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Exam Code: 010-111 Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
010-111 ACSM certified Personal Trainer

The exam content outline is the blueprint for your certification examination. Every question on the exam is associated with one of the knowledge or skill statements that are found in the exam content outline. get the outline that corresponds to the certification of your choice, and you'll also find the percentage of questions within each domain of the exam.

A job task analysis study was completed to describe the job functions of an ACSM Certified Personal Trainer® (ACSM-CPT®). The job task analysis serves as the foundation for the ACSM-CPT® exam blueprint (also known as an exam content outline) which assesses the practice-related knowledge of professionals seeking certification as a requirement of the job as a personal trainer. It is important to note that all ACSM-CPT® examination questions are based on the exam content outline.

Task Name Cognitive Level
I. Initial Client Consultation and Assessment
A. Provide documents and clear instructions to the client in preparation Recall
for the initial interview.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the components of and preparation for the initial client consultation.
b) the necessary paperwork to be completed by the client prior to the initial client
interview.
2) Skill in:
a) effective communication.
b) utilizing multimedia resources (e.g., email, phone, text messaging).
B. Interview the client to gather and provide pertinent information prior to Application
fitness testing and program design.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the components and limitations of a health/medical history, preparticipation
screening, informed consent, trainer-client contract, and organizational policies
and procedures.
b) the use of medical clearance for exercise testing and program participation.
c) health behavior modification theories and strategies.
d) orientation procedures, including equipment utilization and facility layout.
2) Skill in:
a) obtaining a health/medical history, medical clearance, and informed consent.
Job Tasks
Each performance domain is divided into job tasks. Within each task is a list of statements that describe what a personal trainer should know and/or be able to perform as part of their job. Table 2 should provide candidates with a sense of the breadth and depth of information that will be covered on the ACSM-CPT® exam.
Table 2. Job tasks and related knowledge and skill statements
C. Review and analyze client data to identify risk, formulate a plan of action, Synthesis and conduct physical assessments.
1) Knowledge of:
a) risk factors for cardiovascular disease.
b) signs and symptoms of chronic cardiovascular, metabolic, and/or pulmonary disease. c) the process for determining the need for medical clearance prior to participation in fitness testing and exercise programs.
d) relative and absolute contraindications to exercise testing.
2) Skill in:
a) identifying modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease and teaching clients about risk reduction.
b) determining appropriate fitness assessments based on the initial client consultation.
c) following protocols during fitness assessment administration.
D. Evaluate behavioral readiness and develop strategies to optimize Application exercise adherence.
1) Knowledge of:
a) behavioral strategies to enhance exercise and health behavior change (e.g., reinforcement, S.M.A.R.T. goal setting, social support).
b) health behavior change models (e.g., socioeconomic model, readiness to change model, social cognitive theory, theory of planned behavior) and effective strategies that support and facilitate behavioral change.
2) Skill in:
a) setting effective client-oriented S.M.A.R.T. behavioral goals.
b) choosing and applying appropriate health behavior modification strategies based on the clients skills, knowledge and level of motivation.
E. Assess the components of health- and/or skill-related physical fitness to Synthesis establish baseline values, set goals, and develop individualized programs.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the basic structures of bone, skeletal muscle, and connective tissue.
b) the basic anatomy of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
c) the definition of the following terms: anterior, posterior, proximal, distal, inferior, superior, medial, lateral, supination, pronation, flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, hyperextension, rotation, circumduction, agonist, antagonist, and stabilizer.
d) the sagittal, frontal (coronal), transverse (horizontal) planes of the body and plane in which each muscle action occurs.
e) the interrelationships among center of gravity, base of support, balance, stability, and proper spinal alignment.
f) the following curvatures of the spine: lordosis, scoliosis, and kyphosis.
g) the differences between the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and the effects of acute and chronic exercise on each.
h) acute responses to cardiorespiratory exercise and resistance training.
i) chronic physiological adaptations associated with cardiovascular exercise and resistance training.
j) physiological responses related to warm-up and cool-down.
k) physiological basis of acute muscle fatigue, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and musculoskeletal injury/overtraining.
l) physiological adaptations that occur at rest and during submaximal and maximal exercise following chronic aerobic and anaerobic exercise training.
m) physiological basis for improvements in muscular strength and endurance.
n) expected blood pressure responses associated with postural changes, acute physical exercise, and adaptations as a result of long-term exercise training.
o) types of muscle contraction, such as isotonic (concentric, eccentric), isometric (static), and isokinetic.
p) major muscle groups (e.g., trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, deltoids, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis, internal and external obliques, erector spinae, gluteus maximus, hip flexors, quadriceps, hamstrings, hip adductors, hip abductors, anterior tibialis, soleus, gastrocnemius).
q) major bones (e.g., clavicle, scapula, sternum, humerus, carpals, ulna, radius, femur, fibula, tibia, tarsals).
r) joint classifications (e.g., hinge, ball and socket).
s) the primary action and joint range of motion specific to each major muscle group.
t) the following terms related to muscles: hypertrophy, atrophy, and hyperplasia.
u) physiological basis of the components of health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition).
v) normal chronic physiologic adaptations associated with cardiovascular, resistance,
and flexibility training. w) test termination criteria, and proper procedures to be followed after discontinuing an exercise test.
x) anthropometric measurements and body composition techniques (e.g., skinfolds, plethysmography, bioelectrical impedance, infrared, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), body mass index (BMI), circumference measurements).
y) fitness testing protocols, including pre-test preparation and assessments of cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition.
z) interpretation of fitness test results.
aa) the recommended order of fitness assessments.
bb) appropriate documentation of signs or symptoms during an exercise session.
cc) various mechanisms for appropriate referral to a physician.
2) Skill in:
a) locating/palpating pulse landmarks, accurately measuring heart rate, and obtaining rating of perceived exertion (RPE).
b) selecting and administering cardiovascular fitness assessments.
c) locating anatomical sites for circumference (girth) and skinfold measurements. d) selecting and administering muscular strength and muscular endurance assessments.
e) selecting and administering flexibility assessments for various muscle groups. f) recognizing postural deviations that may affect exercise performance and body alignment.
g) delivering test and assessment results in a positive manner. F. Develop a plan and timeline for reassessing physical fitness, goals, and Application related behaviors.
1) Knowledge of:
a) developing fitness plans based on the information obtained in the client interview and the results of the physical fitness assessments.
b) alternative health behavior modification strategies.
c) the purpose and timeline for reassessing each component of physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition).
II. Exercise Programming and Implementation A. Review the clients goals, medical history, and assessment results and Recall determine exercise prescription.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the risks and benefits associated with guidelines for exercise training and programming for healthy adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and pregnant women.
b) the risks and benefits associated with guidelines for exercise training and programming for clients with chronic disease who are medically cleared to exercise.
c) Health-related conditions that require consultations with medical personnel prior to initiating physical activity.
d) components of health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition).
e) program development for specific client needs (e.g., sport-specific training, performance, lifestyle, functional, balance, agility, aerobic and anaerobic).
f) special precautions and modifications of exercise programming for participation in various environmental conditions (e.g., altitude, variable ambient temperatures, humidity, environmental pollution).
g) documenting exercise sessions and performing periodic re-evaluations to assess changes in fitness status.
B. Select exercise modalities to achieve the desired adaptations based on the Application clients goals, medical history, and assessment results.
1) Knowledge of:
a) selecting exercises and training modalities based on clients age, functional capacity, and exercise test results.
b) the principles of specificity and program progression. c) the advantages, disadvantages, and applications of interval, continuous, and circuit training programs for cardiovascular fitness improvements.
d) activities of daily living (ADLs) and their role in the overall health and fitness of the client.
e) differences between physical activity recommendations and training principles for general health benefits, weight management, fitness improvements, and athletic performance enhancement.
f) advanced resistance training programming (e.g., super sets, Olympic lifting, plyometric exercises, pyramid training).
g) the six motor skill-related physical fitness components; agility, balance, coordination, reaction time, speed and power.
h) the benefits, risks, and contraindications for a wide variety of resistance training exercises specific to individual muscle groups (e.g., for rectus abdominis, performing crunches, supine leg raises, and plank exercises).
i) the benefits, risks, and contraindications for a wide variety of range of motion exercises (e.g., dynamic and passive stretching, Tai Chi, Pilates, yoga, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, partner stretching)
j) the benefits, risks, and contraindications for a wide variety of cardiovascular training exercises and applications based on client experience, skill level, current fitness level and goals (e.g., walking, jogging, running).
C. Determine initial Frequency, Intensity, Time, Type, Volume and Progression Application (i.e., FITT-VP Principle) of exercise based on the clients goals, medical history, and assessment results.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the recommended FITT-VP principle for physical activity for cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness in healthy adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and pregnant women.
b) the recommended FITT-VP principle for development of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal fitness in clients with stable chronic diseases who are medically cleared for exercise.
c) exercise modifications for those with physical and intellectual limitations (e.g., injury rehabilitation, neuromuscular and postural limitations). d) implementation of the components of an exercise training session (e.g., warm-up, conditioning, cool down, stretching). e) application of biomechanics and exercises associated with movements of the major muscle groups (i.e., seated knee extension: quadriceps).
f) establishing and monitoring levels of exercise intensity, including heart rate, RPE, pace, maximum oxygen consumption and/or metabolic equivalents (METs).
g) determining target/training heart rates using predicted maximum heart rate and the heart rate reserve method (Karvonen formula) with recommended intensity percentages based on client fitness level, medical considerations, and goals.
h) periodization for cardiovascular, resistance training, and conditioning program design and progression of exercises.
i) repetitions, sets, load, and rest periods necessary for desired goals. j) using results from repetition maximum tests to determine resistance training loads. D. Review the proposed program with the client, demonstrate exercises, and Application teach the client how to perform each exercise.
1) Knowledge of:
a) adaptations to strength, functional capacity, and motor skills.
b) the physiological effects of the Valsalva Maneuver and the associated risks.
c) the biomechanical principles for the performance of common physical activities (e.g., walking, running, swimming, cycling, resistance training, yoga, Pilates, functional training).
d) the concept of detraining or reversibility of conditioning and effects on fitness and functional performance.
e) signs and symptoms of over-reaching/overtraining.
f) modifying exercise form and/or technique to reduce musculoskeletal injury.
g) exercise attire for specific activities, environments, and conditions (e.g., footwear, layering for cold, light colors in heat).
h) communication techniques for effective teaching with awareness of visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles.
2) Skill in:
a) demonstrating exercises designed to enhance cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, balance, and range of motion.
b) demonstrating exercises for improving range of motion of major joints.
c) demonstrating a wide range of resistance training modalities and activities (e.g., variable resistance devices, dynamic constant external resistance devices, kettlebells, static resistance devices).
d) demonstrating a wide variety of functional training exercises (e.g., stability balls, balance boards, resistance bands, medicine balls, foam rollers).
e) proper spotting positions and techniques for injury prevention and exercise assistance.
E. Monitor the clients technique and response to exercise, providing Synthesis modifications as necessary.
1) Knowledge of:
a) normal and abnormal responses to exercise and criteria for termination of exercise (e.g., shortness of breath, joint pain, dizziness, abnormal heart rate response).
b) proper and improper form and technique while using cardiovascular conditioning equipment (e.g., stair-climbers, stationary cycles, treadmills, elliptical trainers).
c) proper and improper form and technique while performing resistance exercises (e.g., resistance machines, stability balls, free weights, resistance bands, calisthenics/body weight).
d) proper and improper form and technique while performing flexibility exercises (e.g., static stretching, dynamic stretching, partner stretching).
2) Skill in:
a) interpreting client comprehension and body language during exercise.
b) effective communication, including active listening, cuing, and providing constructive feedback during and after exercise.
F. Recommend exercise progressions to Improve or maintain the clients Synthesis fitness level.
1) Knowledge of:
a) exercises and program modifications for healthy adults, older adults, children, adolescents, and pregnant women.
b) exercises and program modifications for clients with chronic disease who are medically cleared to exercise (e.g., stable coronary artery disease, other cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, hypertension, arthritis, chronic back pain, osteoporosis, chronic pulmonary disease, chronic pain).
c) principles of progressive overload, specificity, and program progression. d) progression of exercises for major muscle groups (e.g., standing lunge to walking lunge to walking lunge with resistance).
e) modifications to periodized conditioning programs to increase or maintain muscular strength and/or endurance, hypertrophy, power, cardiovascular endurance, balance, and range of motion/flexibility.
G. Obtain client feedback to ensure exercise program satisfaction and adherence. Recall 1) Knowledge of:
a) effective techniques for program evaluation and client satisfaction (e.g., survey, written follow-up, verbal feedback).
b) client goals and appropriate review and modification.
III. Exercise Leadership and Client Education
A. Optimize participant adherence by using effective communication, motivational Synthesis techniques, and behavioral strategies.
1) Knowledge of:
a) verbal and nonverbal behaviors that communicate positive reinforcement and encouragement (e.g., eye contact, targeted praise, empathy).
b) learning preferences (auditory, visual, kinesthetic) and how to apply teaching and training techniques to optimize training session.
c) applying health behavior change models (e.g., socioecological model, readiness to change model, social cognitive theory, theory of planned behavior) and strategies that support and facilitate adherence.
d) barriers to exercise adherence and compliance (e.g., time management, injury, fear, lack of knowledge, weather).
e) techniques to facilitate intrinsic and extrinsic motivation (e.g., goal setting, incentive programs, achievement recognition, social support).
f) strategies to increase non-structured physical activity (e.g., stair walking, parking farther away, biking to work).
g) health coaching principles and lifestyle management techniques related to behavior change.
h) leadership techniques and educational methods to increase client engagement. 2) Skill in:
a) applying active listening techniques.
b) using feedback to optimize a clients training sessions.
c) effective and timely uses of a variety of communication modes (e.g., telephone, newsletters, email, social media).
B. Educate clients using scientifically sound resources. Application 1) Knowledge of:
a) influential lifestyle factors, including nutrition and physical activity habits. b) the value of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins as fuels for exercise and physical activity.
c) the following terms: body composition, body mass index, lean body mass, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and body fat distribution.
d) the relationship between body composition and health.
e) the effectiveness of diet, exercise and behavior modification as a method for modifying body composition.
f) the importance of maintaining hydration before, during and after exercise. g) Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
h) the Female Athlete Triad.
i) the myths and consequences associated with various weight loss methods (e.g., fad diets, dietary supplements, over-exercising, starvation diets).
j) the number of kilocalories in one gram of carbohydrate, fat, protein and alcohol. k) industry guidelines for caloric intake for individuals desiring to lose or gain weight. l) accessing and disseminating scientifically-based, relevant, fitness- and wellnessrelated resources and information.
m) community-based exercise programs that provide social support and structured activities (e.g., walking clubs, intramural sports, golf leagues, cycling clubs).
n) stress management and relaxation techniques (e.g., progressive relaxation, guided imagery, massage therapy).
IV. Legal and Professional Responsibilities
A. Collaborate with health care professionals and organizations to create a Application network of providers who can assist in maximizing the benefits and minimizing the risk of an exercise program.
1) Knowledge of:
a) reputable professional resources and referral sources to ensure client safety and program effectiveness.
b) the scope of practice for the Certified Personal Trainer and the need to practice within this scope.
c) effective and professional communication with allied health and fitness professionals.
d) identifying individuals requiring referral to a physician or allied health services (e.g., physical therapy, dietary counseling, stress management, weight management, psychological and social services).
B. Develop a comprehensive risk management program (including an Application emergency action plan and injury prevention program) consistent with industry standards of care.
1) Knowledge of:
a) resources available to obtain basic life support, automated external defibrillator (AED), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation certification.
b) emergency procedures (i.e., telephone procedures, written emergency procedures, personnel responsibilities) in a health and fitness setting.
c) precautions taken to ensure participant safety (e.g., equipment placement, facility cleanliness, floor surface).
d) the following terms related to musculoskeletal injuries (e.g., shin splints, sprain, strain, bursitis, fractures, tendonitis, patellofemoral pain syndrome, low back pain, plantar fasciitis).
e) contraindicated exercises/postures and risks associated with certain exercises (e.g., straight-leg sit-ups, double leg raises, full squats, hurdlers stretch, cervical and lumbar hyperextension, standing bent-over toe touch).
f) the responsibilities, limitations, and legal implications for the Certified Personal Trainer of carrying out emergency procedures.
g) potential musculoskeletal injuries (e.g., contusions, sprains, strains, fractures), cardiovascular/pulmonary complications (e.g., chest pain, palpitations/ arrhythmias, tachycardia, bradycardia, hypotension/hypertension, hyperventilation), and metabolic abnormalities (e.g., fainting/syncope, hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia, hypothermia/hyperthermia).
h) the initial management and basic first-aid procedures for exercise-related injuries (e.g., bleeding, strains/sprains, fractures, shortness of breath, palpitations, hypoglycemia, allergic reactions, fainting/syncope).
i) the need for and components of an equipment service plan/agreement. j) the need for and use of safety policies and procedures (e.g., incident/accident reports, emergency procedure training) and legal necessity thereof.
k) the need for and components of an emergency action plan.
l) effective communication skills and the ability to inform staff and clients of emergency policies and procedures.
2) Skill in:
a) demonstrating and carrying out emergency procedures during exercise testing and/or training.
b) assisting, spotting, and monitoring clients safely and effectively during exercise testing and/or training.
C. Adhere to ACSM Certifications Code of Ethics by practicing in a professional Recall manner within the scope of practice of an ACSM Certified Personal Trainer.
1) Knowledge of:
a) the components of both the ACSM Code of Ethics as well as the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer scope of practice.
b) appropriate work attire and professional behavior.
2) Skill in:
a) conducting all professional activities within the scope of practice of the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer.
D. Follow industry-accepted professional, ethical, and business standards. Recall 1) Knowledge of:
a) professional liability and potential for negligence in training environments. b) legal issues for licensed and non-licensed healthcare professionals providing services, exercise testing and risk-management strategies.
c) equipment maintenance to decrease risk of injury and liability (e.g., maintenance plan, service schedule, safety considerations).
E. Respect copyright laws by obtaining permission before using protected Recall materials and any form of applicable intellectual property.
1) Knowledge of:
a) national and international copyright laws.
2) Skill in:
a) referencing non-original work.
F. Safeguard client confidentiality and privacy rights unless formally waived or in Recall emergency situations.
1) Knowledge of:
a) practices/systems for maintaining client confidentiality.
b) the importance of client privacy (i.e., client personal safety, legal liability, client credit protection, client medical disclosure).
c) the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) laws.

ACSM certified Personal Trainer
ACSM certified health
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Purple, Arm, Shoulder, Joint, Photography, Physical fitness, Performance,

Kat Wirsing

A medicine ball is like the kale of gym equipment—you know it's good for you, but you've got no clue what to do with it. Once you do, there are so many perks. “It develops explosive power, increases body strength, increases speed and provides more versatile movement in different planes,” says Tatiana Lampa, CPT, ACSM-certified trainer at Fithouse and SLT, and creator of the app, Training With T.

That's why many athletes (baseball, softball, football, and tennis) train with a medicine ball. The versatility of the ball helps them nail down the mechanics and play better. But you don’t have to be anywhere near pro to work out with a medicine ball and get all the benefits.

Meet the expert: Tatiana Lampa is an ACSM-certified personal trainer, corrective exercise specialist, creator of the Training With T app, and instructor at Fithouse in New York City.

Now, you may be wondering…why can’t I just use plain hand weights for these exercises? Well, there’s actually a major difference between dumbbells and medicine balls. “You can’t slam the weights to generate power in a different way like a medicine ball,” Lampa says. “You are definitely working muscles differently with weights and medicine ball in different planes.”

If it's your first time picking up a medicine ball or if your goal is speed, she recommends starting out with a 4- to 6-pound ball. However, if you’re training for power, choose a heavier ball. Medicine ball slams and chest passes are great ways to build upper body power, and medicine ball throws rock at developing rotary power, she adds.

Below, Lampa shares 23 different medicine ball exercises that are perfect for challenging your entire body. Read on to power up your next sweat with a medicine ball.

Time: 18 to 25 minutes

Equipment: 8 to 12 pound medicine ball

Good for: Total body

Instructions: Choose six moves below. Do as many reps as you can for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest. Repeat that three to four times. Then continue to the next move.

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1 Medicine Ball Burpee Squat Thrust

How to:

  1. Start by standing upright, feet hip-distance apart, medicine ball in your hands.
  2. Drop down and push the medicine ball into the ground as you shoot your legs back.
  3. From here, quickly jump your feet to meet the ball, landing in a squat position.
  4. As you stand up, thrust your hips forward and bring the medicine ball back to the starting point. That's one rep.
  5. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest.

2 Kneeling Medicine Ball Slam

How to:

  1. Get into a lunge position with your left leg in front of your right.
  2. Grab a medicine ball, and hold it above your head.
  3. Forcefully slam the ball toward the outside of your left leg as hard as you can.
  4. Pick the ball up and repeat.
  5. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest. Repeat on the other side.

3 Bent-Over Medicine Ball Row

How to:

  1. Grab a medicine ball and stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent.
  2. Bend over from the hips until your back forms a 45-degree angle with the floor.
  3. Pull the medicine ball up, squeezing your shoulder blades together.
  4. Pause, then lower the weights. That's one rep.
  5. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest.

4 Lunge With Medicine Ball Pass

How to:

  1. Standing in a wide split stance, hold the ball at your chest.
  2. Bend both knees to lower into a lunge, moving the ball to the inside of your front leg then quickly passing it under your leg from hand to hand.
  3. Pass the ball back over the leg as you straighten your legs. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest. Repeat on the other side.

5 Medicine Ball Bicycle Twist

How to:

  1. Lie on your back with your knees bent. Hold a medicine ball directly above your chest.
  2. Curl your upper body, and at the top of the crunch rotate your torso so that your left elbow meets your right knee. Extend your left leg at the same time, as if you're pedaling.
  3. Return to start and repeat on the other side. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest.

6 Romanian Deadlift With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Hold a medicine ball at arm’s length in front of your thighs. Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Brace your core.
  2. Without changing the bend in your knees, bend at your hips, and lower your torso until it’s almost parallel to the floor.
  3. Pause, then squeeze your glutes and raise your torso back to starting position. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest.

7 Deadlift With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Hold your medicine ball at arm’s length in front of your thighs. Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Brace your core.
  2. Bend your knees, bend at your hips, and lower until your thighs are almost parallel to the floor.
  3. Pause, then squeeze your glutes and raise your torso back to starting position. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many reps as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds rest.

8 High Knee With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Hold a medicine ball in front of your chest.
  2. Keeping your core tight and chest tall, hop your right knee up so high that it touches the medicine ball.
  3. Return to start and then hop your left knee up.
  4. Continue alternating for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

9 Knee Drive With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Start with your right leg firmly on the ground, and your left leg placed behind you, with your toes balancing on the ground.
  2. Hold the medicine ball out in front of you, so it almost forms a straight line with your back leg.
  3. Drive your left leg up and bring the medicine ball down to meet it.
  4. Repeat this movement for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest. Switch sides.

10 Medicine Ball Mountain Climber

How to:

  1. Get in a pushup position with the medicine ball underneath your hands. Your body should form a straight line from your head to your ankles.
  2. Keeping your core tight and back flat, bend your right knee and raise it toward your chest.
  3. Reverse the movement to return to start, then repeat with your left leg.
  4. Continue alternating for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

11 Pistol Squat With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Stand on one leg. The other should be bent, with your foot in line with your opposite knee. Hold a medicine ball in front of your chest.
  2. Extend your bent leg and press the ball in front of you as your lower your body down as far as you can go.
  3. Driving through your left heel, stand up and bring the ball back to your chest.
  4. Continue alternating for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest. Repeat on the other side.

12 Plank With Medicine Ball Tap

How to:

  1. Hold the top of a pushup position, palms directly below shoulders, legs shoulder-width apart straight out behind you, spine neutral, and abs and glutes engaged.
  2. Place the medicine ball in front of you.
  3. While keeping your body still, tap the ball with your right hand. Return to start. Then tap the ball with your left hand.
  4. Continue alternating for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

13 Pushup With Medicine Ball Shuffle

How to:

  1. Come down into the top of a pushup position, placing one hand on top of the medicine ball.
  2. Do a lopsided pushup, then roll the ball from one hand to the other. Repeat on the other side.
  3. Continue alternating for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

14 Russian Twist With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Sit on the floor with your knees bent and your feet in the air, parallel to the ground. Hold a medicine ball in front of your chest.
  2. Lean back so your torso is at a 45-degree angle to the floor. Brace your core and rotate to the right as far as you can.
  3. Pause, then reverse your movement and twist all the way back to the left as far as you can. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

15 Pushup With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Place the medicine ball under one hand, and place your knees on the ground. Make sure, when you're upright, your body is in a straight line from head and shoulders to knees.
  2. Slowly bend your elbows and lower your body down. Once your left arm is at a 90-degree angle, return to start.
  3. Continue for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest. Repeat on the other side.

16 Situp With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Lie faceup on the floor with your knees bent and feet flat. Hold a medicine ball in both hands, in front of your chest.
  2. Raise your torso to a sitting position. Slowly lower your torso to the starting point. That's one rep.
  3. Do as many as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

17 Situp With Medicine Ball Pass

How to:

  1. Lie faceup on the floor. Hold a medicine ball between your hands.
  2. Bring your knees into your chest, shins parallel to the ground. At the same time, lift your torso and bring your arms overhead and toward your legs. Place the medicine ball on your shins.
  3. Pause, then lower torso to the ground while balancing the ball on your shins. Then rise back up, and grab the ball. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

18 Situp With Medicine Ball Reach

How to:

  1. Lie on your back, and bring your legs into the air, creating a 90-degree angle with the ground. Hold a medicine ball above your head.
  2. Lift your shoulders off the ground, and reach the ball toward your feet.
  3. Do as many as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

19 Situp To Medicine Ball Press

How to:

  1. Lie faceup on the floor with your knees bent and feet flat. Hold a medicine ball in both hands, in front of your chest.
  2. Raise your torso to a sitting position, then extend the medicine ball over your head.
  3. Slowly lower it back down, and then lower your torso to the starting point. That's one rep.
  4. Do as many as you can in 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

20 V-Up With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Lie faceup on the floor with your legs and arms straight. Hold a medicine ball in your hands.
  2. In one movement, lift your torso and legs as if you're trying to touch your toes. Lower your body back down. That's one rep.
  3. Do as many as you can for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

21 Single-Leg Hip Bridge

How to:

  1. Lie on your back with your arms out to the side, knees bent, and feet hip-width apart.
  2. Place a medicine ball under one foot and, keeping your thighs aligned, straighten one leg so that your toes point up.
  3. Squeeze your glutes to lift your hips evenly off the floor, then lower. That’s one rep.
  4. Do as many reps as you can for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest. Repeat on the other side.

22 Skater With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Hold a medicine ball in front of your chest, and stand with both feet flat on the floor.
  2. Cross your right leg behind your left leg as you bend your left knee into a half-squat position. Keep the medicine ball in front of your chest. Then repeat in the other direction.
  3. Keep alternating for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

23 Squat Jump With Medicine Ball

How to:

  1. Stand with your feet hip-width apart, toes forward, with your hands in front of your chest.
  2. Bend your knees, then explosively jump as high as you can. Land softly on the balls of your feet and immediately lower into your next squat.
  3. Continue for 45 seconds, then take 15 seconds of rest.

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Wed, 13 Jul 2022 03:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/g25058598/medicine-ball-exercise/
Killexams : A top trainer says this number is much more useful than calories burned

Photo credit: Hinterhaus Productions - Getty Images

Understanding the inner workings of your bod can be overwhelming. I get it. But whether you're trying to boost your metabolism, track your fitness progress, or focus on a weight management plan, it’s important to understand one number: your basal metabolic rate.

Simply put, basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of calories your body burns while performing basic life-sustaining functions like breathing, growing hair, digesting food, and keeping your heart beating, says Alyssa Lombardi, exercise physiologist, running coach, and founder of Alyssa RunFit Coaching. 'BMR is the minimum amount of calories that your body needs to sustain your current weight.'

Meet the experts: Alyssa Lombardi is an ACSM certified clinical exercise physiologist, certified personal trainer, certified running coach, and founder of Alyssa RunFit Coaching. Cara Carmichael, CPT, is a NASM certified personal trainer, OrangeTheory coach, and certified PN nutrition coach.

It's also important to know what it's not. BMR is not based on your activity levels or how much you exercise. It is the rate at which your body burns calories to perform essential bodily functions only.

And, don't confuse your basal metabolic rate with your resting metabolic rate (RMR). 'RMR is your BMR plus a very small level of daily activity such as walking to the bathroom, getting out of bed, and eating, but essentially being at rest,' notes Lombardi.

There's no one-size-fits-all BMR. The number is based on height, weight, gender, age, muscle mass, and body fat. Knowing your BMR can help you stay in tune with weight management and how your body responds to life activities. 'As your level of activity, exercise, and age changes, your BMR will change,' says Lombardi. 'Checking it every so often can be helpful to know, so you can adjust your lifestyle to maintain a healthy weight.'

That's just a sneak peek at all that BMR can do. Read on for the complete details of calculating your basal metabolic rate, why knowing your BMR matters, and more from experts.

How to figure out your BMR

There are a few different ways to calculate BMR. Getting an exact and totally accurate BMR requires a DEXA scan, says Lombardi. 'This is essentially a picture of your body that will tell you the make-up of your body’s fat, muscle, and bone density,' she says. However, DEXA scans use a low dose X-ray, are performed in a hospital, and require an in-person visit with your physician.

Because DEXA scans are not exactly accessible, Lombardi recommends an online calculator like Omni Calculator for an easier (and free!) measurement right at home. While less exact, studies show online calculators using the Harris-Benedict equation take into account your height, weight, age, and gender to give you a rough assessment of your BMR.

Since the Harris-Benedict equation does not factor in muscle mass or body fat there are limitations to its accuracy. You can estimate it yourself with the equation for women below.

Calculate your BMR: 655 + (9.6 x weight in kg) + (1.8 x height in cm) - (4.7 x age in years)

It’s also important to note that men typically have a higher BMR than women. Generally speaking, men are taller and have more muscle mass than women, resulting in a higher BMR, explains Lombardi. The more muscle you have, the higher your BMR will be.

You may be wondering... does my smartwatch give an accurate BMR? The short answer is no. Fitness trackers use movement, heart rate, and your height and weight to provide some calorie intel, but do not factor in muscle mass or body fat, both of which contribute to your BMR, says Cara Carmichael, CPT. 'The number the watch is creating isn’t necessarily based on the individual,' she says. 'It’s a more basic formula and there’s a lot of room for error.'

Even though smartwatches are not 100% accurate, they can give you a good starting point, adds Lombardi. But remember not to dwell on the numbers. Instead, take this information to understand your body and its necessary caloric intake.

Why BMR is a useful piece of health data

Beyond upping your knowledge (and appreciation!) for how your body works, knowing your BMR can help you reach your health and fitness goals. Here are a few benefits of your BMR:

  • Understanding caloric needs. Knowing your BMR can help you determine a nutrition plan and recognise your daily caloric needs, explains Carmichael. 'A lot of us don’t truly know how much food we need to consume to get through the day without crashing, but your BMR can serve as a baseline,' she says. By knowing how many calories your body naturally burns, you can gauge how much you need to eat in order to gain (eat more calories than you burn), lose (eat fewer calories than you burn), or sustain weight (eat the same number of calories that you burn).

  • Weight management. Whether you are looking to lose or gain weight, understanding your BMR can help speed up the process by giving you necessary information to help set a diet that aligns with your goals, says Lombardi. Once you know your BMR - aka how many calories your body burns for basic functioning - you can use it to base the number of calories needed for the day. The higher your BMR, the more calories you can consume without gaining weight, she explains.

  • Tracking fitness progress. If your BMR increases, that generally means you are gaining more muscle and getting stronger, says Lombardi. Since gaining muscle is the most effective way to change your BMR, consistent strength training and tracking your BMR over time can be a great way to measure your progress and #gains.

  • Improving metabolism. A high BMR is often associated with a fast metabolism and greater muscle mass, while a low BMR can hint to a slower metabolism, lower muscle mass, and higher percent of body fat, says Carmichael. 'A lot of people want to increase their metabolism, but you have to understand that in order to do that, you need to build more muscle and increase your BMR,' she says.

How to Improve your BMR

Take a peek at the stats in the BMR equation above, and you'll get a rough idea of how you can move the BMR needle. Incorporating strength training into your workout and gaining muscle mass is the most effective way to change and increase your BMR, says Carmichael. 'Muscle uses a lot more energy than fat while at rest, so at any given weight, the more muscle on your body, the higher your BMR.'

Carmichael suggests incorporating strength training at least twice a week to build muscle and raise your BMR. But remember, consistency is key and change does not happen overnight. 'So many people look for quick fixes, but in reality, it's about sustainability and sustainable habits.'

Changing your BMR can help boost your metabolism, lose weight, gain strength, or set an optimal meal plan, but there is not one magic number. 'Each individual has a different BMR and cannot be compared to one another,' says Carmichael. What is considered to be 'healthy' varies depending on the person and their goals. The average BMR for women is around 1400 kcal and about 1700 kcal for men, she says.

Bottom line: BMR is a personalised statistic that cannot be compared to anyone else, but measuring yours and learning how your body functions can help you achieve your health and fitness goals.

You Might Also Like

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 18:28:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/top-trainer-says-number-much-102800789.html
Killexams : Acsm Agam SpA chooses the Wolters Kluwer CCH® Tagetik ESG & Sustainability expert solution to address evolving regulatory requirements

Pre-built & configurable expert solution enables utility sector leaders to quickly streamline their ESG reporting processes, simplify compliance and drive sustainable strategies

NEW YORK, Aug. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Wolters Kluwer, a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services, today announced that Acsm Agam SpA selected CCH® Tagetik ESG & Sustainability  Performance Management expert solution to capitalize on advanced, intelligent ESG reporting capabilities.

Wolters_Kluwer_Logo

As one of the main multi-utilities in northern Italy, Acsm Agam, manages four business lines: distribution network, electricity & gas, environment, energy & smart technologies. The efficient use of resources is a distinctive feature of Acsm Agam's environmental policies: sustainability and innovation drive their business to maximize value for society, customers, shareholders, and stakeholders.

Acsm Agam extended its current use of the CCH® Tagetik platform by adding the ESG & Sustainability expert solution to fulfill the EU Taxonomy requirement and optimize their ESG performance. With its strong data processing capabilities, the CCH® Tagetik expert solution will enable Acsm Agam to speed up data collection and KPI calculation, optimize the ESG process, and provide increased efficiency and productivity. The pre-built ESG content, data models, and built-in calculation rules will enable the company to elevate its ESG reporting and disclosures.

"Logging ESG data manually in spreadsheets was painful and time-consuming, making it impossible to get a global, integrated picture of ESG gains and impacts. The CCH® Tagetik ESG & Sustainability expert solution is exactly what we need to help us set a long-term ESG strategy," said Marco Basile, Strategic Project Manager, Acsm Agam. "The solution's ease of use and its guided workflow will help streamline our ESG process and help us meet ESG requirements. We are excited to grow our usage of the CCH® Tagetik platform and are now more confident than ever in our ESG journey."

"We are delighted to be working with Acsm Agam, a company that has grown incrementally, securing a leading role in the utility industry. Beyond compliance, Acsm Agam will benefit from the unification of ESG data with financial results and leverage insightful reporting for driving sustainable growth, identifying cost savings, and combatting risk," said Sabrina Rosati, Vice President and GM for CCH® Tagetik Italy at Wolters Kluwer.

In addition to the ESG & Sustainability expert solution, Acsm Agam leverages the CCH® Tagetik platform to manage financial processes that include Budgeting & Planning, Consolidation, Financial and ESG Reporting & Disclosure. They also adopted CCH® Tagetik SmartInsight for added flexibility to create dynamic reports, perform real-time analysis and quickly react to changing business demands.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer (WKL) is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the healthcare; tax and accounting; governance, risk and compliance; and legal and regulatory sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with advanced technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer reported 2021 annual revenues of €4.8 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,800 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands.

Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt (ADR) program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY).

For more information, visit www.wolterskluwer.com, follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.

Logo -  https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1441883/Wolters_Kluwer_Logo.jpg

Media Contacts:
Beatriz Santin                              
CCH® Tagetik     
+1 339 229 2447 office                   
Beatriz.santin@wolterskluwer.com   

Jackie Hyland  
CCH® Tagetik
 +1 984 218 5410 office
Jackie.hyland@wolterskluwer.com

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View original content:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/acsm-agam-spa-chooses-the-wolters-kluwer-cch-tagetik-esg--sustainability-expert-solution-to-address-evolving-regulatory-requirements-301597682.html

SOURCE Wolters Kluwer

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:42:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/acsm-agam-spa-chooses-wolters-144200142.html
Killexams : Knowing This Number Is So Much More Useful Than Tracking Calories Burned

Photo credit: Hinterhaus Productions - Getty Images

Understanding the inner workings of your bod can be overwhelming. I get it. But whether you're trying to boost your metabolism, track your fitness progress, or focus on a weight management plan, it’s important to understand one number: your basal metabolic rate.

Simply put, basal metabolic rate (BMR) is the amount of calories your body burns while performing basic life-sustaining functions like breathing, growing hair, digesting food, and keeping your heart beating, says Alyssa Lombardi, exercise physiologist, running coach, and founder of Alyssa RunFit Coaching. “BMR is the minimum amount of calories that your body needs to sustain your current weight.”

Meet the experts: Alyssa Lombardi is an ACSM certified clinical exercise physiologist, certified personal trainer, certified running coach, and founder of Alyssa RunFit Coaching. Cara Carmichael, CPT, is a NASM certified personal trainer, OrangeTheory coach, and certified PN nutrition coach.

It's also important to know what it's not. BMR is not based on your activity levels or how much you exercise. It is the rate at which your body burns calories to perform essential bodily functions only.

And, don't confuse your basal metabolic rate with your resting metabolic rate (RMR). “RMR is your BMR plus a very small level of daily activity such as walking to the bathroom, getting out of bed, and eating, but essentially being at rest,” notes Lombardi.

There's no one-size-fits-all BMR. The number is based on height, weight, gender, age, muscle mass, and body fat. Knowing your BMR can help you stay in tune with weight management and how your body responds to life activities. “As your level of activity, exercise, and age changes, your BMR will change,” says Lombardi. “Checking it every so often can be helpful to know, so you can adjust your lifestyle to maintain a healthy weight.”

That's just a sneak peek at all that BMR can do. Read on for the complete details of calculating your basal metabolic rate, why knowing your BMR matters, and more from experts.

How To Figure Out Your BMR

There are a few different ways to calculate BMR. Getting an exact and totally accurate BMR requires a DEXA scan, says Lombardi. “This is essentially a picture of your body that will tell you the make-up of your body’s fat, muscle, and bone density,” she says. However, DEXA scans use a low dose X-ray, are performed in a hospital, and require an in-person visit with your physician.

Because DEXA scans are not exactly accessible, Lombardi recommends an online calculator like Omni Calculator for an easier (and free!) measurement right at home. While less exact, studies show online calculators using the Harris-Benedict equation take into account your height, weight, age, and gender to give you a rough assessment of your BMR.

Since the Harris-Benedict equation does not factor in muscle mass or body fat there are limitations to its accuracy. You can estimate it yourself with the equation for women below.

Calculate your BMR: 655 + (9.6 x weight in kg) + (1.8 x height in cm) - (4.7 x age in years)

It’s also important to note that men typically have a higher BMR than women. Generally speaking, men are taller and have more muscle mass than women, resulting in a higher BMR, explains Lombardi. The more muscle you have, the higher your BMR will be.

You may be wondering... does my smartwatch give an accurate BMR? The short answer is no. Smartwatch trackers use movement, heart rate, and your height and weight to provide some calorie intel, but do not factor in muscle mass or body fat, both of which contribute to your BMR, says Cara Carmichael, CPT. “The number the watch is creating isn’t necessarily based on the individual,” she says. “It’s a more basic formula and there’s a lot of room for error.”

Even though smartwatches are not 100% accurate, they can give you a good starting point, adds Lombardi. But remember not to dwell on the numbers. Instead, take this information to understand your body and its necessary caloric intake.

Why BMR Is A Useful Piece Of Health Data

Beyond upping your knowledge (and appreciation!) for how your body works, knowing your BMR can help you reach your health and fitness goals. Here are a few benefits of your BMR:

  • Understanding caloric needs. Knowing your BMR can help you determine a nutrition plan and recognize your daily caloric needs, explains Carmichael. “A lot of us don’t truly know how much food we need to consume to get through the day without crashing, but your BMR can serve as a baseline,” she says. By knowing how many calories your body naturally burns, you can gauge how much you need to eat in order to gain (eat more calories than you burn), lose (eat fewer calories than you burn), or sustain weight (eat the same number of calories that you burn).

  • Weight management. Whether you are looking to lose or gain weight, understanding your BMR can help speed up the process by giving you necessary information to help set a diet that aligns with your goals, says Lombardi. Once you know your BMR - aka how many calories your body burns for basic functioning - you can use it to base the number of calories needed for the day. The higher your BMR, the more calories you can consume without gaining weight, she explains.

  • Tracking fitness progress. If your BMR increases, that generally means you are gaining more muscle and getting stronger, says Lombardi. Since gaining muscle is the most effective way to change your BMR, consistent strength training and tracking your BMR over time can be a great way to measure your progress and #gains.

  • Improving metabolism. A high BMR is often associated with a fast metabolism and greater muscle mass, while a low BMR can hint to a slower metabolism, lower muscle mass, and higher percent of body fat, says Carmichael. “A lot of people want to increase their metabolism, but you have to understand that in order to do that, you need to build more muscle and increase your BMR,” she says.

How To Improve Your BMR

Take a peek at the stats in the BMR equation above, and you'll get a rough idea of how you can move the BMR needle. Incorporating strength training into your workout and gaining muscle mass is the most effective way to change and increase your BMR, says Carmichael. “Muscle uses a lot more energy than fat while at rest, so at any given weight, the more muscle on your body, the higher your BMR.”

Carmichael suggests incorporating strength training at least twice a week to build muscle and raise your BMR. But remember, consistency is key and change does not happen overnight. “So many people look for quick fixes, but in reality, it's about sustainability and sustainable habits.”

Changing your BMR can help boost your metabolism, lose weight, gain strength, or set an optimal meal plan, but there is not one magic number. “Each individual has a different BMR and cannot be compared to one another,” says Carmichael. What is considered to be “healthy” varies depending on the person and their goals. The average BMR for women is around 1400 kcal and about 1700 kcal for men, she says.

Bottom line: BMR is a personalized statistic that cannot be compared to anyone else, but measuring yours and learning how your body functions can help you achieve your health and fitness goals.

You Might Also Like

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-CA text/html https://ca.news.yahoo.com/knowing-number-much-more-useful-130000798.html
Killexams : A top trainer says this number is much more useful than calories burned No result found, try new keyword!Understanding the inner workings of your bod can be overwhelming. I get it. But whether you're trying to boost your metabolism, track your fitness progress, or focus on a weight management plan ... Wed, 03 Aug 2022 22:50:00 -0500 en-gb text/html https://www.msn.com/en-gb/health/fitness/a-top-trainer-says-this-number-is-much-more-useful-than-calories-burned/ar-AA10i92f
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