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Gainesville Fire Rescue’s Krista Ott and David Sutton share how to tell your story to stakeholders

David Sutton, BS, EMT-P; and Krista Ott, MSFES/DEM, EMT.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Krista Ott, MSFES/DEM, EMT; and David Sutton, BS, EMT-P, shared how they’ve quantified success in Gainesville Fire Rescue’s Community Paramedicine Program with attendees at EMS World Expo 2022.

Ott, interim community resource paramedicine coordinator, and Sutton, assistant chief, shared the benefits and challenges of metrics and how to tell your story to firefighters, officials and other community stakeholders.

Memorable quotes on community paramedicine

Here are some of the memorable quotes from Ott and Sutton:

“It’s not all about driving down admissions – that is an outcome – the goal is to help people.” — David Sutton, BS, EMT-P

“It’s important to identify the gaps. What are the needs in our community and what are the resources and are the resources able to meet those needs.” —  Krista Ott, MSFES/DEM, EMT

“There’s a lot of trust that’s buried in the primary care compliance metric.” — David Sutton, BS, EMT-P

Top takeaways on community paramedicine value

Ott and Sutton shared how their community paramedicine has grown and evolved, and how it’s changed perceptions among Gainesville Fire Rescue firefighters. Sutton noted just years ago, he was fielding angry phone calls about high 911 utilizers, one even going so far as to say they should be charged with a crime for 911 abuse. Now, instead he fields calls about when the community paramedics will be able to help these patients in need.

Following are some of their tips for making the most out of a community paramedicine program.

1. A dual purpose for data

Data can help identify changes in community needs over time, and justify additional resources. According to Ott, data goes the distance in showing Gainesville’s target audience, including internal stakeholders (i.e., their firefighters, officials and administrative staff), as well as community partners and elected officials that what they’re doing is making a difference. “If we don’t collect data and collect the right data, it’s really hard to ask for grants and additional funding,” she explained.

Gainesville collects and distributes monthly, and annual data in dashboards that show trends over time. “We know every day that we’re doing more and more but sometimes we don’t acknowledge or realize until we look at the data,” Ott said. “That matters to your employees. Look at the difference you’re making in these numbers.”

That data has identified the average community paramedicine patient age is trending down. When the program started, patients were typically in the 50-70 age range. Now, the program is getting more requests for mental health, housing and food insecurity needs in younger and even pediatric patients.

Image/Gainesville Fire Rescue

2. Tell the stories

That said, the story matters as much as the numbers, Sutton stressed. He compared having data and numbers to an old-time Western sheriff having a gun on their hip. They know you have it, so you don’t need to use it. Instead, those stakeholders want to hear the stories.

Sutton shared he recently greeted a task force of members who traveled to Florida to assist in Hurricane Ian rescue and recovery. They had the numbers – how many people they had rescued, etc. – but what struck Sutton is a story of one. One of the firefighters, just minutes after stepping out of the transport, shared how he had rescued a woman who watched her husband swept away by floodwaters. She had been stuck in her home for 7 days after experiencing this unthinkable tragedy. Sutton found himself deeply impacted by the story and sharing it with others over the next days. That’s the power of a story, he noted.

You need to have the data, but once you’ve demonstrated that you have the data, it doesn’t matter to 99% of people, Sutton said. “The stories are what matters.”

An important part of telling your story in an impactful way is to package your data in a visually appealing and easy-to-digest manner. Sutton and Ott advise community paramedicine programs to lean on student interns here, when possible. Programs like Canva make it relatively easy to create flyers and newsletters, but the average college student can pull numbers and create a visual in minutes, they reported.

3. Engage primary care physicians

One of the most challenging but impactful elements of Gainesville’s community paramedicine success has been engaging primary care physicians. It wasn’t easy to get started, Sutton admitted, noting, “We couldn’t get past the lobby.”

PCPs’ frontline office staff were effective gate keepers and Sutton had to engineer a different approach to opening the lines of communication. The team drafted a letter with the Gainesville Fire Rescue seal prominently displayed on page 1. Team members would hand deliver the letters, which stated simply, we are working with your patient. Here are three things we have noticed (e.g., the patient is missing appointments because they don’t have transportation) and what you can do to help. If a form was required that would be included as well, Sutton reported. If that didn’t work, community paramedic team members would accompany patients to their PCP visits. Getting in the room, with a uniform on, was another way to open those lines of communication, which are now robust. The local primary care physicians have now embraced the program and are referring patients.

4. Community paramedicine is not about driving down admissions

You often hear people talk about community paramedicine programs as designed to weed out high system utilizers and to drive down 911 calls and admissions, Sutton noted.

And, in many cases, that is the result. He shared a case in which a patient was calling 911 multiple times every single day. Ott responded to the home to explore the circumstances, and found that every time the patient tried to get out of bed or out of a chair, they fell. She was able to secure the patient a slide board, and the calls stopped.

The driving force behind many 911 calls is a medium-to-low acuity problem exacerbated by social determinates of health, Sutton noted. Transportation and access is the biggest problem for many, and coordination with primary care solves that in most cases.

Community paramedicine support can resolve many of those low acuity or medium acuity issues and empower patients to take charge of their chronic conditions, preventing complications.

However, in some cases, improving the connection with patients’ primary care physicians will result in an increase in calls. The PCP identifies a true need for the patient to be hospitalized. That is appropriate and a good thing, Sutton said. ”I’m not afraid of that because at the core of the program, we are supposed to be helping people.”

Learn more about community paramedicine

How 4 community paramedicine programs are positively impacting healthcare

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 03:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.ems1.com/ems-products/ems-data-management/articles/ems-world-expo-quick-take-quantifying-community-paramedicine-success-7m0n89cwLj3AAJZo/
Killexams : A lack of EMS volunteers post pandemic has left medical centers looking to fill the gap

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. (WKBW) — "Got involved 30 years ago," said Jonathan Schultz, Fire Coordinator & Director of Niagara Falls Emergency Services. "You know, some of my friends getting in the fire service, getting into EMS and working to help the community really and tried to do what we could to save lives."

It has been 3 decades of serving his community for Schultz and he said he's seen EMS providers making an impact since day one.

"They're out there, they're providing EMS protection, law enforcement, they're doing amazing work for all of our community," said Schultz. "Pre-covid they did amazing work, through the covid, unbelievable work they did to provide protection for everyone out there."

However, Schultz told 7 News the need for volunteer EMS workers has increased since the pandemic.

"Covid, unfortunately has really hurt the volunteer fire service across not just Niagara County but across the country," said Schultz. So many volunteers have left the ranks and just haven't really come back because of concern for covid, for their health. You know, concerned for everything else."

Wednesday evening at the Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center, the "Emerging from Covid, Looking to the Future" open discussion was held for EMS volunteers. Heather Domanski, Director of Emergency Services at Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center ER 1 said since EMS providers nationwide have been facing extreme worker shortages, they're doing everything they can to ensure people it's safe to come back.

"The local companies in Buffalo will actually pay for education, they'll pay for trainings," said Domanski. "The local fire departments are paying for education, they're paying for training to bring EMT's or people in the community that would like to become an EMT or a paramedic into the volunteer service."

Domanski told 7 News she believes EMS workers are needs just as much as the hospitals themselves.

At the meeting, volunteers were able to hear how the Medical Center can assist their efforts along with a special representation from UBNS Neurosurgeon and Memorial's Medical Stroke Director, Dr. Kenneth Snyder about the sign and symptoms of stroke.

It was an evening of education, encouragement and support so EMS workers can continue to pour into our communities and maybe even encourage someone else to join in along the way.

"When you see them training and you realize how much fun it is, it's a second family," said Schultz. "You know you get in there, you get involved there's something for everyone to do and we'd love to have everyone get involved and help community."

Domanski says if you want to join an EMS program you can stop by your local fire department pr EMS Crew for more information.

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 15:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wkbw.com/news/local-news/a-lack-of-ems-volunteers-post-pandemic-has-left-medical-centers-looking-to-fill-the-gap
Killexams : Could One Hospital’s New EMS App Strengthen Response Times? (TNS) — Catholic Health System calls it a game changer — new technology that it believes could help save lives in Western New York in situations where seconds matter.

The health system’s Mercy Hospital late last month rolled out cloud-based technology that works on smartphones and tablets and boosts communication between emergency medical services personnel and medical providers at the hospital.

The secure system, developed by Montana-based telehealth communications firm Pulsara, provides first responders with consistent two-way communication with emergency physicians, allowing for the transmission of patient data and live video consults before patients even get to the hospital.


Without Pulsara, such communication typically involves multiple phone calls, costing time that is crucial — especially when dealing with stroke and heart patients.

“I have been a paramedic in Western New York EMS for 20 years, and there has always been kind of a struggle to streamline communication between the pre-hospital world and the hospital world,” said Emily James, Catholic Health’s system manager of emergency and neuroscience services.

Efforts to bring Pulsara’s technology to Catholic Health started before the pandemic but were placed on the back burner while Western New York’s second-largest health system, like all hospitals, scrambled to care for Covid-19 patients.


But the pandemic only reinforced the need for such technology, and it took about a year to get it up and running at Mercy Hospital.

How it works


Let’s say EMS responds to a call at a home in Colden, in the southern part of Erie County.

They arrive, evaluate and determine the patient is having a stroke.

As they prepare to transport to Mercy Hospital, the paramedics hop on Pulsara and communicate directly to a doctor, such as Dr. Edward Cosgrove, medical director of Mercy’s emergency department.

The hospital’s neurology team is looped in, too, initiating a case and getting hospital staff prepared to intervene as quickly as possible. And the communication continues while the patient is en route, allowing the neurologist to evaluate and actually see the patient through the app.

“The value of good communication is really critical to the care of these types of patients, principally cardiac emergencies and neurologic emergencies,” Cosgrove said.

“Prior to the availability of this sort of communication tool, if I were the receiving physician and I got a call from the field from an EMS agency, and I got some of the information I needed, but then I had other questions subsequently, my ability to reach back out to the team in the field as they’re coming in was really limited,” he said.

It’s also a big help for the charge nurses, who can plan ahead of time what will happen when the patient arrives: For example, what room to put the patient in, who needs to be in that room and what equipment is needed.

“From a nursing perspective, the charge nurse is managing and juggling many balls,” said Lori Dufresne, system director of emergency and neuroscience services at Catholic Health. “And so to be able to be warned ahead of time and alerted that this is coming in, instead of having them just roll in the door and say, ‘Hey, we’re here,’ it’s very helpful for the charge nurses.”

Officials got a good look at how Pulsara works on the second or third day after it was launched, when two heart attack patients came to Mercy Hospital within seven minutes of one another.

James said both cases were alerted through Pulsara, communicated directly to the interventional cardiologist who was able to immediately pull his team in and, on one platform, discuss things such as which patient was coming to the cardiac catheterization lab first.

Before Pulsara, James said that communication would have consisted of at least three or four phone calls.

“Both of those patients received care faster, because of faster, more streamlined communication,” she said.

What’s next


Ryan Sheedy, coordinator of Erie County’s Medical Emergency Radio System, or MERS, said Catholic Health is the first health system in Erie County to launch Pulsara.

He noted that many area EMS agencies already are using Pulsara, and the county is working with Catholic Health to ensure all EMS providers are using it properly. (Catholic Health said there is no cost for EMS providers to use it.)

In the coming weeks, Catholic Health plans to roll out Pulsara to its other hospitals, including Kenmore Mercy Hospital, Sisters Hospital and Mount St. Mary’s Hospital.

© 2022 The Buffalo News (Buffalo, N.Y.). Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 05:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govtech.com/public-safety/could-one-hospitals-new-ems-app-improve-response-times
Killexams : Crapo: Gratitude for the heart, courage and skill of Idaho's EMS units

Idaho’s Emergency Medical Services (EMS) units provide critical services, and the dedication and hard work of the exceptional Idahoans involved in Idaho’s EMS cannot be overstated. They take action when an Idahoan needs help. And, so often, especially in Idaho’s rural communities, EMS personnel fill multiple roles, working long hours to provide needed help when emergencies happen at any hour of the day or night.

I am deeply grateful for the quick work of Idaho’s EMS personnel, who often wear many hats as they strive to save lives and alleviate suffering. The Idaho Department of Health & Welfare reports, “Approximately 40 percent of Idaho’s EMS providers are volunteers. Almost 10 percent of them also work as career EMS providers with another agency.”

EMS, a system of individuals working together to provide critical care when it is needed most, includes a diverse group of health care practitioners, such as paramedics, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), dual-role firefighter/EMTs, firefighter/paramedics and volunteer personnel serving each of those roles. However, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) that compiles data on the U.S. workforce does not include dual-role firefighter/EMTs and firefighter/paramedics in their count of EMS personnel. This undercounting affects how government agencies determine EMS needs. It influences how they plan for natural disasters, public health and other emergencies.

People are also reading…

Fellow U.S. Senator for Idaho Jim Risch and I co-sponsored S. 2971, the EMS Counts Act, that would address this undercounting by requiring the U.S. Secretary of Labor in collaboration with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget to revise the descriptions for this occupation to include dual-role EMS. This legislation supports those who work in multiple roles providing these services in Idaho communities and helps ensure communities are properly prepared for emergencies. In the legislation, we stress:

“EMS is an integral component of the response capacity of the United States to disasters and public health crises, such as outbreaks of infectious diseases, bombings, mass shootings, earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes. EMS personnel respond to more than 22,000,000 emergency calls each year including strokes, heart attacks, cardiac arrest, and trauma.”

Across Idaho, skilled and caring Idahoans are answering those emergency calls. For example, Ada County Paramedics reported they responded to more than 31,000 calls in 2020 alone, providing pre-hospital care to sick or injured people. To meet this need, they report, “Fulltime EMTs and Paramedics work 24 hour shifts with varying shift schedules.” Shawn Rayne, Emergency Medical Services Chief Paramedic for Ada County, said, “EMTs and Paramedics do extraordinary work that truly makes a difference in people’s lives. From long hours to managing extremely difficult and stressful situations, EMS providers prove they have an unwavering commitment to the communities they serve.”

To distinguish EMS and their critical public service, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) created the “Star of Life” with each bar on the “Star of Life” representing one of six EMS functions, and the serpent and staff in the symbol portraying the staff of Asclepius, an ancient Greek physician deified as the god of medicine.

This symbol is seen on ambulances, EMS apparel and other materials. As we think about the heart, courage and skill of the Idahoans represented by the “Star of Life,” my gratitude and prayers are with them as they carry out their vital roles in our communities.

Mike Crapo represents Idaho in the U.S. Senate.

Sat, 15 Oct 2022 02:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://magicvalley.com/opinion/columnists/crapo-gratitude-for-the-heart-courage-and-skill-of-idahos-ems-units/article_b5d4dd4c-4a6c-11ed-b747-87be29c8afc2.html
Killexams : Living a LifeFlight dream: UMass Memorial paramedic gets airborne to help save lives

Jorge Yarzebski grew up minutes away from UMass Memorial Medical Center and dreamed of working for LifeFlight. Today, he is a LifeFlight paramedic.

WORCESTER — When Jorge Yarzebski was a young boy, he dreamed of flying in a helicopter.

It started when Yarzebski and his dad heard the rotor blades whirring on the UMass Memorial Medical Center LifeFlight chopper from their Worcester apartment, located minutes away from the medical center.

“It was a wow factor,” said Yarzebski of those moments when he and his dad jumped in the car and rushed over to UMass to see the helicopter take off and wait for its return. “It was the coolest thing, to see it come in from the sky after helping people.”

Yarzebski was 5 when he started taking those quick car rides with his dad, sowing the seeds of his desire to one day fly in a helicopter and work in emergency medicine.

Living the dream

Today, at 40, Yarzebski is living his dream, working as a LifeFlight paramedic, flying missions throughout New England to save lives.

Archives: New UMass LifeFlight helicopter set to begin tour of duty

Wearing his official LifeFlight uniform of red shirt and pants and black vest with a winged emblem on the back, Yarzebski was about to board the chopper with pilot Rich McGee to supply a reporter a ride-along tour.

Jorge Yarzebski in the LifeFlight helicopter at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester.

That never happened because LifeFlight was immediately called to Western Massachusetts to complete a mission.

McGee and his crew were airborne within minutes, and Yarzebski stayed behind because he was officially working as an “extra” that day so he could answer questions for this story.

Watching the chopper lift off from the helipad amid a powerful gust of wind generated by the swift-moving rotor blades, Yarzebski uttered “absolutely” when asked if he wished he were on the chopper.

Paid his dues

Instead, Yarzebski patiently answered questions about his life as a flight paramedic, a career he worked toward for several years.

In total, Yarzebski has worked as an EMT since 2000. His résumé includes a certificate of paramedicine from Northeastern University and multiyear stints as a paramedic in Waltham and UMass Memorial EMS.

A LifeFlight helicopter and its crew prepare to lift off in response to a call.

All of those experiences served as a solid foundation for Yarzebski to work the last eight years for LifeFlight, where he's respected by his peers.

“(Yarzebski) is intelligent in the care and work that he does,” said Chuck Landry, a 32-year veteran in the LifeFlight Dispatch Center, where calls come in requesting chopper assistance.

Minutes before McGee climbed into the pilot seat for the trip to Western Massachusetts, he described Yarzebski as, “a great crew member. Very focused. Definitely, one of the better guys.”

One stands out

Of the hundreds of flights in Yarzebski’s logbook, one stands out, he said.

A young man was gravely injured and Yarzebski remembers the victim telling him, "Please don’t let me die." The man died 17 days later, and Yarzebski said LifeFlight’s work extended the man’s life and gave his family time to say goodbye.

“That’s one call that stood out,” he said.

Support system

A strong support system helps Yarzebski balance his emotions while he's literally on the front lines of life and death.

His LifeFlight colleagues offer support. So does his wife, Kate, a physician assistant at UMass Memorial Health. And their two young children are a constant source of joy.

A LifeFlight helicopter crew heads out on a call from UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester.

Yarzebski’s father, who shares the same name as his son, is another source of support. For more than 30 years, the older Yarzebski worked as a research associate professor at UMass Chan Medical School.

He also co-founded the GEMINI global emergency medicine initiative. It’s a collaboration of UMass Chan, rotary clubs, medical facilities and governments that brings training in emergency medicine, expertise and equipment to developing countries worldwide.

It's a like-father, like-son scenario because Yarzebski is also a trainer in emergency medicine.

When he’s not working LifeFlight shifts, Yarzebski is a part-time instructor at the UMass Chan Interprofessional Center for Experiential Learning &  Simulation. In that role he trains medical school students and nurses in emergency medicine using high-fidelity manikins that mimic bodily functions.

Yarzebski called it his “other (professional) love.”

Other love

His other love is LifeFlight, which marked its 40th anniversary last month.

“It’s incredible to be one of the (LifeFlight) providers. Every day I’m doing this, I feel blessed.”

A blessing that feels as strong as it did all those years ago when Yarzebski and his father heard the sounds from the LifeFlight rotor blades, prompting them to rush over for a glimpse.

“When I watch any helicopter take off, it’s the most amazing machine out there. That feeling will always be with me," he said.

Contact Henry Schwan at henry.schwan@telegram.com. Follow him on Twitter @henrytelegram

This article originally appeared on Telegram & Gazette: UMass Memorial LifeFlight paramedic is living a dream saving lives

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:07:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/living-lifeflight-dream-umass-memorial-100037810.html
Killexams : Mercy Hospital launches new EMS app. Could it help provide better, faster care?

Cardiac, stroke patients could see faster care

Catholic Health System calls it a game changer – new technology that it believes could help save lives in Western New York in situations where seconds matter.

The health system's Mercy Hospital late last month rolled out cloud-based technology that works on smartphones and tablets and boosts communication between emergency medical services personnel and medical providers at the hospital.

The secure system, developed by Montana-based telehealth communications firm Pulsara, provides first responders with consistent two-way communication with emergency physicians, allowing for the transmission of patient data and live video consults before patients even get to the hospital.

People are also reading…

Mercy Hospital in South Buffalo has rolled out a new EMS communications system that is expected to provide better and faster care, especially for time-sensitive stroke and heart patients.

Without Pulsara, such communication typically involves multiple phone calls, costing time that is crucial – especially when dealing with stroke and heart patients. 

"I have been a paramedic in Western New York EMS for 20 years, and there has always been kind of a struggle to streamline communication between the pre-hospital world and the hospital world," said Emily James, Catholic Health's system manager of emergency and neuroscience services.

Efforts to bring Pulsara's technology to Catholic Health  started before the pandemic but were placed on the back burner while Western New York's second-largest health system, like all hospitals, scrambled to care for Covid-19 patients. 

But the pandemic only reinforced the need for such technology, and it took about a year to get it up and running at Mercy Hospital.

Let's say EMS responds to a call at a home in Colden, in the southern part of Erie County. 

They arrive, evaluate and determine the patient is having a stroke. 

As they prepare to transport to Mercy Hospital, the paramedics hop on Pulsara and communicate directly to a doctor, such as Dr. Edward Cosgrove, medical director of Mercy's emergency department.

The hospital's neurology team is looped in, too, initiating a case and getting hospital staff prepared to intervene as quickly as possible. And the communication continues while the patient is en route, allowing the neurologist to evaluate and actually see the patient through the app. 

"The value of good communication is really critical to the care of these types of patients, principally cardiac emergencies and neurologic emergencies," Cosgrove said.

"Prior to the availability of this sort of communication tool, if I were the receiving physician and I got a call from the field from an EMS agency, and I got some of the information I needed, but then I had other questions subsequently, my ability to reach back out to the team in the field as they're coming in was really limited," he said.

It's also a big help for the charge nurses, who can plan ahead of time what will happen when the patient arrives: For example, what room to put the patient in, who needs to be in that room and what equipment is needed.

"From a nursing perspective, the charge nurse is managing and juggling many balls," said Lori Dufresne, system director of emergency and neuroscience services at Catholic Health. "And so to be able to be warned ahead of time and alerted that this is coming in, instead of having them just roll in the door and say, 'Hey, we're here,' it's very helpful for the charge nurses."

Officials got a good look at how Pulsara works on the second or third day after it was launched, when two heart attack patients came to Mercy Hospital within seven minutes of one another.

James said both cases were alerted through Pulsara, communicated directly to the interventional cardiologist who was able to immediately pull his team in and, on one platform, discuss things such as which patient was coming to the cardiac catheterization lab first.

Before Pulsara, James said that communication would have consisted of at least three or four phone calls.

"Both of those patients received care faster, because of faster, more streamlined communication," she said.

Ryan Sheedy, coordinator of Erie County's Medical Emergency Radio System, or MERS, said Catholic Health is the first health system in Erie County to launch Pulsara.

He noted that many area EMS agencies already are using Pulsara, and the county is working with Catholic Health to ensure all EMS providers are using it properly. (Catholic Health said there is no cost for EMS providers to use it.)

In the coming weeks, Catholic Health plans to roll out Pulsara to its other hospitals, including Kenmore Mercy Hospital, Sisters Hospital and Mount St. Mary's Hospital.

Welcome to Buffalo Next. This newsletter from The Buffalo News will bring you the latest coverage on the changing Buffalo Niagara economy – from real estate to health care to startups. Read more at BuffaloNext.com.

THE LATEST

Catch up on the latest news from the Buffalo Niagara economy:

The deadline for a stadium benefits plan is nearing – with no sign of a final deal in sight.

Clarence manufacturer Seal & Design is planning to expand its facility, and it is seeking tax breaks from the town's IDA.

ICYMI

Five reads from Buffalo Next:

1. For kids with autism, a different way of learning: Canisius College's Institute for Autism Research offers a unique social skills intervention that starts with young children but could Strengthen the quality of life for all autistic people.

2. As Micron picks Syracuse, will Genesee County ever land its own semiconductor win? The Science and Technology Advanced Manufacturing Park, or STAMP, pitches its ability to lure workers from both Rochester and Buffalo. But is its location, in an isolated spot in the Town of Alabama, more of a liability than economic development officials think?

3. Will there be enough snowplow drivers this year? Some municipalities say they are short-staffed and others say they are ready for the winter months.

4. A handful of solar farms proposed for sites across Western New York will be among the biggest in the state, which is pushing to get more electricity from renewable sources.

5. Let's strike! But just for a day or two: It's all part of a shifting strategy by labor unions to pressure employers, while limiting the financial pain work stoppages inflict on workers.

The Buffalo Next team gives you the big picture on the region’s economic revitalization. Email tips to buffalonext@buffnews.com or reach Deputy Business Editor David Robinson at 716-849-4435.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 20:45:00 -0500 en text/html https://buffalonews.com/business/local/mercy-hospital-launches-new-ems-app-could-it-help-provide-better-faster-care/article_652b0446-4915-11ed-b009-d7aae1d2a8d4.html
Killexams : Paramedic students qualify for NYC Marathon while raising money for cancer awareness © Provided by WFMY-TV Greensboro

Last year, more than 25,000 people finished the New York City Marathon. 

This year two Forsyth County EMT's have qualified for the race, while also training to become paramedics. 

Kate Singletary and Wesley Linton work to save lives as Emergency Medical Technicians with Forsyth County EMS. 

But even away from the ambulance, they still wanted to help others. 

That's why they tackled the daunting task of fundraising to run in the New York City Marathon. 

"It's like the Super Bowl. Serious runners, they have to qualify for the marathon so everyone can't do it," said Linton. 

The two didn't qualify because of their speed.

Instead, they qualified because of their fundraising efforts.

Linton set up a fundraising page and designed his own t-shirt to help raise the $3,000 needed to qualify. 

"I've gone to reach out on people on Facebook and friends and family and they've bought T-shirts and donated directly to the donation page," said Linton. 

"I was looking for ways to kind of help people with cancer, in similar situation as me or my dad," said Singletary.

Singletary has her own cause.

She runs to support her father who battled multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells.

She also ran in last year's marathon by raising money. 

"I think it's just personal to me because I have watched my dad go through cancer treatments and a stem cell transplant and luckily he's been in remission for the past couple years. But, I've been able to make a ton of connections with people, my age, who have had cancer or with family members with cancer," said Singletary. 

The money the two raise will benefit the Ulman Foundation which is dedicated to supporting young adults and families impacted by cancer. 

Both say running in the New York City Marathon is a big deal, but they're not doing this for themselves.

"I also write the names of the people I'm running for on my legs when I do runs like that. It kind of helps carry you through and helps remind you of who you're running for," said Singletary. 

"Honestly I've I've had jobs that pay a lot and they're not as fulfilling. I always come back to public service," said Linton.

Both will continue training, as they also work to finish the paramedic academy and work full-time. 

They'll run the New York City Marathon on November 6th.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 14:26:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/paramedic-students-qualify-for-nyc-marathon-while-raising-money-for-cancer-awareness/ar-AA12WkUg
Killexams : Medline taps into automated vending solution to help EMS providers track inventory in real-time

New distribution partnership with VendNovation enables supply access and reduction in supply waste

NORTHFIELD, Ill., Oct. 5, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Medline today announced a new nationwide agreement with VendNovation, a premier provider of cloud-based automated vending solutions. Medline will distribute the company's Controlled Access Pharmacy (CAP) unit to help Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers enhance efforts around reducing essential medical supply waste and tracking inventory with real-time reporting.

Medline was awarded a national agreement with VendNovation to distribute the company's automated vending solution and help EMS providers reduce supply waste and track inventory with real-time reporting.

Medical supply waste has a significant impact on the financial well-being of EMS providers and the carbon footprints of the communities they serve. Innovative technology from companies like VendNovation is helping reduce manual tracking of inventory and EMS providers have reported cost savings exceeding 40%.

VendNovation's CAP unit scans an EMS worker's ID badge and all withdrawals, such as pharmaceuticals, respiratory and diagnostics products, are cataloged and time stamped. The system provides alerts when inventory is low or products are near expiration. The software is able to generate a number of reports, including usage reports by individual personnel, re-stock lists and current inventory.

"Our distribution partnership with VendNovation is an extension of our commitment to find new ways to help EMS providers enhance operations, reduce costs and increase access to critical supplies," said Rhonda Baliff, Medline EMS division manager. "VendNovation has a long-standing history of bringing new technology to vending solutions and we're excited to expand their reach to the EMS sector to simplify inventory management tasks for our customers."

See the VendNovation unit live and learn more about Medline's solutions for the EMS sector, including EMS online education courses through HealthStream, at Medline's EMS World Expo booth, October 10-14 (booth #2203).

Learn more about how Medline is supporting EMS providers at https://www.medline.com/capabilities/ems-supplies/.

About Medline
Medline is a healthcare company; a manufacturer, distributor, and solutions provider focused on improving the overall operating performance of healthcare. Partnering with healthcare systems and facilities across the continuum of care, Medline provides the clinical and supply chain resources required for long-term financial viability in delivering high-quality care. With the scale of one of the country's largest companies and the agility of a family-led business, Medline is able to invest in its customers for the future and rapidly respond to a dynamically changing market with customized solutions. Headquartered in Northfield, Ill., Medline has 30,000+ employees worldwide and does business in more than 125 countries and territories. Learn more about Medline at www.medline.com.

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SOURCE Medline

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 20:24:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/medline-taps-automated-vending-solution-202100572.html
Killexams : AN INNOVATION FROM TECHNIMOUNT EMS COULD HELP...

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QUEBEC CITY, Oct. 14, 2022 /CNW Telbec/ - Technimount EMS ("Technimount"), a leading provider of of mounting solutions for medical devices, continues to innovate with the Xtension ProTM Assistant- CCT; a revolutionary solution that will henceforth allow to safely transfer critically ill patients to specialized care facilities. The Xtension Pro Assistant- CCT is the result of a complex research and development process that began a few years ago and conducted in close collaboration with one of Canada's leading healthcare institutions, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, part of CIUSSS du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal.

A highly specialized and multi-disciplinary team of experts is needed to transfer a patient on ECMO. Every moment counts, and it is crucial to ensure the safety of patients and crews during transport. Technimount understands the evolving needs of the Critical Care industry and responds today with the most advanced solution on the market.

Designed, developed and manufactured by Technimount, the Xtension ProTM Assistant – CCT is tested in compliance with the highest industry standards for EMS transport, as published by the Society of Automative Engineers (SAE). This solution brings safety to patients and crews with a robust system for the management of multiple life-sustaining medical devices, such as ECMO, during Critical Care Transport. This mounting solution integrates key features highly appreciated by Critical Care Transport professionals, such as an ergonomic gliding system that facilitates lateral patient transfer. In addition, all medical device brackets have also been designed with a quick-release system that allows for easy removal of medical devices.

Responding to the unique operational needs of EMS and healthcare providers, the Xtension ProTM Assistant – CCT improves interchangeability between medical devices enabling customization according to protocols in place. This solution features Technimount's universal mounting system widely used among Emergency Medical Services in North America, ensuring a seamless transition from ground emergency transport up to hospital environments.

"Our Foundation is proud to have made it possible for the intensive care team at Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal to make this acquisition. As the first hospital in Quebec to acquire this equipment, our major university hospital will continue its progress towards excellence and innovation. We are convinced that the Foundation's contribution represents a real investment that will help critical care experts save more lives," said Paul Bergeron, President, and CEO of the Sacré-Coeur de Montréal Hospital Foundation. 

"This is a major innovation that will allow an entire specialized team to travel for the repatriation of highly unstable patients, bringing with them all the necessary equipment with ease and safety. This will allow our advanced respiratory team to be even more effective in saving the lives of critically ill patients in referring hospitals. This is a great example of the constructive interaction of specialized clinical intensive care staff with Technimount's dynamic and creative team," added Dr. Martin Albert, Intensivist at Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal.

This collaboration allowed Technimount to create a system adapted to the specific and evolving needs of critical care providers. The CIUSSS du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal Hospital becomes the first institution to benefit from this innovation in North America, the most advanced medical device transport solution in ground Critical Care Transport available.

"The arrival of the Xtension Pro Assistant - CCT marks a significant milestone in the ECMO and Critical Care Transport industry and demonstrates our commitment to the healthcare community," said Carl Bouchard, President, and CEO of Technimount System. "Our primary goal is to provide the safest and most innovative fixation systems that meet the evolving needs of healthcare practices. The Xtension Pro Assistant - CCT improves healthcare practices and subsequently allows critical care professionals to be more efficient in managing equipment and concentrating on what matters most, patient care," concluded Mr. Bouchard.

ABOUT TECHNIMOUNT EMS

Technimount EMS offers a wide range of mounting systems for medical devices, addressing the safety needs of patients and staff during ground or air emergencies and Critical Care Transport, establishing itself as a standard in the Emergency Medical Services industry.

ABOUT CIUSSS DU NORD-DE-L'ÎLE-DE-MONTRÉAL

With 26 health and social services facilities located in five boroughs in the north of Montreal, the CIUSSS du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal is responsible for organizing and developing health and social services for the 436,000 Montrealers in its territory. It also provides specialized services, mainly in trauma, respiratory health, cardiovascular health and mental health, to 1.8 million Quebecers in other regions. The CIUSSS du Nord-de-l'Île-de-Montréal, affiliated with the Université de Montréal, focuses on three main areas of research: biomedical research, social research, and mental health research in children and teenagers.

SOURCE TECHNIMOUNT SYSTEM

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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 01:17:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/n29268202/an-innovation-from-technimount-ems-could-help-save-lives-with-a-unique-mounting-system-for-securin
Killexams : Living a LifeFlight dream: UMass Memorial paramedic gets airborne to help save lives

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