick a time when you don't have much to do, and just let them go around the house without pants. If your toddler starts getting that look, or starts to get squirmy, lead them to the bathroom and tell them it's time to try. After about a week, Dr. Altmann says they should be motivated to visit the potty without being prompted.

    Put the responsibility on them

    One good way to train a reluctant potty user is to stop all the reminding and nagging altogether. “Most resistance when it comes to potty training is from parental pressure — and I totally get it, we just want them to go to the freaking bathroom!” Schlachter says. “However, when we take a step back and show our children that we trust them to listen to their body, they will realize we're not going to force anything, and one day they'll just start going on their own.”

    Tell your child, "I know you know when you need to poop and pee. That poop and pee wants to go in the potty, so from now on, it's your job to get it there. You don't need help." Then leave it at that. When you stop paying so much attention to their toilet habits, your child doesn't have a reason to fight back. And offer plenty of praise when your child does decide to use the potty on their own.

    Bring in some incentives.

    © Provided by Romper

    Bribery obviously isn’t the answer — you don’t want your little one to only go to the bathroom for the sake of a reward — but creating an association of happiness with the potty is helpful when it comes to potty training a strong-willed child. “It can also be helpful to create a fun and positive environment around using the potty,” Schlachter says. “A basket of toys specifically for potty use is usually a great motivator.”

    You might even consider letting your child help choose the incentive. Rather than just offering an M&M for every potty visit, involve your child in the process. Ask your child, "What would help you remember to go poop in the potty?" and take it from there. Time-limited incentives, such as 15 minutes of playing a tablet game or painting instead of a toy or candy each time, are also great options here.

    Stay consistent

    As Gravel explains, it’s easy for parents to think, “This isn’t working!” and change their whole approach to potty training at the first sign of hardship. But switching things up too quickly can be confusing for the child.

    “Children love predictably and routine, even when it comes to things they may not like doing (think brushing teeth, going to the doctor, etc.),” Gravel says. “Instead of changing your methods, ease off on the pressure, questions, or reminders. Often, children who are exceptionally resistant to using the potty finally make progress when they gain the confidence in their own abilities.” If you notice any measurable progress during the first week or so, that’s a sure sign to keep going.

    Relax

    Agonizing over your child's training doesn't do anything to help; it just makes you a stressed-out, unhappy parent. “Potty training can feel stressful for both the child and parent, so look for ways to enjoy your child during the process,” says Gravel. “You're going to get annoyed, frustrated, or maybe even a little mad. Scheduling even 15 to 30 minutes each day to engage in an activity you and your child both enjoy together can be a nice reset for everyone.”

    From my own experience, I can say that things got so much better after I adopted our pediatrician's no-big-deal attitude. I encouraged, cleaned up the messes, and trusted that everything would work out. Sure enough, one day, my resistant child told me she had to go, marched herself into the bathroom, and did her thing. Boom. Just like that. From there, it was a matter of days before she was completely trained.

    Look at all the people you know. Can you tell just by looking at them who was using the toilet at age 2, and who wasn't out of diapers until 4 or 5? Of course not. Keep your perspective and your sense of humor, and you and your child will both come through this milestone smiling.

    Experts:

    Jacklyn Gravel, certified potty training consultant

    Tanya Altmann, M.D., parenting expert and spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics

    Anneliese Schlachter, certified potty training consultant

    Mon, 19 Sep 2022 06:55:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/parenting/9-potty-training-resistance-techniques-for-your-strong-willed-toddler/ar-AA120AXG
    Killexams : Age-Old Techniques at Hispanic-Owned Sustainable Farm

    With a focus on healthy living, a Hispanic family a few kilometers from the U.S. capital keeps a traditional way of farming alive. The owners of Glory Fields in Maryland use techniques from the past to implement a sustainable living initiative they say is paying off so far. VOA News' Cristina Caicedo Smit has the story.

    Wed, 21 Sep 2022 05:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.voanews.com/a/age-old-techniques-at-hispanic-owned-sustainable-farm-/6757121.html
    Killexams : Lanthanide doping could help with new imaging techniques
    Lanthanide doping could help with new imaging techniques
    a) Main luminescent transitions of the lanthanide activators in the electromagnetic spectrum, spanning from UV to visible then extending to second near-infrared. b) XEOL, XEPL, DS and UC processes in lanthanide-doped fluoride NSs. c) Schematic illustration of the multimode color evolution based on fluoride core@shell@shell NSs. P represents excitation power. When different lanthanide activators generate diverse emission wavelengths of XEOL, UC and DS in a designed core@shell@shell NSs, plentiful multicolors can be modulated on demand by controlling the excitation wavelength and/or power. Credit: Lei Lei, Yubin Wang, Andrey Kuzmin, Youjie Hua, Jingtao Zhao, Shiqing Xu and Prasad N. Paras

    X-rays are electromagnetic waves with short wavelengths and strong penetrability in physical matter, including live organisms. Scintillators capable of converting X-rays into the ultraviolet (UV), visible or near-infrared (NIR) photons are widely employed to realize indirect X-ray detection and XEOL imaging in many fields. They include medical diagnosis, computed tomography (CT), space exploration, and non-destructive industrial material and security inspections.

    Commercial bulk scintillators possess high light yield (LY) and superior energy resolution. However, they suffer from several drawbacks, such as complex fabrication procedures, expensive experimental equipment, non-tunable XEOL wavelength and poor device processability. They all produce emissions in the visible spectral range, but having XEOL in the NIR range may find more interesting applications in biomedicine. Thick crystals also generate light scattering followed by evident signal crosstalk in a photodiode array.

    Recently, metal halide perovskites have been investigated for X-ray detection. Unfortunately, these materials also exhibited some intrinsic limitations, such as poor photo-/environmental- stability, heavy metal toxicity and low LY. Thus, the search for developing a new generation of scintillators is still a considerable focus of scientific research.

    In a new paper published in eLight, a team of scientists, led by Professor Prasad N. Paras from the University of Buffalo, investigated the use of lanthanide-doped fluoride NSs. Their paper looked at design strategies and nanostructures that allow manipulation of excitation dynamics in a core-shell geometry.

    Lanthanide-doped fluoride NSs avoid the limitations of bulk scintillators and metal halide perovskites. They also exhibit many useful properties. The core-shell structures of the lanthanide doped fluoride NSs can be tuned and designed on demand by employing a cheap and convenient wet-chemical method. The emission wavelengths can be tuned and extended to the second NIR window, benefiting from the abundant energy levels of lanthanide activators.

    These NSs show superior photostability, low toxicity and convenient device processability. It makes them promising candidates for next-generation NSs and XEOL imaging. Moreover, they exhibit XEPL property, showing promising applications in biomedicine and optical information encoding. The combination of XEOL and XEPL makes them suitable for broadening the scope of their applications.

    In exact years, significant advances have been made in NS development. The research team discussed design strategies and nanostructure that allow manipulation of excitation dynamics in a core-shell geometry. They also produce XEOL, XEPL, photon upconversion (UC) and downshifting (DS). It enables emission at multiple wavelengths and at varying time scales.

    The fundamental working principle of XEOL imaging is to record the attenuation of X-rays after penetrating the subject with a scintillator and imaging with a camera. The scintillator screen is placed under the target to absorb the transmitted X-ray photons. A low dose of X-rays penetrating live organisms enables the application of computed tomography. Penetrating nonliving matter enables product quality and security inspection. The X-ray irradiation dose should be low enough to assure safety, while the high resolution and distinct contrast are important for image analysis.

    X-ray, ionizing radiation with deep penetration depth in the human body, has been broadly studied for radiotherapy and bioimaging applications. The strong XEOL can activate the photosensitizers to generate reactive oxygen species. They directly slow or stop tumor growth by photodynamic therapy, causing inflammation and compromising microvasculature.

    The XEPL in UVC range can be used for sterilization and in vivo killing of pathogens and cancer cells. Fluorides with large band-gap and facile creation of anionic defects are appropriate for generating UVC persistent luminescence. Experimental characterizations combined with first-principles calculations suggested that oxygen introduction-induced fluorine vacancies acted as electron traps.

    Photodetectors have various applications in biomedical sensing, camera imaging, optical communications, and night vision. In commercial photodetectors, crystalline inorganic semiconductors are employed as photodiodes and phototransistors. They do not effectively respond to a broad scope of photon energy covering X-ray, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), and NIR light.

    Under NIR excitation, the lanthanide-doped fluoride layer emits UV-vis light through energy-transfer UC processes. The subsequential radiation re-absorption process from lanthanide activators to the perovskite layer occurs. Visible emission from the perovskite layer is produced through recombining electrons in the CB and holes in the VB.

    This nanotransducer exhibited a wide linear response to X-rays with various dose rates and UV and NIR photons at different power densities. As discussed in section 4.4, without integrating the perovskite layer, lanthanide-doped fluoride NSs can be used for the generation of XEOL, UC and DS as well, which might be possible for the realization of broadband detection in theory and need more study in the future.

    Lanthanide-doped fluoride nanoparticles are suitable candidates for next-generation NSs owing to their low bio-toxicity, high photo-/environmental- stability, facile device processability, tunable XEOL and XEPL properties, and other useful features.

    To promote the development of high-performance fluoride NSs and their practical applications, the team discussed the existing challenges and future multidisciplinary opportunities in this field below. Understanding the XEOL mechanism benefits the design and exploration of new fluoride NSs. At present, how the generated low kinetic energy charge carriers are transported to the luminescent centers or captured by defects and the corresponding influence factors are unclear.

    The first populated nonradiative excited levels and the radiative levels of lanthanide activators are optimal when calculating or characterizing the energy differences among these charge carriers. These calculations will guide the design of energy transfer processes to match the energy differences followed by the enhanced light yield. High LY is a prerequisite for the realization of ultra-low dose rate applications.



    More information: Lei Lei et al, Next generation lanthanide doped nanoscintillators and photon converters, eLight (2022). DOI: 10.1186/s43593-022-00024-0

    Citation: Lanthanide doping could help with new imaging techniques (2022, September 19) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-09-lanthanide-doping-imaging-techniques.html

    This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

    Sun, 18 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://phys.org/news/2022-09-lanthanide-doping-imaging-techniques.html
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