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Exam Code: IAPP-CIPP-E Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Certified Information Privacy Professional/Europe (CIPP/E)
IAPP Professional/Europe approach
Killexams : IAPP Professional/Europe approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/IAPP-CIPP-E Search results Killexams : IAPP Professional/Europe approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/IAPP-CIPP-E https://killexams.com/exam_list/IAPP Killexams : How Silicon Valley gamed Europe’s privacy rules

When Europe’s tough privacy rules came into force on May 25, 2018, policymakers and industry executives expected a series of dominoes would soon start to fall.

Global technology giants like Facebook would feel the heat of fines of up to 4 percent of their total yearly revenue. Companies like Google would think twice before pushing ahead with aggressive new ways of collecting people’s data. Smaller rivals would be given greater space to compete.

But a year later, none of those dominoes have yet fallen, according to interviews with senior policymakers, tech executives and privacy campaigners.

Big fines and sweeping enforcement actions have been largely absent, as under-resourced European regulators struggle to define their mission — and take time to build investigations that will likely end up in court.

New forms of data collection, including Facebook’s reintroduction of its facial recognition technology in Europe and Google’s efforts to harvest information on third-party websites, have been given new leases on life under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR.

Smaller firms — whose fortunes were of special concern to the framers of the region’s privacy revamp — also have suffered from the relatively high compliance costs and the perception, at least among some investors, that they can’t compete with Silicon Valley’s biggest names.

“Big companies like Facebook are 10 steps ahead of everyone else, and 100 steps ahead of regulators,” declared Paul-Olivier Dehaye, a privacy expert who helped uncover Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal. “There are very big questions about what they’re doing.”

The patchy record of Europe’s data protection overhaul — on the one-year anniversary of its implementation — has given industry an opportunity to blunt similar efforts outside the European Union to emulate the region’s new privacy rules.

Campaigners and some lawmakers from Colombia to South Africa and even the United States clamor to import similar protections, claiming that only strict restrictions will grant citizens sufficient control over their data.

But aggressive industry lobbying in capitals worldwide has worked hard to frame Europe’s laws as overly cumbersome, particularly for small companies, with technology groups warning other politicians not to merely copy Europe in the rejiggering of their own local privacy standards.

“A lot of small and medium-sized businesses are still struggling,” said John Miller, vice president of policy at the Information Technology Industry Council, a trade group in Washington, D.C. that represents many of Silicon Valley’s biggest names. “How do we protect the rights of consumers here without making the law quite so onerous?”

GDPR, one year on

It was not supposed to be this way.

When Europe unveiled its privacy revamp, European officials hailed it as a major victory for consumers — a message that piggybacked on the public’s growing awareness of their data rights after Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, in which roughly 87 million of its users worldwide had their data misused during political campaigns.

Policymakers like Andrea Jelinek, an Austrian official in charge of a pan-regional group of EU data protection regulators, gave evidence to the U.S. Congress on how Europe has implemented its new laws. Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, promised to offer European-style protections to all of his company’s 2.2 billion global users.

But since the region’s standards came into force a year ago, few companies have yet to have their wings clipped by the new regulation — and some of the world’s largest tech companies have used their significant in-house regulatory and financial muscle to turn Europe’s privacy push to their advantage.

“There has been a dramatic change both in the attitudes toward the tech firms and, I would say, in the views of European privacy law” — Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center

So far, almost 100,000 privacy complaints have been filed with national privacy regulators, though only a few have led to meaningful penalties, according to the International Association of Privacy Professionals, an industry trade body. Total fines have now reached roughly €56 million, although almost all of that came from a one-off €50 million levy against Google by French officials (the search giant is appealing that decision).

National agencies — often small, obscure regulatory offshoots that lack the manpower or legal resources to keep large multinationals at bay — have struggled to deliver Europe’s privacy rules real bite, despite widespread government efforts to increase their yearly budgets. Officials urge restraint, saying that it will take time for the full force of Europe’s privacy rules to take effect and that companies are already changing how they collect people’s data because of potential blockbuster fines.

“Even after 12 months, the reality is that there is no consensus or clear harmonization for how data should be processed,” said Ahmed Baladi, co-chair of the privacy, cybersecurity and consumer protection unit at Gibson Dunn, a law firm in Paris. “We still need more guidance from national authorities.”

Facebook and Google

Into this void has stepped Big Tech.

Ahead of Europe’s privacy overhaul, Facebook spent months preparing to restart its facial recognition service in the region — technology that the company believes now meets the region’s beefed-up standards. Ireland’s data protection agency, which oversees the social media giant’s activities in the EU, has yet to take a position on the matter.

Despite the previous ban, Facebook’s facial recognition technology is now permitted in Europe because users are actively given the choice to opt into the service. The social networking giant also restarted the sharing of some data between WhatsApp, its popular messaging service, and Facebook – a practice that had similarly been outlawed in some states in the 28-country bloc.

A Facebook logo on a stand during the VivaTech startups and innovation fair, in Paris, France, May 16, 2019. | Julien de Rosa/EPA-EFE

Even now, some privacy regulators aren’t convinced that people understand how their data may be used and that others could still have their digital information collected without consent. Facebook denies it stores data on individuals who have not chosen to use its facial recognition technology.

“Processing of biometric data such as in automatic facial recognition comes with substantial risks,” Johannes Caspar, head of the Hamburg privacy regulator, said in an email. “Facial recognition must be strictly limited to those users who have opted in to that technology.”

Google also moved quickly to cement its position in the data economy.

Weeks before Europe’s new rules became law, the search giant contacted all websites, both inside the EU and elsewhere, that relied on the company’s dominant advertising services, informing these publishers that they would now have to solicit people’s consent to collect data on Google’s behalf.

Under Europe’s new privacy standards, the tech giant must get people’s permission to target them with digital advertising. But by forcing publishers to do this work for Google — the search giant said if websites did not comply, they would not be able to use the company’s advertising services — it added an additional line to the company’s revamped privacy settings, which allowed Google to take ownership of people’s data from publishers that it then could use for its own undefined purposes.

In response, the tech giant said these changes were necessary under Europe’s new data protection rules, and that it had not taken greater control over data collected by publishers worldwide.

Yet in a sign of potential future privacy woes for Google, an investigation into the legality of such practices is expected to be announced in the coming weeks, according to an industry executive with knowledge of the matter.

For Jason Kint, chief executive of Digital Content Next, a trade body for publishers including the New York Times and the Guardian (Axel Springer, which co-owns the European edition of POLITICO, is also a member), Google’s request represents a land grab for lucrative data that websites routinely have collected on their users — a crucial resource for newspapers increasingly going digital in search of much-needed revenues.

“It forced our members to deliver Google secondary use of their data,” said Kint. “They’re supposed to be transparent about what they’re using the data for, but we don’t really know.”

First Europe, now the world

The first shots in the global privacy war were fired in Europe. But as policymakers from New Delhi to Brasilia turn their attention to reining in Big Tech’s use of data, the EU’s standards are now at the center of cut-throat lobbying worldwide.

That’s particularly true in the United States, where lawmakers and tech executives agree on the need for new privacy rules after years of Silicon Valley’s dismissal of such protections.

In recent months, Congress has held multiple hearings on privacy, and politicians are engaged in negotiations over a wide-ranging data protection bill. But Republicans and Democrats are still divided on key principles, including if a federal law should override existing state-based rules and if individual consumers should have the right to sue tech firms over privacy violations.

“GDPR is the global standard, but the history of deployment of technology in the United States is more aligned to the ‘opt out’ approach”  — Reuven Carlyle, a Washington State senator

Those sticking points may threaten to derail the push for national legislation — but the fact talks are happening after years of disinterest can be attributed, in part, to the global influence of Europe’s privacy rules.

“There has been a dramatic change both in the attitudes toward the tech firms and, I would say, in the views of European privacy law,” said Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a campaigning group in Washington, D.C. “Lawmakers are genuinely asking whether the U.S. needs a law similar to Europe.”

With negotiations in Washington stalled, particularly ahead of the U.S. presidential election in 2020, attention has shifted toward U.S. states, many of which are mulling wide-ranging privacy legislation that often mirrors sections of Europe’s rules.

In California, which became the first U.S. state to pass wide-ranging data privacy legislation last year, lobbyists have until 2020 to soften the proposals’ impact on the likes of Google and Facebook by adding industry-friendly provisions to exempt certain kinds of data collection. Companies also successfully petitioned local lawmakers to kill a bill that would have given citizens greater ability to sue firms for illegally collecting their digital information.

In Washington State, local lawmakers went a step further by specifically name-checking Europe’s privacy standards in proposals that narrowly failed to pass the local legislature in late April.

But whereas in Europe, people are automatically given the right to not have their information collected unless they deliver explicit consent to companies, the U.S. proposals, by default, had given businesses the right to harvest such data without needing to seek users’ permission. That raised concerns among privacy groups that U.S. lawmakers were co-opting Europe’s privacy reboot without offering the same fundamental rights to U.S. citizens — criticisms that the bill’s backers deny.

“GDPR is the global standard,” said Reuven Carlyle, a Washington State senator who co-sponsored the recent privacy legislation. “But the history of deployment of technology in the United States is more aligned to the ‘opt out’ approach. Without that, you fundamentally alter the value proposition of innovation.”

CORRECTION: This story has been corrected to show that Ireland’s Data Protection Commission has not yet taken a position on Facebook’s facial recognition tool. It has also been corrected to reflect that companies petitioned California lawmakers to kill a bill that would have given citizens greater ability to sue firms for illegally collecting their digital information.

Wed, 22 May 2019 02:25:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.politico.eu/article/europe-data-protection-gdpr-general-data-protection-regulation-facebook-google/amp/
Killexams : Business learning leads the way

In this swiftly changing corporate environment where technology advances and market forces are continually progressing, business management education is becoming essential to keeping up with the global competition. Both large multinationals and smaller SMEs are investing in management qualifications. Lifelong upskilling can vary from MBA degrees to strategic planning seminars to ensure that managers of the future have the latest digital data analysis, financial education, and technical resources at their fingertips.

Prestigious academic institutions such as UCD Smurfit Business School, Trinity Business School, the IMI and tech companies are creating customised courses to meet the demands of leading organisations.

Helen Brophy, director of executive development at UCD Smurfit Business School in Dublin has witnessed a phenomenal increase from both graduates and business executives. She is also delighted with the financial ranking that puts her college 31st in the world of top Business School Educators.

“UCD Smurfit School has now been listed among the world’s top business education providers by the Financial Times for two decades,” says Brophy. “This milestone comes at a time when we are seeing extraordinary changes to ‘business as usual’ as we collectively face the defining challenge of a generation. Now more than ever, investment in the development of leadership talent is essential.”

Strategic leadership and a flexible approach to management are key to continued success and the Smurfit Business educators have degrees and courses tailored to meet the workforce.

“We have a popular portfolio of three-day programmes that are online and also in person as well,” explains Brophy. “Covid swiftly transformed the online learning experience and accelerated the creation of customised courses that are structured and updated continually to meet a transformed landscape. The Business degrees, leadership programmes and diplomas are accessible to students and executives who can enrol not only outside Leinster but beyond the perimeters to reach an international market as well.

“Business education is really lifelong learning as employees are staying longer in the workforce and changing roles that require a new set of skills and valuable learning curves. It is no longer possible to stay still if you want to excel and at Smurfit Business School future business leaders meet like-minded people who may be currently mid- to senior managers.”

The academic choices on offer include MScs in Business Analytics, Digital Marketing, and Aviation Finance as well as a much-needed degree in Renewable Energy and Environmental Finance. Companies that want to retain and train their brightest recruits are allocating an education budget to finance their employees to gain these credentials and to become motivated leaders in their future strategic plans.

Another key provider of advanced business education programmes is the Irish Management Institute, a globally ranked provider of executive development programmes. They have devised a number of courses that are geared at preparing leaders for the challenges ahead in this rapidly evolving marketplace. Cyrilla Costello, programme lead at IMI, highlights some of their latest offerings.

“One of the programmes that is of particular interest to companies is in our Customised Solutions offerings. It touches directly on the key priority of succession planning in companies and we run it in conjunction with the IDA,” she explains.

“Future Subsidiary Leaders aims to develop the mindsets and capabilities of leaders so that there is a strong pipeline in place to bring the organisation forward,” she adds.

Another leadership programme at the IMI run in association with IDA is titled Leading with Strategic Intent. This programme is mainly focused on increasing the influence of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) subsidiary companies in Ireland by becoming more strategic in their outlook. It has a module dedicated to shaping future leaders, which caters for the development and growth of the organisation through talent management.

“Irish subsidiaries have long recognised the need to broaden their ‘bench’ of leaders who can strategically represent the organisation at global level and contribute to and influence strategic decision making,” says Costello. “By focusing on building the mindset and capabilities of high potential talent we will prepare these individuals to move from aspirational positioning to ready-now site leadership roles.”

A long-term strategy is also a key component of the IMI’s programmes — that means taking a futuristic view of how to move forward with continued progress and market gains.

“IMI’s work with senior teams in FDI multinationals has highlighted the need for organisations to become more strategic in terms of their long-term influence and impact,” adds Costello.

“The need to balance day-to-day operations with a more innovative and entrepreneurial mindset. This is now more critical than ever as leaders grapple with continuous change and disruption.”

Costello explains that it is aimed at high-potential candidates seeking leadership roles. Participating companies will be made up of a team of four executives selected from across the organisation and they collaborate to facilitate the development of a succession plan. Mentoring is provided by senior executives, while expert speakers, panel discussions and company group work will also form part of the experience.

Costello believes that the recent health crisis and resulting disruption and ambiguity have propelled us to develop more agile ways of working. Leading With Strategic Intent will address the critical challenges facing leaders in multinationals and will enable the crafting of a future-focused strategy.

Other rapidly evolving areas of business management education are providing cybersecurity and grappling with the jungle of privacy laws. The rapid diffusion of interconnected digital technology in recent decades has changed profoundly how people interface with the world around them.

Peter Carberry is a privacy and compliance expert at Huawei and they have cyber security courses aimed at tackling hacking risks as well as taking a people-centric approach to technology which guarantees informed choice and consent.

“A key component is a focus on the professional capabilities of those involved in developing the company’s digital products and services. This evolution has been further accelerated since the onset of Covid-19 with video conferencing, cloud offices, and contactless commerce becoming deeply embedded in our lives. The digitalisation of our society offers countless opportunities for improving people’s lives, but it also expands the array of risks posed to cyber security and privacy.” Huawei offers internal training and certification for cybersecurity and privacy practitioners’ knowledge. They also encourage employees to pursue external professional certification programmes to keep up with the competition. These include the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) which offer training to many of their staff and employees of other digital companies in the areas of law and regulations, privacy operation management, and privacy in technology. The Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) also provides important data management and privacy learning and is accredited for validating privacy expertise.

According to Carberry: “By supporting employees to constantly upskill in these areas they will keep abreast of the contingent worlds of cybersecurity and privacy.”

Miriam Di Nardi is the student recruitment officer at Trinity Business School and they have developed a number of MSC programmes as well as MBAs directed at business graduates, non-business graduates and business executives alike. The International Consulting Project, part of the MSc International Management programme, prepares graduates for the career environment ahead and they get to interact with successful Irish companies and evolve an implementation plan for them.

“The top companies know that Trinity graduates are high calibre and bring boundless energy and perspective so they are in big demand. Our students can ultimately end up evolving a real implementation plan within a leading company,” says Di Nardi. “We often see students gaining employment in the company they’ve been working with during the course of their studies.”

“For those who would like to study a more specific business course can avail of a suite of Masters in areas such as digital marketing strategy and human resource management as well as business analytics, which is popular due to the high demand for managers with data literacy. Their Postgraduate Diploma in Accounting is a particularly popular route for those seeking to fast-track the qualification because it provides significant exam exemptions from professional accountancy bodies (ACCA, CAI and CIMA), and can be accomplished in just nine months.

Eoghan O’Sullivan is Trinity’s Business School MBA recruitment officer and describes the type of applicants that enrol in their degree courses.

“Trinity MBA’s can help experienced professionals from any industry achieve their personal and professional goals and ambitions. Successful applicants are clear in their motivations, goals and rationale. Demonstrating collaboration and a desire to work in teams is also important. Peer-to-peer learning is central to the Trinity MBA so we seek applicants from a wide range of backgrounds and professional experiences.”

The Trinity MBA is an intensive project-based programme for those who want to accelerate their current career path or transition into a new industry. The programme facilitates live-action learning through participation in three company projects to help graduates develop leadership qualities. There are three distinct MBA’s on offer — the one-year full-time — suitable for professionals who can dedicate themselves to an intensive one-year programme. Then the Executive MBA which is a two-year, part-time programme for those who wish to study while working. The third one is the Flexible Executive MBA, this is a two-year, part-time, distance-learning model. Students have the flexibility to study remotely without attending classes on campus.

“Most of those who enrol in the MBA would have five-year professional experience in a company and a degree or else sit a GMAT to gain entry. There is a big demand for knowledge in the area of business analytics, artificial intelligence and block chains.

“Gender-wise, the classes are very well balanced with a more or less 50-50 male and female split. They are heavily projected and conducted in association with feedback and advice from leading Irish companies,” says O’Sullivan. “A lot of the group work is done via online theatres that were launched and worked well through the pandemic.

Finally, O’Sullivan advises that most of the MBA recruits would have on average five years of professional experience working and can therefore apply the teaching to real case scenarios.

As business team leaders and marketing managers navigate an increasingly complex business world, the need to constantly update skillsets through further education programmes is essential in this fast-moving digital economy. In today’s market, the notion of being a Born Leader is hypothetical — instead the truly ambitious learn how to become business leaders of the future.

Tue, 12 Jul 2022 11:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.irishtimes.com/special-reports/2022/07/13/business-learning-leads-the-way/
Killexams : OCC's Hsu Urges Multifactor Authentication MFA Plus Patch Management and Backups Can Prevent Cyber Incidents
OCC's Hsu Urges Multifactor Authentication

A top federal regulatory official urged financial institutions to implement multifactor authentication for all nonpublic systems, telling an audience of financial executives that a majority of breaches could be avoided or mitigated through basic cybersecurity controls.

See Also: OnDemand | Zero Tolerance: Controlling The Landscape Where You'll Meet Your Adversaries

The frequency and severity of attacks against financial institutions have mounted over the past years, said Michael Hsu, acting comptroller for the currency, before a Beltway-area audience on Tuesday. A majority of financial system breaches observed by the Office of the Comptroller of Currency boil down to failures in strong authentication, unpatched systems and poor response or resilience, said Hsu.

Security practitioners have long touted multifactor authentication - in which anyone logging onto a system must present additional evidence of legitimacy besides a password, such as a one-time code - as an essential element of cybersecurity. Especially when tied to a hardware fob, multifactor makes it significantly harder for hackers to penetrate systems.

A pan-federal financial sector regulatory agency group last August published guidance emphasizing the importance of multifactor authentication.

Hsu also told the audience that unpatched or misconfigured systems follow compromised credentials as the most common contributing factor to data breaches. "Malicious actors are very familiar with the security settings of commonly used software products," he said.

Financial institutions should also be prepared to respond to an attack, including through systems for backed up data that are kept offline.

"Even relatively unsophisticated attacks can cause significant damage and disruption under the right conditions," he said.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 04:16:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govinfosecurity.com/occs-hsu-urges-multifactor-authentication-a-19695
Killexams : Facebook, Google and Twitter in data regulators' sights
  • By Matthew Wall
  • Technology of Business editor

Image caption,

Facebook has more than two billion active users worldwide

Social media giant Facebook and its subsidiaries Instagram and WhatsApp have been the subject of most data investigations in the Republic of Ireland since the European Union's new data protection regulation came into force a year ago.

Most of the major US tech companies, including Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Apple, LinkedIn, Airbnb and Dropbox, are registered for processing personal data in Ireland.

Ireland's Data Protection Commission says it has launched 19 statutory investigations, 11 of which focus on Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram.

Google is appealing against the decision.

So the responsibility for policing their compliance with the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) - which started in May 2018 - falls on the country's Data Protection Commission (DPC).

Nine of the DPC's investigations were launched after complaints from individuals or businesses, while 10 have been instigated by the DPC itself.

The most common concerns are about the legal basis for processing personal data, lack of transparency about how a company collects personal data, and people's right to access their data.

"There has been a huge increase in awareness among individuals about their data rights since GDPR came in," says Graham Doyle, the DPC's head of communications.

This has led to a steep rise in complaints, with the number increasing from 2,500 in 2017 to more than 6,500 now, says Mr Doyle.

An office of 27 staff has had to be beefed up to more than 130. Mr Doyle expects the number to rise eventually to more than 200 over the next year or so.

A Facebook spokesperson said: "We spent more than 18 months working to ensure we comply with the GDPR.

"We made our policies clearer, our privacy settings easier to find and introduced better tools for people to access, download, and delete their information. We are in close contact with the Irish Data Protection Office to ensure we are answering any questions they may have."

Video caption,

WATCH: What is GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) took effect in May 2018 and gives EU citizens more rights over how their personal data is collected, used and stored.

We have the right to demand a copy of our personal data from companies, and they have to comply within a month.

That data must be easy to understand and should also be presented in a machine-readable format, so that a customer could transfer all their data to a competitor.

We can ask for any incorrect data to be corrected or for the whole lot to be deleted if we want.

And companies have a responsibility to keep our data safe. If any is stolen or unwittingly shared with unauthorised organisations - and this could pose a risk to people's rights and freedoms - companies have to inform the national data regulator within 72 hours.

"Big tech is well and truly in the spotlight at the moment following the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal and other well-publicised data breaches," says Anthony Lee, data privacy expert and partner at law firm DMH Stallard.

"A lot of these big tech companies are consumer facing so handle a lot of personal data, but come from the US which doesn't have as strong privacy laws as Europe," he adds.

"If they weren't well attuned to the requirements that GDPR imposes, they certainly are now."

According to the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), fines levied for GDPR breaches now top €56m. Fines can be as high as €20m or 4% of annual turnover.

"In the first year, we've seen tens of thousands of complaints and data breaches," says Omer Tene, the IAPP's vice president and chief knowledge officer.

"But we've yet to see much evidence that the GDPR has led to an improvement in organisations' data practices."

IAPP estimates that organisations have appointed more than 500,000 data protection officers with specific responsibility for handling GDPR-related issues.

Image source, Gittings Photography

Image caption,

Ann Bevitt thinks the real effects of GDPR have yet to be felt by businesses

But it thinks many companies still need to do much more to bring themselves fully into compliance.

And Ann Bevitt, partner at law firm Cooley, believes that while some companies have instigated a "wholesale change in their culture around privacy and data protection", many others have simply engaged in "a box-ticking exercise with little to no embedded change in practice".

A year after GDPR came in to force, she warns that "to some extent, the impact has yet to be felt, in that we haven't yet seen significant enforcement activity, both in terms of volume and amount".

This is likely to change over the next year as the number of completed investigations - and potential fines - rises.

There is a time lag because investigations can take many months. All parties need to be consulted before the data protection authority can reach a conclusion. Then the decision has to be circulated to all the other EU data protection authorities for approval.

And the company under investigation has the right to appeal against the final decision.

Ireland's Data Protection Commissioner, Helen Dixon, is expected to circulate her decisions on some cases by July or August, with final rulings made by the end of the year, Mr Doyle predicts.

Big tech firms may be feeling the heat for some time to come.

Fri, 29 Jul 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.bbc.com/news/business-48357772.amp
Killexams : Professor Colin C Williams

Colin adopts an enthusiastic research-led approach to his teaching using case studies from his current research projects to convey the practical importance of the courses covered in his lectures.

His teaching on the Future of Work (MGT6098) is based on the in-depth research he conducted for his book Re-thinking the future of work (Routledge) whilst his teaching on Managing Local and Regional Economies (MGT6097) draws extensively on his consultancy projects conducted for numerous local and regional Governments and central Government agencies.

In this way, his students receive not only theoretically-informed understandings of contemporary issues of policy relevance, but also cutting-edge knowledge of how issues are being conceptualised and acted upon in policy terms.

In doing so, he hopes to inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in both private sector consultancy organisations as well as Government agencies that seek to tackle the problems he lectures on.

His past students have now successfully progressed to become partners in large private sector consultancy companies, highly-skilled private sector consultants, heads of national voluntary organisations and directors of local Government departments.

Tue, 02 May 2017 12:26:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/management/people/academic-staff/colin-c-williams
Killexams : Security Operations

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Tue, 02 Aug 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.govinfosecurity.com/security-operations-c-444
Killexams : 2022 Forbes Wealth Summit

A Reimagined Print Experience

The updates were made with the understanding that people are consuming the majority of content on their phones, Randall Lane and team concisely bring together a full meal of facts and ideas that contrast with the à la carte nature of digital surfing. The new, modern look of the magazine — clean and simple, with less text — was created in partnership with Priest + Lee (designers Robert Priest and Grace Lee), who worked with Forbes art director Bob Mansfield, digital creative director Dan Revitte and the Forbes art team.

I believe strongly that entrepreneurial capitalism and market-based thinking can solve the world's problems.

Tue, 28 Dec 2021 08:40:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.forbes.com/connect/print/
Killexams : Darrin Reynolds Joins Edgio as Chief Information Security Officer

Seasoned security executive to drive next phase of advancement for edge solutions provider

TEMPE, Ariz., July 19, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Edgio, Inc. (Nasdaq: EGIO), the globally-scaled software solutions provider powering secure seamlessly integrated delivery, applications and streaming experiences at the edge, today announced the appointment of Darrin Reynolds as Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). Championing a security-first approach to operations, development and governance, he will lead the security organization, oversee the protection of client, partner, and employee data and assets, and contribute to product innovation.

Reynolds has more than 20 years of information security experience spanning technology, healthcare, pharmaceutical, financial, manufacturing, communications, entertainment and retail industries, helping organizations realize the benefits of safeguarding and leveraging sensitive data. He served as Chief Privacy Officer and the VP of Information Security for the Diversified Agency Services division of Omnicom Group (NYSE: OMC), one of the world’s largest advertising holding companies, and was the subject matter expert on data protection for more than 200 advertising and marketing companies worldwide.

"I’m really excited to welcome Darrin to the Edgio team as our CISO. He’s an accomplished cybersecurity executive with a very strong record of building impactful, high-performing teams," said Bob Lyons, Edgio CEO. "With recent acquisitions increasing our global solutions portfolio and footprint, Darrin’s leadership will help us grow the security organization and further advance our strategy of improve, expand and extend. We’ll continue to invest in security and connectivity solutions at the edge to help clients address the cost, complexity, and security issues associated with handling large, complex, and distributed high stakes web applications."

In March, Edgio (then Limelight) entered a definitive agreement to acquire Yahoo’s Edgecast, Inc. The companies combined in June and rebranded as Edgio, creating a globally scaled, edge-enabled software solutions provider of cloud security and web applications, content delivery and video streaming for outcome-oriented businesses and clients looking to deliver a fast, secure and frictionless digital experience to end users. The new Edgio platform includes Edgecasts’ enterprise-grade security solutions, Limelight’s developer and Jamstack APIs, and application operations tools – all seamlessly integrated with the world's most performant global edge platform.

"Edgio is on an incredible journey, with tremendous transformation during the past year and momentum that continues to build as we enter the second half of 2022. I’m thrilled to apply my experience running world-class security organizations to the company, and build out an exceptional security practice," said Reynolds. "Too often security is viewed as a cost center or merely some type of insurance. Edgio recognizes that security is truly a differentiator in the marketplace – to serve, guide and safeguard clients, and act as a catalyst for new business."

Reynolds is a frequently sought-after speaker in the cybersecurity and privacy communities. He is also a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), charter member of the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC2) Indianapolis chapter and holds memberships in the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA), InfraGard and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). In addition, he serves on the Board of Directors for EveryoneForVeterans.org, a private, nonprofit group connecting businesses and services to local veterans.

About Edgio
Edgio (NASDAQ: EGIO) is an edge-enabled software solutions provider powering unmatched, secure digital experiences through a seamlessly integrated delivery, applications and streaming platform. Our globally-scaled technology and expert services fuel the world’s top brands with the capacity to deliver the fastest, most dynamic, and frictionless education, entertainment, events and applications to every user. Dedicated to providing unparalleled client care and extending value every step of the way, Edgio is a partner of choice, driving about 20% of worldwide internet traffic to support the most popular shows, movies, sports, games and music, and instant-loading websites. To learn more, visit edg.io and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220719005885/en/

Contacts

Media Contact:
Katherine Webb
kwebb@edg.io

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 04:34:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/darrin-reynolds-joins-edgio-chief-161000450.html
Killexams : Amelita Martin Promoted to Vice President of Provider Relations and Account Management at Secure Health

MACON, Ga., July 21, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Secure Health, a third-party administrator for self-funded health benefits plans, is proud to announce the promotion of Amelita Martin to the role of Vice President of Provider Relations and Account Management, effective July 1, 2022.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220720006039/en/

Amelita Martin, Vice President of Provider Relations and Account Management at Secure Health (Photo: Business Wire)

"We are undergoing significant changes in the way we service both our customer and provider communities. Bringing a unified approach to these efforts is a significant step to improving our performance, and Amelita is the right choice for this new direction."

Lovell Harmon
Chief Operating Officer

Amelita joined Secure Health in 1995 and has most recently served as Director of Provider Relations. She has also held the position of Privacy Compliance Officer since 2002. Amelita came to Secure Health having enjoyed a successful tenure of more than ten years in the field of banking. She received her Certified Information Privacy Professional (CIPP) certification in 2005 through the International Association of Privacy Professionals and is responsible for organizational compliance relative to the HIPAA Privacy Rule. Amelita is a resident of Macon, GA, where she and her late husband, Andre Sr., achieved their proudest accomplishment: raising their two amazing sons, Andre and Alex.

"I have always been committed to great service to our Secure Health Providers. I am excited to bring this level of commitment to our customers – both current and new. I look forward to the exciting changes ahead for our organization."

Amelita Martin
Vice President, Provider Relations and Account Management

While Amelita will be reaching out to constituents soon, she can be contacted before then at martina@shpg.com

About Secure Health

Secure Health is a third-party administrator (TPA) and preferred provider organization (PPO) network located in Macon, Georgia. Secure Health, which is owned by physician-hospital organizations, has managed health benefits for employers with self-funded health benefit plans since 1992. Today, Secure Health serves more than 72 health plans in multiple states across the U.S. Learn more at our website: shpg.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220720006039/en/

Contacts

Lovell Harmon
Chief Operating Officer
harmonl@shpg.com

Wed, 20 Jul 2022 16:00:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/amelita-martin-promoted-vice-president-110000322.html
Killexams : Darrin Reynolds Joins Edgio as Chief Information Security Officer

Seasoned security executive to drive next phase of advancement for edge solutions provider

TEMPE, Ariz., July 19, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Edgio, Inc. (Nasdaq: EGIO), the globally-scaled software solutions provider powering secure seamlessly integrated delivery, applications and streaming experiences at the edge, today announced the appointment of Darrin Reynolds as Chief Information Security Officer (CISO). Championing a security-first approach to operations, development and governance, he will lead the security organization, oversee the protection of client, partner, and employee data and assets, and contribute to product innovation.

Reynolds has more than 20 years of information security experience spanning technology, healthcare, pharmaceutical, financial, manufacturing, communications, entertainment and retail industries, helping organizations realize the benefits of safeguarding and leveraging sensitive data. He served as Chief Privacy Officer and the VP of Information Security for the Diversified Agency Services division of Omnicom Group (NYSE: OMC), one of the world’s largest advertising holding companies, and was the subject matter expert on data protection for more than 200 advertising and marketing companies worldwide.

"I’m really excited to welcome Darrin to the Edgio team as our CISO. He’s an accomplished cybersecurity executive with a very strong record of building impactful, high-performing teams," said Bob Lyons, Edgio CEO. "With recent acquisitions increasing our global solutions portfolio and footprint, Darrin’s leadership will help us grow the security organization and further advance our strategy of improve, expand and extend. We’ll continue to invest in security and connectivity solutions at the edge to help clients address the cost, complexity, and security issues associated with handling large, complex, and distributed high stakes web applications."

In March, Edgio (then Limelight) entered a definitive agreement to acquire Yahoo’s Edgecast, Inc. The companies combined in June and rebranded as Edgio, creating a globally scaled, edge-enabled software solutions provider of cloud security and web applications, content delivery and video streaming for outcome-oriented businesses and clients looking to deliver a fast, secure and frictionless digital experience to end users. The new Edgio platform includes Edgecasts’ enterprise-grade security solutions, Limelight’s developer and Jamstack APIs, and application operations tools – all seamlessly integrated with the world's most performant global edge platform.

"Edgio is on an incredible journey, with tremendous transformation during the past year and momentum that continues to build as we enter the second half of 2022. I’m thrilled to apply my experience running world-class security organizations to the company, and build out an exceptional security practice," said Reynolds. "Too often security is viewed as a cost center or merely some type of insurance. Edgio recognizes that security is truly a differentiator in the marketplace – to serve, guide and safeguard clients, and act as a catalyst for new business."

Reynolds is a frequently sought-after speaker in the cybersecurity and privacy communities. He is also a member of the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), charter member of the International Information Systems Security Certification Consortium (ISC2) Indianapolis chapter and holds memberships in the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA), InfraGard and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). In addition, he serves on the Board of Directors for EveryoneForVeterans.org, a private, nonprofit group connecting businesses and services to local veterans.

About Edgio
Edgio (NASDAQ: EGIO) is an edge-enabled software solutions provider powering unmatched, secure digital experiences through a seamlessly integrated delivery, applications and streaming platform. Our globally-scaled technology and expert services fuel the world’s top brands with the capacity to deliver the fastest, most dynamic, and frictionless education, entertainment, events and applications to every user. Dedicated to providing unparalleled client care and extending value every step of the way, Edgio is a partner of choice, driving about 20% of worldwide internet traffic to support the most popular shows, movies, sports, games and music, and instant-loading websites. To learn more, visit edg.io and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220719005885/en/

Contacts

Media Contact:
Katherine Webb
kwebb@edg.io

Tue, 19 Jul 2022 04:34:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/darrin-reynolds-joins-edgio-chief-161000450.html
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