Forget Failing CBEST exam with these Practice Questions and PDF Dumps

With killexams.com, we all give completely legitimate Admission-Tests California Basic Educational Skills Test questions answers that are lately necessary for Transferring CBEST test. We really individuals to enhance their CBEST knowledge in order to memorize the test prep plus be sure completely success within the particular exam. It is definitely the best choice to accelerate your own position as a good expert in the particular Industry with CBEST certification.

Exam Code: CBEST Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
CBEST California Basic Educational Skills Test

Section Number of Questions
Reading 50 (Multiple Choice)
Mathematics 50 (Multiple Choice)
Writing 2

35% of questions Computation and problem solving
30% of questions Estimation, measurement, and statistical principles
35% of questions Numerical and graphic relationships

HOW ARE THE MULTIPLE CHOICE
QUESTIONS ARE SCORED?
Skill Area Performance: Your performance on the multiple-choice test questions for each skill area is indicated next to the skill area title. The information will help you assess your areas of strength and weakness and/or will help you prepare to retake any section(s) of the test. For each skill area, you will see one of the designations that appear below.
Each section score is based on a scale ranging from 20 to 80. For the Reading and Mathematics sections, your score is derived from the total number of questions you answered correctly.

Personal Experience - the “Experience” essay Topics include reminiscences about people or past events, situations at home, school, or in the community, current events and issues, observations about the media, hobbies, personal successes and accomplishments, changes the writer would like to see made, career choices, and the like. Explanatory/Analytic - the “Issue” essay Calls on the writer to explain current issues and ideas, controversies, difficulties, or opinions.

Rhetorical Force – the clarity with which the central idea or point of view is stated and maintained; the coherence of the discussion and the quality of the writers ideas. Organization – the clarity of the writing and the logical sequence of the writers ideas.
Support and Development – the relevance, depth, and specificity of the supporting information

Each of the three sections receives a score ranging from 20 to 80. The passing score for each section is 41. The total passing score for the CBEST is 123. If you score below the passing mark on one section (or even on two sections) but your total score is 123 or higher, you can still pass the test but only if your score in each section is 37 or above. This test is paper based or computer administered.

Let our outstanding teachers deliver you the edge to pass this very important California state teachers exam! Our credentialed instructors provide you with expert in-class instruction, successful test-taking strategies, computer-assisted information, and practice testing by syllabu area. Two class meetings consist of a mathematics review (problem solving, estimation, measurement, and numerical/graphic relationships). One class meeting consists of multiple approaches to help you Improve your studying comprehension and essay writing skills. The book included in the course fee is CliffsTestPrep CBEST® preparation guide, revised by authors of BTPS Testing.

The CBEST measures proficiencies in three general areas: studying comprehension, mathematics and essay writing. This test was developed to meet requirements related to credentialing and employment. It is based upon the theory that teachers should be able to use the same skills taught to students – skills essential to students both in the classroom and outside school. All questions (except the essay in the Writing Section) are multiple choice with five answer choices for each question.

California Basic Educational Skills Test
Admission-Tests Educational learning
Killexams : Admission-Tests Educational learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CBEST Search results Killexams : Admission-Tests Educational learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CBEST https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Killexams : PROOF POINTS: Colleges that ditched test scores for admissions find it’s harder to be fair in choosing students, researcher says

Get important education news and analysis delivered straight to your inbox

One college admissions officer at a large public university described how test-optional admissions had spurred more disagreements in his office. A third reader on an application was often called in to break a tie when one staffer said ‘yes’ and another said ‘no.’ Without SAT and ACT scores, he explained, the job of admitting students had become more subjective and more time-consuming. “I feel like everyone who reviews applications has their own perspective or opinion,” he said.

This sobering anecdote comes from a research project led by Kelly Slay, an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University, who has been conducting in-depth interviews with admissions officers in 2022 to understand how the elimination of SAT and ACT testing requirements has been playing out inside colleges and universities. According to Slay, admissions officers often described a “chaotic” and “stressful” process where they lacked clear guidance on how to select students without test scores. Admissions officers at selective colleges were also “overwhelmed” by the volume of applicants that test-optional policies had unleashed.

“One of our key findings were the tensions that were emerging around these test optional policies,” said Slay. “There’s a struggle on how to implement them.”

Slay’s work gives us a rare, unvarnished glimpse inside college admissions offices. It’s especially significant now because a college admissions case is currently before the Supreme Court that could strike down affirmative action, a practice that gives preferences to groups that have been discriminated against. As colleges experiment with alternative solutions, these interviews help shed light on why test-optional policies haven’t been helpful for increasing diversity on college campuses. 

Earlier quantitative studies found that the test-optional movement, which has spread to over 1,700 colleges, failed to substantially raise the share of low-income students or students of color. For example, one study published in 2021 found that the share of Black, Latino and Native American students increased by only 1 percentage point at about 100 colleges and universities that adopted the policy between 2005-06 and 2015-16. A separate study of a group of selective liberal arts colleges that adopted test-optional policies before 2011 didn’t find any didn’t find any diversity improvements on those campuses.

Before the pandemic, the move to test-optional admissions was already gathering steam as concerns mounted over the fact that wealthier students could hire tutors, take the tests multiple times and post higher scores. Other critics said that the paperwork to waive testing fees was a barrier for many low-income students. Then, during the pandemic, it became nearly impossible for students to sit for exams and the vast majority of colleges eliminated testing requirements. Some have since restored them, but many haven’t.

Slay’s research is still ongoing, and she presented her preliminary findings at the 2022 annual conference of the Association For Education Finance & Policy. When I interviewed her in October 2022, she and her research team had interviewed 22 admissions officers from 16 colleges and universities. All were four-year institutions, but they ranged from public to private, large to small, and religious to nonreligious. Four of the colleges had dropped testing requirements in the years before the pandemic with the remaining 12 doing so during the pandemic. 

It’s not surprising that colleges that went test-optional during the pandemic were suddenly scrambling to decide how to review applications without standardized tests. But the researchers learned that even colleges who had years of experience with test-optional admissions were still working out the details of how to implement it.

Admissions officers thinking that their colleges were replacing standardized tests with metrics that were even more biased toward wealthier and white students, such as letters of recommendation and expensive extracurricular activities. One college purchased a data service that ranked high schools and factored those high school rankings into each application. Students from underserved high schools received a lower ranking, an admissions officer explained. It wasn’t a fair process. 

Many admissions officers said that they were struggling with how to select candidates fairly and didn’t know how to weigh an application with test scores against one without. “I think the students that do have the strong test scores still do have that advantage, especially when you have a student that has strong test scores versus a student who doesn’t have test scores and everything else on the academics is more or less the same,” an admissions officer told Slay.

“It’s really hard to ignore test scores if that’s the way you were trained to review applications and think about merit,” said Slay. “If the standardized test is there in the file, it might still bias you in ways that you’re not aware of. It’s an anchoring bias.”

Admissions officers also described how they struggled to answer a frequent, but basic question: are you really test optional? Students wanted to know if they would have an advantage if they did submit a test score. Slay said admissions officers wished they had better guidance on how to answer this question. Since college entrance test scores could also be used for certain scholarships and determining course placements once admitted, it was difficult for admissions officers to say that the test wasn’t still important.

Larger workloads were a common complaint. College admissions officers said they were spending more time on each application in an effort to be diligent. Plus, the volume of applications had increased “a lot” at selective schools, Slay said. Meanwhile, many offices lost staff during COVID. Some employees resigned amid the strong job market. Budget cuts at some schools led to layoffs and furloughs. Slay said that some admissions offices were operating with a “skeletal” staff. 

The stress and pressure of being short-staffed and confused could affect anyone’s decision making. The conditions were ripe for amplifying implicit biases – exactly the opposite of the intent of the test-optional policy.

Slay is hearing from colleges that test-optional policies have increased the diversity of the applicant pool, but it may not translate into a more diverse student body.

“One of the things we concluded is that test optional does not mean an increase in diversity – racial diversity or socio-economic diversity,” said Slay. “If we haven’t figured out how to review students who come from diverse backgrounds who come from schools where they may not have the same access to AP or IB courses, then that could mean that these students still aren’t going to be admitted.”

This story about test optional admissions was written by Jill Barshay and produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. Sign up for the Hechinger newsletter.

The Hechinger Report provides in-depth, fact-based, unbiased reporting on education that is free to all readers. But that doesn't mean it's free to produce. Our work keeps educators and the public informed about pressing issues at schools and on campuses throughout the country. We tell the whole story, even when the details are inconvenient. Help us keep doing that.

Join us today.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 04:34:00 -0500 More by Jill Barshay en-US text/html https://hechingerreport.org/proof-points-colleges-that-ditched-test-scores-for-admissions-find-its-harder-to-be-fair-in-choosing-students-researcher-says/
Killexams : ACT Score Decline: Lost Learners Not Learning Loss

This past week ACT, the Iowa City-based college admissions test publisher, released its annual performance report with the headline “Average ACT Score For the High School Class of 2022 Declines to Lowest Level in More Than 30 Years.”

This framing predictably sparked a media cycle stating plummeting scores have reached rock-bottom levels. As is far too common when test results are reported, these articles failed to look past the splashy headline and provided no underlying data-informed analysis of score changes. The resulting reporting predictably either parroted the ACT press release or joined the popular narrative of youth in academic decline and failing public schools.

The problem is that the data doesn’t actually show learning loss so much as it demonstrates ACT’s learner loss.

While the national average ACT score has fallen, the explanation for the score drop is far more nuanced than ACT’s press release encourages the media to report.

Yes, for the class of 1991 the average ACT composite score was 22.1 (out of 36) and for the class of 2022 it was 19.8. But for that number to mean the nation has a learning problem, as opposed to ACT having a problem, the examination of test scores must look at the pools of test takers over time and whether they are truly comparable.

Turns out the number of test takers and the demographic composition have shifted in a way that could explain the decline. Unfortunately, most media chose to ignore these shifting demographics (and the rank socioeconomic inequality in the k-12 school system that was recently exacerbated by a pandemic) and imply that students are failing to be taught or to learn.

A bit of history is in order.

The ACT was created in Iowa in 1959 and primarily required by colleges in the Midwest through the 1980s.

In 1990 roughly 35% of U.S. high school graduates took the ACT and many colleges wouldn’t accept it, instead preferring the SAT. It wasn’t until 2007, when Harvey Mudd College finally accepted the test for admission that all colleges in the U.S. accepted the ACT, as equivalent to the SAT.

As more colleges accepted either test for admission, ACT’s share of students increased. From 1990 onward, ACT saw a steady growth in test takers (particularly in coastal states), surpassing the SAT in number of test takers in 2009.

However, since ACT hit its peak participation in 2016 (with 64% of high school graduates taking the test), the company has been shedding test takers and scores have been falling.

ACT says it's a lack of knowledge and skills. But, maybe the answer lies in who has opted out of taking the test. The demographics of students taking the test has shifted.

States with high scoring students have abandoned the ACT at a much faster rate than states with historically lower scoring students. In fact, of the 10 highest scoring states in 2016, the number of ACT test takers dropped by 20,000 more than from the 10 lowest scoring states.

From 2016 to 2022, the lowest scoring 50% of the country shed 296,000 test takers while the highest scoring 50% saw a drop of 444,000 students. These shifts will lower the average test scores no matter what is actually happening in schools under the mantra of “college readiness.”

These changes are in part because states like Illinois, Michigan and Colorado have switched their contract for testing from ACT to the College Board’s SAT.

In other cases, students are opting to apply to college under test-optional or test-free admissions policies. More than 900 colleges offered test optional or free admissions in 2019 and that number spiked to more than 1800 since 2020.

In states, like California and Oregon, where all public colleges are either test-optional or test-free the decline in test takers is particularly drastic, with declines of 74% and 79%, respectively, since 2020.

Why isn’t ACT following best practices and encouraging good data science and good reporting? ACT’s own document warns that “best practice is to compare states where the same or similar percentages of graduates were tested” yet their press release ignores this advice.

Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT, rightfully said “Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students.”

But, what she neglected to emphasize the importance of and provide was high-quality data interpretation.

ACT could have encouraged the media, public, or policy makers to compare ACT score changes to SAT score changes.

SAT scores, which range from 400 to 1600, dropped only 11 points since 2021 and are essentially equal to 2020. Perhaps looking at college admissions tests as measures of national academic progress is not the right data or right use of available data. Looking at test score changes and ignoring underlying demographic changes has never been the right approach.

The misinterpreting of declining SAT scores from a College Board sponsored study, undermined faith in public schools in the 1970s and was used as the basis of the 1983 “Nation at Risk” report that spurred thirty years of test-based “accountability” that hasn’t appreciably benefited public education.

What incentive could a test publisher, especially one losing market share and customers, have to overlook interpretations beyond learning loss and school failure? Babbington may have provided some insight into that as well when she said “I think it also speaks to the need for earlier opportunities for assessment, for instructional improvement, and for conversation.”

ACT and other testing companies would have you believe that if you weigh the pig more frequently, the pig will get fatter. But it doesn’t work that way. You have to feed the pig.

We, the public, need to be wary of simplistic interpretation of complex data. Even if ACT (and SAT) performance wasn’t such a highly coachable socioeconomically correlative phenomenon, giving the test sooner and getting more data won’t Improve K-12 education or college readiness. Investing in quality teaching, curriculum, facilities, after-school activities and the tools to combat poverty will Improve academic outcomes.

Feed the pig, not the scale.

Mon, 17 Oct 2022 03:54:00 -0500 Akil Bello en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/akilbello/2022/10/17/act-score-decline-lost-learners-not-learning-loss/
Killexams : Schools failing our children: Students' ACT test scores drop to lowest level in 30 years

Students' ACT test scores drop to lowest level in 30 years

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Striking new low test scores on ACT college admissions test further illustrate the devastating impact of the COVID shutdowns on education and raise questions about high school students' readiness for higher education.

Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years. The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. An increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

Podcast host Kmele Foster told "Fox & Friends" Thursday argued that the drop in test scores is due the fallout from schools pushing a social justice agenda and not focusing on the basics.

ACT SCORES HIT LOWEST POINT IN MORE THAN 30 YEARS, EVIDENCE OF LEARNING DISRUPTION CAUSED BY PANDEMIC

The ACLU argued that a transgender student at the Martinsville school in Indiana should be able to use a bathroom which corresponds with his gender identity. iStock © iStock The ACLU argued that a transgender student at the Martinsville school in Indiana should be able to use a bathroom which corresponds with his gender identity. iStock

"There's been a precipitous decline in these scores on average for a number of decades now. And when we talk about the ACT, we're talking about math, science, English and studying readiness for college. And we're talking about students in maybe the top 35% of all graduating seniors," Foster, the host of "The Fifth Column" said.

"These are kids who have their futures ahead of them, who think that they ought to be able to go to college. And we're finding out that something like 40% of them is not prepared to tackle these subjects at a college level."

READ ON THE FOX NEWS APP

UNIVERSITIES DROP SAT, ACT TESTING REQUIREMENTS AMID CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

Classroom with empty wooden desks. (iStock) iStock © iStock Classroom with empty wooden desks. (iStock) iStock

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

HARVARD WAIVES ACT, SAT ADMISSION REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATING CLASSES THROUGH 2030

Kmele Foster told "Fox & Friends" said that there is also an "increasing number of parents who are very concerned about" the decline in ACT. test scores.

"I think the increasing popularity of things like school choice, for example, is a pretty good indication of the fact that there's growing concern about this," he said.

Bill Bennett on America's declining education system

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

"But I also think it's worth us taking into consideration what's been happening in public schools over the last couple of years," Foster added. "I mean, we've been having these pitched ideological battles about what should be taught in the school."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:41:12 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careers/schools-failing-our-children-students-act-test-scores-drop-to-lowest-level-in-30-years/ar-AA12Wjxw
Killexams : The Psychological Toll of High-Stakes Testing

“The more I understand what testing is, actually, the more confused I am,” said Duckworth, a psychologist and expert on measuring human potential, when we interviewed her in 2020. “What does the score mean? Is it how smart somebody is, or is it something else? How much of it is their recent coaching? How much of it is genuine skill and knowledge?”

Yet standardized tests are still a mainstay of U.S. education. They play a critical role in deciding whether students graduate, what college or university they’ll attend, and, in many ways, what career paths will be open to them. Despite the fact that they take a few hours to complete—a tiny fraction of the time students spend demonstrating their learning—the tests are a notoriously high-stakes way to determine academic merit. 

By several measures, high-stakes tests are an inequitable gauge of aptitude and achievement. A 2016 analysis, for example, found that the tests were better indicators of prosperity than ability: “Scores from the SAT and ACT tests are good proxies for the amount of wealth students are born into,” the researchers concluded. Even students who manage to do well on the tests often pay a steep price emotionally and psychologically. “Students in countries that did the best on the PISA [Programme for International Student Assessment],” for example, “...often have lower well-being, as measured by students’ satisfaction with life and school,” wrote Yurou Wang, a professor of educational psychology at the University of Alabama, and Trina Emler, a researcher at the University of Kansas. 

We’ve almost certainly given too much weight to high-stakes tests, in other words, and increasingly the pressure of the tests is showing up as a serious health issue for students.

Biological Flares

As high-stakes tests loom, cortisol levels, a chemical marker for stress, rise by an average of 15 percent, a physiological response linked to an 80-point drop in SAT scores, according to 2018 research. For students who were already experiencing hardships outside of school—poverty, neighborhood violence, or family instability, for instance—cortisol spiked by as much as 35 percent, a level that is likely to derail cognitive processes and distort test scores beyond recognition. Are high-stakes tests sometimes measuring the impact of stressors like depression, family divorces, or the tests themselves, rather than knowledge? 

The researchers also found that in a small group of students, cortisol levels dropped steeply during test-taking season, which they speculated had more to do with “shutting down in the face of the test” than handling the stress more effectively—in effect, triggering an emergency shut-off switch.

“Large cortisol responses—either positive or negative—were associated with worse test performance, perhaps introducing a ‘stress bias’ and making tests a less reliable indicator of student learning,” the researchers concluded. This is a real problem, they warned, not only because elevated cortisol levels “make concentration difficult,” but also because “prolonged stress exposure” burns kids out and increases the likelihood of disengagement and academic failure.

Sleepless Nights and Crises of Identity

In a 2021 study, Nancy Hamilton, a University of Kansas psychology professor, detailed the damaging effects of high-stakes tests on young adults. 

Starting a week before consequential exams, college undergraduates recorded their study habits, sleep schedules, and mood swings in daily diary entries. Hamilton’s findings were troubling: The anxiety caused by imminent, high-stakes tests leaked into daily life and were “correlated with poor health behaviors, including dysregulated sleep patterns and poor sleep quality,” leading to a “vicious cycle” of cramming and poor sleep.

In an interview with Edutopia, Hamilton explained that instead of thinking about the academic material to be studied, many students became preoccupied by the life-changing consequences of the exams. Trying to fall asleep at night, they fretted about whether they’d get into a good college, thinking about landing a job that paid well, and feared they’d disappoint their parents. 

Without breaks, high-stakes tests can cause a host of cascading problems, Hamilton continued, including increased anxiety levels, overconsumption of caffeine, smoking, an unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, and poor sleep quality.

Test results are often tinged with a kind of existential dread. In a 2011 study, Laura-Lee Kearns, a professor of education at St. Francis Xavier University, discovered that high school students who failed the state standardized literacy test “experienced shock at test failure,” asserting that they “felt degraded, humiliated, stressed, and shamed by the test results.” Many of the students were successful in school and thought of themselves as academically advanced, so the disconnect triggered an identity crisis that made them feel as though “they did not belong in courses they previously enjoyed, and even caused some of them to question their school class placement.”

“I enjoyed English, but my self-esteem really went down after the test,” a student reported, echoing a sentiment felt by many. “I really had to think over whether I was good at it or not.” 

Early Psychological Impact

High-stakes testing commonly begins in third grade, as young students get their first taste of fill-in-the-bubble scantrons. And while the tests are commonly used as diagnostic tools (presumably to help tailor a student’s academic support) and to evaluate the performance of teachers and schools, they can come with a bevy of unintended consequences.

“Teachers and parents report that high-stakes tests lead to higher levels of anxiety and lower levels of confidence on the part of elementary students,” researchers explained in a 2005 study. Some young students experience “anxiety, panic, irritability, frustration, boredom, crying, headaches, and loss of sleep” while taking high-stakes tests, they reported, before concluding that “high-stakes testing causes damage to children’s self-esteem, overall morale, and love of learning.”

When asked to draw pictures portraying their test-taking experience, the students in the study overwhelmingly cast their ordeal in a negative light—a depiction of a “nervous” student predominated. “Students were nervous about not having enough time to finish, not being able to figure out the answers, and not passing the test,” the researchers explained. In nearly every drawing, the children drew themselves with “unhappy and angry facial expressions.” Smiles were nearly nonexistent, and when they did occur, it was to show relief that the test was over, or for unrelated reasons, such as being able to chew gum during the test or being excited about an ice cream celebration after the test.

Manufactured Power

Tests like the SAT and ACT aren’t inherently harmful, and students should learn how to manage reasonably stressful academic situations. In fact, banning them completely might be counterproductive, denying many students a critical avenue to demonstrate their academic skills. But to make them a condition of matriculation, and to factor them so prominently in internal ranking and admissions processes, inevitably excludes millions of promising students. In a 2014 study, for example, researchers analyzed 33 colleges that adopted test-optional policies and found clear benefits.

“The numbers are quite large of potential students with strong high school GPAs who have proved themselves to everyone except the testing agencies,” asserted the researchers. High-stakes tests too often function as arbitrary gatekeepers, pushing away students who might otherwise excel in college.

If recent events in California are any indication, high-stakes tests may be in decline. Last year, the University of California dropped SAT and ACT scores from its admissions process, delivering a “resounding blow to the power of two standardized tests that have long shaped American higher education,” the Washington Post reported. Meanwhile, hundreds of colleges and universities that dropped testing for pandemic-related reasons are reconsidering their value—including all eight Ivy League schools.

“This proves that test-optional is the new normal in college admissions,” said Bob Schaeffer, FairTest’s Public Education director, in the New York Times. “Highly selective schools have shown that they can do fair and accurate admissions without test scores.”

In the end, it’s not the tests—it’s the almost fetishistic power we deliver to them. We can preserve the insights that the tests generate while returning sanity and proportionality to a broken system. Quite simply, if we deemphasize high-stakes tests, our students will, too.

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 08:26:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.edutopia.org/article/psychological-toll-high-stakes-testing Killexams : Free Webinar - Understanding College Admissions

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Oct. 16, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Parents with high school seniors considering college are grappling with a slew of questions about standardized tests, how to choose the right school and how the admission process works. This week Fusion Education Group (FEG) is hosting a free Virtual College Week with programs to support that journey.

"From FAFSA to admissions, families have many questions," said Stafford Slick, Director of Post-Secondary Counseling. 

A week's worth of events from October 17 – 21 is planned. FEG's Fall Virtual College Week is free and open to all high school families across the country. Speakers include representatives from mission-driven colleges, college admission counselors, and higher education and standardized testing experts.

The full schedule of events  can be found here, and include: (all times are EDT US and Canada):

"From FAFSA to admissions, families have lots of questions," said Stafford Slick, FEG Director of Post-Secondary Counseling. "We've consistently heard from families who attend our spring and fall college week, that the speakers provided them with useful information that helped them support their student's post-secondary journey."

All webinar details can be found here. Attendees must register for each program individually.

About Fusion Education Group: Fusion Education Group (FEG) is an innovator of personalized education. FEG provides accredited personalized education for than 5,000 middle and high school students at Fusion Academy, with 80 campuses that offer one-to-one instruction; Barnstable Academy, which offers traditional college-prep in a small school setting in New Jersey; and Fusion Global Academy, which offers one-to-one personalized education through a completely virtual campus that currently serves students in all 50 states and 35 additional countries. Attend an upcoming Open House or learn more about FEG events here.

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/free-webinar--understanding-college-admissions-301650278.html

SOURCE Fusion Education Group

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 08:07:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/n29280588/free-webinar-understanding-college-admissions
Killexams : ACT College Admission Test Scores Drop To 30-Year Low As Effects Of Covid-Era Online Learning Play Out

Topline

High school students’ ACT college admission test scores fell to a three-decade low in 2022, according to a new report released Wednesday, falling for the fifth straight year as educators grapple with ongoing learning loss made worse by remote classes during the Covid-19 pandemic.

High school students' ACT scores dropped to their lowest levels since 1991, according to new data released Wednesday. getty © Provided by Forbes High school students' ACT scores dropped to their lowest levels since 1991, according to new data released Wednesday. getty

Key Facts

Students in the graduating high school class of 2022 averaged a score of 19.8 out of 36, the lowest score since 1991 on the admissions test, which colleges use to gauge students’ English, reading, math and science skills.

The average score is down from 20.3 in 2021, and 20.8 in 2018, which were down from a recent high of 21.2 in 2007 (SAT college admission test scores have also dropped slightly from 981 in 2007 to 927 in 2021).

Some 32% of 2022 graduates who took the test passed three out of four benchmarks—indicating whether they have a 50% chance of earning a B or higher in English, reading, math and science—down from 36% of students last year and 38% in 2018.

From 2018 to 2022, the percentage of students who passed the benchmark in the English section dropped from 60% to 53%, while students who passed the math benchmark fell from 40% to 31%.

Only 22% of the students met the benchmark in all four categories, down from 27% in 2018.

ACT CEO Janet Godwin said the decline can’t be blamed exclusively by learning disruptions from online learning and missed classes when schools were shuttered during the Covid-19 pandemic, but by “longtime systemic failures” that were “exacerbated by the pandemic.”

Crucial Quote

“The magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming, as we see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting the college-readiness benchmark in any of the subjects we measure,” Godwin said in a press release,

Key Background

Recent studies have linked online learning during the pandemic—when teachers were forced to completely pivot from in-person classes to lessons online—to disruptions in students’ math and studying comprehension. During that time, students were shown to have connected less with their teachers and classmates, and become distracted more easily while at home. The high school class of 2022 dealt with online learning for more than half of their time in high school, starting in March, 2020. Students who switched to online lessons from in-person classes for just a month missed the equivalent of seven to 10 weeks of math, Harvard University Center for Education Policy Research director Thomas Kane told NPR. The losses held true for younger students, as well. A National Assessment of Educational Progress report released last month found 9-year-olds’ studying levels suffered the biggest fall since 1990, while math scores had their biggest drop ever.

Tangent

Disparities between racial groups also increased over that pandemic, with Black students’ math scores falling 13 points, compared to white students’ scores falling five points, according to the Nation’s Report Card. Analysts at McKinsey & Company attribute the difference between races to variation in access to education, with Black and Hispanic students less likely to have access to internet or live interaction with teachers, despite being more likely to remain in remote classrooms.

Surprising Fact

Washington D.C. students had the highest ACT score (26.9), followed by California and Massachusetts (26.5), while the lowest scores were recorded in Nevada (17.3) and Mississippi (17.8).

Big Number

1.3 million. That’s how many students in the class of 2022 took the ACT test, or roughly 36% of graduating high school seniors, according to the report.

Further Reading

Pandemic-Era Policies Caused Dramatic Education Decline (Forbes)

Pandemic Set Students’ studying Levels Back Two Decades—Here’s Where It Dropped The Most (Forbes)

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 08:35:21 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/careersandeducation/act-college-admission-test-scores-drop-to-30-year-low-as-effects-of-covid-era-online-learning-play-out/ar-AA12UcXu
Killexams : Colleges that ditched test scores for admissions still struggle with bias

One college admissions officer at a large public university described how test-optional admissions had spurred more disagreements in his office. A third reader on an application was often called in to break a tie when one staffer said ‘yes’ and another said ‘no.’ Without SAT and ACT scores, he explained, the job of admitting students had become more subjective and more time-consuming. “I feel like everyone who reviews applications has their own perspective or opinion,” he said.

This sobering anecdote comes from a research project led by Kelly Slay, an assistant professor at Vanderbilt University, who has been conducting in-depth interviews with admissions officers in 2022 to understand how the elimination of SAT and ACT testing requirements has been playing out inside colleges and universities. According to Slay, admissions officers often described a “chaotic” and “stressful” process where they lacked clear guidance on how to select students without test scores. Admissions officers at selective colleges were also “overwhelmed” by the volume of applicants that test-optional policies had unleashed.

“One of our key findings were the tensions that were emerging around these test optional policies,” said Slay. “There’s a struggle on how to implement them.”

Slay’s work gives us a rare, unvarnished glimpse inside college admissions offices. It’s especially significant now because a college admissions case is currently before the Supreme Court that could strike down affirmative action, a practice that gives preferences to groups that have been discriminated against. As colleges experiment with alternative solutions, these interviews help shed light on why test-optional policies haven’t been helpful for increasing diversity on college campuses.

Earlier quantitative studies found that the test-optional movement, which has spread to over 1,700 colleges, failed to substantially raise the share of low-income students or students of color. For example, one study published in 2021 found that the share of Black, Latino and Native American students increased by only 1 percentage point at about 100 colleges and universities that adopted the policy between 2005-06 and 2015-16. A separate study of a group of selective liberal arts colleges that adopted test-optional policies before 2011 didn’t find any didn’t find any diversity improvements on those campuses.

Before the pandemic, the move to test-optional admissions was already gathering steam as concerns mounted over the fact that wealthier students could hire tutors, take the tests multiple times and post higher scores. Other critics said that the paperwork to waive testing fees was a barrier for many low-income students. Then, during the pandemic, it became nearly impossible for students to sit for exams and the vast majority of colleges eliminated testing requirements. Some have since restored them, but many haven’t.

Slay’s research is still ongoing, and she presented her preliminary findings at the 2022 annual conference of the Association For Education Finance & Policy. When I interviewed her in October 2022, she and her research team had interviewed 22 admissions officers from 16 colleges and universities. All were four-year institutions, but they ranged from public to private, large to small, and religious to nonreligious. Four of the colleges had dropped testing requirements in the years before the pandemic with the remaining 12 doing so during the pandemic.

It’s not surprising that colleges that went test-optional during the pandemic were suddenly scrambling to decide how to review applications without standardized tests. But the researchers learned that even colleges who had years of experience with test-optional admissions were still working out the details of how to implement it.

Admissions officers thinking that their colleges were replacing standardized tests with metrics that were even more biased toward wealthier and white students, such as letters of recommendation and expensive extra-curricular activities. One college purchased a data service that ranked high schools and factored those high school rankings into each application. Students from underserved high schools received a lower ranking, an admissions officer explained. It wasn’t a fair process.

Many admissions officers said that they were struggling with how to select candidates fairly and didn’t know how to weigh an application with test scores against one without. “I think the students that do have the strong test scores still do have that advantage, especially when you have a student that has strong test scores versus a student who doesn’t have test scores and everything else on the academics is more or less the same,” an admissions officer told Slay.

“It’s really hard to ignore test scores if that’s the way you were trained to review applications and think about merit,” said Slay. “If the standardized test is there in the file, it might still bias you in ways that you’re not aware of. It’s an anchoring bias.”

Admissions officers also described how they struggled to answer a frequent, but basic question: are you really test optional? Students wanted to know if they would have an advantage if they did submit a test score. Slay said admissions officers wished they had better guidance on how to answer this question. Since college entrance test scores could also be used for certain scholarships and determining course placements once admitted, it was difficult for admissions officers to say that the test wasn’t still important.

Larger workloads were a common complaint. College admissions officers said they were spending more time on each application in an effort to be diligent. Plus, the volume of applications had increased “a lot” at selective schools, Slay said. Meanwhile, many offices lost staff during COVID. Some employees resigned amid the strong job market. Budget cuts at some schools led to layoffs and furloughs. Slay said that some admissions offices were operating with a “skeletal” staff.

The stress and pressure of being short-staffed and confused could affect anyone’s decision making. The conditions were ripe for amplifying implicit biases – exactly the opposite of the intent of the test-optional policy.

Slay is hearing from colleges that test-optional policies have increased the diversity of the applicant pool, but it’s not translating into a more diverse student body.

“One of the things we concluded is that test optional does not mean an increase in diversity – racial diversity or socio-economic diversity,” said Slay. “If we haven’t figured out how to review students who come from diverse backgrounds who come from schools where they may not have the same access to AP or IB courses, then that could mean that these students still aren’t going to be admitted.”

This story about test-optional admissions was written by Jill Barshay and produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. Sign up for the Hechinger newsletter.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 19:17:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/60002/colleges-that-ditched-test-scores-for-admissions-still-struggle-with-bias
Killexams : ACT test scores drop to lowest in 30 years in pandemic slide

PHOENIX (AP) — Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

“Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. “Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses.”

ACT scores have declined steadily in recent years. Still, “the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure.”

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. “Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students,” Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

“All the test did for me was deliver me extra financial money,” Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

___

The Associated Press education team receives support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/act-test-scores-drop-to-lowest-in-30-years-in-pandemic-slide/ar-AA12SHjW
Killexams : ACT test scores fall again. Could you ace the math or English tests? Find out here

At the end of the 2020 school year, students in grades three to eight were typically behind 8–12 points in math and 3–6 points in reading, according to Northwest Evaluation Association data released in 2021.

Test scores remain a strong indicator of learning loss, even when considering how the temporary closing of schools affected testing veracity. In order to break down precisely how these declining trends in math and studying have affected various demographics among all students, HeyTutor looked at the drop in test scores in studying and math for fourth and and eighth grade students before and after COVID-19. This article cites long-term trend data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress along with information from other news reports and studies.

Prior to the pandemic, long-term trends showed that math and studying scores for students ages 9 and 13 had fallen or remained the same since 2012, according to the NAEP. Since 1971, the organization, which operates under the auspices of the U.S. Commissioners of Education, has tracked how students ages 9, 13, and 17 are performing in math and reading.

NAEP notes that while average test scores in math and studying in 2012 surpassed those of the 1970s for students ages 9 and 13, average scores among 13-year-old students decreased between 2012 and 2020. Specifically, average math scores for 13-year-old students in the 10th, 25th, and 50th percentiles decreased between 2012 and 2020.

Average math scores for 9-year-old students in the 10th and 25th percentiles also fell during the same time period. Additionally, average studying scores for 13-year-old students were higher in 2012 than they were in 2020, however, variations in average studying scores for 9-year-old students between 2012 and 2020 were negligible.

Continue studying for a closer look at how the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted education in America.

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 00:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://omaha.com/news/national/act-test-scores-fall-again-could-you-ace-the-math-or-english-tests-find-out/article_efa80ad6-2bd0-56a5-b7c5-96d3db0aac91.html
Killexams : Tokyo education board to scrap gender section in high school admission application forms
The Tokyo Metropolitan Government headquarters (Mainichi/Makoto Ogawa)

TOKYO -- The Tokyo Metropolitan Board of Education will remove the gender section in public high school admission application forms starting from entrance exams to be carried out in spring 2023, in a bid to ease the psychological burden on transgender applicants and other sexual minority teens.

According to the Tokyo education board, the high school admission application forms' gender section remained until the 2022 entrance exams due to separate acceptance quotas for male and female students set at each metropolitan government-run school. The board will work out applicants' genders based on their academic dossiers submitted by their respective junior high schools for the 2023 school year exams, but it plans to abolish gendered acceptance quotas from the entrance exams for the 2024 academic year.

Of Japan's 47 prefectures, the Tokyo education board is the last one to scrap the gender section from public high school admission application forms.

Meanwhile, the metropolitan education board has also decided to allow high school entrance test takers with Japanese nationality to bring in a dictionary for academic ability assessment tests starting from the academic 2023 entrance exams if the student requires Japanese assistance. The existing rule had allowed only applicants of foreign nationality to bring a dictionary to entrance exams. The new rule will be applied in principle to Japanese and foreign applicants who have lived in Japan for three years or less.

(Japanese original by Asako Takeuchi, Tokyo City News Department)

Fri, 14 Oct 2022 16:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20221015/p2a/00m/0na/006000c
CBEST exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List