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Business Objects Certified Professional Web Intelligence XI 3.0
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Technology Help Desk

Preus Library
Main Level
700 College Dr
Decorah, IA 52101

Fall Semester Hours

Mon.-Thu.: 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Fri.: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sat.: 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sun: Noon – 9:00 p.m.

Fall Break Hours

Oct. 15: Closed
Oct. 16: Closed
Oct. 17: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Oct. 18: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Oct. 19: 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Full Hours

Send Email

Phone: 563-387-1000

Business Objects is Luther’s reporting platform. Business Objects takes data from multiple sources and aggregates it for reporting purposes. There are multiple report types, but Luther uses Web Intelligence reports almost exclusively.

Unless otherwise specified, Business Objects refreshes nightly. For example, data entered into Colleague today would not be in Business Objects until tomorrow unless part of a “Live” report.

Business Objects has many layers of access. For example, you may not have access to edit a report, or schedule reports; or maybe you have view only access. Access to data is tightly controlled as well. For example, Financial Aid information is not available to the Registrar’s office, unless requested and approved by the Financial Aid office.

Business Objects is only available on campus. You will need a VPN or a Citrix connection to access reports from off-campus.

You can learn more about Business Objects in our training guide, including how to create, edit, and view reports.

Technology Help Desk

Preus Library
Main Level
700 College Dr
Decorah, IA 52101

Fall Semester Hours

Mon.-Thu.: 7:30 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Fri.: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sat.: 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Sun: Noon – 9:00 p.m.

Fall Break Hours

Oct. 15: Closed
Oct. 16: Closed
Oct. 17: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Oct. 18: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Oct. 19: 8:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Full Hours

Send Email

Phone: 563-387-1000

Wed, 14 Sep 2022 14:13:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.luther.edu/offices/its/help-desk/services/software/facultystaffsoftware/businessobjects
Killexams : how much does sap business objects cost?

BusinessObjects was acquired by SAP in 2007 for $6 billion. BusinessObjects was acquired by SAP in 2009 for $78 billion, its largest acquisition to date. Initially, BusinessObjects operated independently, but in 2009 became a SAP division, and its products became SAP BusinessObjects.

Is SAP BusinessObjects dead?

The general availability announcement for SAP BusinessObjects BI 4 was made recently by SAP. The SAP Business Intelligence 4 application is in step 3. Thus, all speculations that SAP was getting rid of BusinessObjects came to an end. SAP announced SAP BI 4 instead. Supported until 2027, this is 3.

What is SAP BusinessObjects platform?

With BusinessObjects Business Intelligence, you can easily report on, visualize, and share data. In its role as an on-premises BI layer for SAP's Business Technology Platform, it transforms data into actionable insights available from any location, at any time.

How much does Business Objects cost?

Starting at $14000, SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence is offered by SAP. The annual fee is $800. There is no free version of the software. There is no free trial for SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence.

How much does SAP for small business cost?

Starting at $24,958/month for SAP Business One AP Business One Starting @ ₹ 24,958/Month*

How much does it cost for SAP?

As for the licenses, a Professional license will set you back about $3213, whereas a Limited license is $1666 per year. For those who are Professional users, they must pay $94 per month per user, whereas those who are Limited users must pay $54 per month per user. Additionally, you can also purchase a subscription for one year for a prepaid amount.

Does SAP own business objects?

SAP BusinessObjects (BO, BOBJ, or BObjects) is a business intelligence (BI) software company founded by SAP. SAP acquired BusinessObjects in 2007 for a reported $5 billion. During its final earnings release before being acquired by SAP, the company reported that it had over 46,000 customers.

Is SAP BusinessObjects free?

Price details on SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence pricing starts at $14,000. The annual fee is $800. There is no free version of the software.

Is SAP BusinessObjects an ERP?

We will now examine the instruments that are included in the SAP BI offer from the end user's perspective: SAP BusinessObjects BI Suite is a real-time BI platform that is on premises. Integrating extra analytical tools, data sources, or separate applications like ERP is also an option.

What is SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence?

With SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence, you can create reports, share data visualisations, and report on it. It transforms data into useful insights and makes them available anytime, anywhere as the on-premise BI layer for SAP's Business Technology Platform.

What is SAP Business Intelligence platform?

SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence is a tool that provides business intelligence. With SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence, you can create reports, share data visualisations, and report on it. In its role as an on-premises BI layer for SAP's Business Technology Platform, it transforms data into actionable insights available from any location, at any time.

What is SAP BusinessObjects Explorer?

The SAP BusinessObjects Explorer lets you access data within your Business Intelligence system in a Google like manner: just type your question and it will deliver the data in a table, chart, or a variety of other ways that will make sense to you.

Which functionalities belong to the current portfolio of SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence?

  • Provide ad hoc queries and BI reporting that will help business users uncover trends and root causes.
  • Applications related to Data Visualization and Analytics.
  • Integration of office software.
  • Is SAP a reporting tool?

    BI is a tool used to store data and report on it. BI (Business Intelligence) involves cleaning raw data, applying business logic, processing it, and presenting user-friendly information. Business Intelligence is a SAP product that offers a user-friendly interface.

    What is SAP BusinessObjects Web Intelligence?

    A web-based reporting and analysis tool for SAP Business Objects is SAP Business Objects Web Intelligence (WebI). This is a tool that allows you to analyze workforce-related data as a part of the Enterprise Data Warehouse (EDW) of Washington Workforce Analytics (WWA).

    What is meant by SAP Bobj?

    Reporting and analytical business intelligence (BI) are the core functions of SAP BusinessObjects BI. Formerly known as BOBJ, SAP BO is a business intelligence software solution. This is a front-end-based platform for business intelligence that pulls in data from various back-end sources, rather than storing it in the application itself.

    What is the use of Bobj in SAP?

    Reporting and analytical business intelligence (BI) are the core functions of SAP BusinessObjects BI. Formerly known as BOBJ, SAP BO is a business intelligence software solution. The application includes multiple reporting applications that allow users to conduct analytics, find data, ous reporting applications that help the users to find data, conduct analytics, and generate reports.

    What happened to SAP Business Objects?

    Over time, it became one of the largest and most respected BI vendors. BusinessObjects was acquired by SAP in 2007 for $6 billion. In 2001, SAP acquired SAP for $78 billion, their largest acquisition to date.

    Is Business Objects end of life?

    You may be aware that SAP BusinessObjects BI platform version 4 was recently released. From 31 December 2020, number 1 will undergo an official 'End of Life' (EOL) designation. There are still customers still running 4. As long as you keep using unsupported software, you will be subject to the normal operational, security, and compliance risks that go along with this.

    What is the latest version of SAP Business Objects?

    With SAP BusinessObjects BI 4, a highly successful beta has been completed. The third release has been released. The 4. With the latest version 3, this industry leaders' scalable enterprise reporting platform has taken a major step forward.

Thu, 23 Dec 2021 18:32:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.ictsd.org/business/how-much-does-sap-business-objects-cost/
Killexams : RMIT: Reimagining fashion accessories for Melbourne Fashion Week

RMIT students have worked with Sans Beast to reconfigure and upcycle handbags into creative fashion accessories to be displayed during Melbourne Fashion Week.

RMIT Bachelor of Fashion and Textiles (Design) (Honours) students partnered with the Australian-based luxe vegan fashion brand to upcycle bags with minor faults to add value back to the product, through creative innovation.

Students embraced the concept of reconfiguration – rearranging something into an altered form and configuring it again in a new way. They also explored the concept of upcycling, examining how to change use, increase resell value and reimagine the way materials are used to extend their life.

“This project wasn’t about sticky tape and staples. Our students were applying skill, craftsmanship and creativity at an advanced level,” said Chantal Kirby, Program Manager Bachelor of Fashion (Design)(Honours).

Throughout the past semester, students participated in a series of masterclasses exploring approaches to upcycling and developed a series of prototypes that are being showcased as a part of the Melbourne Fashion Week Fashion Capsules.

“Students have had an open scope to reinterpret what a bag could be. They were encouraged to be thinking about objects and other types of artifacts. It was about prototypes that might provoke thinking around the idea of reconfiguration and upcycling.”

Collaborating to boost creativity
Sans Beast founder Cathryn Wills said she chose to partner with RMIT on this project to put creativity and innovation as the priority.

Cathryn Wills in front of a green wallCathryn Wills established Sans Beast in 2017. after recognising a disconnect between her professional role and her ethical stance on animal welfare and the environment.
“As an independent brand working to survive and thrive, the business metrics can often become the primary focus. I want us to always remember that creative thinking and continuous improvement is central to our growth – both personal and professional,” Wills said.

“The idea of Sans Beast partnering with the RMIT School of Fashion and Textiles was exciting, in that it meant doing a project that was purely focused on innovative solutions to upcycling in fashion. Scale, sales, profit – none of this mattered for this project – it was just about getting ideas into the incubator and igniting creative flow.”

Associate Dean Fashion and Textiles Design, Ricarda Bigolin said “This partnered project between RMIT and Sans Beast is a fantastic opportunity for our students to gain hands-on experience and for our staff to strengthen their connections to Australia’s fashion industry. RMIT’s School of Fashion and Textiles consistently seeks to embed ethical, sustainable and circular economy practices into our curriculum and we’re excited to work with a brand that shares this ethos.”

From RMIT and back again
A graduate of RMIT in 1990s, Cathryn was excited to have the opportunity to reconnect with her university.

“I look back on my RMIT chapter with enormous fondness,” she said.

“I’m so grateful to have had the years of study, practise, discipline and creativity that the RMIT experience offered me – not to mention the lifelong friends I made while patternmaking, sewing, sketching and stressing together!”

“It was a nostalgic blast from the past – lovely all round to be back there. The faculty team were incredibly welcoming and have been such a delight to partner with.”

2 images of Cathryn Wills from the 1990s, left standing in front of a statue and right standing in front of a gateCathryn Wills on a 1995 RMIT trip to Europe, featuring a handmade and tie-dyed dress (left)
She hopes that students participating in this project will embrace concepts of upcycling as they begin their careers in fashion.

“The future of fashion will increasingly be about reconfiguration and upcycling. A lot needs to evolve in the industry of course – for one, manufacturing at scale with an upcycled design model is not straightforward – however the students of today will be the creative leaders of tomorrow,” she said.

“I suspect upcycling doesn’t resonate with all – but undoubtedly there will be a cohort of todays’ students who will be the changemakers in the thrift-led fashion economy.”

Sun, 16 Oct 2022 13:36:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://indiaeducationdiary.in/rmit-reimagining-fashion-accessories-for-melbourne-fashion-week/
Killexams : Engineering students create a 3D-printed functional robotic arm

Fifteen bachelor's and master's degree students from the Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB) of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC) share the same dream: improving the quality of life of people with disabilities using assistive technologies. Specifically, the young biomedical engineering team Arm2u is developing a transradial prosthesis—which replaces an arm missing below the elbow—with myoelectric control (i.e., controlled by the natural electrical signals produced by muscle contraction).

After creating a first prosthesis last year, the team has taken a step forward by creating a second prototype, a fully functional robotic arm that enables hand pronosupination (forearm rotation) and opening/closing movements. It is based on EMG sensors, which collect the commands from the patient's muscle contraction and transforms these electrical impulses into a signal that the microcontroller can understand and use.

The prosthesis is 3D printed with PLA plastic, so it can be produced at a low cost, as explained by Lluís Bonet Ortuño, one of the team leaders: "One of our main goals when developing the prosthesis was to make a prototype with affordable technologies so that it could be produced and modified constantly without a high cost. Using 3D printing, we have created a prosthesis at a much lower cost than similar prostheses on the market."

Prototype parts

Designed entirely by the Arm2u team, the prototype includes four fundamental parts that work in a coordinated way to enable mobility: the socket, which holds firmly the device onto the limb; the prono, which stores most of the electronics and houses the control and status information elements of the prosthesis; the gripper, a clamp-shaped element to manipulate objects; and finally, the electronic part, which uses an Arduino Uno microcontroller to connect the sensors, motors and other elements for controlling the device and reporting its status to the user.

The second model features several improvements, such as an integrated LCD screen, which reports continuously the status of the prosthesis providing information on , the effort by fingertips, the interior temperature and more.

Additionally, the new design has enhanced adaptability that allows for adjustment to the user's arm size, and a reduced total weight compared to the previous model, which makes it more comfortable.

Teamwork

Arm2u is a university team created in Barcelona in 2018 and based at the ETSEIB. It is a multidisciplinary group of students from the ETSEIB's bachelor's degree in Industrial Technology Engineering, the master's degree in Industrial Engineering and the master's degree in Automatic Control and Robotics, with interests in mechanics and electronics applied to biotechnology.

With the aim of pushing the boundaries of the prosthetics industry, the team is organized into three areas: the mechanics department, in charge of developing a conceptual CAD model—both kinetic and static simulations—selecting materials and researching manufacturing systems; the electronics department, in charge of controlling the multiple actuators in the prosthesis and the acquisition of myoelectric signals; and the management department, in charge of developing business and financial plans, managing resources and budget, internal management, communication and others.

According to Aleix Ricou, also a team leader, "the team aims to develop new prostheses to help people in and continue research in biomedical engineering. We want to become a leading university team for all students who want to learn about this area and we are open to working with anyone who shares our concerns."

An FME student, the Arm2u carrier

The carrier is a key actor in the design and development of prostheses, being the person for whom the prototype is customized and who tests its functions in a real environment. In the case of the robotic arm designed by the Arm2u team, the carrier is Kyle Briggs, an American student on the master's degree in Statistics and Operations Research at the UPC's School of Mathematics and Statistics (FME).

Having used several prostheses throughout his life to do activities such as cycling or working, Kyle admits that he enjoys wearing the prosthesis developed by the ETSEIB team. The student "competed" with the Arm2u prosthesis at the Cybathlon Challenge in Zurich, Switzerland, on 18 May. In this competition, people with physical disabilities test prostheses, developed by research teams from universities and companies around the world, by tackling everyday tasks, such as handling and transporting objects and placing them in a specific position inside cubes with different slots.

Now the team is looking forward to the 2024 Cybathlon, which is the main event, consisting of six tests. Participating in this type of experience is very positive, as it strengthens the bonds between team members. As explained by the students, "carrying out an engineering project and presenting it internationally before other professionals is a rewarding experience, it makes us feel proud and gives us the chance to experience first-hand the kind of situations that we may encounter in our future professional careers. Pursuing a common goal as a team allows us to face this challenge together, giving each other strength and support, and to complement our skills to accomplish the team's mission."



Citation: Engineering students create a 3D-printed functional robotic arm (2022, October 4) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://techxplore.com/news/2022-10-students-3d-printed-functional-robotic-arm.html

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Tue, 04 Oct 2022 06:24:00 -0500 en text/html https://techxplore.com/news/2022-10-students-3d-printed-functional-robotic-arm.html
Killexams : How The Innovator’s Brain Works

How does the human brain learn to innovate? The Thousand Brain theory, proposed by Silicon Valley innovator-turned-scientist Jeff Hawkins, is the first proposal to explain how the brain functions at the cellular level. This theory has direct, important, unexpected implications for how people learn to innovate, and therefore for how teachers, coaches, managers, and other professionals teach innovation.

This article provides a summary of Jeff’s conclusions. A longer, more detailed and informative video where I interview Jeff is available here or click the graphic below.

Key Idea

Based on new research in neuroscience, the Thousand Brain theory proposes that the cells in your brain make models of objects and concepts called reference frames. When new information arrives into the brain, these cells “vote” in order to determine if the new information fits the existing model or requires a new model. In this session, the theory’s author, Jeff Hawkins, will explain how the brain processes concepts like “opportunity” and “innovation”. These explanations have surprising implications for the way that educators teach students to innovate so that our pedagogy aligns with the way that our students’ brains function. During the session, Jeff will apply his theory of the brain to his own history as the inventor of the PalmPilot and the Treo, the world’s first handheld computer and first smartphone.

The theory begins with the supposition – supported with evidence – that each person’s brain creates models, called reference frames, inside the neocortex that approximate the world outside of the brain. These collect inputs from touch, sight, sound, smell, and taste. Each sensory experience creates its own model. These slowly converge towards a single consensus model of the world. For example, your brain has a full three-dimensional model of your coffee cup, along with estimates for where the cup is in space and where you are in comparison to the cup.

When an adult encounters a new object for the first time, the person’s brain first attempts to fit the object into reference frames that already exist in their mind. When you first saw a coffee cup, you might have thought that it was a solid stone. As the actor continues to interact with the object, the person’s cells vote to determine if the object fits in an existing frame or if a new model is required. (This vote is why this theory is called Thousand Brains. There are thousands of individual cells that participate in this vote.) The person’s brain will start to create a new model, using as many pieces from the old model as possible.

Once a person has developed a model of an object, they can make predictions about when they next see portions of the object. If you see only one side of your cup on a shelf, you can guess that it is the full, whole, complete cup even though you cannot see or touch all of it. The subset of information that you can collect agrees with the model that is already in the brain. The vote by the brain’s cells quickly achieve consensus.

The brain goes through this same process with more complex concepts like “democracy” or “trust.” It creates a rough model from other concepts that it already knows, and then refines the model to fit the new experiences. In other words, the brain starts with analogies. If new evidence contradicts predictions from the analogy, then the brain creates a new model that fits with the evidence, which in turn can become the basis for new prediction.

The Innovating Brain

Applying this theory to innovation is particularly challenging because, unlike a coffee cup or democracy, an innovator knows that a concept like “opportunity” does not necessary exist. And even if it does exist, it might be fleeting. And even if it does exist and is durable, it might not be large enough or lucrative enough to support an innovative product.

In addition to discovering this Thousand Brains theory, Jeff Hawkins was also the inventor of the PalmPilot, the world’s first handheld computer, and the Treo, the world’s first smart phone. A few years after the successful IPO of Palm, Jeff left technology to recommence his pursuit of brain science. This history allows Jeff to explain his own theory based on its activity while he himself was innovating.

He developed several different reference frames for how the PalmPilot could evolve as a product and as a business in the marketplace, which he and his co-founders drew from analogies of prior products. For example, he concluded that the company should follow the model set by Apple – one company making both the core software and the hardware devices for an integrated, cohesive product – and not the model set by Microsoft – one company making software with many companies competing against each other to create Windows computers for sale in various different segments. As he collected more evidence, his reference frame incrementally evolved into a new model.

How should educators teach students to be innovative? The Thousand Brain Theory suggests that neither recipes for innovation (i.e. the Lean Startup Method) nor practice in innovating (i.e. experiential experimentation) are sufficient to train an innovator’s brain to create new reference frames.

Jeff concludes that innovators need hundreds of existing reference frames in their brain already to help the brain’s cells recombine models during their voting process. Moreover, innovators need to protect this voting process in the neocortex from deeper feelings of fear, pressure, anxiety, adventure, or excitement that can emerge from older portions of the brain.

Artificial Intelligence and Popular Inaccuracies

In the latter portion of Jeff’s book, he explains the current popular method for helping computers mimic the brain to create artificial intelligence are larger on the wrong track because they do not attempt to imitate how the brain’s cells are creating and choosing reference frames. This fault, he opines, limits the progress that these contemporary approaches will make.

Jeff also describes how some false ideas – for example, willful and intentional belief that humans are not altering the Earth’s climate – can spread as a popular albeit inaccurate reference frame.

Every discipline – business strategy, childhood education, football training – rests on assumptions about how the human brain works. Jeff Hawkins asserts that every professional in these disciplines will be more effective if they more explicitly leverage this realization based on hard evidence for brain function.

References

Hawkins, J. (2021). A Thousand Brains: A New Theory of Intelligence. New York: Basic Books.

Lewis, M., Purdy, S., Ahmad, S., & Hawkins, J. (2019). Locations in the neocortex: a theory of sensorimotor object recognition using cortical grid cells. Frontiers in neural circuits, 13, 22.

Hawkins, J., Lewis, M., Klukas, M., Purdy, S., & Ahmad, S. (2019). A framework for intelligence and cortical function based on grid cells in the neocortex. Frontiers in neural circuits, 12, 121.

Hawkins, J., Ahmad, S., & Cui, Y. (2017). A theory of how columns in the neocortex enable learning the structure of the world. Frontiers in neural circuits, 11, 81.

Hawkins, J. (2017). Special report: Can we copy the brain?-What intelligent machines need to learn from the Neocortex. IEEE spectrum, 54(6), 34-71.

Hawkins, J., & Ahmad, S. (2016). Why neurons have thousands of synapses, a theory of sequence memory in neocortex. Frontiers in neural circuits, 10, 23.

Ahmad, S., & Hawkins, J. (2016). How do neurons operate on sparse distributed representations? A mathematical theory of sparsity, neurons and active dendrites. arXiv preprint arXiv:1601.00720.

George, D., & Hawkins, J. (2009). Towards a mathematical theory of cortical micro-circuits. PLoS computational biology, 5(10), e1000532.

Hawkins, J. (2007). Why Can't a Computer be more Like a Brain? IEEE spectrum, 44(4), 21-26.

Hawkins, J., & Blakeslee, S. (2004). On intelligence: Macmillan.

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 05:24:00 -0500 Ted Ladd en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/tedladd/2022/10/03/how-the-innovators-brain-works/
Killexams : UPC's engineering students design a customizable transradial prosthesis using 3D printing

The Arm2u biomedical engineering team, from the UPC's Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB), has designed and manufactured using 3D printing technology a customizable transradial prosthesis that responds to the user's nerve impulses.

Fifteen bachelor's and master's degree students from the Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB) of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC) share the same dream: improving the quality of life of people with disabilities using assistive technologies. Specifically, the young biomedical engineering team Arm2u is developing a transradial prosthesis—which replaces an arm missing below the elbow—with myoelectric control, i.e. controlled by the natural electrical signals produced by muscle contraction.

After creating a first prosthesis last year, the team has taken a step forward by creating a second prototype, a fully functional robotic arm that enables hand pronosupination (forearm rotation) and opening/closing movements. It is based on EMG sensors, which collect the commands from the patient's muscle contraction and transforms these electrical impulses into a signal that the microcontroller can understand and use.

The prosthesis is 3D printed with PLA plastic, so it can be produced at a low cost, as explained by Lluís Bonet Ortuño, one of the team leaders: "One of our main goals when developing the prosthesis was to make a prototype with affordable technologies so that it could be produced and modified constantly without a high cost. Using 3D printing, we have created a prosthesis at a much lower cost than similar prostheses on the market."

Prototype parts

Designed entirely by the Arm2u team, the prototype includes four fundamental parts that work in a coordinated way to enable mobility: the socket, which holds firmly the device onto the limb; the prono, which stores most of the electronics and houses the control and status information elements of the prosthesis; the gripper, a clamp-shaped element to manipulate objects; and finally, the electronic part, which uses an Arduino Uno microcontroller to connect the sensors, motors and other elements for controlling the device and reporting its status to the user.

The second model features several improvements, such as an integrated LCD screen, which reports continuously the status of the prosthesis providing information on battery life, the effort by fingertips, the interior temperature and more.

Additionally, the new design has enhanced adaptability that allows for adjustment to the user's arm size, and a reduced total weight compared to the previous model, which makes it more comfortable.

Teamwork

Arm2u is a university team created in Barcelona in 2018 and based at the ETSEIB. It is a multidisciplinary group of students from the ETSEIB's bachelor's degree in Industrial Technology Engineering, the master's degree in Industrial Engineering and the master's degree in Automatic Control and Robotics, with interests in mechanics and electronics applied to biotechnology.

With the aim of pushing the boundaries of the prosthetics industry, the team is organised into three areas: the mechanics department, in charge of developing a conceptual CAD model—both kinetic and static simulations—selecting materials and researching manufacturing systems; the electronics department, in charge of controlling the multiple actuators in the prosthesis and the acquisition of myoelectric signals; and the management department, in charge of developing business and financial plans, managing resources and budget, internal management, communication and others.

According to Aleix Ricou, also a team leader, "the team aims to develop new prostheses to help people in everyday life and continue research in biomedical engineering. We want to become a leading university team for all students who want to learn about this area and we are open to working with anyone who shares our concerns."

An FME student, the Arm2u carrier

The carrier is a key actor in the design and development of prostheses, being the person for whom the prototype is customised and who tests its functions in a real environment. In the case of the robotic arm designed by the Arm2u team, the carrier is Kyle Briggs, an American student on the master's degree in Statistics and Operations Research at the UPC's School of Mathematics and Statistics (FME).

Having used several prostheses throughout his life to do activities such as cycling or working, Kyle admits that he enjoys wearing the prosthesis developed by the ETSEIB team. The student "competed" with the Arm2u prosthesis at the Cybathlon Challenge in Zurich, Switzerland, on 18 May. In this competition, people with physical disabilities test prostheses, developed by research teams from universities and companies around the world, by tackling everyday tasks, such as handling and transporting objects and placing them in a specific position inside cubes with different slots.

Now the team is looking forward to the 2024 Cybathlon, which is the main event, consisting of six tests. Participating in this type of experience is very positive, as it strengthens the bonds between team members. As explained by the students, "carrying out an engineering project and presenting it internationally before other professionals is a rewarding experience, it makes us feel proud and gives us the chance to experience first-hand the kind of situations that we may encounter in our future professional careers. Pursuing a common goal as a team allows us to face this challenge together, giving each other strength and support, and to complement our skills to accomplish the team's mission."

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 06:05:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20221003/UPCs-engineering-students-design-a-customizable-transradial-prosthesis-using-3D-printing.aspx
Killexams : Peter Linneman On The Economy: Keep Calm And Carry On

Peter Linneman on the Walker Webcast

Business leaders such as JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon are predicting the U.S. economy could easily slip into a recession, but Peter Linneman, founder of CRE advisory firm Linneman Associates LLC, has a prescription for making it through the turmoil: practice patience, avoid shiny objects and don’t worry so much about interest rate increases.

Dimon and many others have voiced concerns about the impact of the Federal Reserve hiking interest rates to tame the economy. Speaking with host Willy Walker on the Walker Webcast this week, Linneman said he understands the concern about rising rates — taken to the extreme, it can echo the old workplace joke that “beatings will continue until morale improves,” he quipped.  

However, a strategic application of rate increases is just what the economy needs, Linneman said.

“Should things that are valuable have a zero price if what you're trying to do is maximize resource efficiency?” Linneman said. “The answer is, ‘Of course not.’ Something that's valuable should not have a zero price because it will get overused. Interest rates going up, at least to a certain point, gives a better signal of where money should be flowing. And that will enhance economic output.” 

Linneman said that even as banks like Dimon’s raise red flags, they could take steps to potentially juice the economy by opening up the lending spigot.  

“They have their hands full of money, and of course, they're human, they want to make their bonuses,” Linneman said. “If they had no money, I couldn’t tell you that they'll start lending. But I know they have money because all you have to do is look at their reserve positions in the Federal Reserve reports. They have stunning reserves.”

He said he believes most markets will achieve supply-and-demand balance within the next year if the rate increases are allowed to work. As a result, inflation will recede, he said.

Walker questioned why Linneman seemed unfazed by the fact that real gross domestic product fell in the first two quarters of 2022.

“Your response to that is: ‘If this is a recession, I want it to last forever,’” Walker said. “If this is such a great time, why are the markets so pessimistic?” 

Willy Walker on the Walker Webcast

Linneman, who holds master's and doctorate degrees in economics from the University of Chicago, agreed that markets dislike uncertainty, and investors and consumers are understandably spooked when they read that billions of dollars in wealth have been wiped out in the markets this year. But statistics like that miss the bigger picture, he said.

“Another way to look at it is that our real wealth is unchanged,” Linneman said. “What do I mean by that? We have the same stock of human capital, we have the same stock of physical capital, we have the same stock of people who are creative, and all that didn't change. That's the real wealth of the country, and I'm not being cute.”

Linneman’s advice to investors is to avoid being distracted by “shiny objects” such as the upcoming election and the impacts they might have on the economy. 

“Don't get distracted,” he said. “Focus on the asset, focus on the fundamentals. And I think if you do, [you will find] this is not such a bad time.” 

Linneman is bullish on most CRE asset classes — except for senior housing, whose time has not quite come, he said. The baby boomers are aging, but today’s healthier lifestyles mean they can live independently longer.

At nearly the opposite end of the generational spectrum, Linneman, a professor emeritus at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, said his advice to young people is that now — in spite of the economic uncertainty — is actually a great time to get into CRE.

“To this day, I still advise students that the worst time to get hired is at the peak of the market because once you're there, you think it's great, and then in a year and a half, two years, it’s gone,” Linneman said. “With hindsight, the best time is when it’s at the bottom. That’s because everybody's humble and the people you get hired by have figured out how to survive, and so you're learning from survivors instead of wild men. And you just have a better environment, although it's a more painful environment for a couple of years.”

If Linneman’s assertion that rising interest rates will enhance economic growth materializes, then those young CRE professionals can eventually look forward to an improving economy as they begin to move up the ranks at work. 

That is, if they don’t allow themselves to get distracted by shiny objects.

The next Walker Webcast will be on Oct. 19 with Diana Walker, an award-winning photojournalist and former Time Magazine White House photographer — and Willy’s mother. Click here to register. The discussion will take place at the Walker & Dunlop Women’s Summit. 

This article was produced in collaboration between Walker & Dunlop and Studio B. Bisnow news staff was not involved in the production of this content.

Studio B is Bisnow’s in-house content and design studio. To learn more about how Studio B can help your team, reach out to studio@bisnow.com

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 13:27:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bisnow.com/national/news/commercial-real-estate/peterlinneman-economy-walkerdunlop-studiob-115838
Killexams : Michigan tried to limit 'barbaric' practice in 2016. Educators used it 94,000 times since.

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Killexams : Biz bits: Fernbank Museum launches new exhibits, Emory nursing school receives $11.8 million in grants

Atlanta, GA — Here’s a look at business news in our community.

— Fernbank Museum launched two new exhibits on Oct. 8. 

Here is the full press release:

ATLANTA (Sept. 6, 2022) On the horizon of Fernbank’s 30th anniversary, the museum announces an out-of-this-world exhibit, “Journey to Space,” on view from Oct. 8, 2022 – Jan. 1, 2023. This new exhibit highlights the excitement of cosmic travel, the physical issues that arise with space exploration, the challenges of gravitational weightlessness, what it would be like to live and work outside of Earth’s atmosphere and more! Visitors are invited to immerse themselves in a hands-on experience that explores the challenges and solutions surrounding space travel and, inevitably, humankind’s future.

“Journey to Space” delights science enthusiasts with a combination of impressive objects and hands-on opportunities that allow patrons to better understand the science of traveling to, living in and working from space. Visitors will have the opportunity to explore historic space-related attire and protective gear, including Neil Armstrong’s gloves, an Apollo helmet, space suit sleeves, meteoroid shields and more. They will also gain the unique perspective of how spacesuits are engineered to protect astronauts from the many dangers they encounter while in orbit.

Interactivity abounds in “Journey to Space,” including the chance to launch a water rocket to see how much hydropower it takes to reach its maximum height, turn on an ion engine to watch ionized air molecules in action, view Earth as only astronauts can through a large projection of images taken from an orbiting space craft, control a robotic arm using hand controllers and video monitors to complete a task as astronauts do and more.The exhibit also offers interactive, pressure-related experiments to explore, including a Vacuum Bell Jar that demonstrates how objects behave in zero pressure, an orbit table that allows guests to simulate what it would be like to launch a puck into space and a 16-foot drop tower that explores the effects of momentary weightlessness on objects.

“For space enthusiasts who considered becoming an astronaut, this exhibit will be a taste of what life would be like in orbit,” said Educational Manager, Sarah Arnold. “Journey to Space really gives our guests the full experience of life as an astronaut, not just the lives we see portrayed in the movies. It explores not only the educational aspects of getting up to space, but the challenges that can arise on this journey.”

The exhibitoffers guests a real-time view into the intricacies of space travel as it currently stands and what this means for the future among the stars. With objects including everything from space food to shuttle era urinals, guests can compare the complexities of everyday life on Earth when juxtaposed against long-term galactic living, ultimately gaining an understanding of what it’s like to eat, sleep, and even go to the bathroom in space. From earth-living to moon travel to voyages on Mars, “Journey to Space” enthralls visitors with the intensity required of space travel and will find themselves asking, “where to next?

Presented by the Science Museum of Minnesota and the California Science Center. With support from NASA.

Local presentation made possible in part by Genuine Parts Company.

Additional support provided by Atlanta Falcons, Delta Air Lines, Novelis, and Romanoff Renovations.

RELATED PROGRAMMING

Also opening on Oct. 8 is the giant screen film, “Astronaut: Ocean to Orbit.” Planned to open alongside the space-themed exhibit, this film explores the ways NASA uses underwater environments to simulate life and work in space. Offering a fascinating look into the high-tech world of astronauts, “Astronaut: Ocean to Orbit” includes footage of renowned astronaut, Jeanette Epps living underwater for ten days and details the intricacies of extensive space-walk training. Specific showtimes vary by date. One giant screen movie is included with general admission (subject to availability).

To kick-off the out-of-this-world exhibit, Fernbank is making plans for a galactic adventure into family fun with a special Discovery Day on October 8 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., commemorating the launch of “Journey to Space” and “Astronaut: Ocean to Orbit,”complete with fun activities for all ages. This event is included with general admission.

Fernbank Museum will also be bringing back a fan-favorite special exhibit, “Sun, Earth, Universe” which will allow visitors to engage in hands-on content about our closest star, our planet, the universe and how they interact. Exhibit activities include a Mars Landscape Play Table, a Spacecraft Model Building Activity, Your Mission to Space Board Game and more. To view this exhibit, please visit the Naturalist Center, Lab B. The “Sun, Earth, Universe” special exhibit created by the National Informal STEM Educational Network (NISE Net) in collaboration with NASA.

TICKETS

Journey to Space is included with general admission at Fernbank and with CityPASS. General admission tickets include three floors of exhibits in the natural history museum, choice of one giant screen film, and 75 acres of nature explorations in Fernbank Forest and WildWoods. Fernbank is located at 767 Clifton Road NE in Atlanta, minutes from midtown Atlanta and downtown Decatur.

For more information, visit FernbankMuseum.org. General admission tickets are $24.95 for adults, $23.95 for seniors, $22.95 for children ages 3-12, free for children ages 2 and younger, and free for Fernbank Members. These prices are for tickets purchased online at FernbankMuseum.org. Tickets not purchased in advance are offered, if available, at a higher price.

More information is available at FernbankMuseum.org.

*Fernbank Museum’s 30th anniversary is Oct. 5, 2022.

Image provided by Emory University

— Emory’s School of Nursing has received over $11.8 million in HRSA funding for health delivery and training programs in Atlanta, the state and the Southeast.

Here is the full announcement:

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has awarded the Emory University Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing four grants totaling more than $11.8 million for work in health delivery and training programs for underserved areas of Atlanta, the state of Georgia and the Southeast.

The grants will advance the public health workforce in the Atlanta area, establish a mobile health presence in South Georgia and Atlanta, increase the numbers of clinical nursing faculty and preceptors in the Southeast, and prepare students and practicing nurses to advance culturally sensitive acute care in Atlanta communities.

The projects will be part of the community programming work of the School of Nursing’s Lillian Carter Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility, charged with helping Improve the health of vulnerable people worldwide through nursing education, research, practice and policy.

“The community is where much of care happens, and this funding will play a tremendous role in preparing our future nurse leaders to serve communities,” says Linda McCauley, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of the School of Nursing. “We have a responsibility to be part of the solution of making sure every individual has access to care, and we are grateful for such a breadth and depth of funding to bolster this work.”

Supporting the community health workforce

A $3 million, three-year HRSA grant will create the Atlanta Region Community Health Workforce Advancement (ARCHWAy) program, which aims to expand and support the work of community health workers (CHW) including health educators, community organizers, capacity builders and care delivery team members.

In a recent health care ranking of the nation’s top 20 cities, Atlanta ranked second to last for health cost, quality and access. Meanwhile, Atlanta is the eighth largest metropolitan statistical area in the nation but is not among the 10 metro areas with the highest CHW employment, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The program will address these challenges by providing a 12-week training program for new and existing CHWs, coupled with recruitment and retention initiatives such as field placements, tuition support/stipends, job placement and wrap-around services including early care and education, financial literacy support and mentoring. The training will feature simulated experiences and hands-on learning involving Topics such as patient advocacy, community outreach, service coordination, health promotion, emergency response, and heart disease, stroke and HIV prevention and treatment.

Beth Ann Swan, PhD, RN, FAAN, associate dean and vice president for academic practice partnerships at the School of Nursing, received the grant and will be directing the program. This program is supported by HRSA as part of an award totaling $3 million with 0.05 percent financed with non-governmental sources.

Making health care mobile

Mobile health benefiting underserved communities is the focus of the more than $3.9 million, four-year “Nurse Education, Practice Quality and Retention – Mobile Health Training Program” grant.

With the funding, the School of Nursing will establish the Emory in MOTION mobile health program, which will provide two nurse-led mobile health units serving South Georgia and the Atlanta area and allow Emory nursing students from diverse backgrounds to gain clinical experience while providing care on the units.

Emory in MOTION will work with the Ellenton Migrant Farmworker Clinic, a long-standing clinical partner in Moultrie, Georgia, to purchase and staff a nurse-led mobile health van providing care to the area’s migrant farm workers. In Atlanta, Emory in MOTION will work with several partners to establish nurse-led teams providing mobile care to communities in need. Partnering organizations include Boat People SOS, Atlanta Harm Reduction Coalition, the Mexican Consulate, the DeKalb County Board of Health and the Gwinnett, Newton and Rockdale district public health departments.

The grant was awarded to assistant professorsQuyen Phan, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC; Erin Ferranti, PhD, MPH, RN, FAHA; and Roxana Chicas, PhD, RN; and Laura Kimble, PhD, RN, FNP-C, FAHA, FAAN, professor and associate dean for academic operations. This program is supported by HRSA as part of an award totaling $3,908,760 with no percentage financed with non-governmental sources.

Increasing clinical faculty, preceptors

Like all professionals, nurses benefit from insight and guidance from experienced colleagues as they start their careers. That reality is the heart of a four-year, more than $3.9 million grant that will recruit and train nurses to be clinical nursing faculty and preceptors in the Southeast.

Clinical nursing faculty teach and evaluate nursing students during their on-site training in hospitals and other clinical settings, and preceptors are experienced, licensed nurses who supervise students during clinical rotations.

The HRSA grant will create the Clinical Instructor and Preceptor Excellence in the Southeast (CAPES) Academy, which will prepare 128 nurses to serve as clinical nursing faculty and preceptors to newly hired licensed nurses for a variety of care settings in health professional shortage areas in eight states in the Southeast.

The academy will create and implement a training curriculum, provide services to facilitate clinical faculty and preceptor success, financially support clinical faculty and preceptors to promote retention, place newly trained clinical faculty and preceptors with employment opportunities, and enhance or create new academic-clinical partnerships.

The CAPES Academy is designed to increase the capacity of the nursing workforce, as the increase in nurse educators will enable nursing schools to enroll more students and prepare more nurses.

The program will be directed by Quyen Phan, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC, assistant professor in the School of Nursing. This program is supported by HRSA as part of an award totaling $3,923,317 with no percentage financed with non-governmental sources.

Strengthening culturally sensitive acute care

A nearly $1 million, three-year grant will create “Toward Health Equity and Literacy: Training for Optimal RN Efficacy in Acute Care” (2HEAL) — a program to increase the number of undergraduate nursing students trained in acute care settings to address and manage social determinants of health.

Social determinants of health are conditions in the places where people live, learn, work and play that affect health and quality of life.

Through 2HEAL, approximately 135 bachelor of science in nursing students from diverse backgrounds will take part in hands-on learning, simulation scenarios with manikins and patient-actors, and training alongside community partners that serve marginalized populations — all to strengthen students’ capacity for high-quality, culturally sensitive care in acute care settings, where patients receive active but short-term care for severe injury or illness.

The School of Nursing is one of the first nursing schools in the U.S. to systematically integrate social determinants of health across its curricula. 2HEAL will build upon that momentum, expanding how students address social determinants of health in clinical training and bolstering student insight into health equity and health literacy for underserved populations in metro Atlanta.

The program will also partner with Emory Healthcare to deliver professional development learning modules as part of its registered nurse preparation.

The grant recipient is Roxana Chicas, PhD, RN, assistant professor in the School of Nursing. This program is supported by HRSA as part of an award totaling $945,776 with no percentage financed with non-governmental sources.

The contents of HRSA-supported grants are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by HRSA, the Department of Health and Human Services, or the U.S. government. For more information, please visit HRSA.gov.

Fernbank Museum will launch “WildWoods: AGLOW” this fall in celebration of the museum’s 30th anniversary. Photo courtesy of Fernbank Museum.

— In celebration of Ferbank’s 30th anniversary, the museum announced a new, immersive convergence of nature and technology in “WildWoods: AGLOW.”

This all-new, limited-run nighttime experience is set to open in the 10-acre woodlands of WildWoods in late fall 2022.

Highlighting the complex, connected and sometimes-hidden stories that flourish in the surrounding forest, this innovative experience brings together the vast, natural environment with the latest innovations in immersive design and technology, according to a press release.

“We are always exploring exciting ways to engage audiences with science and nature while tickling the imagination through innovative and fun programming,” said Fernbank President and CEO, Jennifer Grant Warner. “WildWoods: AGLOW is an exciting experience that will reveal nature’s magnificent wonders through beautiful, artistic and intentional uses of projection that enhance our understanding of the ecosystem that connects us all.”

As guests enter the experience, they first discover oversized seeds glowing with interactive light, signaling the origin of forest growth and inspiring a deeper connection with nature. Throughout the experience, guests will encounter nocturnal animals, forest projections, and interactive lighting integrated with the surrounding plants and woodland environment. Another zone features larger-than-life incandescent mushrooms that can respond to guest movement with a musical symphony of illuminated communication.

Developed in partnership with Thinkwell, a leading design and production agency creating immersive, content-driven experiences for brands and companies around the world, “WildWoods: AGLOW” is the third endeavor between the two organizations. Thinkwell has also previously designed and opened outdoor, nighttime experiences, including Omega a la Nuit and Harry Potter: A Forbidden Forest Experience.

“We are thrilled to be partnering with Fernbank once again, this time with creative and technical development driven by our teams in Montréal. The focus on innovation, along with strategic partnership and shared creative vision has allowed this project to flourish,” said Joe Zenas, Thinkwell’s CEO. “Wildwoods: AGLOW highlights the best of nature, immersion and engagement in a unique and beautiful way, and we’re so excited to bring it to the public later this fall.”

“WildWoods: AGLOW” will be offered from late fall 2022 through early spring 2023.

Former DeKalb County Board of Health District Health Director Sandra Elizabeth Ford,
M.D., M.B.A., F.A.A.P., speaks before the first frontline workers with the board of health receive the COVID-19 vaccine at the T. O. Vinson Health Center Auditorium on Winn Way in Decatur on Dec. 31, 2020. Photo by Dean Hesse.

— CaringWorks is celebrating 20 years of breaking the cycle of homelessness in metro Atlanta.

CaringWorks, one of the largest providers of supportive housing in the metropolitan Atlanta area, is marking 20 years of breaking the cycle of homelessness, one person, one family, at a time. By providing quality supportive housing, behavioral health, and a myriad of support services that empower clients to achieve stability and reach their full potential, CaringWorks has helped more than 10,000 individuals and families in metro Atlanta escape homelessness, according to a press release.

To commemorate their anniversary, the city of Atlanta has recognized Oct. 27 as CaringWorks Day. Additionally, Dr. S. Elizabeth Ford, Special Assistant to the President for Public Health and Science, and former District Health Director and Chief Executive Officer of the DeKalb County Board of Health, will provide remarks about important efforts underway to address health disparities in communities across the country – an important issue throughout metro Atlanta and particularly for the people CaringWorks serves.

“At CaringWorks, we are honored to be celebrating 20 years of serving those exiting homelessness in metro Atlanta and are excited about the possibilities for breaking the cycle of homelessness over the next 20 years,” said CaringWorks CEO Carol Collard. “Since our inception in 2002, CaringWorks has grown exponentially to become one of Georgia’s leaders in providing permanent supportive housing. But our commitment extends beyond housing support. As an advocate for equitable access to housing and health services, we also offer support to help clients optimize their physical and mental wellness, increasing their chance at remaining stably housed.”

CaringWorks seeks to remove barriers to health and stability through its unique programs that are specifically tailored to the needs of those facing chronic homelessness. To address growing unmet behavioral health and other health needs, CaringWorks continues to grow in its capacity and effectiveness to serve by launching innovative programs and services – and enhancing existing ones – to integrate health services more seamlessly with its housing and essential supportive services.

— Latino Community Fund Georgia’s “Estamos Aqui Fiesta” attracts hundreds to Atlanta Beltline to kick off Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month. The inaugural event held “inside the perimeter” brings awareness to city of Atlanta’s Latinx community as part of LCF Georgia’s Get Out the Vote campaign.

Here is the full press release:

Hundreds of people recently gathered at the Historic Old Fourth Ward Park along the Atlanta Beltline’s busy Eastside Trail to celebrate the inaugural “Estamos Aqui” fiesta sponsored by the Latino Community Fund Georgia, a nonprofit group focused on supporting and amplifying the voices of the state’s Latinx community.

The “Estamos Aquí Fiesta” on Sept. 10 kicked off a calendar of events for Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month, celebrated through October. Live music, vendors selling food from several Latin American countries, and traditional dance created a space to celebrate culture.

Holding the fiesta along the Atlanta Beltline where thousands of people, especially young people, walk, bicycle and skate, is one way LCF Georgia plans to increase awareness of Atlanta’s Latinx residents living inside I-285, or ITP. Nearly 5% — or 25,000 —of the city of Atlanta’s population is Hispanic or Latino, according to 2020 Census data. The median age of metro Atlanta Latinx residents is 26, according to the Atlanta Regional Commission. Throughout the state, there are close to 1.2 million people of Latin American descent, or nearly 11% of the population.

“I loved that LCF chose to host the event in the city in a high-profile park,” said Atlanta City Councilmember Amir Farokhi, who attended the event and whose district includes the Old Fourth Ward.

“Our metro Atlanta Latinx population tends to live and convene OTP (outside the perimeter of I-285). But Atlanta, as a global city, is a proper is home for everyone,” he said. “It was a beautiful, joyous event that reflected the richness of our region. Next year, I’d like to see more immediate residents to the park come out to enjoy the festival. But that will come from early outreach and word of mouth.”

LCF Georgia fiesta also celebrated its “Estamos Aqui” Get Out the Vote campaign at the fiesta. Atlanta-based rapper Victor Mariachi performed his song “Estamos Aqui” at the fiesta and a video of him performing the song is also part of LCF Georgia’s voter outreach to younger Latinx residents.

In 2020, LCF Georgia partnered with Panamanian artist Nino Augustine, a Panamanian artist who has been featured in Rolling Stone and People, on its “Me Toca a Mí, Te Toca a Tí” campaign to encourage Latinx people to participate in the 2020 Census. The campaign included a video of Augustine performing an original song. It was nominated for a SouthEast Emmy Award.

“I’ve been part of the Atlanta creative community since 2012, as a curator of events and as a performer. It’s amazing to see the growth looking back 10 years,” said Augustine, who recently moved to the East Coast but returned to Atlanta to perform at the Estamos Aqui fiesta.

“I’m proud of what’s been accomplished … and I feel very good about the future of Atlanta’s Latinx scene,” he said. “I had to be present at this year’s “Estamos Aqui” fiesta because I feel part of the mission, and even though I’m currently working out of the state to further my career, I will forever look at Atlanta, LCF Georgia, and my community as my family, and wherever I’m at, I’m a representation of them,” Augustine said.

Juan Mendoza, president of the Old Fourth Ward Business Association, said plans are in the works to hold the second Estamos Aqui fiesta at the park along the Beltline again next year.

“We’re aware that there is a need to build a space here in town, specifically in the Old Fourth Ward, for a richer Latinx culture,” he said.

Mendoza, who is of Mexican descent, said he often finds himself traveling “outside the perimeter” to places such as Norcross and Duluth to find Hispanic and Latinx cultural events. The Estamos Aqui fiesta was “amazing and successful” in reaching a broader audience of people in the city of Atlanta to learn more about Latinx culture, he said.

“The attendees of the fiesta were very diverse, and it was a joy to see people from all walks of life enjoying themselves, immersing themselves and learning more about Latinx culture,” Mendoza said. “It was just a tender moment for me to see the Latinx community being able to celebrate their culture and have others celebrate their culture in that beautiful and historical part of Atlanta.”

Nonprofit and civic groups registered voters, informed residents of various ways to contribute to their neighborhoods and city and provided resources on how to remain civically involved in their communities. Many more events are planned to celebrate Hispanic/Latinx events and are available at this link.

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Thu, 13 Oct 2022 23:57:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://decaturish.com/2022/10/biz-bits-fernbank-museum-launches-new-exhibits-emory-nursing-school-receives-11-8-million-in-grants/
Killexams : 'You' Season Four Will Stream in a Terrifying Two Parts

It’s official: Joe Goldberg will live to creep another day.

Netflix has announced that You will get a fourth season. The thrilling stalker psychodrama has amassed legions of fans, with reportedly upwards of 40 million viewers tuning in during its first month on the platform alone. The announcement video strings together every time Joe says “for you” in voiceover, leading to a card reading, “4 You.” (Awful clever, aren’t they?)

Based on a novel of the same name by Caroline Kepnes, the series asks the question, “What would you do for love?” The answer, according to Joe Goldberg (played by Penn Badgley): stalk women, gaslight the hell out of them, and bury them alive. The objects of Joe’s romantic obsessions always exit the show in a bodybag, but Season Two ended with a delicious twist when Love Quinn (Victoria Pedretti), then Joe’s latest beloved, turned out to be every bit as deranged and murderous as he. Season Three ended with a literal explosion when Joe killed a jealous Love, set their house (containing her body) on fire, and framed the crime as a murder-suicide. Leaving their young son with a loving couple, Joe high-tailed it to Paris, determined to find his new obsession Marienne abroad and build a life with her.

“Reading Caroline’s novel, Greg and I were instantly obsessed with Joe Goldberg and his twisted world view,” said show-runner Sera Gamble. “And it’s been thrilling to watch Penn bring Joe to creepy yet compelling life. We’re deeply grateful that Netflix has shown You such monumental support, and that people around the world have enjoyed watching Joe really get it all very wrong over the past 3 seasons. The whole You team is excited to explore new, dark facets of love in season 4.”

What Will You Season Four Be About?

You tradition dictates that Season Four will see Joe pick up a new city with a new cast of characters. A new teaser from Netflix, streaming above, confirms as much. This time around, Joe is living in London, with a new identity as Professor Jonathan Moore. “Gone are the days of unrequited love and longing,” Joe narrates. “This time around, I’m focusing on academia and instruction while keeping my typical extracurricular activities strictly professional. I made time to exchange ideas with like-minded colleagues. Unfortunately, with friends in high places, then usually come others attempting to climb that social ladder. So, they end up falling or shall I say, pushed, to their social death. The question, by who?”

Of course, a new country and a new identity don't mean a new Joe. “I think if Joe finds Marienne, he’ll live happily ever after and have beautiful babies. He’ll learn to speak French, he’ll become a writer, they’ll spend a lot of time along the Seine, and they’ll send their kids to school in Sweden,” Badgley joked. “No, I think Joe will remain the same. Someone this profoundly ill, disturbed, traumatized and violent has a serious hurdle before them if they’re ever going to heal and change. I don’t know if it’s possible for someone who’s that far gone.”

Behind the scenes of You. © Netflix Behind the scenes of You.

Will There Be New Characters?

Netflix has released a bushel of character descriptions about all the new faces we can expect to see in Season Four; they also make their first appearances in the teaser streaming above. By the looks of it, they'll be Joe's compatriots on the London literary scene. Below, you'll find Netflix's official character descriptions for the three new series regulars:

Tilly Keeper as Lady Phoebe: As sweet and kind as she is rich, famous, and chaotic, Phoebe's every bikini wax has been documented by the tabloids since she was 15 years old. An aristocratic socialite with an avid fan base, Phoebe's true colors show when she's alone with her friends. She's a steadfast cheerleader, especially to American entrepreneur boyfriend Adam. She's also a wild card: When misfortune strikes, will she rise to the occasion, or shatter?

Amy Leigh Hickman as Nadia: A literature major with a love of genre storytelling and the aspiration to be a serious author, Nadia's outspokenness and intensity are a perfect cover for the insecurities carried by a young woman who's never been accepted by her peer group. She's made some big mistakes; now, they threaten to destroy her life. She'll need help, even if it's from the wrong people.

Ed Speleers as Rhys: Dry, irreverent Rhys is an author whose memoir garnered him acclaim and pressure to launch a political career. Born into poverty, Rhys lived a traumatic early life before he came into money, going to Oxford and making all the right friends. Now, he moves easily in any social circle, while also seeing through those around him. He doesn't have much time for partying, though he enjoys staying in touch with his eccentric circle of friends. After all, they were there for him in his troubled youth.

We're also getting a bushel of recurring players—from cryptocurrency magnates to insufferable influencers, Joe really knows how to pick'em. You'll find their official character descriptions below:

Niccy Lin as Sophie: Sophie is an entrepreneur in the body of a pampered jet-setter. Sure, it looks like she's lying around in a bikini on social media, but every aspect of her feed represents cannily negotiated high-end sponsorship deals. Underneath her whimsical exterior, Sophie is a watchful protector of her introverted artist brother, Simon.

Aidan Cheng as Simon: Simon is impossible to impress and abhors small talk and strangers. The Oxford-educated son of a Chinese technology magnate, Simon proved the world wrong when, despite his wealth and sheltered life, he proved himself an artist worthy of acclaim.

Stephen Hagan as Malcolm: Born to privilege, Malcolm is a literature professor who enjoys all the social perks of the job without working very hard. A drug-loving bon vivant, Malcolm's friendliness can tip over into bullying if you resist. He's dating brilliant, successful Kate, which speaks to his own intelligence and maturity. But he's also seeing a few others on the side, which cancels out those bonus points.

Ben Wiggins as Roald: Roald hails from an old aristocratic family whose names are on many an important building around Europe. He is attractive, stylish, and possessed of perfect manners, but there's a certain cold calculation to Roald, not to mention rumors of a hidden dark side.

Eve Austin as Gemma: A member of a privileged circle of friends who met at Oxford, Gemma has never given a day's thought to life beyond the next VIP event, fashion show, or date. She's a fun friend to party with, but her insular and privileged life has rendered her shockingly tone-deaf and startlingly lacking in empathy towards those with less.

Ozioma Whenu as Blessing: A Nigerian princess with several post-graduate degrees, Blessing is an investor with a passion for cryptocurrency. Wry, fun-loving, unapologetically cliquish with her university friends, her carefree risk-taking in life and business has paid off time and again. What's her secret? She believes we're all living in a simulation, so only fools would stop themselves from doing whatever they want.

Dario Coates as Connie: Connie attended Oxford with Kate and Phoebe's friend group. He is upper-crust, posh, a sportsman gone soft. Loud, potty-mouthed, loves betting, horses, drinking, and cocaine. It's safe to assume that Connie's never had to face a negative consequence in his life.

Sean Pertwee as Vic: Adam's personal driver/dealer/security, proud and impeccably dressed Vic is loyal and keeps many of Adam and his friends' secrets. He's not afraid to get his hands dirty to protect them — the job always comes first. Outsiders are treated with polite but utter suspicion.

Brad Alexander as Edward: University student Edward's dad owns a powerful news outlet. Edward is popular and used to being the smartest student in the room. He has a fierce rivalry with fellow student Nadia.

Alison Pargeter as Dawn: Dawn is not someone you'd notice in a crowd, and that helps with her work as a paparazzi photographer. But if you're someone determined to avoid being captured on camera, well, Dawn could pose a problem.

Adam James as Elliot: World-weary, calm, grounded, allergic to drama, Elliot has lived in California for decades, but his job requires him to travel throughout Europe. Elliot's employer is powerful, and Elliot always delivers, no matter how challenging the task.

Which Cast Members Will Return?

Other than Badgley, the only confirmed returning cast member is Tati Gabrielle (who plays Marienne), but the possibilities don't stop there. As viewers of You know, most of the show's characters exit the picture very much dead, but Scott Speedman's Matthew Engler miraculously survived the season. Matthew, who blames Joe for his wife Natalie's death, clearly isn't done with Joe. Could we see Matthew return in Season Four, hell bent on hunting Joe down and making him pay?

"No one's said anything to me," Speedman divulged in an exclusive interview with Esquire. "My honest answer is that I really doubt it. I think they want to close that loop up, or they don't want to lock themselves into other things. I think they've got a great show going, which really prides itself on having separate full seasons with new sets of characters. Though I agree that I don’t think the character is done with Joe. Matthew is a very rich man, so I can see him trying to track Joe down. I’d love to come back for that, but somehow I’m doubtful."

When Will You Season Four Hit Netflix?

You officially has a release date. Part One of the season will stream on February 10, while Part Two will hit Netflix on March 10. As for the split, Gamble teased, “Trust me, you’ll need the time to process… and maybe place a few friendly bets about where it’s all going.” Watch this space for updates as we continue to learn more.

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