Real Questions and latest syllabus of ACSM-GEI exam

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Exam Code: ACSM-GEI Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
ACSM-GEI Certified Group Exercise Instructor

This exam content outline is based on a Job Task Analysis (JTA) for the ACSM Certified Group Exercise Instructor® (GEI). The JTA describes what an ACSM GEI does on a day-to-day basis and is divided into four domains and associated tasks performed on the job. As you prepare for your exam, it is important to remember that all exam questions are based on these domains—making it a perfect addition to your preparation materials! In fact, when you receive your test scores, your performance in each domain is scored individually so you can see exactly where you excelled and/or where you may need additional preparation. Using this in combination with other optional study materials will ensure you are ready for exam day

Domain I Participant and Program Assessment 10%
Domain II Class Design 25%
Domain III Leadership and Instruction 55%
Domain IV Legal and Professional Responsibilities 10%

A. Evaluate and establish participant screening procedures to optimize safety and minimize risk by reviewing assessment protocols based on ACSM standards and guidelines.
Knowledge of: • appropriate techniques for health history assessment.
• ACSM standards and guidelines related to pre-participation health history assessment.
• ACSM pre-participation screening questionnaire related to screening of class participants.
Skill in: • determining the adequacy of a facilitys current pre-participation procedures.
• developing and implementing pre-participation screening procedures.
B. Administer and review, as necessary, participants health risk to determine if preparticipation assessment is needed prior to exercise using PAR-Q, ACSM pre-participation health screening or other appropriate tools.
Knowledge of: • the use of informed consent and medical clearance prior to exercise participation.
• ACSM guidelines related to pre-participation screening procedures.
• ACSM risk stratification categories to aid in pre-participation screening (i.e., low, moderate, high risk).
• important health history information (e.g., past and present medical history, orthopedic limitations, prescribed medications, supplements, activity patterns, nutritional habits, stress and anxiety levels, family history of heart disease and other chronic diseases, smoking history, use of alcohol and illicit drugs, etc).
Skill in: • determining when to recommend medical clearance.
• administering pre-participation screening questionnaire.
• determining risk stratification category by evaluating screening questionnaire.
• making appropriate recommendations based upon the results of screening questionnaire.
C. Screen participants, as needed, for known acute or chronic conditions to providerecommendations and/or modifications. Knowledge of: • common medical conditions and contraindications to group exercise participation.
• risk factors, signs and symptoms, physical limitations and medical conditions that may affect or preclude class participation.
• appropriate criteria for NOT starting or stopping a participant from exercising.
Skill in: • determining health status of group exercise class participants prior to each class. • determining when to recommend medical clearance.
• making recommendations based on results of pre-exercise health status determination.
A. Establish the purpose and determine the objectives of the class based upon the needs of the participants and facility. Knowledge of: • methods used to determine the purpose of a group exercise class (e.g., survey, focus group, inquiry, word of mouth, suggestion box).
• types of group exercise classes (e.g., land-based, water-based, equipmentbased).
• types of equipment used in group exercise settings.
• participant characteristics such as health, fitness, age, gender, ability.
• health challenges and/or special needs commonly encountered in a group exercise setting.
• environmental factors as they relate to the safe participation (e.g., outdoor, indoors, flooring, temperature, space, lighting, room size, ventilation).
• the types of different environments for group exercise such as outdoor, indoors, flooring, temperature, space, lighting, room size, ventilation and need to potentially adapt that environment.
B. Determine class content (i.e., warm-up, stimulus and cool-down) in order to create an effective workout based upon the objectives of the class.
Knowledge of: • the physiology of warm-up, stimulus and cool-down.
• the FITT principle (i.e., frequency, intensity, time and type) for developing and/or maintaining cardiorespiratory fitness.
• training principles (e.g., specificity, adaptation, overload).
• different training formats (e.g., continuous, circuit, interval, progressive classes such as 4-6 week sessions).
• exercise modification to most appropriately meet the needs of the class participants.
• different teaching styles (e.g., formal, authoritarian, facilitator, nurturer).
• different learning styles (e.g., auditory, visual, kinesthetic).
• the use of music in group exercise.
Skill in: • applying FITT principles (i.e., frequency, intensity, time, type) to class design.
• organizing the warm-up, stimulus and cool-down.
• planning a class for participants with health challenges and special needs.
• planning a class based on exercise environment and available equipment.
• applying various styles of learning to most effectively meet the objectives of the class.
C. Select and sequence appropriate exercises in order to provide a safe workout based upon the objectives of the class.
Knowledge of: • a variety of exercises used during warm-up, stimulus and cool-down.
• variety of exercises to meet the needs of participants with different skill and fitness levels.
• cardiovascular training principles and techniques.
• muscular conditioning principles and techniques.
• flexibility training principles and techniques.
Knowledge of:
• motor fitness components (e.g., balance, agility, speed, coordination).
• the principles of muscle balance (e.g., flexion/extension, agonist/antagonist).
• exercise progression (e.g., easy/hard, slow/fast).
• health challenges and/or special needs commonly encountered in a group exercise setting.
• risks associated with various exercises.
• the benefits and use of music in class design.
Skill in: • the selection and application of music given class purpose and objectives.
• selecting and sequencing exercises to maintain muscle balance, minimize risk to the participants and modify for those with health challenges and special needs.
• designing transitions between exercises.
D. Rehearse class content, exercise selection and sequencing and revise as needed in order to provide a safe and effective workout
based upon the purpose and objectives of the class.
Knowledge of: • the purpose of class rehearsal.
• proper execution of exercises and movements.
• verbal and non-verbal cueing techniques for the purpose of providing direction, anticipation, motivation and safety.
• a variety of class environments (e.g., outdoor, indoors, flooring, temperature, space, lighting, room size, ventilation) and associated adaptations that may be required.
Skill in: • demonstrating exercises and movements.
• the application of music, if used, given class purpose and objectives.
• modifying class design based on rehearsal trial and error.
• applying teaching styles (e.g., formal, authoritarian, facilitator, nurturer).
• applying verbal cueing techniques for the purpose of providing direction, anticipation, motivation and safety.
• applying non-verbal cueing techniques (visual, directional).
• corresponding movements to music phrase and/or counts during selected exercises or segments.
A. Prepare to teach by implementing pre-class procedures including screening new participants and organizing equipment, music and room set-up.
Knowledge of: • equipment operation (e.g., audio, exercise equipment, facility).
• the procedures associated with determining the health status of group exercise class participants prior to each class.
• class environment (e.g., outdoor, indoors, flooring, temperature, space, lighting, room size, ventilation).
Skill in: • determining health status of group exercise class participants prior to each class.
• time management.
• delivering pre-class announcements (welcome, instruction, safety, participant accountability).
• operating sound equipment.
• evaluating and adapting, if needed, environment to maximize comfort and safety.
B. Create a positive exercise environment in order to optimize participant adherence by incorporating effective motivational skills, communication techniques and behavioral strategies.
Knowledge of: • motivational techniques.
• modeling.
• appropriate verbal and non-verbal behavior.
• group behavior change strategies.
• basic behavior change models and theories (e.g., stages of change, self-efficacy, decisional balance, social learning theory).
• the types of feedback and appropriate use.
• verbal (voice tone, inflection) and non-verbal (body language) communication skills.
Skill in: • applying behavior change strategies.
• applying behavior change models and theories.
• applying communication techniques (verbal and non-verbal/body language).
• fostering group cohesion.
• interacting with class participants.
• providing positive feedback to class participants.
• projecting enthusiasm, energy and passion.
• applying techniques addressing various styles of learning.
C. Demonstrate all exercises using proper form and technique to ensure safe execution in accordance with ACSM standards and guidelines.
Knowledge of: • basic human functional anatomy and biomechanics.
Knowledge of:
• basic exercise physiology.
• basic ergonomic principles.
• proper alignment, form and technique.
• high-risk exercises and movements.
Skill in: • demonstrating proper alignment, form and technique.
• demonstrating exercise modifications.
• correcting improper form and/or technique.
D. Incorporate verbal and nonverbal instructional cues in order to optimize communication, safety and motivation based upon industry guidelines.
Knowledge of: • anticipatory, directional, educational, motivational, safety, tactile and visual cueing techniques. • proper participant performance.
Skill in: • applying anticipatory, directional, educational, motivational, safety, tactile, and visual cues. • monitoring participants performance.
• instructing participant how to correct their own exercise execution and/or form.
E. Monitor participants performance to ensure safe and effective exercise execution using observation and participant feedback techniques in accordance with ACSM standards and guidelines.
Knowledge of: • safe and effective exercise execution.
• the rationale for exercise intensity monitoring.
• exercise intensity monitoring methods and limitations.
• exercise programming (e.g., mode, intensity, frequency, duration).
• the signs and symptoms of overexertion.
• proper exercise demonstration techniques.
• proper feedback techniques (i.e., visual and auditory).
• normal and adverse response to exercise.
• appropriate criteria for NOT starting or stopping a participant from exercising.
Skill in: • safe and effective exercise execution.
• monitoring exercise intensity in class participants.
• recognizing signs and symptoms of overexertion.
• applying the principles of exercise programming (e.g., mode, intensity, frequency, duration).
• teaching participants how to monitor and modify their own exercise intensity.
• proper exercise demonstration techniques.
• proper feedback techniques (i.e., visual and auditory).
F. Modify exercises based on individual and group needs to ensure safety and effectiveness in accordance with ACSM standards and guidelines.
Knowledge of: • cardiovascular response to various environmental conditions.
• how aerobic, strength and flexibility exercise modifications affect intensity and safety.
• various exercise safety and intensity modification techniques (e.g., tempo, range of motion, alternate movements, load).
• a variety of exercises for any particular muscle group, from easiest to hardest.
• the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommendations for exercise during pregnancy.
Skill in: • modifying exercise execution and intensity based on environmental conditions.
• modifying aerobic, strength and flexibility exercise intensity based on environmental condition, individual and/ or group needs.
• applying exercise intensity modification techniques (e.g., tempo, range of motion, alternate movements, load).
G. Monitor sound levels of vocal and/or audio equipment following industry guidelines.
Knowledge of: • appropriate vocal projection techniques.
• the value of vocal warm-up.
• vocal warm-up techniques.
• safe volume level.
• group exercise sound projection technology (e.g., microphones, amplifiers, speakers).
Skill in: • the application of appropriate vocal projection techniques.
• the application of group exercise sound projection equipment (e.g., microphones, amplifiers, speakers).
H. Respond to participants concerns in order to maintain a professional, equitable and safe environment by using appropriate conflict management or customer service strategies set forth by facility policy and procedures and industry guidelines. Knowledge of: • conflict prevention.
• basic conflict resolution techniques.
• communication techniques as it relates to conflict resolution (e.g., active listening, mirroring, reflection).
• specific club policies regarding conflict management and your role in application of policies.
Skill in: • applying conflict resolution techniques.
• applying empathetic listening skills.
• selecting the appropriate resolution.
I. Educate participants in order to enhance knowledge, enjoyment and adherence by providing health and fitness related information
and resources.
Knowledge of: • basic human functional anatomy and biomechanics.
• basic exercise physiology.
• basic human development and aging.
• the basic principles of weight management and nutrition.
• motivational techniques used to promote behavior change in the initiation, adherence or return to exercise.
• benefits and risks of exercise.
• basic ergonomic principles.
• stress management principles and techniques.
• healthy lifestyle practices and behavior.
• credible, current and pertinent health-related information.
• risk factors which may require referral to medical or allied health professionals prior to exercise.
Skill in: • accessing available health and exercise-related information.
• delivering health and exercise-related information.
• referring participant to appropriate medical or allied health professional when warranted.
A. Evaluate the class environment (e.g., outdoor, indoor, capacity, flooring, temperature, ventilation, lighting, equipment, acoustics)
to minimize risk and optimize safety by following pre-class inspection procedures based on established facility and industry standards and guidelines.
Knowledge of: • ACSM facility standards and guidelines.
• established regulations and laws (e.g., Americans with Disabilities Act, CDC, OSHA).
• the procedures associated with determining the health status of group exercise class participants prior to each class.
Skill in: • evaluating classroom environment.
B. Promote participants awareness and accountability by informing them of classroom safety procedures and exercise and intensity options in order to minimize risk.
Knowledge of: • components that contribute to a safe environment.
• safety guidelines as it relates to group exercise.
Skill in: • communicating safety precautions before and during class.
• observing compliance with instructions provided to participants.
• cueing to reinforce safety precautions during class.
C. Follow industry-accepted professional, ethical and business standards in order to optimize safety and reduce liability.
Knowledge of: • appropriate professional behavior and boundaries pertaining to class participants.
• the ACSM code of ethics.
• the scope of practice of an ACSM Certified Group Exercise Instructor.
• standards of care for an ACSM Certified Group Exercise Instructor.
• informed consent, assumption of risk and waivers.
• established and applicable laws, regulations and policies.
• bounds of competence.
• established and applicable laws, regulations and policies.
• confidentiality, privacy laws and practice.
• insurance needs (e.g., professional liability, general liability insurance).
• basic business principles (e.g., contracts, negligence, types of business entities, tax business structure, advertising, marketing).
Skill in: • applying professional behavior and in maintaining appropriate boundaries with class participants.
• applying the ACSM code of ethics.
DOMAIN IV: LEGAL AND PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES
Skill in (continued): • assuring and maintaining the privacy of all group exercise participants and any pertinent information relating to them or their membership.
D. Respond to emergencies in order to minimize untoward events by following procedures consistent with established standards of care and facility policies.
Knowledge of: • Adult CPR.
• automated external defibrillator (AED).
• basic first aid for accidents, environmental and medical emergencies (e.g., heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, lacerations, incisions, puncture wounds, abrasions, contusions, simple/compound fractures, bleeding/ shock, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, sprains, strains, fainting).
• the standard of care for emergency response (e.g., incident reporting, injury assessment, activating emergency medical services).
• the Emergency Action Plan, if applicable, for the fitness facility.
• unsafe or controversial exercises.
Skill in: • activating emergency medical services.
• administering CPR.
• administering an AED.
• administering basic first aid for exercise-related injuries, accidents, environmental and medical emergencies (e.g., assessment, response, management of class or environment).
• documenting incidents and/or emergencies.
• selecting exercises that are not controversial or high risk.
E. Respect copyrights to protect original and creative work, media, etc. by legally securing copyright material and other intellectual property based on national and international copyright laws.
Knowledge of: • copyright laws (e.g., BMI, ASCAP).
• fair use of copyright material.
Skill in: • acquiring appropriate copyrighted materials and music.
F. Engage in healthy lifestyle practices in order to be a positive role model for class participants.
Knowledge of: • healthy lifestyle practices.
• lifestyle behavior change strategies (cognitive and behavioral).
• appropriate modeling behaviors (e.g., non-threatening, motivating).
• risks associated with overtraining.
• body image concepts and perceptions.
• risks associated with the female athlete triad.
• referral practices to allied health professionals.
Skill in: • applying healthy lifestyle practices.
• communicating healthy lifestyle information.
• personalizing behavioral strategies to class participants.
• recognizing the symptoms of overtraining.
• referring participants to appropriate allied health professionals when necessary.
• identifying issues/behavior related to unhealthy body image and making appropriate referrals.
G. Select and participate in continuing education programs that enhance knowledge and skills on a continuing basis, maximize effectiveness and increase professionalism in the field.
Knowledge of: • continuing education requirements for ACSM certification.
• continuing education resources (e.g., conferences, workshops, correspondence courses, on-line, college/ university-based, journals).
• credible, current and pertinent health-related information.
Skill in: • obtaining relevant continuing education.
• applying credible, current and pertinent health related information when leading the class.

Certified Group Exercise Instructor
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Ten people are hoping to take a seat at the Visalia City Council dais to decide on issues that impact every resident.

Visalia Times-Delta asked each candidate what they hope to accomplish in their first 100 days as a city council member, if elected?

David Farris © Submitted David Farris

District 1

David Farris: As a contender for Visalia City Council, if elected, my top priorities for the first 100 days in office would be to implement a sound and practical strategy to put our water infrastructure on sustainable footing. This would include expansion of our water reclamation capacity, a re-negotiation of the substantial grey-water allocation to TID from our current reclamation facility, expansion of recharge basins, and engaging with CalWater to have greater agency and influence in the management of our water resources.

Secondly, I would seek to work with our public safety departments, planning department and the wealth of private entities in our community to address our homeless population, coordinate and encourage the development of affordable housing ($600-$1200/month) for the median income of $31,235 in our community. Further, I would like to work with College of the Sequoias, which is a wonderful resource, to develop and expand educational opportunities as well as trade training to help the housing-insecure reenter the local economy. I believe we have an opportunity to be a model for other cities throughout the nation to help uplift these community members while simultaneously resolving the significant labor shortages which local businesses are experiencing.

Our city is on the precipice of significant critical challenges: water insecurity, homelessness, and public safety, all of which can and must be solved together! It’s time for us to step away from mediocrity and build a thriving community in our beautiful city, full of art, culture, and the old-fashioned small-town compassion and love for our neighbors.

Justin Bolton © Submitted Justin Bolton

Justin Bolton: I have had many careers in my lifetime starting with being a camp counselor all the way up to being a firefighter/EMT. I also used to work for the city at the animal shelter. My passion now is politics and being an entrepreneur. I have a wonderful family including two young beautiful children. I have lived in Visalia for over four years now and I love this city and look forward to raising my family here. I truly believe that being a city council member means that I am only your representative. Nothing more, Nothing less. It is your voice that is important to me and this is your city. Together let’s take it back. 

With the help of the people of Visalia, I would like to plan and implement strategies to help the homeless issue that has been plaguing the city. 

Liz Wynn takes the oath of office as the new Visalia City Councilwoman Monday, August 16, 2021. She replaces Phil Cox and represents District 1. © Ron Holman Liz Wynn takes the oath of office as the new Visalia City Councilwoman Monday, August 16, 2021. She replaces Phil Cox and represents District 1.

Liz Wynn (Incumbent): I plan to continue working as a team with city staff and council on projects that are most important to our community now and in the future. 

Our goal is to have design alternatives and cost estimates for a new aquatic center to be discussed at our March Strategic Planning Session. This is an opportunity that will enhance our community and we need to do this together. Please join us.

With our new parks and recreation director, we have the opportunity to look at the programs our children have available and take a hard look at what needs to be enhanced and improved. This includes additional parks, pool, sports facilities and programs for all ages. Parks and recreation are key to our quality of life.

Dive deeper: Here are the top takeaways from Visalia City Council candidate forum

On a very different front, the State of California is considering taking away local control over cannabis sales. We need to prepare a taxation plan and determine how the tax revenue will be spent. There has been plenty of opportunity to see how other communities implemented cannabis sales.  We will review and learn from those communities. There will be ongoing opportunity for public input.

We need to celebrate the quality of our community and the success of our city leadership. We have an industrial park that is providing thousands of quality jobs. Our police and fire departments work tirelessly to protect our citizens and our property.  Strong city staff leaders oversee Visalia’s financial health ensuring a strong future. I would be honored to continue serving our city.

District 3

Brian Poochigian © Submitted Brian Poochigian

Brian Poochigian (Incumbent): On my first 100 days in office I will continue to represent and respond to the needs of the residents of Visalia. My top priorities are improving the roads and traffic circulation, keeping our city safe, supporting local business, and working to find creative solutions to Improve the homelessness issues in our city.

I will continue working to Improve roads and traffic circulation in our city. I will work on widening Shirk, Visalia Parkway, and Riggin Road and use a long-term plan to develop new roads to accommodate city growth.

I will continue to support public safety in our community to ensure the safety of all the residents of Visalia. In my first term, I voted to increase funding to public safety so our police officers and fire fighters have what they need to keep the city safe. I am proud to have the support of the Visalia Police officers Association, Visalia Fire Fighters Association, Tulare County Deputy Sherriff’s Association, Tulare County Sherriff Mike Boudreaux, and District Attorney Tim Ward.

I will continue to support local business because the economy does the best when the government gets out of its way. I will facilitate conversations between local businesses and the city to streamline solutions to problems they face.

I will continue finding creative solutions to help Improve the homeless situation in our city. I promise to work to find new ideas to get the homeless out of parks, off of the streets, and get them the help they deserve.

Heather Carter © Submitted Heather Carter

Heather Carter: I am a personal trainer and fitness instructor specializing in senior care. I graduated from Kent State University with a BA in International Relations. My husband is in agriculture and my twins attend El Diamante. My oldest is at UC Davis.

My goal is to serve the city of Visalia and its residents to the best of my abilities. I want all the residents of Visalia to know that I am to open and receptive to discussions and feedback. I speak Spanish and English. I believe that everyone’s input has value.

During the first 100 days in office, I would work with Planned Parenthood to find a better location for their facility in Visalia that provides reproductive care for all the community without traveling outside of the city. Also, I would vote to allow marijuana dispensaries within the city limit. Finally, I would vote for the aquatic community center.

District 4

Bob Ainley © Submitted Bob Ainley

Bob Ainley: I am running for City Council in District 4 to continue my service to this community in a greater way, as well as bring additional experience and expertise to the council. I am a local small business owner: The Darling Hotel and Ainley Alipaz Webb PC. I was born and raised in Visalia, graduating from Golden West High School where my dad, Tim, was a longtime teacher and coach. I went on to obtain degrees from UC Davis, the University of Warwick, and the University of Oregon. I met my wife overseas where we were engaged in anti-human trafficking operations and brought her home to Visalia. My wife and I have a 3-year-old daughter.

First and foremost, I want to be realistic about how fast government works and temper my expectations. Initially, I hope to build and solidify my relationships with the other councilmembers and City staff in order to be as effective as possible when it comes to assisting my constituents with City departments or advocating for them on Council matters. Next, I want to make sure I get fully up speed on all the current closed session items, as those tend be pressing matters (such as pending litigation) and we, the public, are not privy to the details of these potentially complex matters. I would like to resolve the closed session items I would be inheriting as soon as possible. I also look forward reviewing the plan for a new pool that is to be formulated by City staff for review at the 2023 Strategic Planning Session, and hopefully making concrete decisions regarding that potential project. I would like to have received and reviewed the Ag Mitigation Program study being developed by recently retained consultants in order to either finalize that program or continue to make progress in resolving that matter.

Finally, I would like to see the following items on the agenda: (1) a feasibility study of storm drain projects in Birdland, and (2) a review of the current Traffic Impact Fee program that needs to be reworked and updated to match the city’s priorities, including incentivizing infill, promoting fairness, and allowing for orderly development of city streets.

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Emmanuel Soto: Ultimately, it is my goal to serve you. If you have questions, please contact me at (559) 809-1500.

For too long, North Visalia has been ignored, and I hope together we can work to Improve our community. You can count on me to be your voice on the council, listen to your recommendations and concerns, focus on areas of need in our neighborhoods, advocate and support our local businesses and public safety personnel. I will establish office hours rotating at a nearby coffee shops in District 4, it will be an inviting space to talk to residents who wish to voice their opinions and concerns. I also plan to meet with the city manager regularly. I will focus on our roads, sidewalks, streetlights and add speed tables to slow down cars in our neighborhoods. I will engage with our police chief and city engineer to work together to deter those speeding in our neighborhoods. Also, we need to invest in our youth programs and parks and recreation centers. I will meet with local organizations who help the homeless and support their goals to be more successful.

Win or lose, other community members and I are in the process of adopting Dinuba Boulevard to pick up trash in North Visalia on a monthly basis. I will make myself available to my community because I am here to serve you.

Marie Line-Labbee © Gigi Crouse, Gigi Kraus Photography.com Marie Line-Labbee

Marie Line-Labbee: My family started out in agriculture. My great grandfather planted oranges in Ivanhoe, and that family ranch became the hub for many more generations who call Visalia home. After graduating from Golden West, I graduated from Chapman University with a degree in Organizational Leadership. I’m a mom and small business owner. I have served on the board for Networking for Women, Soroptimist International, Children’s Ark Learning Center, and the Miss Tulare County Scholarship Program. I’ve also served as the chair of the Visalia Chamber Ambassadors and as a volunteer for Visalia Emergency Aid, FoodLink, and Visalia United Water Polo Club. My passion as a community champion has fueled my desire to have a more prominent voice in the community on city council.

As you may know, nothing in any level of government gets accomplished quickly. I truly believe the best leaders are the most educated leaders. I plan on spending my first days on City Council continuing to educate myself on the needs of community members, first responders, and city programs. My goal is to fully understand the ins and outs of our general plan, continue to meet with community members to understand your concerns, and tour city programs and facilities listening to what works well and what needs improvement.

My long-term goal is to bring an aquatic center to Visalia. I’m actively connecting members of the water community with the Parks and Recreation Foundation. The goal is to fundraise for an endowment that covers the long-term cost of the aquatics center, which is one of the significant factors holding up this project. I truly believe if we come together as a whole community, nothing is impossible.  

District 5 

Kris Korsgaden: I was born and raised in Visalia - graduate of Mt. Whitney High School. After attending College of the Sequoias for a few years, I transferred, and eventually graduated with a bachelors de from San Diego State University (Piano Performance & Composition).

Upon returning to Visalia, I started a couple businesses, including a construction company (Korsgaden Tile). A few years ago, I met my fiancé, Chelsea. We have a one-year old baby boy. His name is Finn.

Housing: Local property owners and small-time developers need more freedom - to provide quality, low-cost homes for our growing community. Government grants only help to provide a limited number of units. It's not enough.

Homelessness: Utilizing local talent and empowering community resources is the key to solving the problem. Government assistance is helpful, but we need strategic planning to face the issue, head-on.

Jobs & Business Growth: Visalia is a special place. Part of what makes it special is the quality, family-owned businesses. If want job growth, we must support family operations.

Steven Nelsen (Incumbent): I sought this position to help provide leadership and tangible benefits for not only the district but the city as a whole. I will continue to strive for a balance budget, sustain our police and fire departments. I advocated for the inclusive park to be built, so everyone has the opportunity to build relationship that benefit the city, such as I did with Caltrans and the 198 corridor litter removal and Dump on Us Days. There's more to be done, I am responsive to the issues brought forth, I will continue to work the constituents priorities and together we can contribute to make Visalia the jewel of the Valley. 

Related: Top 3 takeaways from Tulare's informational forum on cannabis, homelessness and roads

Steve Nelsen is Visalia's next mayor. He succeeds Bob Link, who retired from the council after 21 years of public service. © Joshua Yeager Steve Nelsen is Visalia's next mayor. He succeeds Bob Link, who retired from the council after 21 years of public service.

This article originally appeared on Visalia Times-Delta: Election 2022: What would Visalia City Council candidates do if elected?

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 01:00:22 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/election-2022-what-would-visalia-city-council-candidates-do-if-elected/ar-AA133BoZ
Killexams : Navy SEAL candidate died of pneumonia after training exercise, report says A Navy SEAL candidate died of acute pneumonia, with an enlarged heart as a contributing factor, hours after completing the elite force's punishing Hell Week training, according to a Navy report on the sailor's death. Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy © U.S. Navy A Navy SEAL candidate died of acute pneumonia, with an enlarged heart as a contributing factor, hours after completing the elite force's punishing Hell Week training, according to a Navy report on the sailor's death. Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy

Oct. 12 (UPI) -- A Navy SEAL candidate died of acute pneumonia, with an enlarged heart as a contributing factor, hours after completing the elite force's punishing Hell Week training, according to a Navy report on the sailor's death.

The report found that Kyle Mullen, who was training at Navy Amphibious Base Cornoado in California in February, died in the line of duty and not due to his own misconduct.

"Our deepest sympathy extends to Seaman Mullen's family and friends during this difficult time," said the commander of the Naval Special Warfare Command, Rear Adm. Keith Davids said.

Mullen's death has resulted in changes to the Navy's leadership. According to The New York Times, the Navy took administrative action against the top two officers at the SEAL training base in Coronado, as well as the doctor in charge of medical care there.

Medical staff members told Navy criminal investigators that Mullen had died a after brief medical exam that found no issues.

Other SEAL candidates said Mullen was wheezing and coughing up large amounts of brown fluid. One student said that he tried to take Mullen to get help, but an instructor told him to turn around and go back to training.

By the last day of Hell Week, Mullen's body was was so swollen that one sailor said he looked "like the Michelin Man." The oxygen in his blood had reached dangerously low levels.

Mullen died a few hours later.

"Kyle's death will not be in vain." Davids said. "We have a moral obligation to learn everything we can from Kyle's tragic death so that we can ensure the safety of all future candidates."

 

Read More

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 07:23:10 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/navy-seal-candidate-died-of-pneumonia-after-training-exercise-report-says/ar-AA12SNFy
Killexams : Gruesome Details Released in Death of 24-Year-Old Navy SEAL Trainee Who Died Just Hours After Training

In February, Navy Seaman Kyle Mullen died from cardiac arrest and acute pneumonia during SEAL training. He had just completed what is known as Hell Week, one of the most grueling parts of the program.

A new report with more details about Mullen’s death was released on Wednesday, the New York Times reported.

Naval Special Warfare had ordered the report to determine whether Mullen, 24, had died while performing his naval duties. The report concluded that he had.

The report also said that Mullen’s heart was found to be enlarged more than two times the size of a normal male’s heart. This played a role in his death as well, the New York Post reported.

In the months since Mullen’s death, three officers were reprimanded — but not blamed or fired. That’s not good enough for Mullen’s mother, the Post reported.

“I don’t understand how, eight months later, no one has been held accountable,” Mullen’s mother, Regina Mullen, told the Asbury Park Press.

“I told them, they killed a good man. He would have gone out on the battlefield and protected anybody. Now they’re not protecting his reputation, and that concerns me,” she added.

Regina Mullen met Tuesday with Navy officials who told her that her son’s death occurred in “the line of duty,” she told the Press.

“Which means there’s no misconduct on his part,” she added.

Do you think that there should be a deeper investigation into this death?

Yes: 88% (7 Votes)

No: 12% (1 Votes)

“I told them, ‘You already killed my son, you don’t need to tarnish his character,’” Regina said.

With investigations into the 24-year-old Mullen’s death, five other SEAL candidates reportedly told investigators that Mullen had been having breathing problems long before his death, the Times reported.

One other candidate said that he had taken Mullen to get medical aid part way through Hell Week, but an instructor told Mullen to return to training.

According to the report, other members of the training told investigators that Mullen was swollen up “like the Michelin Man” and incoherent.

The report also found that Mullen’s blood oxygen level had dropped and medical staff had to provide him supplemental oxygen, the Times reported.

A few hours after the end of Hell Week, Mullen succumbed to cardiac problems and pneumonia and died.

Mullen’s death has raised questions and concerns related to how the Navy conducts its SEAL training, the Times reported.

The training, commonly known as “BUD/S” (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training) has been criticized for perhaps being abusive and not giving candidates proper medical care, the Times reported.

In light of this, Navy commanders have ordered yet another investigation to look into the training and selection course itself, the Times reported.

That report is expected to come out later this fall.

This article appeared originally on The Western Journal.

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 06:21:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://ijr.com/gruesome-details-released-death-24-year-old-navy-seal-trainee-died/
Killexams : Navy SEAL candidate died of bacterial pneumonia hours after training exercise, investigation finds

Navy SEAL candidate Kyle Mullen, 24, died of bacterial pneumonia in the hours after completing what is known as "Hell Week" during the special operations force's demanding basic training program in February, a Navy line of duty investigation released Wednesday found.Navy investigators concluded Mullen died in the "line of duty, not due to his own misconduct," a press release from Naval Special Warfare Command Public Affairs said.Mullen's death has sparked criticism of the Navy SEAL's intense Hell Week training program. There have been 10 Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) (the formal name for the program) training-related deaths since 1953, according to the Navy.The over 300-page investigation explains the cause of Mullen's death, the events leading up to his death in the final hours of the Hell Week training program, and possible signs that were missed between medical caregivers and observers. The Navy has adopted some process changes since Mullen's death as a result.Administrative actions have been taken against the former Commanding Officer of Basic Training Command, Capt. Bradley Geary, the Commander of Naval Special Warfare Center, Capt. Brian Drechsler and senior medical staff under their command, the Navy said. An administrative action is a typically in the form of a letter to the service member instructing them on correcting deficient performance. It does not always lead to the end of a career.Those administrative actions "will be reviewed during the" separate investigation directed by senior Navy leaders and led by Naval Education and Training Command that has not been completed or released yet, the Navy said. This separate investigation would likely be the vehicle for any future accountability actions if found to be warranted, a US military official said.A turn in the last 24 hoursMullen was coughing up what fellow classmates described as "phlegm," "mucus," and "dark-colored fluid" on the second to last day and final morning of Hell Week, according to interviews included in the Navy's investigation.Hell Week is a five-day intense training exercise designed to "expose candidates to extreme stress in a controlled environment," according to a Hell Week Validation Report included in the investigation. Hell Week is one part of a 56-week training program candidates must complete to become Navy SEALs.During the five-day exercise, candidates are "only allotted two 2-hour sleep periods," an interview included in the investigation said."To the students it seems like chaos, intentionally so," an interview included in the investigation said. "It replicates the confusion and conditions in the field during war."Candidates participating in Hell Week are medically evaluated daily by a member of Naval Special Warfare Center Medical to determine if they are able to continue training. During training, Basic Training Command medical staff are in the field with candidates and instructors to respond to any medical emergencies or issues.While a follow-up between Basic Training Command staff and Naval Special Warfare Center Medical was not "typical or standardized" before Mullen's death, "it is now," a Naval Special Warfare Center Medical doctor said in an interview included in the investigation.Mullen appeared in good health and was completing the training successfully, according to multiple interviews from fellow classmates, instructors and medical staff included in the investigation, until Thursday, Feb. 3, the second to last day of the training.Several fellow classmates interviewed said they observed Mullen coughing up fluid on Thursday. One fellow classmate described the fluid as "dark-colored," another described Mullen was "spitting up orange stuff" and noted he had a "very deep" cough, interviews in the investigation said. A Basic Training Command staff member treated Mullen for knee pain on Thursday, but no breathing issues were mentioned, the member said in an interview.On the morning of Feb. 4, hours away from completing the training, Mullen "self-reported for breathing issues," a Basic Training Command staff member said. Mullen was given oxygen twice the morning of February 4, once at 6:53 a.m. and once at 8:16 a.m., according to the 24-hour Hell Week medical observation log included in the investigation."There is no written policy requiring Naval Special Warfare Center Medical be contacted if a student is being treated with oxygen," a Basic Training Command staff member said in an interview included in the investigation.Center Medical "should have known" Mullen was put on oxygen that morning, a Naval Special Warfare Center Medical doctor interviewed for the investigation said. "It may have warranted a chest X-ray," the doctor said.Mullen returned to training between those two instances of receiving oxygen. After receiving oxygen the second time, Mullen was transported to the location where the rest of the candidates were completing Hell Week by ambulance, a paramedic who treated Mullen from Basic Training Command that morning said.Mullen completed and passed the medical check from Naval Special Warfare Center Medical after he finished Hell Week. He was moved from the classroom where he was briefed with his fellow classmates to the barracks in a wheelchair due to the extreme swelling he was experiencing, multiple interviews included in the investigation said.One of his fellow classmates described Mullen as "looking like the 'Michelin Man' because he was super puffed up at the final medical check," an interview included in the investigation said.A fellow classmate of Mullen's said that while Mullen completed the medical check successfully, he was "still coughing up fluid when he got to the classroom," where they were all briefed after completing training.Another classmate observed Mullen sitting in the classroom with a Gatorade bottle "between his legs spitting bloody mucus inside of it," an interview included in the investigation said.Ten classmates who completed the Hell Week training with Mullen noticed him coughing up mucus and discolored fluid from Thursday to Friday morning when the training was complete, according to interviews included in the report.Training complete, still sufferingAfter completing the training, Mullen returned to the barracks to rest with his fellow classmates. He was observed by candidates awaiting training students at the command, or CATS, assigned to watch over the candidates and assist them in recovery. They are not medically trained.One of the people assisting with watching over the candidates said he "could tell Mullen was going to need constant watch and assistance due to his observation that Mullen appeared to be coughing and spitting up blood into a Gatorade bottle," an interview with the person said.One of the observers called the duty medical officer at 2:35 p.m. on February 4, per the protocol outlined at the end of Hell Week, saying Mullen was "unable to eat without vomiting and was coughing and spitting up fluids," the investigation states. The duty medical officer advised the person to call 911.Candidates are not encouraged to call 911 after completing training, because "from the perspective of medical staff and candidates, outside medical staff are not familiar with the physical effects of the extreme training candidates undergo," the investigation said. If candidates go to the hospital and are misdiagnosed or diagnosed with something that disqualifies them, they are at risk of being medically disqualified from training.On a copy of the post-Hell Week student brief included in the investigation, No. 11 states, "DO NOT go and see other/outside medical providers. We will see you at any time (If it is a true emergency call 911)... IF YOU GO AND SEE OTHER MEDICAL PERSONNEL WHO DO NOT UNDERSTAND HELL WEEK, THEY MAY ADMIT YOU TO THE HOSPITAL OR provide YOU MEDICINES THAT ARE NOT COMPATIBLE WITH TRAINING."One of the observers taking care of Mullen "recalled someone relayed it was Mullen's choice to go to medical. Mullen told" two people "no he did not want to go to medical," an interview with one of the observers included in the investigation said.Mullen's condition continued to deteriorate. Between 3:50 p.m. and 4:09 p.m., "Mullen was seen 'gasping for air' and appeared to be 'super swollen' or 'bloated,' with blueish colored skin and fluids coming out of his mouth," the findings of facts in the investigation said.At 4:03 p.m., the officer-in-charge called the duty medical officer again who told him to call 911. The federal fire department received a call at 4:09 p.m. and arrived 15 minutes later. Mullen was unresponsive at the time they arrived, the investigation said.Mullen stopped breathing five minutes before Emergency Medical Services showed up, one of the people observing him said in an interview.Mullen was then transported to the nearest hospital and was declared dead at 5:35 p.m.ChangesSince Mullen's death, the Navy has adopted several changes including adding advanced cardiology screening for Navy SEAL candidates, including proactive pneumonia prevention training by giving candidates an injection of Bicillin ahead of BUD/S and extending medical personnel to observe candidates who have completed the training for 24 hours after Hell Week ends, according to the Navy.There is also now a "mandatory, formal shift turnover" between Basic Training Command Medical and NSW Central Medical to "discuss the medical status of candidates," the Navy said.No changes to the Hell Week training itself have been implemented.While no drugs were found in Mullen's system according to the autopsy, Mullen's death has sparked concern around candidates' use of performance enhancing drugs to push themselves physically in the program.One of the changes the Navy has adopted since Mullen's death is including "medically safe-to-train" PED testing "through urine tests" for candidates, the Navy said. The Navy is also working on an "exception to policy" to expand the authority to test candidates for PEDs in order to help in "understanding the scope of PED use within the force and counter unauthorized PED use," the Navy added.Rear Admiral Keith Davids, the Commander of Naval Special Warfare Command which oversees the SEALs and their training, sent a memo to his command on Oct. 4 after news articles about Mullen's death and other issues within the SEALs were published, reminding everyone in the command to "create a culture of accountability." CNN obtained a copy of the memo."We must continually self-assess and self-correct so that we identify problems before they grow into larger, systemic issues. I expect everyone in our community to create a culture of accountability and to assess and use the tools at your disposal to maintain good order, discipline and mission success," the memo states.

Navy SEAL candidate Kyle Mullen, 24, died of bacterial pneumonia in the hours after completing what is known as "Hell Week" during the special operations force's demanding basic training program in February, a Navy line of duty investigation released Wednesday found.

Navy investigators concluded Mullen died in the "line of duty, not due to his own misconduct," a press release from Naval Special Warfare Command Public Affairs said.

Mullen's death has sparked criticism of the Navy SEAL's intense Hell Week training program. There have been 10 Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) (the formal name for the program) training-related deaths since 1953, according to the Navy.

The over 300-page investigation explains the cause of Mullen's death, the events leading up to his death in the final hours of the Hell Week training program, and possible signs that were missed between medical caregivers and observers. The Navy has adopted some process changes since Mullen's death as a result.

Administrative actions have been taken against the former Commanding Officer of Basic Training Command, Capt. Bradley Geary, the Commander of Naval Special Warfare Center, Capt. Brian Drechsler and senior medical staff under their command, the Navy said. An administrative action is a typically in the form of a letter to the service member instructing them on correcting deficient performance. It does not always lead to the end of a career.

Those administrative actions "will be reviewed during the" separate investigation directed by senior Navy leaders and led by Naval Education and Training Command that has not been completed or released yet, the Navy said. This separate investigation would likely be the vehicle for any future accountability actions if found to be warranted, a US military official said.

A turn in the last 24 hours

Mullen was coughing up what fellow classmates described as "phlegm," "mucus," and "dark-colored fluid" on the second to last day and final morning of Hell Week, according to interviews included in the Navy's investigation.

Hell Week is a five-day intense training exercise designed to "expose candidates to extreme stress in a controlled environment," according to a Hell Week Validation Report included in the investigation. Hell Week is one part of a 56-week training program candidates must complete to become Navy SEALs.

During the five-day exercise, candidates are "only allotted two 2-hour sleep periods," an interview included in the investigation said.

"To the students it seems like chaos, intentionally so," an interview included in the investigation said. "It replicates the confusion and conditions in the field during war."

Candidates participating in Hell Week are medically evaluated daily by a member of Naval Special Warfare Center Medical to determine if they are able to continue training. During training, Basic Training Command medical staff are in the field with candidates and instructors to respond to any medical emergencies or issues.

While a follow-up between Basic Training Command staff and Naval Special Warfare Center Medical was not "typical or standardized" before Mullen's death, "it is now," a Naval Special Warfare Center Medical doctor said in an interview included in the investigation.

Mullen appeared in good health and was completing the training successfully, according to multiple interviews from fellow classmates, instructors and medical staff included in the investigation, until Thursday, Feb. 3, the second to last day of the training.

Several fellow classmates interviewed said they observed Mullen coughing up fluid on Thursday. One fellow classmate described the fluid as "dark-colored," another described Mullen was "spitting up orange stuff" and noted he had a "very deep" cough, interviews in the investigation said. A Basic Training Command staff member treated Mullen for knee pain on Thursday, but no breathing issues were mentioned, the member said in an interview.

On the morning of Feb. 4, hours away from completing the training, Mullen "self-reported for breathing issues," a Basic Training Command staff member said. Mullen was given oxygen twice the morning of February 4, once at 6:53 a.m. and once at 8:16 a.m., according to the 24-hour Hell Week medical observation log included in the investigation.

"There is no written policy requiring Naval Special Warfare Center Medical be contacted if a student is being treated with oxygen," a Basic Training Command staff member said in an interview included in the investigation.

Center Medical "should have known" Mullen was put on oxygen that morning, a Naval Special Warfare Center Medical doctor interviewed for the investigation said. "It may have warranted a chest X-ray," the doctor said.

Mullen returned to training between those two instances of receiving oxygen. After receiving oxygen the second time, Mullen was transported to the location where the rest of the candidates were completing Hell Week by ambulance, a paramedic who treated Mullen from Basic Training Command that morning said.

Mullen completed and passed the medical check from Naval Special Warfare Center Medical after he finished Hell Week. He was moved from the classroom where he was briefed with his fellow classmates to the barracks in a wheelchair due to the extreme swelling he was experiencing, multiple interviews included in the investigation said.

One of his fellow classmates described Mullen as "looking like the 'Michelin Man' because he was super puffed up at the final medical check," an interview included in the investigation said.

A fellow classmate of Mullen's said that while Mullen completed the medical check successfully, he was "still coughing up fluid when he got to the classroom," where they were all briefed after completing training.

Another classmate observed Mullen sitting in the classroom with a Gatorade bottle "between his legs spitting bloody mucus inside of it," an interview included in the investigation said.

Ten classmates who completed the Hell Week training with Mullen noticed him coughing up mucus and discolored fluid from Thursday to Friday morning when the training was complete, according to interviews included in the report.

Training complete, still suffering

After completing the training, Mullen returned to the barracks to rest with his fellow classmates. He was observed by candidates awaiting training students at the command, or CATS, assigned to watch over the candidates and assist them in recovery. They are not medically trained.

One of the people assisting with watching over the candidates said he "could tell Mullen was going to need constant watch and assistance due to his observation that Mullen appeared to be coughing and spitting up blood into a Gatorade bottle," an interview with the person said.

One of the observers called the duty medical officer at 2:35 p.m. on February 4, per the protocol outlined at the end of Hell Week, saying Mullen was "unable to eat without vomiting and was coughing and spitting up fluids," the investigation states. The duty medical officer advised the person to call 911.

Candidates are not encouraged to call 911 after completing training, because "from the perspective of medical staff and candidates, outside medical staff are not familiar with the physical effects of the extreme training candidates undergo," the investigation said. If candidates go to the hospital and are misdiagnosed or diagnosed with something that disqualifies them, they are at risk of being medically disqualified from training.

On a copy of the post-Hell Week student brief included in the investigation, No. 11 states, "DO NOT go and see other/outside medical providers. We will see you at any time (If it is a true emergency call 911)... IF YOU GO AND SEE OTHER MEDICAL PERSONNEL WHO DO NOT UNDERSTAND HELL WEEK, THEY MAY ADMIT YOU TO THE HOSPITAL OR provide YOU MEDICINES THAT ARE NOT COMPATIBLE WITH TRAINING."

One of the observers taking care of Mullen "recalled someone relayed it was Mullen's choice to go to medical. Mullen told" two people "no he did not want to go to medical," an interview with one of the observers included in the investigation said.

Mullen's condition continued to deteriorate. Between 3:50 p.m. and 4:09 p.m., "Mullen was seen 'gasping for air' and appeared to be 'super swollen' or 'bloated,' with blueish colored skin and fluids coming out of his mouth," the findings of facts in the investigation said.

At 4:03 p.m., the officer-in-charge called the duty medical officer again who told him to call 911. The federal fire department received a call at 4:09 p.m. and arrived 15 minutes later. Mullen was unresponsive at the time they arrived, the investigation said.

Mullen stopped breathing five minutes before Emergency Medical Services showed up, one of the people observing him said in an interview.

Mullen was then transported to the nearest hospital and was declared dead at 5:35 p.m.

Changes

Since Mullen's death, the Navy has adopted several changes including adding advanced cardiology screening for Navy SEAL candidates, including proactive pneumonia prevention training by giving candidates an injection of Bicillin ahead of BUD/S and extending medical personnel to observe candidates who have completed the training for 24 hours after Hell Week ends, according to the Navy.

There is also now a "mandatory, formal shift turnover" between Basic Training Command Medical and NSW Central Medical to "discuss the medical status of candidates," the Navy said.

No changes to the Hell Week training itself have been implemented.

While no drugs were found in Mullen's system according to the autopsy, Mullen's death has sparked concern around candidates' use of performance enhancing drugs to push themselves physically in the program.

One of the changes the Navy has adopted since Mullen's death is including "medically safe-to-train" PED testing "through urine tests" for candidates, the Navy said. The Navy is also working on an "exception to policy" to expand the authority to test candidates for PEDs in order to help in "understanding the scope of PED use within the force and counter unauthorized PED use," the Navy added.

Rear Admiral Keith Davids, the Commander of Naval Special Warfare Command which oversees the SEALs and their training, sent a memo to his command on Oct. 4 after news articles about Mullen's death and other issues within the SEALs were published, reminding everyone in the command to "create a culture of accountability." CNN obtained a copy of the memo.

"We must continually self-assess and self-correct so that we identify problems before they grow into larger, systemic issues. I expect everyone in our community to create a culture of accountability and to assess and use the tools at your disposal to maintain good order, discipline and mission success," the memo states.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 05:45:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wcvb.com/article/navy-seal-candidate-died-bacterial-pneumonia-training-investigation/41598497
Killexams : Two candidates running for Westlake Chief of Police Two candidates running for Westlake Chief of Police © Provided by Lake Charles KPLC Two candidates running for Westlake Chief of Police

Lake Charles, LA (KPLC) - Among the many races taking place on November 8 is Westlake Chief of Police.

Two candidates have thrown their hat into the ring: current chief Chris Wilrye and Michael Perez. Both have several years in law enforcement under their belt.

“I work with the federal government in a federal law enforcement capacity where I was a field training instructor,” Michael Perez said. “I was a firearm instructor doing active threats. I went to school and got certified to teach these types of courses. After that, I had a small [job] with the Astros as a bomb canine instructor. I did that for a little while, until I can back to Westlake. At Westlake, I was in the traffic division and investigations. I was also the training coordinator and field coordinator prior to leaving.”

“I’ve been in law enforcement for 22 years,” Chris Wilrye said. “Born and raised her in Westlake. I started my career here at Westlake PD as a reserve officer in 2001. In 2002, I was able to get hired on as a dispatcher, went to the police academy and eventually went to the road. Left here, went to the sheriff’s office for eight years, and came back here when I got elected.”

7News asked both candidates what their priority would be when taking office.

“The first priority for me is going to be meeting with the individuals that I’ve talked to that I am going to need beside in the department,” Perez said. “The department lacks leadership right now, there is a big gap between the chief and patrol, and I need someone that is going to work beside me as a deputy chief so I can move on and start managing and doing other things in the department for patrol operations and training that is needed.”

Perez said he’d also like to focus on training.

“As a training coordinator when I was at Westlake, I pushed a lot of training,” Perez said. “I tried to provide a lot of training. As an instructor at a federal level, training is just so key, so that is going to be something really important for me to push.”

Wilrye said hiring more officers has been his priority.

“There are only two officers on shift right now,” Wilrye said. “My job as your Chief of Police is to ensure the safety of this town, and the people in it. I’ll be working closely with the council and financial office to allocate more funds for the officers on the streets. I need to get the pay comfortable enough to entice new recruits and people with prior law enforcement or military experience to work for Westlake. When we are given the funds to hire more officers, we will then be able to bring in more training. More training provides officer safety, as well as public safety.”

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 18:56:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/two-candidates-running-for-westlake-chief-of-police/ar-AA12ODi2
Killexams : Three candidates running for sheriff in Scott County

Three candidates are running to be the next Scott County sheriff.If elected to office, the candidates told 40/29 News they would focus on illegal drugs and the effects they have on the community."Because it's everywhere, it's not just Scott County, it's everywhere," said Tim Starr, who is running as an Independent candidate for office. Starr said he has 34 years of law enforcement experience and is currently a deputy in Yell County."We just need good leadership, good training and the best of equipment that we can get for our department. I want to bring professionalism and integrity to the sheriff's department here. I'm a certified law enforcement instructor, a certified Tazer instructor and I believe, being a certified instructor, I can help instruct what we need to better the department," Starr said.Sheriff Randy Shores has been in office for nearly 6 years and is seeking reelection as an Independent candidate."We've got almost 12 pounds of crystal meth off the streets in the last year-and-a-half. I like working for the citizens of Scott County and I believe myself and the deputies are doing a real good job. We've got the sheriff's department, the equipment and training they need," he said.On Friday Sept. 30, Shores was arrested and charged by a special prosecutor with two counts of misdemeanor Third-Degree Battery, in connection to a violent arrest that occurred Feb. 16. Shores previously told 40/29 News he was not able to see the incident in question due to pepper spray being in his eyes.When asked about the incident and how it could affect the upcoming election, Shores said, "It's strictly political. I've done nothing wrong, but I'll have my day in court and we will be found innocent."Clint McPherson is running for office as a Republican. He told 40/29 News he worked as a deputy for the sheriff's department under the previous administration. He currently works for the county road department."Our break-ins have skyrocketed, homes are being broken into, businesses and the last two years have been a lot for the people in the area to endure. There are things we need to do differently, new areas we need to look at for funding and just create a new and better working environment for all the law enforcement here and really restore that proactive policing to our county," McPherson said.Currently, the sheriff's department employs eight deputies to patrol more than 900 miles of mostly rural county roads. The Scott County sheriff earns a yearly salary of just more than $52,000. The sheriff serves a four-year term in office. In order to win the race on Nov. 8, a candidate must garner more than 50% of the votes. According to the county clerk's office, there are a little more than 5,000 registered voters in Scott County.

Three candidates are running to be the next Scott County sheriff.

If elected to office, the candidates told 40/29 News they would focus on illegal drugs and the effects they have on the community.

"Because it's everywhere, it's not just Scott County, it's everywhere," said Tim Starr, who is running as an Independent candidate for office. Starr said he has 34 years of law enforcement experience and is currently a deputy in Yell County.

"We just need good leadership, good training and the best of equipment that we can get for our department. I want to bring professionalism and integrity to the sheriff's department here. I'm a certified law enforcement instructor, a certified Tazer instructor and I believe, being a certified instructor, I can help instruct what we need to better the department," Starr said.

Sheriff Randy Shores has been in office for nearly 6 years and is seeking reelection as an Independent candidate.

"We've got almost 12 pounds of crystal meth off the streets in the last year-and-a-half. I like working for the citizens of Scott County and I believe myself and the deputies are doing a real good job. We've got the sheriff's department, the equipment and training they need," he said.

On Friday Sept. 30, Shores was arrested and charged by a special prosecutor with two counts of misdemeanor Third-Degree Battery, in connection to a violent arrest that occurred Feb. 16. Shores previously told 40/29 News he was not able to see the incident in question due to pepper spray being in his eyes.

When asked about the incident and how it could affect the upcoming election, Shores said, "It's strictly political. I've done nothing wrong, but I'll have my day in court and we will be found innocent."

Clint McPherson is running for office as a Republican. He told 40/29 News he worked as a deputy for the sheriff's department under the previous administration. He currently works for the county road department.

"Our break-ins have skyrocketed, homes are being broken into, businesses and the last two years have been a lot for the people in the area to endure. There are things we need to do differently, new areas we need to look at for funding and just create a new and better working environment for all the law enforcement here and really restore that proactive policing to our county," McPherson said.

Currently, the sheriff's department employs eight deputies to patrol more than 900 miles of mostly rural county roads. The Scott County sheriff earns a yearly salary of just more than $52,000. The sheriff serves a four-year term in office. In order to win the race on Nov. 8, a candidate must garner more than 50% of the votes. According to the county clerk's office, there are a little more than 5,000 registered voters in Scott County.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 12:47:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.4029tv.com/article/three-candidates-running-for-sheriff-in-scott-county/41522944
Killexams : CircEsteem opens enrollment for their Social Circus Instructor Training program

When most employees speak of “juggling” tasks or “jumping through hoops” at their place of employment, they’re speaking metaphorically, but for future participants in CircEsteem’s Social Circus Instructor Training program, it’s literally part of the job.

Founded in 2001, the Uptown-based non-profit organization uses circus arts as a tool to foster connection, creativity, and self-esteem. With a focus on underserved communities, CircEsteem provides imaginative, transformative programming for thousands of Chicago youth ages 3-19, including workshops, summer camps, and the Chicago Youth Circus (which is held on Saturdays in Uptown and Humboldt Park). Scholarships and a sliding financial aid scale are available so that no child is turned away due to financial hardship. “We strongly believe that every child should be able to play with their peers, learn through play, and try new things,” says CircEsteem’s Director of Community Outreach, Patty Aikonedo. “We never want money to prevent such experiences.”

CircEsteem is currently growing a like-minded staff by rolling out a new, paid program to train future teaching artists in circus arts with a focus on social emotional learning. The Social Circus Instructor Training program is six-months long and consists of three parts: physical training that introduces several circus art skills, teaching skills centered on social emotional learning, and observation and integration within CircEsteem’s city-wide after-school programs. The organization is currently accepting applications, and BIPOC candidates are strongly encouraged to apply. For full consideration, participants must be Chicago residents and plan to continue working with CircEsteem after completion of the program.

CircEsteem’s enriching programming includes partnerships with several Chicago Public Schools (CPS) throughout the city, bringing their playful energy straight to students’ classrooms, aged 8 to 16 years old. Through their free Homework & CircusWork after-school program, they provide an environment of academics and play throughout the week for CPS students.