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Exam Code: E20-365 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
Network Storage - NS Implementation
EMC Implementation history
Killexams : EMC Implementation history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-365 Search results Killexams : EMC Implementation history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/E20-365 https://killexams.com/exam_list/EMC Killexams : A First time right design methodology for successful development of automotive SoC products

By Haridas Vilakathara, NXP Semiconductors

Abstract

This paper describes the methodology employed during the development of a System on Chip (SoC) platform developed for automotive applications. The methodology is based on the following major aspects.

  • Requirement driven development approach based on reusable IP core as the base for SoC integration and development
  • Functional coverage based verification approach providing 100% coverage to requirements
  • FMEA based risk identification and tracking approach.
DEVELOPMENT METHODOLOGY

In a typical SoC project keeping track of different requirement and the relationship between them is a difficult task. DO-254, Design Assurance Guidance for Airborne Electronic Hardware [1], provides guidance for design assurance across the hardware project life cycle starting from requirement capture to product transition.

Figure[1] show a DO-254 based hardware life cycle adapted to meet a typical SoC hardware design process. The key item of the life cycle is the central planning and control function along with a concurrent process support functions based on the following aspects.

  • An effective planning process defining clear milestones within the project execution life cycle.
  • Requirement driven development flow, wherein requirement management and traceability across work product is considered as key to project success.
  • An FMEA based product risk assessment starting from early concept phase itself, and continues evaluation of the FMEA items and process.
  • A concurrent supporting process to ensure process and product assurance along with 100% forward and backward traceability to the requirement process.

Figure 1 : Development methodology

The following are the major attributes of the hardware life cycle followed.

PLANNING PROCESS

Figure 2 : Project gates

An effective planning process can define a number of gates/milestones, which divide the project up into manageable project phases. Within these project phases activities will be planed to generate a number of deliveries. Each of these deliveries will have their own maturity. It is related to the type of delivery, i.e document, design, hardware, software, etc. based on the maturity model is applied. The longer implementation phase is further sub divided into different phases based on product maturity expectations. At the end of each planned phases, formal reviews and audits are conducted to make sure that the expected process compliance and product level maturity are in place.

Development phase Remarks
Pyrite Identify the key IP’s component and their sources. Risk assessment
Bronze Early prototype state. Freeze the top level and component level interfaces. All individual IP’s are Silver quality
Silver Freeze all IP’s. Basic functional verification OK. All IP’s are of gold quality
Gold RTL freeze. Functional coverage 100 %
Diamond Only ECO changes

FMEA BASED PRODUCT RISK ASSESSMENT

Figure 3 : FMEA process and feedback loop

FMEA is considered as an efficient tool in assessing the product level risk, starting at an early phase of the product development life cycle, and carried throughout the product life cycle and on a continuous evaluation basis. One of the critical aspects of the FMEA flow is the organizational level feedback loop, wherein the inputs are taken from organizational level quality history of similar products, and the FMEA findings are fed back to the quality history repository for future projects. The quality history consists of lessons learned in previous projects, field failure reports, benchmarking reports, and expert opinions etc. The FMEA flow and feedback mechanism is shown in figure[3].The red lines on the left side of the picture indicates the feedback loop at the project level and the red lines at right indicates the organizational level feedback. FMEA validation is a key aspect at the organizational level, where in the effectiveness of FMEA is assessed through product field failure reports.

Within the project the FMEA is conducted at three levels. We will be discussing the first two FMEA items in this paper. The semiconductor manufacturing itself is considered as a matured process, and if not the Semiconductor fabrication house along with process flow validation team will be qualifying the process through various test chip programs. Hence not considered within the scope of the project.

FMEA Scope Remarks
Concept level Focuses on potential failure modes associated with the proposed functions or a concept proposal
Design level Focuses on potential failure modes of products caused by design deficiencies
Semiconductor Process level Focuses on potential failure modes of the semiconductor process that are caused by manufacturing or assembly process deficiencies
Table 1 : FMEA levels

Concept phase: The primary strategy is to focus on ensuring right information at the conceptual design stage and then preserving the information integrity as we proceed through detailed design and implementation stage. We found that an early concept level FMEA is a good mechanism to critically evaluate the requirements itself and to validate the concept against the system constraints. Focus is on the interaction between systems at concept level and identifies potential failure modes caused by interactions. This can used to analyze concepts in the early stages before hardware is defined. The following are the benefits of doing an evaluation at an early stage.

  • Helps in selecting the optimum concept alternatives, or determine changes to design specifications.
  • It also can identify system level testing requirements.
  • Helps in determining hardware redundancy and fault tolerance requirements based on failure modes and effects.
  • Helps to select the optimum concept alternatives, or determine changes to System Design Specifications (SDS).

Figure 4 : Concept FMEA

The following are the outputs of the concept level FMEA that may influences the system level decisions

  • A list of potential concept level Failure modes and causes.
  • A list of actions (and to track) to eliminate the causes of Failure Modes, or reduce their rate of occurrence.
  • Decision on redundancy management (if required).
  • Specific operating parameters and boundaries as key specifications in the design phase.
  • New test methods or recommendations for new generic testing.
  • Decision on which concept to pursue.

Design phase: Here again apart from the standard design practices, clear attention is given on doing a design level FMEA based approach in identifying the weak spots in the design. The focus is on identifying potential failure modes of products caused by design deficiencies and the mission profile/boundary conditions of the design. The following are the generic guidelines followed in conducting the design level FMEA.

  • Analysis based hardware functions, interfaces or a combination
  • HW-SW interfaces can be covered in a separate Software FMEA.
  • Consider environmental conditions and its impact on design (EMI/EMC, ESD, Single event upset etc.)
  • An identified failure mode may provide additional information to help plan thorough an efficient verification and validation programs.
  • It also establishes a priority system for design improvements, provides an open issue format for recommending and tracking risk reducing actions and future reference to aid in analyzing field concerns.

Figure 5 : Design FMEA

The following are the benefits of the design level FMEA that can also influences the design decisions

  • Aiding in the objective evaluation of design, including functional requirements and design alternatives.
  • Evaluating the initial design against non functional requirements (example environmental conditions such as ESD, EMI/EMC etc.)
  • Providing additional information to aid in the planning of thorough and efficient design, development, and validation programs.
  • Developing a ranked list of potential Failure Modes according to their effect on the "customer," there by establishing a priority system for design improvements, development and validation and analysis.
  • Identify Implementation/verification priorities.
  • Providing an open issue format for recommending and tracking risk reducing actions by linking FMEA results CR/PR, Risk register etc.
  • Providing future reference, e.g., lessons learned, to aid in analyzing field concerns, evaluating design changes and developing advanced designs.
  • Additional information to validate the system specification and V&V plan by linking FMEA items to V&V plan and to requirement management process.

The following are the valuable outputs from a design FMEA process.

  • A list of potential product Failure Modes and Causes.
  • A list of critical Characteristics of the system to help in design priority setting
  • A list of recommended actions for reducing severity, eliminating the causes of product failure modes or reducing their rate of Occurrence, or improving Detection.
  • Feedback of design changes to the design community

Inputs for FMEA: A critical issues we found is on how do we start an FMEA process. We found the following to be ass generic guidelines to get the right information on table to conduct an effective FMEA process.

  • Review specifications such as the statement of work (SOW) and the system requirement document (SRD), System configurations, designs, specifications, and operating procedures, Interface information and functional descriptions.
  • Analyze above with respect to key requirements
  • Compile information on earlier/similar designs from in-house/customer users such as data flow diagrams and reliability performance data from the company's failure reporting, analysis and corrective action system
  • Collect data by interviewing: architecture, design, verification, customer, IP suppliers and outside experts to gather as much information as possible
  • Create boundary condition diagram at system level (for Concept FMEA) and functional block diagram for Design FMEA
  • Identify the sensitive areas in SoC. It is easy to start if the SRS/HRS specify safety requirements (can be based on IEC61508), If not start with a generic way, such as finding a sensible zone (a sensible zone is one of the elementary failure points of the SoC in which one or more faults converge to lead a failure). Valid definitions of sensible zones are, HW–SW interface, Memory elements, Critical inputs and outputs, Critical nets such as Clock, Complex IP/subsystems, and other key observation points

REQUIREMENT MANAGEMENT

There are two important aspects in a requirement driven product development flow.

  • There must be a formal agreement with the system development process to asses and evaluate the underlying hardware requirements, and a mechanism to validate them
  • There must be an effective mechanism to track the requirement throughout the product development phase to various design and verification items.

Automation and tool support is crucial to avert any trivial human errors introduced through manual control and management of requirements. In this project we used commercial requirement management software from Telelogic named “DOORS”. The following are the critical aspects of requirement management that can be easily managed through such tool based requirement management.

Attribute Remarks
Valid Can map to either a customer requirement or to a organizational level guidelines
Traceable Lower level requirements are derived from high-level ones, and to a design verification item
Complete No user requirements are omitted
Consistent No conflicting requirements
Relevant No inefficient use of resources
Unambiguous Less likely to lead to misunderstanding

Table 2 : Key requirement attributes

By organizing the requirements through a formal process we are making sure that, we have only one source for to capture and mange requirements, thereby enabling easy traceability across work product. Further to this the following aspects of product quality assurance can be easily established through the following.

  • Requirement traceability across work products (Forward and backward traceability between architecture – design – verification).
  • Formal review and audit process across work products, making sure that the requirements are correctly mapped to at least one design elements.
  • System level requirements can be allocated to sub modules/IP, and they can be tracked through separate IP projects or can be realized through a proven re-usable IP component.
  • Formal alignment with system/SW requirement process.

DESIGN INTEGRATION

A typical SoC may contain many IP components that get integrated at different hierarchy levels. All these components are to be typically customized (configuration) to meet the architectural requirements. Configurable IP offers a solution to the problem above by allowing the system integrator to set up configuration parameters through a script that configures the block according to the parameters. However to implement such feature in an automated way, the basic configurable architectural intellectual property (IP) blocks are needed in a standardized (Standardized views are required in IP deliveries, documents, and an electronic description of the IP etc. such as IP-XACT view) machine-readable form, so that this can be pushed into an automated design and verification flow. The system integrator can evaluate the IP configurations against the system requirements by quickly integrating the system and evaluating the same. If the design requirements are not met, then different configurations of the IP can be tried. This provides options to the integrator in analyzing the requirements and how it matches with the IP configuration parameters.

Magillem Platform Assembly (MPA) [3] is the standard design environment used in realizing the project that addresses the requirements listed above through extensive utilization of architecture, IP reuse, efficient system integration, hardware-software (HW-SW) co-verification and design flow automation. Since this is based on industry standard (SPIRIT) for design integration and advanced commercial design technologies, MPA helps in correct-by-construction designs and allows rapid development of new systems from platform templates as well as platform derivatives.

One of the key advantage in having automation in an early phase of development is in having an early RTL integration, thereby allowing evaluation against hardware requirement as well having an early prototype platform to validate key Soc level parameters. This also allows us to have quick early iterations of the SoC, and if the iterations are planned properly, this will enable in achieving minimizing overall design time with sufficient product maturity. The following are the few important aspects of design iteration loops

  • Quick early SoC for early trials (bronze phase) to analyze the impact on crucial SoC parameters such as chip area, DFT, power, performance etc.
  • Strict formal releases towards Silver/Gold
  • Promote local iterations in activities such as Coding, verification, synthesis timing closure etc. at smaller blocks (divide and conquer)
  • Promote IP reuse, where ever applicable

One of the important parameter that need to be noted for successful integration is that , we need to make sure that the integrated IP is of right quality and maturity and this can be done through a formal review and audit process called as IP incoming inspection.

  • Do an IP vendor and IP repository assessment
  • Expert team (Architects, SW experts) review on IP configuration, IP Reuse status, and IP maturity status (version, CR/PR database, silicon proven status etc.), standardized views (IP_XACT), interconnect standards, naming, signal convention, clock and reset, global control registers, HIS etc.
  • IP documentation, specially from an IP-SoC integration perspective

VERIFICATION & VALIDATION

In a requirement driven SoC development approach, the hardware design and verification activities need to be done independently. The hardware designer works to ensure the design of the hardware will meet the stated requirements. Similarly, the verification engineer will generate a verification plan which will allow for testing the hardware to verify that it meets all of its derived requirements. The verification process provides assurance that the hardware item implementation meets all of the hardware requirements, including derived requirements. The validation process provides assurance that the hardware item derived requirements is correct and complete with respect to system requirements allocated to the hardware item.

Functional coverage and traceability is the key important aspects of the requirement driven verification and validation flow. Through “DOORS’ we can make sure that each requirement can be mapped to at least one verification and validation items. The V&V activities are also categorized into four sections to have sufficient focus.

Figure 6 : Requirement based V&V

Category Remarks
Functional verification 100% functional coverage at SoC level. Primarily simulation driven.
Reuse of IP level verification item at SoC level
Constraints verification Verify the SoC level constraints (e.g. area, power, timing etc.)
Simulation plus review
Prototype validation Primary vehicle for validating system level requirement at pre-silicon level. Also for HW-SW co verification and validation
Review/Audit Checklist based review at every formal project gate level

Table 3 : verification category

CHANGE REQUEST AND PROBLEM REPORT

Here we may use any standard tools that can support, track, and manage the process. However tools that can report the process status at a regular basis would be preferred. CollabNet TeamForge[4] offer one such tool, and this is what been used in our project. As we can see from the figure, the tool can report history information on the change request and problem report along with process maturity index. This will be helpful in assessing the process/product maturity at various project stages.

Figure 7 : Product maturity index

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT:

One of the important aspects of configuration management is the management of design and verification data throughout the life of the product including design in and customer support. Hence, there is a need for an effective recording and configuration management system. There are several interrelated aspects to configuration management. The primary requirement is a consistent repository of data. This repository contains identification of the design environment, a collection of design artifacts sufficient for consistent replication, and verification data that provides sufficient evidence that the design meets its requirements. Information in this repository needs to be maintained such that controlled changes preserve a consistent set of data.

TOOLS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Tool assessment is an important step to make sure that hardware design and verification perform correctly; those chosen must be, of course, suitability of the tool for their intended tasks and specified so that the process is traceable and repeatable. Apart from this the infrastructure also plays a bigger role in maintaining data integrity and maintainability. An early assessment of the tools used along with periodic planned review and audit is necessary to make sure about the data base integrity and correct transformation of the requirement to the product transition stage. The following are the typical elements that need to be reviewed and assessed within a project.

  • Data base structure
  • Development standards & flows
  • Requirement management tools
  • Configuration management tools and structure
  • CR/PR system and tracking methodology
  • Effective simulation analysis and regression systems
  • Effective problem analysis and debug. For example automation in simulation/synthesis etc.
  • Communication infrastructure between architects, design engineers, & verification engineers
  • Documentation templates, location & traceability to make sure that all the team members get right information at right time
  • Periodic audits (at least at each gate level) on all of the above

DESIGN ASSURANCE

Design assurance is an integral part of all the activities mentioned above. At a formal level the design team along with the quality assurance officer will analyze the following critical aspects at appropriate gate/milestone

  • Formal reviews & audits of all artifacts.
  • IP Vendor & IP quality checklist (IP reuse & IP intake strategy )
  • Technology Library
  • Process Reliability measures
  • Data base (CM, CR/PR, Documentation)
  • Compliance check against requirement specification/Implementation/Verification
  • Verification strategy/methodology review
  • Verification coverage review
  • Explicit SoC constraints review
  • Non functional requirement review (coverage)
  • Layout review

CONCLUSION

A first time right development of any SoC requires a well defined development methodology that can effectively track the requirements, assess the risk at appropriate level and ensure process and product quality assurance across the product life cycle. Right information at right time at all level is the key for first time success

REFERENCE

[1] RTCA, 2000, DO-254: Design Assurance guidance for Airborne Electronic Hardware,
RTCA, Inc., Washington, DC.
[2] Telelogic DOORS. http://www.telelogic.com/products/doorsers/doors/ . http://www-01.ibm.com/software/awdtools/doors/
[3] http://www.magillem.com/
[4] http://www.collab.net/products/teamforge

Tue, 01 Mar 2022 10:17:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.design-reuse.com/articles/31805/design-methodology-automotive-soc-products.html
Killexams : Human Factors Roundtable Part II: Standards Development and Implementation Issues

Medical Device & Diagnostic Industry Magazine
MDDI Article Index

Originally Published February 2001

A little more than one year ago, Americans were shocked to learn that medical errors in U.S. hospitals were responsible for more deaths annually than were highway accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. The significant number of ongoing references in the popular press to the Institute of Medicine's now one-year-old report on medical errors is a clear indication of the impact of the study on the consciousness of the general public. The fact that the study's findings attributed a considerable percentage of errors to product-design problems has also caught the attention of the device industry.

More and more, companies are realizing the importance of creating and following a coherent human factors program with the same diligence they might devote to instituting a Web strategy or preparing for ISO certification. Although it can be difficult to identify clear trends in the design world, there is definite movement toward an earlier and more-intensive consideration of human factors issues in the product development process. As reflected in the discussion that follows, the imminent release of the AAMI human factors standard makes it even more urgent for firms to have a viable human factors program currently underway—if a company's not up to speed now, they're already late.

This feature represents the second part of MD&DI's special human factors roundtable. Part I, entitled "The Regulatory Imperative," appeared in the January 2001 issue.

MD&DI: In the area of standards development, could someone provide us a short history lesson on the AAMI human factors committee standards development efforts, and tell us when we might expect to see these standards published by AAMI?

Weinger: For more than 20 years, there has been a very close relationship between standards-making activities—both national and international—and regulatory activities by FDA. The AAMI human factors guidelines were first approved in 1988, but there was a period of approximately five years of activity prior to that approval. The guidelines were revised over the five-year period after 1988 by a committee that included several members of the present panel. The main changes reflected in the current version—which is designated HE48 1993 and is an AAMI/ANSI standard—are the inclusion of human-computer interaction guidance with regard to designing microprocessor-controlled devices, and the inclusion of a brief description of the human factors engineering process. Beginning in 1996, the committee began deliberating on how to revise the 1993 document, which was still insufficiently specific to medical industry needs and had some gaps because of evolving technology.

However, a larger concern of the post-1996 committee was that the general guidance about how one should design a display, for example, was perhaps less important than a broader approach that would define an optimal human factors design process—especially since this process could vary from device to device. So the committee began work on a separate document that was intended to be a national standard for the human factors design process. That document is currently out for final balloting, and is expected to be approved by July 1, 2001. Over the last year and a half, the committee has concurrently begun a parallel effort to revise and expand the classical "how-to" human factors design guidelines that are in HE48. Our current plan is to do this as a Web site, and in fact we very much need manufacturer support and encouragement to be able to deliver on this opportunity to provide good user interface design guidance.

I should have mentioned earlier that the AAMI human factors committee includes, in almost equal numbers, representatives from industry, clinicians, and others with interest or expertise in human factors and medical device design, including FDA representatives and human factors consultants.

Wiklund: Could you clarify one of the comments you made, which was that the last version of the standard was still considered less than ideal in terms of how well it is suited to medical devices? Perhaps you could retrace the history of why, even after a second revision, it still might not speak to medical devices as effectively as we'd like it to.

Weinger: I think the big problem, frankly, is that especially back in 1993—and even now—we just didn't have a lot of medical device–specific design guidance available. Even though individual device companies have a lot of knowledge and experience (although how much of it was documented is hard to say), this information was not public. The material that was available to the committee prior to the 1993 document consisted primarily of published standards from other domains, especially the military. And so the committee lifted heavily from military design guidance standards, and, together with some material from the NRC and other published design documents, tried to modify them as best they could for the medical industry. However, it was recognized at the time—and certainly since—that some of those modifications were more successful than others. In particular, the human-computer interface sections were not modified sufficiently to address the needs of medical device manufacturers with respect to building real devices, particularly for critical-care applications.

MD&DI: Why did the committee initially focus on design process issues rather than principles of good design? What are the core elements of AAMI's recommended process?

Wiklund: What I can perhaps do is personalize the question. As a consultant, I'm asked from time to time to take a look at a medical device and render a judgment regarding its usability and safety by virtue of the quality of its user interface. Now, that's a really hard job to do. Occasionally there might be some low-lying fruit that you can pick—that is, obvious cosmetic shortcomings in the design, the nature of the labeling, the size of characters in a display, things that you can readily identify by inspection and application of known principles of good design. However, it's generally very difficult to make more overarching judgments about the usability of a device just by looking at it. Moreover, as a designer, you may come up with a design that you think would pass any litmus test in terms of good design practices, but, until you validate it in the context of a usability test, you can't be sure that you have developed a good design.

The AAMI work and FDA's guidance do stress good design processes, because we would all probably agree that such an emphasis represents our best hope for producing a high-quality user interface. As a practical objective, it's difficult to create perfection right off the bat by virtue of outstanding design talent being brought to a task. A more workable objective is to create an iterative process of researching users' needs and preferences, turning those into design goals, developing a design concept that reflects those goals as well as good design practices, then going ahead and modeling a design and having people interact with it and seeing how things go—and then repeating the process. You might liken it to the way you wash your hair: you wet, lather, rinse, and repeat. One could say the same thing about cleansing a medical device design of any kind of human factors shortcoming. The objective is to get end-users involved in the process of expressing their needs and preferences up front, and then evaluating the product by having them put their hands and minds on it and seeing how things go when they try to perform tasks. That's probably the most reliable way of producing a design that will perform well.

Hasler: One of the reasons we really focus on design process issues is that—despite the fact that people often want to just pick up some sort of a generic "cookbook" document and look for the exact "recipe" they want—there's simply too much variation in the user interface of medical devices for an encyclopedic guidance to work. In other words, if we're focusing on a ventilator or an infusion device, we could come up with great guidelines, but when it's a matter of the whole industry, an approach emphasizing good processes is initially the best way to proceed.

MD&DI: What is the status of international efforts to promote human factors in medical device design?

Carstensen: The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is in the process of updating its big document, IEC 60601-1, which covers general requirements for the safety of electromedical equipment. As part of that undertaking, about a year ago they initiated efforts to develop a new collateral standard that, once in place, will become part of IEC 60601-1. Its number is IEC 60601-6; there are five other collateral standards, covering areas such as EMC testing. The first committee draft (CD) is scheduled for distribution to national committees for hearing and comment in February 2001, although the target date for publishing the final document is not until the fall of 2004. That sounds like a long time, but the good news is that, historically, companies will get wind of what's going on and procure copies of the first and second CDs and respond to them. They'll react in anticipation of a standard coming down the track, and derive much of the good effects well before the publication date of 2004.

The international standard—basically an international human factors engineering guideline—is based on the AAMI documents. But the IEC document itself probably doesn't occupy more than about 10 pages, plus an informative annex that tells you how to go about doing the job. That informative annex will be the newly revised AAMI human factors design process standard. The intent is to achieve global harmonization at the outset, as opposed to what we usually do, which is to have an international version of a standard and various domestic standards, and then get together years later and sort of argue about the differences and try to settle on something that is reasonably harmonious. This time, we're making sure it's harmonious from the beginning.

In addition, ISO Technical Committee 210 on quality systems has expressed an interest in joining the IEC working group that's developing the international version of the AAMI standard, so as to put out a joint ISO/IEC version of the standard. What that would do is allow us to expand the scope beyond electromedical devices to include all medical equipment.

MD&DI: Rod, as a human factors specialist working at a large company, what is your view of the new regulations? What are the greatest challenges you face in responding to them? What about cost pressures? Finally, are there differences in the way the regulations affect how you develop products for domestic versus foreign markets?

Hasler: Regarding human factors concerns in the medical device industry, companies can be divided into two camps. The camp I come from recognizes the importance of human factors at least as long ago as the early 1990s. At that time, we implemented a customer-focused process to define an IV infusion system, and quickly discovered that the feature most desired by the customer was ease of use. This drove us to see the importance of hu-man factors practices, and how good human factors could benefit us. So my introduction to human factors was really on the marketing side—how to make better-selling products that are easy for customers to use.

And I think that's probably where you're seeing the companies that jumped into the discipline of human factors early on—they were really utilizing it for the ease of use, and to drive a better product to the customer. Those who didn't recognize that are a little bit behind as far as converting.

I think that most of the larger companies followed this same route, and typically have long-standing human factors programs. Many smaller companies are still in something of a catch-up mode; they're trying to understand exactly what is required and how they can implement it. But I believe that this regulation has a very strong upside for the entire medical device industry—it will really Excellerate the industry as a whole, as far as reducing design errors.

MD&DI: Do you notice any differences in the emphasis on human factors in products destined for the U.S. market versus the overseas market?

Hasler: What you see much less of in Europe is human factors used as part of a marketing strategy or approach. Regarding domestic and foreign markets, however, one of the problems in the device industry is that we tend to develop products that are oriented toward and designed for a specific customer in a specific country, but are then released to other countries with no changes. Whereas even though the real clinical application may remain the same, there are often differences on a country-by-country basis in how the users react to the design and employ the device. So the biggest concern I have on a global front concerns releasing a product that was designed for one market into multiple markets.

MD&DI: How do the new rules affect the marketing of devices that were developed before the human factors regulations were adopted? What happens with products that represent slight modifications to older products that may not have incorporated good human factors design principles?

Wiklund: I'd be happy to answer this question from a consultant's point of view. I think this is going to be a great source of anxiety in the future for those companies that are not getting clear signals as to their vulnerability in terms of selling any product that hasn't benefited from a good human factors design process. Because many companies will be introducing products that represent slight variations of previous versions, one could argue that they should conduct a thorough human factors evaluation of the modified design—which might infer getting customer feedback in the context of usability tests, and so forth. Of course, a company that has marketed a product for a long time—a product that was originally approved by FDA—might ask itself whether it really needs to go through all of that effort after making only minor changes to the product.

Compounding this whole issue is the fact that, once regulations are in place and people become more aware of them, a company that doesn't follow good human factors processes could be accused of not applying due diligence in pursuing state-of-the-art practice. In other words, you raise the possibility of legal liability exposure if a firm fails to follow the new standard. My guess is that companies that carry out minor modifications to existing products will at least want to conduct a usability test to confirm that the new changes are in fact good changes. They'll want to make sure that they haven't inadvertently introduced other kinds of problems, or somehow corrupted the preexisting design in a way that could lead to user error. So at a minimum, I think that companies taking a conservative and careful approach will likely begin doing more usability testing than they would have before these regulations were in place.

Hasler: What I'm seeing in the industry reflects very much what Mike has just described. It can be quite confusing deciding how to handle a product that you've been producing for, say, 20 years once you recognize that a minor feature needs to be changed. According to all previous methods of evaluation, you would have gone ahead and made the change for any additional units sold. Now, however, once you start dealing, for example, with the user interface, you may realize that other aspects of the device may not meet the present standard and may need to be changed. Although a company certainly wants to support its customers, you're now faced with a full-blown project—a whole rework—of something that really isn't the product line you want to move into the future. In short, it is very difficult to understand how the regulations should be applied to older products.

Wed, 22 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.mddionline.com/news/human-factors-roundtable-part-ii-standards-development-and-implementation-issues
Killexams : APTARE IT Analytics Help

This uninstall process assumes that the Data Collector was installed using the standard installation process.

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The uninstaller may not delete the entire Data Collector directory structure. Sometimes new files that were created after the installation are retained along with their parent directories. You may need to manually remove the root install folder (default C:\Program Files\Aptare) and its sub-folders after the uninstaller completes.

Tue, 31 May 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.veritas.com/support/en_US/doc/140578616-147591765-0/pgfId-1020779-147591765
Killexams : 35. Dell Technologies

2018 U.S.-Booked Air Volume: $110 million
2018: Global Air Volume:
$214 million
2018 U.S. T&E:
$397.7 million
2018: Global T&E:
$672 million
Primary U.S. Air Suppliers:
American, United, Delta
Primary U.S. Hotel Suppliers:
Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt
Primary U.S. Car Rental Suppliers:
National, Enterprise
Primary Global Online Booking Tool:
Concur
Primary U.S. Payment Supplier:
American Express
Card Program:
individual bill/central pay
Primary Global Expense Supplier:
Concur
Primary U.S. Travel Risk Management Supplier:
International SOS
Consolidated Global TMC:
Amex GBT

Dell and EMC Corp. Merged in 2016 to become dellemc. The company is now known as Dell Technologies, and the travel programs consolidated in 2018, including the full implementation of American Express Global Business Travel and the SAP Concur booking tool. U.S.-booked air tickets made through approved online tools rose from 90 percent in 2017 to 91 percent in 2018, 93 percent of those getting done without agent assistance. Dell Technologies consolidated its U.S. global distribution system to Sabre last year, as well. EMC had been on Apollo.

Globally, the online adoption rate rose from 85 percent to 87 percent. The company also brought Japan, Chile, Colombia and Peru onto Concur’s online booking tool and expanded Tripbam and Yapta to additional markets. This year, the company plans to bring India, the United Arab Emirates, Israel and New Zealand into the booking tool and bring Sri Lanka and Bangladesh into the travel program in general. The company has a single global travel policy, and 58 percent of its 2018 U.S.-booked air spend was domestic travel. Also in 2018, Dell Technologies plans to implement Tripism, which presents booking options based on a client’s preferred suppliers, specialized supplier offers and peer reviews. It also will implement meetings sourcing platform Groupize, as well as Clear, which helps travelers navigate on-site security checkpoints, and Passport Plus, which expedites U.S. passports and other travel documents. And it plans to switch to dynamic hotel pricing.

The company also intends to automate rebookings via the Tripbam and Yapta reshopping tools: Tripbam will reshop the rates on completed bookings not just at the same hotel but across a cluster of similar properties, and it will rebook automatically when it finds a cheaper rate for a like-for-like room and property. Dell Technologies will configure Yapta to rebook airfares automatically when the rate drops within the original booking’s no-penalty-cancellation window. Dell Technologies’ U.S.-booked air spend dropped $6 million from 2017’s $116 million, and the company expects it to stay at $110 million this year. Its global air volume dropped from $225 million to $214 million. The company’s U.S. T&E dropped 29 percent while its global T&E dropped 4 percent. The company’s 2018 revenue was $78.7 billion.

Thu, 13 Aug 2020 21:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businesstravelnews.com/Corporate-Travel-100/2019/Dell-Technologies
Killexams : Museum launches app to help children get outdoors and connect to nature

The Museum, in partnership with Dell EMC and in association with Intel and Microsoft, today launches Dippy’s Naturenauts, to encourage children to venture outdoors and interact with the natural world.

Designed with the concerns of parents in mind, the new technology means data usage will be limited, the app will work in areas of low internet connectivity and users’ privacy is fully protected.

The educational app has been created to support the Museum’s two-year, UK-wide tour of its iconic Diplodocus dinosaur cast, Dippy on Tour: A Natural History Adventure. The tour aims to instil a passion for nature in children and encourage families to explore green spaces wherever they live - in countryside or urban environments.

Designed for children aged four and above, characters’ Dippy and Fern the fox lead the user through a series of fun exploratory games created to encourage them to interact with the natural world around them. The activities include:

  • A ‘tree safari’, in which children are able to make virtual bark rubbings from different trees by using the cameras on their phones, swiping their fingers across the screen which captures the image which can be annotated with additional observations to build their own digital scrapbook.
  • ‘Feathered friends’ which introduces key features of birds appearances and songs to assist children in the identification of UK native species.
  • ‘Colour hunter’ utilising the devices built in camera to find things in nature, from the sky and rocks to feathers and flowers, that match selected shades and tones on a digital colour chart. This super-accessible activity will inspire children about the many amazing colours that exist in nature all around them.
  • ‘Petal quest’ will guide children to use scientific identification techniques to compare their photographs of flowers to a library in the app and set them on the path of identification.

Children will be encouraged to create their own avatar to personalise the experience. By completing the tasks and challenges throughout the interactive adventure children and families will unlock special Dippy’s Naturenauts badges and fun facts about UK wildlife. As the tasks are completed the players will unlock new pages in a digital storybook that features their avatar and photography alongside Dippy and Fern the fox as they explore the natural world together.

Piers Jones, Chief Product and Digital Officer at the Natural History Museum says, 'Research has consistently outlined the major benefits for children from being outside in nature from improved sleep and mental wellbeing to a natural absorption of vital Vitamin D. - yet more than 90 per cent of the population has been urbanised and the chances of any child visiting a green space having halved in a generation. Studies have also found that if children rarely encounter even common species of plants and animals, they will have low expectations of the natural world, low appreciation of the rich diversity of flora and fauna in the UK - and little support for its conservation.

'For all these reasons, the Museum believes finding new ways to ignite curiosity in and understanding of the natural world has never been more vital. This progressive web app, like Dippy on Tour, will help engage children with the nature on their doorstep and encourage them to explore, discover and want to protect the world around them.'

The progressive web app technology enables ‘app-like’ functionality on a wide variety of devices from smart phones or tablets, through a web browser. Once the browser has loaded the content the app will be fully functional offline allowing the user to limit data usage and use the app in areas where connectivity may be low. The Dippy’s Naturenauts app also takes no data away from the handset, protecting the user’s privacy.

The app has been made possible by the support of Dell EMC.

Claire Vyvyan, Senior Vice President UK&I Commercial, Dell EMC says, 'Dippy’s Naturenauts harnesses the entertainment value of mobile devices which, with the help of parents, enables children to use these devices as a gateway to the natural world. As leaders in technology, it’s our responsibility to inspire young individuals and help them to understand the exciting opportunities that a career in STEM holds; and of course, the power of technology to drive common good and human progress. This app is a great example of how we can encourage engagement with nature, through the power of digital technology.'

Ends

Notes for editors

Media contact:

Tel: +44 (0) 20 7942 5654/+44 (0) 7799 690151

Email: press@nhm.ac.uk

The Natural History Museum exists to inspire a love of the natural world and unlock answers to the big issues facing humanity and the planet. It is a world-leading science research centre, and through its unique collection and unrivalled expertise it is tackling issues such as food security, eradicating diseases and managing resource scarcity. The Natural History Museum is the most visited natural history museum in Europe and the top science attraction in the UK; we welcome more than 4.5 million visitors each year and our website receives over 500,000 unique visitors a month. People come from around the world to enjoy our galleries and events and engage both in-person and online with our science and educational activities through innovative programmes and citizen science projects.

Dippy the Diplodocus skeleton has been to Dorset, the first stop of a UK-wide tour. Until now the dinosaur has never been on public display outside London, but visitors to Dorset County Museum will be able to see him until 7 May. After leaving Dorset, the skeleton will travel to seven other partner venues, ending the tour in Norwich in 2020. It is hoped that the iconic skeleton will encourage families and schools up and down the UK to explore nature on their doorstep. Dippy on Tour is brought to you by the Natural History Museum in partnership with the Garfield Weston Foundation and supported by DELL EMC and Williams and Hill.

Dell EMC, a part of Dell Technologies, enables organizations to modernize, automate and transform their data center using industry-leading converged infrastructure, servers, storage and data protection technologies. This provides a trusted foundation for businesses to transform IT, through the creation of a hybrid cloud, and transform their business through the creation of cloud-native applications and big data solutions. As a supplier of the Natural History Museum, Dell EMC technology has supported the work of its scientists for many years. Through Dippy on Tour, Dell EMC, in association with Intel, Microsoft and the Natural History Museum, have the opportunity to inspire the next generation of scientists and encourage them to engage with the natural world. The digital world has a huge role to play in this, by providing online and mobile technology that allows people to explore the outside world.

Toaster is a digital creative agency with offices in London, Singapore, San Francisco, New Delhi and Jakarta. Their clients include Google, YouTube, Android, Evernote, Novartis and Toyota. Toaster provides everything from the early stages of strategic brand and comms planning, through to creative concepting, design, and full implementation of digital-first campaigns, experiences, and products. No matter how far along the digital journey clients are; Toaster helps them to experiment, learn, launch and iterate new ways to create meaningful connections and relationships with their audiences.

The Garfield Weston Foundation is celebrating its 60th anniversary in 2018, the Garfield Weston Foundation is a family-founded charitable grant-making foundation which supports causes across the UK with grants totalling over £60million each year. 2018 also marks its £1billionth donation since it was established. One of the largest and most respected charitable institutions in the UK, the Weston Family Trustees are descendants of the founder and they take a highly active and hands-on approach. The Foundation’s funding comes from an endowment of shares in the family business which includes Twinings, Primark, Kingsmill (all part of Associated British Foods Plc) and Fortnum & Mason amongst others - a successful model that still endures today; as the businesses have grown so too have the charitable donations. From small community organisations to large national institutions, the Foundation supports a broad range of charities and activities that make a positive impact in the communities in which they work. Over 1,500 charities across the UK benefit each year from the Foundation’s grants.

Williams & Hill have built up a reputation for excellence by firmly establishing themselves as the leading ‘Specialised Transporter of Fine Art, Antiques, Design Furniture and Decorative Objects’. With a highly experienced team working for the world’s major galleries and exhibition venues – they have a true understanding of the requirements for methodical care, consideration and appreciation of whatever may be in their care. No two days are the same, and the excitement of working in their own ever changing art gallery never fades.

Thu, 24 May 2018 01:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.nhm.ac.uk/press-office/press-releases/museum-launches-app-to-help-children-get-outdoors.html
Killexams : Mobile Cloud Market Report 2022 | Industry Insights, Share, Size, Market Growth, Trends and Forecast 2029 | 110 Report Pages

Mobile Cloud Market report presents a comprehensive overview, market shares, and growth opportunities of Mobile Cloud market by product type, application, key manufacturers and key regions and countries. | Top Companies-GOOGLE INC, ORACLE PRIVATE LIMITED, RACKSPACE INC, MICROSOFT CORPORATION, IBM INC, APPLE INC, EMC, AMAZON WEB SERVICES

Global “Mobile CloudMarket2022 Research report is an in-depth study of the market Analysis. Along with the most latest patterns and figures that uncovers a wide examination of the market offer. Mobile Cloud Market size, Market status and position of worldwide and key areas, with points of view of makers, locales, item types and end businesses this report examination the highest organizations in worldwide and principle districts, and parts the Mobile Cloud Market Analysis by item type and applications or end enterprises.All the fundamental data, needed to comprehend the vital advancements in the market spending in Mobile Cloud market share and development patterns of each fragment and district.

Get a trial PDF of the report at –https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/request-sample/20950030

Global Mobile Cloud Market Overview

The primary highlights of the report offer important details pertaining to profit estimations, statistics, and applications of this product. Our report covers regional analysis of the domestic markets, key company profiles, value chain analysis, consumption, demand, and growth areas. The report analyzes major market firms, focusing on their innovative developments, product launches, operations, and emerging market players to implement new business growth strategies. The report focuses on growth prospects, restraints, and trends of the global Mobile Cloud market analysis. The study provides Porter’s five forces analysis to understand the impact of various factors such as bargaining power of suppliers, competitive intensity of competitors, threat of new entrants, threat of substitutes, and bargaining power of buyers on the global Mobile Cloud market outlook.

Mobile Cloud uses tracking and customer behavioral analysis to Excellerate corporate operations. Furthermore, when compared to on premise deployment, the deployment paradigm enables the implementation of analytics solutions at a low cost. Executives, data analysts, team leaders, managers, and professionals use business intelligence (BI) tools to collect, analyses, visualize, and report on numerous functions within a company and apply their results to their respective industries.

The report contains different market predictions related to revenue size, production, CAGR, Consumption, gross margin, price, and other substantial factors. While emphasizing the key driving and restraining forces for this market, the report also offers a complete study of the future trends and developments of the market. It also examines the role of the leading market players involved in the industry including their corporate overview, financial summary and SWOT analysis.

Get a trial copy of the Mobile Cloud Market Report

List of TOP KEY PLAYERS in Mobile Cloud Market Report are: –

  • GOOGLE INC
  • ORACLE PRIVATE LIMITED
  • RACKSPACE INC
  • MICROSOFT CORPORATION
  • IBM INC
  • APPLE INC
  • EMC
  • AMAZON WEB SERVICES

Global Mobile Cloud Market Growth report serves to be an ideal solution for better understanding of the Market. It is helpful in finding out the size of the Market for specific products. These major players operating in this Market are in strong competition in terms of technology, innovation, product development, and product pricing. The Market study aids in making sales forecasts for its products and thereby, establishing harmonious adjustment between demand and supply of its products.

The report gives a comprehensive investigation of the global Mobile Cloud market. The report contains huge data, measurable information focuses, factual reviewing, SWOT analysis, chance assessment, genuine scene, common exploration, and future improvement prospects. The analysis aims to specify market sizes in individual sections and countries in preceding years and forecast the worth in the subsequent years. The report saves valuable time as well as adds credibility to the work that has been done to grow the business.

Enquire before purchasing this report –https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/20950030

Global Mobile Cloud Market Segmentation Analysis

Global Mobile Cloud Market forecast report provides a holistic evaluation of the market. The report offers a comprehensive analysis of key segments, trends, drivers, restraints, competitive landscape, and factors that are playing a substantial role in the market.

By the product type, the market is primarily split into

  • Consumer
  • Corporate/Enterprise

Based on Component, Mobile Cloud is a business solution that provides an in-depth analysis of crowd movement at large gathering locations such as airports and train stations, city malls, retail stores, convention centers, stadiums, and other venues. Data from a variety of sources, including closed-circuit television cameras (CCTV), commercial off-the-shelf cameras, and first- and third-party consumer data, is processed using powerful artificial intelligence approaches to present prediction crowd flow models and customer preference patterns.

By the end users/application, this report covers the following segments

  • Entertainment
  • Education
  • Productivity
  • Business and Finance
  • Social Networking
  • Healthcare
  • Travel and Navigation

Based on the End Use, the Mobile Cloud Market Trend is bifurcated into Aromatic Industries, Automotive, Building and Construction, Paints, Agrochemicals, and others. It is a low-cost solution that outperforms most composite applications in terms of price vs. performance. In the next five years, hydrocarbon resin is expected to remain the second-largest application in the worldwide Mobile Cloud Market, owing to increased usage in adhesives, coatings, printing inks, and rubber goods. Also growing construction activities will help this market is growing.

COVID-19 impact on the market

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Largely unknown before this outbreak across the world, COVID-19 has moved from a regional crisis to a global pandemic in just a matter of a few weeks. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared COVID-19 as a pandemic on March 11, 2020.

To know How COVID-19 Pandemic Will Impact This Market/IndustryRequest a trial copy of the report-:https://www.researchreportsworld.com/enquiry/request-covid19/20950030

Geographic Segment Covered in the Report:

The Mobile Cloud report provides information about the market area, which is further subdivided into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region during the estimated period.

  • North America(USA and Canada)
  • Europe(UK, Germany, France and the rest of Europe)
  • Asia Pacific(China, Japan, India, and the rest of the Asia Pacific region)
  • Latin America(Brazil, Mexico, and the rest of Latin America)
  • Middle East and Africa(GCC and rest of the Middle East and Africa)

Purchase this report (Price 3450 USD for a single-user license) –https://www.researchreportsworld.com/purchase/20950030

Detailed TOC of Global Mobile Cloud Market Research Report 2022 – Impact of COVID-19 on the Market

1 Mobile Cloud Market Overview

1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Mobile Cloud Market

1.2 Mobile Cloud Market Segment by Type

1.3 Global Mobile Cloud Market Segment by Application

1.4 Global Mobile Cloud Market, Region Wise (2017-2029)

1.5 Global Market Size (Revenue) of Mobile Cloud (2017-2029)

1.6 Influence of Regional Conflicts on the Mobile Cloud Industry

1.7 Impact of Carbon Neutrality on the Mobile Cloud Industry

2 Mobile Cloud Market Upstream and Downstream Analysis

2.1 Mobile Cloud Industrial Chain Analysis

2.2 Key Raw Materials Suppliers and Price Analysis

2.3 Key Raw Materials Supply and Demand Analysis

2.4 Market Concentration Rate of Raw Materials

2.5 Manufacturing Process Analysis

2.6 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis

2.7 Major Downstream Buyers of Mobile Cloud Analysis

2.8 Impact of COVID-19 on the Industry Upstream and Downstream

3 Players Profiles

4 Global Mobile Cloud Market Landscape by Player

4.1 Global Mobile Cloud Sales and Share by Player (2017-2022)

4.2 Global Mobile Cloud Revenue and Market Share by Player (2017-2022)

4.3 Global Mobile Cloud Average Price by Player (2017-2022)

4.4 Global Mobile Cloud Gross Margin by Player (2017-2022)

4.5 Mobile Cloud Market Competitive Situation and Trends

5 Global Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price Trend by Type

5.1 Global Mobile Cloud Sales and Market Share by Type (2017-2022)

5.2 Global Mobile Cloud Revenue and Market Share by Type (2017-2022)

5.3 Global Mobile Cloud Price by Type (2017-2022)

5.4 Global Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue and Growth Rate by Type (2017-2022)

6 Global Mobile Cloud Market Analysis by Application

6.1 Global Mobile Cloud Consumption and Market Share by Application (2017-2022)

6.2 Global Mobile Cloud Consumption Revenue and Market Share by Application (2017-2022)

6.3 Global Mobile Cloud Consumption and Growth Rate by Application (2017-2022)

7 Global Mobile Cloud Sales and Revenue Region Wise (2017-2022)

7.1 Global Mobile Cloud Sales and Market Share, Region Wise (2017-2022)

7.2 Global Mobile Cloud Revenue and Market Share, Region Wise (2017-2022)

7.3 Global Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.4 United States Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.5 Europe Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.6 China Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.7 Japan Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.8 India Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.9 Southeast Asia Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.10 Latin America Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

7.11 Middle East and Africa Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2017-2022)

8 Global Mobile Cloud Market Forecast (2022-2029)

8.1 Global Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue Forecast (2022-2029)

8.2 Global Mobile Cloud Sales and Revenue Forecast, Region Wise (2022-2029)

8.3 Global Mobile Cloud Sales, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2022-2029)

8.4 Global Mobile Cloud Consumption Forecast by Application (2022-2029)

8.5 Mobile Cloud Market Forecast Under COVID-19

9 Industry Outlook

9.1 Mobile Cloud Market Drivers Analysis

9.2 Mobile Cloud Market Restraints and Challenges

9.3 Mobile Cloud Market Opportunities Analysis

9.4 Emerging Market Trends

9.5 Mobile Cloud Industry Technology Status and Trends

9.6 News of Product Release

9.7 Consumer Preference Analysis

9.8 Mobile Cloud Industry Development Trends under COVID-19 Outbreak

10 Research Findings and Conclusion

11 Appendix

Browse complete table of contents at –https://www.researchreportsworld.com/TOC/20950030

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To view the original version on The Express Wire visit Mobile Cloud Market Report 2022 | Industry Insights, Share, Size, Market Growth, Trends and Forecast 2029 | 110 Report Pages

Wed, 29 Jun 2022 20:01:00 -0500 TheExpressWire en-US text/html https://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/mobile-cloud-market-report-2022-industry-insights-share-size-market-growth-trends-and-forecast-2029-110-report-pages
Killexams : Recombinators Appoints Mike O’Connor as New Partner

Mike O’Connor brings two decades of transformative operations strategy to Innovation Consultancy, Recombinators

Mike O'Connor

Mike O'Connor, Partner Operational Excellence

CEDAR KNOLLS, N.J., June 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Recombinators today announced that Mike O’Connor will be joining Recombinators as a Partner, and will be based in Boston, effective June 16, 2022.

Mike will be joining Recombinators from SEI, a management consulting firm, where he directed strategic account relationships and C-Level business transformation, operational improvement, and merger and acquisition advisory engagements. His operational experience also includes management positions at EMC/Dell Technologies and Pepsi Cola.

Strategic Innovation has been central to Recombinators’ approach for many years, yet operational innovation is now becoming a key priority throughout the business world. Mike brings a wealth of experience and success across senior level operational leadership roles all with a core focus on business optimization, strategic planning and execution and customer success. He will continue to build upon Recombinators’ strategic innovation work as he leads the operational innovation practice and play a crucial role in the continued growth of Recombinators.

A graduate of Boston College (BA, MBA) Mike is also an adjunct professor of organizational behavior and business communication courses at Northeastern University and resides in the Boston area.

Quotes:

“I am thrilled to be joining the Recombinators team. Operational innovation is vital for any business to transform their people, processes and practices to launch results to the next level,” says Mike O’Connor, Partner.

“We are so thrilled to have Mike join us; his deep expertise will help build our Operational Innovation practice which is a natural output of the strategic innovation we’ve already been executing,” says Nadim Yacteen, Managing Partner at Recombinators.

“Operational innovation has been central to some of the greatest success stories in latest business history. Mike’s knowledge and experience is going to be instrumental as we continue this work at Recombinators,” says Stephen Moulton, Partner at Recombinators.

About Recombinators
Recombinators is a leading strategy and innovation consulting firm which helps their clients see their challenges in a new way - focusing on one or two challenges that will provide them the greatest return, and re-frame them to drive new thinking. With a proven proprietary approach to strategy, Innovation is in their DNA - they have been doing precedent research across every industry and domain for over 15 years, accumulating over 10,000 winning precedents. Recombinators have successfully partnered with some of the world’s most iconic organizations and brands to solve their critical business challenges.

They teach Strategic Innovation Workshops for C-level Executives and their teams at Stanford Graduate School of Business and have designed and co-taught Strategy and Innovation Labs at Columbia Business School. Recombinators helps their clients craft successful implementation and realize wins, with extensive experience helping clients go from their whiteboard to concrete ROI.

If you would like more information about Recombinators, please contact:

Contact Name: Helen Roberts
Organization Name: Recombinators
Website: recombinators.com
(201) 565-6476   hroberts@recombinators.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/84a7b92c-fb82-48eb-b08d-739e87ccd32a

Thu, 16 Jun 2022 02:26:00 -0500 en-AU text/html https://au.sports.yahoo.com/recombinators-appoints-mike-o-connor-182600644.html
Killexams : Single- and dual-line self-powered digital input current limiter in SOT23-8L and QFN-16L packages

The self-powered CLT03-1SC3 and CLT03-2Q3 digital input current limiters drastically reduce power dissipation while improving EMC robustness in industrial automation and process control.

In high-density, compact, multi-channel modules, power consumption and associated heat dissipation is a critical consideration. An efficient current limitation should be applied in compliance with IEC 61131-2 specifications.

The CLT03-1SC3 and CLT03-2Q3 are industrial digital input current limiters that convert a 24 V digital input to 3 mA current to drive optical isolators or non-isolated LVTTL interfaces.

With a wide input voltage range up to 60 V, a built-in test pulse generator, and extra smart power limitation during overvoltage, the CLT03-1SC3 and CLT03-2Q3 simplify SIL certification for safety applications.

Mon, 01 Nov 2021 07:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.st.com/content/st_com/en/campaigns/clt03-self-powered-digital-input-current-limiters.html
Killexams : Recombinators Appoints Mike O’Connor as New Partner

Mike O’Connor brings two decades of transformative operations strategy to Innovation Consultancy, Recombinators

Mike O'Connor

Mike O'Connor, Partner Operational Excellence

CEDAR KNOLLS, N.J., June 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Recombinators today announced that Mike O’Connor will be joining Recombinators as a Partner, and will be based in Boston, effective June 16, 2022.

Mike will be joining Recombinators from SEI, a management consulting firm, where he directed strategic account relationships and C-Level business transformation, operational improvement, and merger and acquisition advisory engagements. His operational experience also includes management positions at EMC/Dell Technologies and Pepsi Cola.

Strategic Innovation has been central to Recombinators’ approach for many years, yet operational innovation is now becoming a key priority throughout the business world. Mike brings a wealth of experience and success across senior level operational leadership roles all with a core focus on business optimization, strategic planning and execution and customer success. He will continue to build upon Recombinators’ strategic innovation work as he leads the operational innovation practice and play a crucial role in the continued growth of Recombinators.

A graduate of Boston College (BA, MBA) Mike is also an adjunct professor of organizational behavior and business communication courses at Northeastern University and resides in the Boston area.

Quotes:

“I am thrilled to be joining the Recombinators team. Operational innovation is vital for any business to transform their people, processes and practices to launch results to the next level,” says Mike O’Connor, Partner.

“We are so thrilled to have Mike join us; his deep expertise will help build our Operational Innovation practice which is a natural output of the strategic innovation we’ve already been executing,” says Nadim Yacteen, Managing Partner at Recombinators.

“Operational innovation has been central to some of the greatest success stories in latest business history. Mike’s knowledge and experience is going to be instrumental as we continue this work at Recombinators,” says Stephen Moulton, Partner at Recombinators.

About Recombinators
Recombinators is a leading strategy and innovation consulting firm which helps their clients see their challenges in a new way - focusing on one or two challenges that will provide them the greatest return, and re-frame them to drive new thinking. With a proven proprietary approach to strategy, Innovation is in their DNA - they have been doing precedent research across every industry and domain for over 15 years, accumulating over 10,000 winning precedents. Recombinators have successfully partnered with some of the world’s most iconic organizations and brands to solve their critical business challenges.

They teach Strategic Innovation Workshops for C-level Executives and their teams at Stanford Graduate School of Business and have designed and co-taught Strategy and Innovation Labs at Columbia Business School. Recombinators helps their clients craft successful implementation and realize wins, with extensive experience helping clients go from their whiteboard to concrete ROI.

If you would like more information about Recombinators, please contact:

Contact Name: Helen Roberts
Organization Name: Recombinators
Website: recombinators.com
(201) 565-6476   hroberts@recombinators.com

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/84a7b92c-fb82-48eb-b08d-739e87ccd32a

Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:26:00 -0500 en-SG text/html https://sg.finance.yahoo.com/news/recombinators-appoints-mike-o-connor-182600644.html
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