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Killexams : Counselor Addictions certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LCAC Search results Killexams : Counselor Addictions certification - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LCAC https://killexams.com/exam_list/Counselor Killexams : How to create a strong support system for loved ones maintaining sobriety | Opinion

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Mon, 17 Oct 2022 11:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.tennessean.com/story/opinion/contributors/2022/10/17/strong-support-system-makes-all-the-difference-in-undergoing-recovery/69568928007/
Killexams : What Is The Law Of Attraction?

The basic philosophy behind the law of attraction is that energy precedes manifestation, explains Whitman. As such, positive thoughts may bring positive results into a person’s life, while negative thoughts bring the opposite.

“Whatever we direct our powerful focus upon within the invisible realm of our thoughts, beliefs and emotions eventually manifests into outer form,” claims Whitman. Thereby the law of attraction says the state of everything in our external world—our bodies, our relationships, the robustness of our careers and our finances—is a direct reflection of our internal state.

“When we’re focused on what’s missing, what’s unjust or on all the ways we’ve been wronged, we not only continue to find evidence of wrongdoing, but we hold ourselves in a victim mindset that deprives us of our power to think and feel on purpose,” adds Whitman. Conversely, the law of attraction says if you don’t like the quality of the experiences you’re drawing to yourself, you can change them by adjusting your vibrational output, which means shifting your mood, attitude, words, thoughts or perspective.

As an example, imagine you are selling your house and you feel anxious about people going through your home, because someone might steal something—that is a negative output and like a boomerang will deliver an equal reaction of vibrational energy, claims Whitman. You might find that someone moved something, stole something or the energy in the house feels off. However, if you are tending to your energy and the fear or anxiety around selling your home, and trust that the perfect buyer will come, in the perfect timing, and that you are excited about your next move or the money that will flow in, then you are sending out positive vibes.

“The energy, attitude, acts and emotions one puts out into the world are more likely than not to attract similar or resonant energy, attitudes, acts, vibrations and emotions,” says James Michael Nolan, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist, law of attraction coach and former president of Southwestern College in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “This is not unrelated to the common notion of karma, you reap what you sow, or what goes around comes around.”

The History of the Law of Attraction

Principles behind the law of attraction can be traced back to ancient philosophers, says Nolan, including Hermes Trismegistus and the Hermetic Teachings, which were written as far back as the first century. “So, this is not by any means new or ‘new age-y’ thinking,” says Nolan. “It has been around a very long time, across all major religions and many philosophical schools.”

There are various ways people look at the law of attraction, explains Nolan. On the one hand, there are people who ascribe to the more scientific sounding explanation of vibrational energy. While the other, more metaphysical worldview of this concept isn’t based on a logical, linear explanation at all, and instead relies on intuition, faith and trust, according to Nolan.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 05:45:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.forbes.com/health/mind/what-is-law-of-attraction-loa/
Killexams : FMCC awarded grant for student training program FMCC awarded grant for student training program © Provided by WTEN Albany FMCC awarded grant for student training program

JOHNSTOWN, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) selected

SUNY Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC) to receive $513,761 to develop and launch a Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training Program (BEHWET). This program will provide academic and financial support to student interested in getting their credentialed alcohol and substance abuse counseling (CASAC) coursework.

FMCC was chosen through a competitive process based on the capacity for innovation, staff knowledge, commitment to student success, and collaborative relationships within Fulton and Montgomery communities. The college plans to utilize community partnerships with St. Mary's Healthcare, Centro Civico of Amsterdam, and the HFM Prevention Council Creative Connections Clubhouse to recruit and enroll students interested in joining and growing a diverse workforce for collaborative, team-based, experiential training as CASACs, Certified Recovery Peer Advocates, and paraprofessionals in behavioral health. The funding will help increase experiential training sites where students can learn and practice in real-life activities.

BEHWET Program Director, Courtney Schanthal states, "This funding provides a great opportunity for current students interested in working in those helping professions and truly having an impact within their community. Additionally, the funding can assist those individuals who are currently working in the field and are interested in obtaining their CASAC, or someone who may be feeling stagnant in their current position and are looking for a change in career. Enrolled students receive up to $3,000 towards tuition, fees, and supplies and a $5,000 stipend to assist in meeting needs to ensure they are able to complete the CASAC coursework."

Copyright 2022 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Wed, 12 Oct 2022 06:13:56 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/fmcc-awarded-grant-for-student-training-program/ar-AA12T6iL
Killexams : Counselors worry Kansas isn't ready for gambling problems that'll follow legalized sports betting

The legalization of sports betting was widely celebrated this September, with Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly placing a $15 bet on the Chiefs.

But some counselors who treat problem gambling worry that sports betting could lead to an increase in addiction — and they say that Kansas isn’t allocating enough resources to handle it.

“Today, I had to work in a client who was referred by the problem gambling help line who's gotten themselves into a lot of debt due to sports betting,” said Stephenie Roberts, a certified gambling counselor in Wichita. “And I’m just worried that we’re going to see an increase in these numbers of calls now because of the easy accessibility that online gambling has for folks.”

The state dedicates 2% of all money generated from gambling to its Problem Gambling and Addictions Grant Fund. The issue, advocates say, is that not all of that money goes to problem gambling services, such as advertising the problem gambling hotline.

Since 2013, 7 percent of the fund on average has gone to problem gambling services, according to the Kansas Legislative Research Department. That’s an average of about $600,000.

Kansas’ investment is comparable — if not larger than — the amount neighboring states put toward problem gambling services. Oklahoma spends $250,000 a year on assisting with gambling addiction treatment. Colorado allocates about $130,000 a year for its problem gambling hotline and problem gambling services.

Arkansas is mandated to spend $200,000 a year for gambling disorder and treatment programs but was sued last year for failing to do so.

Cara Sloan-Ramos, a spokesperson for the Kansas Department of Aging and Disability Services, said the state is assessing budgetary needs for problem gambling resources.

“As part of our ongoing effort to emphasize the importance of providing resources to Kansans who may experience a gambling problem, KDADS is reviewing the program and its needs,” Sloan-Ramos wrote in an email to KMUW. “Once that review is complete, any recommendations for additional staff or marketing support will be made through the normal budgeting process for consideration during the next Legislative Session.”

Joyce Markham, president of the Kansas Coalition on Problem Gambling, said that more money is needed to fund a statewide advertising campaign for the problem gambling hotline. She said not enough people know it’s the first step to seek help.

“I bet you ask 10 people today where would you go if you had a problem with problem gambling, they’re probably not going to tell you they’re going to call the hotline and ask for help,” Markham said.

From July 2021 to June 2022, 156 people called the hotline to seek information or referral services to a treatment counselor, down from 225 the previous year.

Roberts also added that she wants the state to hire more problem gambling specialists, who help regions around the state provide problem gambling prevention and education services. Roberts said the state used to have four of these certified and now has two.

Sloan-Ramos confirmed that two of the four problem gambling specialist positions were cut under a previous administration.

Though they have concerns about the total amount of money going to problem gambling services, both Markham and Roberts said the state provides enough funding for anyone to receive free problem gambling counseling.

“That is the good thing about the amount that does go in,” Roberts said. “Anybody who contacts us and gets connected to a certified gambling counselor is eligible for no out-of-pocket cost help.

“That’s very important because when you’ve gambled away your last dime and you’re in debt up to your neck, you can’t afford counseling.”
Copyright 2022 KMUW | NPR for Wichita. To see more, visit KMUW | NPR for Wichita.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 10:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kcur.org/news/2022-10-10/counselors-worry-kansas-isnt-ready-for-gambling-problems-thatll-follow-legalized-sports-betting
Killexams : New Ohio Gambling Addiction Program May Clear Your Crime Record

Cuyahoga County is getting a head start on helping problem gamblers.

This week, the county’s common pleas court announced the Problem Gambling Addiction Program (PGAP) launch. The initiative will allow certain gamblers convicted of crimes to clear their conviction after completing the program. It is the first of its kind.

Administrative and Presiding Judge Brendan J. Sheehan this about PGAP at a press conference:

“A primary goal of our Court is to help individuals overcome the difficulties that brought them into the justice system. By treating a person’s problem gambling addiction, we hope to eliminate the source of these criminal acts.”

The program will be a collaboration between the court, Recovery Resources, and Ohio for Responsible Gambling. Its goal is to “break the cycle of addiction,” Sheehan said.

In addition, anyone in need of help anywhere in the country can call 800-GAMBLER to get instant information on local resources.

Ohio gambling addiction program can help 50 clients at a time

PGAP is designed for problem gamblers who get in trouble with the law as a result of their addiction.

Ohio Lottery Director of Responsible Gambling Karen Russo said problem gambling leads to a variety of crimes, including:

  • Felonies
  • Assault
  • Domestic violence
  • Fraud
  • Embezzlement
  • Aggravated assault

So, say a gambler is arrested for a felony related to their gambling addiction. The court can refer the gambler to PGAP.

If the gambler gets into the program, specially trained probation officers known as “gambling recovery officers” will meet with the gambler and do an assessment of their addiction.

From there, the officers will work with Recovery Resources and certified counselors to help the gambler break their gambling addiction.

According to the court, if the gambler successfully finishes their program, the court might dismiss their felony charge.

The program can support up to 50 people at a time.

Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Director Lori Criss said her department is pleased to see the program start. It coincides with the governor’s push for better mental health services. Criss commented:

“Governor Mike DeWine’s focus on addressing mental illness and addictions for overall wellness has changed thousands of lives for the better. This program will encourage recovery for those with gambling problems.”

The program comes at a crucial time in Ohio’s sports betting history

Overall, about 0.9% of Ohio adults are problem gamblers, the court noted. That’s about 800,000 people—a considerable problem, especially with the imminent launch of Ohio sports wagering.

Just the idea of sports betting launching soon seems to have stoked Ohio’s problem gambling. Russo said that calls to the state’s problem gambling hotline have jumped more than 32% recently.

That uptick in calls coincides with the start of the NFL season and the Cleveland Guardians’ run to the MLB playoffs. Later this month, the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Columbus Blue Jackets will start their seasons, too. Sheehan said:

“With the guardians starting their first playoff series tomorrow, and the Browns hopefully playing good football against the Chargers, and the Ohio State football team playing this weekend, it seemed like a good time to let you know about this program.”

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:44:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.playusa.com/new-ohio-gambling-addiction-program-clears-crime-record/
Killexams : Where to find help when battling addiction

Like with every recovery, the road to overcoming addiction has to start somewhere.

It can seem scary, overwhelming and downright impossible at times. That was true for 46-year-old Michael Mahoney, who was addicted to drugs for over 20 years.

He’s been in and out of detox facilities and rehabs. He’s been sent to prison multiple times. He lost the love of his life because of his addiction. And, for a long time, he felt like he failed everyone in his life — especially himself.

“I hope you don’t have to hurt yourself too much before you learn that there’s a better way to live,” Mahoney said. “It’s going to be hard, but it’s still going to be worth it. You should start now.”

Mahoney has stayed sober since he entered a rehab program at Recovery Centers of America in Danvers this July. He finished his program on Sept. 3 and has been living in a sober house in Brighton since.

“(RCA) gave me hope at the age of 46,” Mahoney said. “I thought that was an emotion that I was no longer going to be able to experience, and I don’t say that with any sense of drama.”

Types of care

Recovery didn’t end for Mahoney when he walked out of RCA’s doors. But it was a good start, just as centers like this, anonymous group meetings and hotlines can be a start for others.

“The first thing is to identify what they are willing to do,” said Dr. Heidi Ginter, chief Medical officer for RCA’s Massachusetts facilities. “For somebody who needs help, it’s going to vary depending on what drugs they’re using, and what they can actually do.”

Generally, someone who is using alcohol or benzodiazepines needs to start at an inpatient detoxification facility because the withdrawal from these substances is potentially deadly, Ginter said.

Opioid users, including those who are addicted to heroin and fentanyl, can start in either inpatient or outpatient programs, she said.

Inpatient care usually lasts for 30 days. The detoxification period takes up the first five to seven days and is supported by special medicine to help reduce the side effects of withdrawal. For the rest of their stay, patients will attend support groups and individual counseling to work on behavioral skills they’ll need after leaving the program.

Outpatient care comes in three levels. The first, partial hospitalization programs, requires those in recovery to take part in groups and counseling five days a week in person or virtually.

Intensive outpatient programs call for people to do this with a little less support and more independence about three days a week. General outpatient care means that people who are well established in their recovery only need to check in with a counselor once a week, every few weeks or once a month.

“As a starting place, consider what you need to do for safety, then parenting, if you are running your own businesses or have additional responsibilities that may make it harder to step out of your life and go to an inpatient level of care,” Ginter said.

Support for those in treatment

Groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous can help keep those in recovery away from substances.

FDA approved medications buprenorphine, methadone and naltrexone can reduce opioid cravings and withdrawal symptoms when used in tandem with counseling or other treatment programs.

Naltrexone can be given at a doctor’s office by anyone who has experience and training with it, but isn’t usually used in an outpatient setting because it can be hard to start, Ginter said.

Methadone has to be used at outpatient methadone clinics open throughout the state. Buprenorphine, commonly known as Suboxone, can be prescribed by a certified doctor and also used in an outpatient setting.

“For many people who work or who go to school or who really want treatment but can’t take time out of their life to go inpatient, that’s a great opportunity to get outpatient treatment in a very private way,” Ginter said.

For those who have relapsed, trying a new type of treatment or revisiting ones that were successful in the past are both fair game.

“If you’ve experienced something that really worked for long-term recovery in the past, it’s very reasonable to go back to that,” Ginter said.

“As long as they’re not hurting themselves, as long as they’re doing something to get to a more positive place, then that’s absolutely the right answer,” she said.

Affording care

Affording treatment can be challenging, but most insurance covers at least some mental health or recovery care, Ginter said. This includes inpatient detoxification.

“Going through a five- or seven-day inpatient detox is not treatment. That’s the very beginning of treatment,” Ginter said. “It is a period of time to stabilize off drugs.”

Some residential care programs are covered by MassHealth. For those who don’t have coverage through private insurance or who are still struggling to afford care, scholarships may be available through these programs, other private companies or organizations.

Affordable care options may be included in employee assistance programs. College students can also find help through resources within their school.

Once someone is out of a treatment program, temporarily staying at a halfway house or sober house is one way someone can stay away from addiction.

“These levels of care really need you to be able to support some portion of that, and so a lot of that’s going to have to come from scholarships for people who just don’t have the financial resources,” Ginter said.

Where to start

Wendy Goddard is a program director at RCA in Danvers, but also struggled with alcoholism for years. As did her son, who is also now sober.

“Any alcoholic or addict wants instant gratification and unfortunately, starting recovery is not instant gratification,” Goddard said. “It takes time and perseverance.”

The first step, she added, can also feel like the hardest.

“It’s hard to pick up the phone themselves sometimes,” Goddard said. “Sometimes they’re up late at night and see a commercial about the wealth of resources out there for people like us… and they reach out to friends or family for help.”

“It’s all about that window of opportunity,” she continued. “When an alcoholic decides it’s time, you have a very small window of opportunity to actually get them a bed somewhere because that window will shut when the next drink goes into their hand and ultimately into their body.”

At times, it can feel impossible to help someone with their addiction.

“There is nothing you can say to someone if they’re not done,” Mahoney said. “Some people, we just have to learn the hard way. We have to get beaten down repeatedly.”

That doesn’t have to always be the case though, Ginter said.

“Sometimes people shy away from treatment because of the stigma and because of the shame associated with the disease,” Ginter said. “We want them to be able to access treatment, just like people who have high blood pressure or diabetes.”

Resources

The Massachusetts Substance Abuse Helpline can connect addicts or their loved ones to rehabs and other recovery resources on its website, https://helplinema.org/ or through its 24/7 hotline 800-327-5050.

  • Narcotics Anonymous meeting times and locations, along with other resources, can be found at

www.na.org/

  • For alcohol addiction resources and Alcoholic Anonymous meetings, more information is available at

https://alcoholicsanonymous.com/

  • The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration runs a free, confidential 24/7 hotline to support those battling addiction and/or mental health issues. By calling 800-662-HELP (4357), operators can provide treatment options and information services in English or Spanish.
  • You can also text SAMSA your zip code at 435748 or go

https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/

  • to find local treatment options.
  • Visit SAMSA’s website at

https://tinyurl.com/suboxoneproviders

  • to find a Suboxone provider.

Contact Caroline Enos at CEnos@northofboston.com and follow her on Twitter @CarolineEnos .

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 21:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.salemnews.com/news/where-to-find-help-when-battling-addiction/article_0b65b244-3ddf-11ed-9fde-17d58edf7192.html
Killexams : Virginia prison agency expands addiction treatment program for people on probation

Several rounds of showers expected Wednesday night and Thursday.

Virginia is expanding addiction treatment services for people on probation, by starting to use buprenorphine in some community corrections programs, including Chesterfield County’s women’s program.

Buprenorphine relieves withdrawal symptoms and decreases cravings for people addicted to opioids, by activating the same parts of the brain that opioids reach. Its effects are weaker than methadone, however.

It is used in tandem with counseling and medical monitoring, since it can cause respiratory distress or death when taken in high doses or when combined with alcohol or illicit drugs such as heroin or cocaine.

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The Department of Corrections says probation staffing squeeze is nearing crisis

Introducing it at Chesterfield and through the Community Corrections Alternative Program for men in Stafford and Brunswick counties means more options are available to help people on probation recover from addiction to opioids, according to the Virginia Department of Corrections.

The buprenorphine pilot program means jail inmates currently on suboxone or other buprenorphine can participate in the Community Corrections Alternative Programs and continue receiving the medication.

The 22- to 48-week alternative program provides vocational training, including welding and masonry work, as well as cognitive behavioral therapy, substance abuse programs, GED classes and anger management programs in addition to the drug screening that people on probation generally receive. Community Corrections Alternative Programs are sentencing options for people convicted of nonviolent crimes.

“The buprenorphine pilot program allows CCAP probationers to participate without a pause in substance abuse treatment and hopefully complete the program with greater results,” said Harold Clarke, Virginia Department of Corrections director.

The department began a medication-assisted treatment program in 2018, by providing inmates addicted to opioids and who were on the verge of release from prison with naltrexone as well as referrals for treatment after release.

While buprenorphine produces sensations like an opioid, but with much weaker effects, naltrexone blocks opioids from having any effect. But the risk of relapse is higher, while the mild high from buprenorphine means it can be abused.

In addition to the naltrexone program at all Virginia community corrections programs and the three offering buprenorphine, the Department of Corrections runs a Narcan/Naloxone take-home initiative, providing individuals with training and products to treat an opioid overdose.

dress@timesdispatch.com

(804) 649-6948

Twitter: @daveress1

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 04:50:00 -0500 David Ress en text/html https://richmond.com/news/state-and-regional/virginia-prison-agency-expands-addiction-treatment-program-for-people-on-probation/article_0aa47aac-b499-53a0-bcc2-d1309e5dbfc9.html
Killexams : Personal addiction recovery experience helps founder of Scottsdale treatment center serve patients

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/entrepreneurs/2022/10/13/soul-surgery-scottsdale-helps-people-recover-addiction/10430024002/
Killexams : Canadian Doctors Call for Mental Health and Addiction Funding for Team-Based Care

The Ontario Medical Association (OMA) and Primary Care Collaborative have called for $37.5 million in immediate funding, as well as $75 million annually for 10 years, to help primary care providers treat patients with depression, anxiety, and addiction.

The recommendation is part of a four-point plan to strengthen mental health and addiction services in primary care doctors’ offices. accurate reports suggest that a third of Canadians are struggling with their mental health, yet they often face difficulties in locating care in their communities.

Dr Rose Zacharias

"Society is coming through a stressful global pandemic, and it's hitting us all somewhat differently, which is contributing to a mental health tsunami," Rose Zacharias, MD, president of the OMA, told Medscape Medical News.

"We know the scope of the issue is overwhelming, and the solutions are complex," she said. "Patients should be able to come into a psychologically safe space to talk, and they need to be directed toward good care, where a family doctor has access to a team of mental health providers, counselors, and behavioral therapists, to point people in the right direction."

The OMA announced the proposal on Oct. 3.

Providing Local Support

The OMA's four-point plan urges the provincial government to invest in strengthening the delivery of mental health and addiction services. The plan highlights issues that are prevalent in Ontario, focusing on areas where primary care providers can make a difference with more support.

The funding would be used to embed mental health supports in interprofessional teams of primary care providers. These mental health experts would then offer treatment for moderate to severe depression and anxiety at the local level, rather than in hospitals that aren't typically equipped to provide specialized mental health support.

"About three-quarters of Canadians rely on their primary care provider to treat their mental health needs, especially in communities where there are no or few mental health certified or wait times are long," Zacharias said.

The plan also recommends that the Ontario government expand Health Connect Ontario, formerly Telehealth, to allow primary care doctors and their patients to better navigate the mental health system. This expansion could prevent unnecessary emergency visits and delays in care, OMA said.

In addition, the plan suggests expanding access to supervised consumption and treatment sites, as well as other evidence-based harm reduction programs, for substance abuse and addiction. Since the onset of the pandemic, the rates of emergency medical services for suspected opioid overdoses have increased by 57%, and the rates of fatal opioid overdoses have increased by 60%.

During the pandemic, one in four Ontarians who died due to an opioid overdose had an interaction with the healthcare system in the week before their death, which suggests missed opportunities for overdose prevention, OMA said. Supervised consumption and treatment sites could create multiple points of contact with healthcare staff, social workers, and other mental health professionals in the community.

"Family doctors are chronically underequipped to handle their patients' mental health concerns in 10-minute visits," Zacharias said. "We want to equip and empower primary care providers to care for mental health, wrapping around them a team of mental healthcare providers so the entire team can care for our patients."

Indigenous-Led Initiatives

The four-point plan also calls for the implementation of an indigenous-led mental health and wellness strategy to address the health inequities and challenges among the indigenous community. Throughout the pandemic, indigenous people with chronic conditions have faced higher risks for poor physical, mental, and social outcomes than other Canadians.

Several major factors lead to these greater risks among the indigenous community, OMA said, including low income, food insecurity, disrupted family dynamics, lack of immediate and ongoing social support, and increased substance use.

"If we call ourselves a province and country that care for everyone equally, we need to look where care is lacking and address gaps intentionally," Zacharias said. "We're not caring for our indigenous neighbors well."

The OMA recommends specific strategies, such as incorporating traditional health and wellness practices throughout primary care, investing in indigenous-led mental health and addiction programs, recruiting and retaining indigenous healthcare professionals, addressing barriers for indigenous students who want to enter the healthcare field, and requiring mandatory cultural safety training for healthcare professionals.

The recommendation calls for the Ontario government to implement the four-point plan across the province, which could ripple into nationwide action.

Concerns Remain Elevated

"The Mental Health Commission of Canada is happy to hear Ontario Medical Association's call for new funding to help primary care providers treat patients with depression and anxiety through team-based care," Mary Bartram, PhD, director of policy, programs, and priorities for the Mental Health Commission of Canada, told Medscape Medical News.

Mary Bartram PhD

Bartram, who wasn't involved with the OMA recommendation, has led mental health and substance use policy development and implementation with federal and territorial governments, indigenous organizations, and nongovernmental organizations.

"Mental health and substance use concerns have remained elevated in all provinces throughout multiple waves of the COVID-19 pandemic, but fewer than one in three people with current mental health concerns are accessing mental health services," she said. "We need all hands on deck, including team-based primary care and increased direct funding for psychotherapy from governments and workplace benefit plans."

The proposal was made by the Ontario Medical Association, which represents the province's 43,000 physicians, medical students, and retired physicians, and advocates for the leadership role of doctors in the healthcare system.

OMA. Published Oct. 3, 2022.

Carolyn Crist is a health and medical journalist who reports on the latest studies for Medscape, MDedge, and WebMD.

For more news, follow Medscape on  Facebook,   Twitter,   Instagram, and  YouTube.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 03:29:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/982537
Killexams : With sports betting legalized, counselors worry Kansas is unprepared for problem gambling increase

The legalization of sports betting was widely celebrated this September, with Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly placing a $15 bet on the Chiefs.

But some counselors who treat problem gambling worry that sports betting could lead to an increase in addiction — and they say that Kansas isn’t allocating enough resources to handle it.

“Today, I had to work in a client who was referred by the problem gambling help line who's gotten themselves into a lot of debt due to sports betting,” said Stephenie Roberts, a certified gambling counselor in Wichita. “And I’m just worried that we’re going to see an increase in these numbers of calls now because of the easy accessibility that online gambling has for folks.”

The state dedicates 2% of all money generated from gambling to its Problem Gambling and Addictions Grant Fund. The issue, advocates say, is that not all of that money goes to problem gambling services, such as advertising the problem gambling hotline.

Since 2013, 7 percent of the fund on average has gone to problem gambling services, according to the Kansas Legislative Research Department. That’s an average of about $600,000.

Kansas’ investment is comparable — if not larger than — the amount neighboring states put toward problem gambling services. Oklahoma spends $250,000 a year on assisting with gambling addiction treatment. Colorado allocates about $130,000 a year for its problem gambling hotline and problem gambling services.

Arkansas is mandated to spend $200,000 a year for gambling disorder and treatment programs but was sued last year for failing to do so.

Cara Sloan-Ramos, a spokesperson for the Kansas Department of Aging and Disability Services, said the state is assessing budgetary needs for problem gambling resources.

“As part of our ongoing effort to emphasize the importance of providing resources to Kansans who may experience a gambling problem, KDADS is reviewing the program and its needs,” Sloan-Ramos wrote in an email to KMUW. “Once that review is complete, any recommendations for additional staff or marketing support will be made through the normal budgeting process for consideration during the next Legislative Session.”

Joyce Markham, president of the Kansas Coalition on Problem Gambling, said that more money is needed to fund a statewide advertising campaign for the problem gambling hotline. She said not enough people know it’s the first step to seek help.

“I bet you ask 10 people today where would you go if you had a problem with problem gambling, they’re probably not going to tell you they’re going to call the hotline and ask for help,” Markham said.

From July 2021 to June 2022, 156 people called the hotline to seek information or referral services to a treatment counselor, down from 225 the previous year.

Roberts also added that she wants the state to hire more problem gambling specialists, who help regions around the state provide problem gambling prevention and education services. Roberts said the state used to have four of these certified and now has two.

Sloan-Ramos confirmed that two of the four problem gambling specialist positions were cut under a previous administration.

Though they have concerns about the total amount of money going to problem gambling services, both Markham and Roberts said the state provides enough funding for anyone to receive free problem gambling counseling.

“That is the good thing about the amount that does go in,” Roberts said. “Anybody who contacts us and gets connected to a certified gambling counselor is eligible for no out-of-pocket cost help.

“That’s very important because when you’ve gambled away your last dime and you’re in debt up to your neck, you can’t afford counseling.”

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kmuw.org/news/2022-10-10/counselors-worry-kansas-unprepared-problem-gambling
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