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SPLK-1003 Splunk Enterprise Certified Admin

The Splunk Enterprise Certified Admin test is the final step towards completion of the Splunk Enterprise Certified Admin certification. This upper-level certification test is a 57-minute, 63-question assessment which evaluates a candidates knowledge and skills to manage various components of Splunk on a daily basis, including the health of the Splunk installation. Candidates can expect an additional 3 minutes to review the test agreement, for a total seat time of 60 minutes. It is recommended that candidates for this certification complete the lecture, hands-on labs, and quizzes that are part of the Splunk Enterprise System Administration and Splunk Enterprise Data Administration courses in order to be prepared for the certification exam. Splunk Enterprise Certified Admin is a required prerequisite to the Splunk Enterprise Certified Architect and Splunk Certified Developer certification tracks.
The Splunk Enterprise System Administration course focuses on administrators who manage a Splunk Enterprise environment. courses include Splunk license manager, indexers and search heads, configuration, management, and monitoring. The Splunk Enterprise Data Administration course targets administrators who are responsible for getting data into Splunk. The course provides content about Splunk forwarders and methods to get remote data into Splunk.
The following content areas are general guidelines for the content to be included on the exam:
● Splunk deployment overview
● License management
● Splunk apps
● Splunk configuration files
● Users, roles, and authentication
● Getting data in
● Distributed search
● Introduction to Splunk clusters
● Deploy forwarders with Forwarder Management
● Configure common Splunk data inputs
● Customize the input parsing process

1.0 Splunk Admin Basics 5%
1.1 Identify Splunk components
2.0 License Management 5%
2.1 Identify license types
2.2 Understand license violations
3.0 Splunk Configuration Files 5%
3.1 Describe Splunk configuration directory structure
3.2 Understand configuration layering
3.3 Understand configuration precedence
3.4 Use btool to examine configuration settings
4.0 Splunk Indexes 10%
4.1 Describe index structure
4.2 List types of index buckets
4.3 Check index data integrity
4.4 Describe indexes.conf options
4.5 Describe the fishbucket
4.6 Apply a data retention policy
5.0 Splunk User Management 5%
5.1 Describe user roles in Splunk
5.2 Create a custom role
5.3 Add Splunk users
6.0 Splunk Authentication Management 5%
6.1 Integrate Splunk with LDAP
6.2 List other user authentication options
6.3 Describe the steps to enable Multifactor Authentication in Splunk
7.0 Getting Data In 5%
7.1 Describe the basic settings for an input
7.2 List Splunk forwarder types
7.3 Configure the forwarder
7.4 Add an input to UF using CLI
8.0 Distributed Search 10%
8.1 Describe how distributed search works
8.2 Explain the roles of the search head and search peers
8.3 Configure a distributed search group
8.4 List search head scaling options
9.0 Getting Data In – Staging 5%
9.1 List the three phases of the Splunk Indexing process
9.2 List Splunk input options
10.0 Configuring Forwarders 5%
10.1 Configure Forwarders
10.2 Identify additional Forwarder options
11.0 Forwarder Management 10%
11.1 Explain the use of Deployment Management
11.2 Describe Splunk Deployment Server
11.3 Manage forwarders using deployment apps
11.4 Configure deployment clients
11.5 Configure client groups
11.6 Monitor forwarder management activities
12.0 Monitor Inputs 5%
12.1 Create file and directory monitor inputs
12.2 Use optional settings for monitor inputs
12.3 Deploy a remote monitor input
13.0 Network and Scripted Inputs 5%
13.1 Create network (TCP and UDP) inputs
13.2 Describe optional settings for network inputs
13.3 Create a basic scripted input
14.0 Agentless Inputs 5%
14.1 Identify Windows input types and uses
14.2 Describe HTTP Event Collector
15.0 Fine Tuning Inputs 5%
15.1 Understand the default processing that occurs during input phase
15.2 Configure input phase options, such as sourcetype fine-tuning and character set encoding
16.0 Parsing Phase and Data 5%
16.1 Understand the default processing that occurs during parsing
16.2 Optimize and configure event line breaking
16.3 Explain how timestamps and time zones are extracted or assigned to events
16.4 Use Data Preview to validate event creation during the parsing phase
17.0 Manipulating Raw Data 5%
17.1 Explain how data transformations are defined and invoked
17.2 Use transformations with props.conf and transforms.conf to:
● Mask or delete raw data as it is being indexed
● Override sourcetype or host based upon event values
● Route events to specific indexes based on event content
● Prevent unwanted events from being indexed
17.3 Use SEDCMD to modify raw data

Splunk Enterprise Certified Admin
Splunk Enterprise test success
Killexams : Splunk Enterprise test success - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SPLK-1003 Search results Killexams : Splunk Enterprise test success - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/SPLK-1003 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Splunk Killexams : How test Success Masks Lack Of Writing Skills
Photo by Olu Eletu

The A-level test results are out in the UK. Over 350,000 teenagers have been placed on undergraduate courses, according to UCAS, the organization that manages applications to UK full-time higher education courses. And while they jump for joy, excited at the prospect of going to university, some social commentators and education critics are harrumphing.

They feel that despite their success, these exam-savvy youngsters are woefully ill-prepared for the real world. And that the ones who go to university are simply entering outdated institutions that don’t prepare them for the world of work.

Most university courses aren’t vocational. Yet, the debts that mount up throughout a course (an average of £50,000) are forcing students to create a “personal brand” and a portfolio of work before they leave – so that they have a chance of competing in a crowded marketplace once they graduate.

In the past, students were only expected to step-up their writing, thinking and analytical skills while at university. Now, they’re expected to take Instagram-worthy internships and use social media to network their way to success. They’re expected to document their skills and capabilities across a range of social media so that they can effectively secure work opportunities.

A report from the Department of Education showed that in 2017, graduates and postgraduates had higher employment rates than non-graduates. And that the average, working-age graduate earned £10,000 more than the average non-graduate.

So good, so far. But this emphasis on securing work is contributing to a hole in their university life. This manifests as poorer quality studying and writing skills on the essays they write throughout their course. And the writing they do in the business world. This is not new. And it’s not down to youngsters spending more time on Snapchat than perusing the abridged works of Shakespeare. But it’s a skill gap that doesn’t seem to be closing.

Many arrive at university after years of teachers “teaching to the test”. Students haven’t necessarily been given the opportunity to think for themselves. At least, not in an academic sense. Their teachers have been judged on results throughout their teaching careers. So, their primary task hasn’t been to help students to write fluently, or accurately. In fact, while 26.4% of exams scored an A or A*, just 1.8% of English language exams were graded A*. Overall, the teachers have done their jobs, which has been to get their pupils to pass. And the overall pass rate for 2018 sits at 97.6%.

But when school leavers get to university, many will find themselves in a quandary. It’s likely that they’ll feel a pressure “to get their money’s worth”. Yet, they’ll also be faced with a barrage of new concepts and theories. And they may not have the writing skills to communicate them effectively. Ironically, this can hamper their chances in the job market.

A Royal Literary Fund report called “Writing Matters” labeled the writing skills of students “shocking” and “inadequate”. What’s more, an academic survey cited in this report found that 90% of lecturers said it was necessary to teach writing skills to students. Yet, university is structured so that the teaching of writing skills is not embedded into courses. It’s a veritable chicken-and-egg situation.

In any case, qualifications alone don’t sell themselves anymore. So, students need to see themselves as a package, not as a vessel for their test results. They need to hone their soft skills – their ability to think well, write well, be emotionally intelligent and communicate with themselves and others.  Employers want to hire people who are creative, resourceful and resilient.

So, as students crack open the prosecco and celebrate their results – I say we supply them a break. Going to university is a massive life transition in itself, as is starting work for the first time. It’s easy to forget the days when you couldn’t boil an egg. And it’s easy to forget that it’s the system itself that isn’t teaching students the writing and communication skills they need to truly succeed in life and work.

Thu, 16 Aug 2018 00:08:00 -0500 Greta Solomon en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/gretasolomon/2018/08/16/how-exam-success-masks-lack-of-writing-skills/
Killexams : Pre-Employment Exams: What Are They, And How Can You Prepare?

Over the past several years, employment exams have become an integral part of the job search process. The scope, analysis and details of each test is different by industry and assessment type. Countless employers and job boards are utilizing these exams to pre-screen applicants before they enter their system for review, thereby minimizing administrative costs while increasing efficiency.

First and foremost, it’s important to understand that pre-employment assessments are nothing new. Employers have always screened candidates (via things like drug tests and reference checks) to determine whether they would be a good fit for their organization. What has changed, however, is the format of these exams and the purpose. Assessments are now used to determine a candidate’s aptitude, performance and personality. By scoring and sorting through applicants blindly, employers feel they can select the best candidates to interview — solely on qualifications and skills alone.

So, if you have recently started the job search process and are confused (or, frankly, a bit anxious) by the thought of these exams, you shouldn’t be. Here are the types of exams being utilized, what they measure and how you can prepare.

There are two types of assessments: employee-driven and employer-driven.

An employee-driven assessment is one that you take on your own — without prompting — in order to highlight your skills within your field. These assessments are available through various job sites, such as LinkedIn, which provide aptitude tests based on industry. Other types of exams result in a certification (such as PMP, Six Sigma or CFM). Once passed, these tests and/or certifications can be displayed on your profile and resume to strengthen your candidacy.

An employer-driven test is generally given alongside a job application so that an employer can determine if you are, in fact, qualified for the position. Employer assessments, such as through Indeed, are designed to measure industry-specific and general aptitude skills. Since these are not initiated by the employee but rather through the employer, I find that these exams are what make my clients the most nervous.

Both exams are targeted in their design and specific in their purpose.

Whether employee- or employer-driven, both assessments demonstrate that your skills and abilities go beyond what is written on your resume. Each test is created to assess a wide variety of attributes and skills, in a technical and emotional capacity.

Questions for these exams typically revolve around:

• Hard skills: Do you have the proficiency level required for the role?

• Operations: In on-the-job scenarios, how well can you handle daily tasks?

• Abilities: How do you handle yourself when things don’t go as expected?

• Personality: Does your personality align with what the role requires?

These factors can be tested individually or combined in order to find the perfect candidate that fits a company’s long-term goals and objectives. For example, Marie is applying for a role as a retail sales manager. The role requires the ability to handle various changing needs, strong customer service skills and proficiency in Microsoft Office. The employer has decided to utilize an Indeed assessment to measure just how well Marie can perform. They test her hard skills (asking questions pertaining to Microsoft Office), provide her on-the-job scenarios (to see how well she tackles customer concerns), throw in an obscure situation (what does she do when someone tries to steal?) and ask questions to gauge her personality type. The test takes about 25 minutes and provides an all-encompassing picture for the company to review.

How can you prepare for an employer-driven test when you are not given the questions in advance?

While employee-driven assessments can be taken several times and/or studied for, an employer-driven test cannot be. It is a one-shot deal, and there are no study guides or Cliff notes. This should not deter or frighten you from taking these exams. Why? You are applying for a role that you qualify for, so the questions and scenarios should all be ones that you know. Regardless, there are still ways you can prepare.

• Practice: There are various IQ and skills tests online that you can take to simply get used to taking a timed test on a computer. Best of all, they are free to use.

• Research: Read through the description of the job and company to ensure you understand their mission and vision and what it is they are looking for in a candidate.

• Wait: Some assessments allow you to start them separately from your application. I strongly recommend completing your application and then taking a short break (10-15 minutes) before starting your assessment. Assessments should be completed the same day in order to get your application into the system, so please don’t wait too long, but taking a few minutes to ensure there are no distractions and you are in the right frame of mind will prove to be beneficial.

• Do not rush: Even if the test is timed, read through each question and the corresponding directions thoroughly. The purpose isn’t always to complete every question in the allotted amount of time, but rather to see how well you perform under pressure. Details and accuracy are more important than finishing quickly, so focus.

Exams and assessments often invoke fear, but in this case, they should cause you to feel empowered rather than uncertain. Be confident in your abilities and detailed in your approach. As Helen Keller is often credited with saying, “Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement. Nothing can be done without hope and confidence.” You are capable, prepared and qualified — these exams are merely a means to prove that!

Fri, 24 Jun 2022 05:32:00 -0500 Tammy Homegardner en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2020/03/26/pre-employment-exams-what-are-they-and-how-can-you-prepare/
Killexams : Gupshup Hires Krishna Tammana as Chief Technology Officer No result found, try new keyword!Prior to Talend, he led large global engineering teams in hyper-growth environments at Splunk, E-TRADE, and Sybase. “We are on the cusp of another fundamental shift in how the world leverages ... Wed, 20 Jul 2022 00:43:00 -0500 text/html https://www.ciol.com/gupshup-hires-krishna-tammana-chief-technology-officer/ Killexams : SBU grads pass certification test with distinction

ST. BONAVENTURE, N.Y. — Katie Heitzman and Claire Schaef didn’t just pass the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology certification exam. They did so with distinction.

Heitzman and Schaef, who graduated from St. Bonaventure University in May with degrees in biochemistry, were among only 12% of graduating seniors nationwide who passed the ASBMB test with distinction, meaning they attained scores of “proficient or above” on 10 of the 11 test questions.

Overall, only 43% of the 1,052 students passed the test to achieve certification (“proficient or above” on at least eight questions).

“Compared to the national average of below 50% for ASBMB certification, this is strong evidence for the preparedness that our biochemistry program provides for our students,” said Dr. Xiaoning Zhang, biology professor and director of the biochemistry program.

“I’m very proud of Katie and Claire. They worked hard and persevered, especially during the pandemic. These are invaluable traits that the workforce is looking for.”

The certificate test has been offered to graduating biochemistry seniors at St. Bonaventure every year since 2018, when SBU’s program earned ASBMB accreditation. Since then, about 90% of SBU’s students who took the test achieved certification, almost all with distinction, Zhang said.

The certification test is designed to test students’ knowledge and understanding of the core competencies in biochemistry and molecular biology developed by the ASBMB and its members. Questions have been structured to assess these concept areas at different levels of cognitive skills and abilities.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 00:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bradfordera.com/news/sbu-grads-pass-certification-exam-with-distinction/article_ad4f859c-f55d-59e1-a416-1c6b694ef023.html
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