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BA3 - Fundamentals of Financial Accounting
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The degree involves studying courses to the value of 12 units over three years, plus LSE100. You will also have the opportunity to apply for a year abroad at one of our global exchange partners. 

First year

In Michaelmas Term of the first year of the programme you will gain an essential foundation in economics and learn the necessary quantitative skills. In Lent Term you will take introductory courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. You will also choose an outside option course from a rich array of courses from other departments – this can be a whole unit course or two half unit courses in Michaelmas Term and Lent Term, respectively. In addition, you will ​also take LSE100.

Michaelmas Term

Economics (0.5)

Principles economics course to introduce students to traditional and topical economic questions and how both established and new economic approaches can deal with them. 

Quantitative Methods (0.5)*

The aim of this course is to develop the basic mathematical tools necessary for further study in economics and related disciplines.

Elementary Statistical Theory (0.5)

The course provides a precise and accurate treatment of introductory probability theory, statistical ideas, methods and techniques. 

Outside option


Lent Term

Microeconomics I (0.5)

This course provides a foundation to help students understand key microeconomic questions using a variety of established and new approaches.

Macroeconomics I (0.5)

This course provides a foundation to help students understand key macroeconomic questions using a variety of established and new approaches.

Econometrics I (0.5)

Introduction to econometrics to teach students the theory and practice of empirical research in economics.

Outside option

*Students can opt to take Mathematical Methods (1.0) in place of Quantitative Methods (0.5) and the Lent Term outside option (0.5).

LSE100*
A half unit, running across Michaelmas and Lent Term in the first year, LSE100 is compulsory for all LSE undergraduate students, and is designed to build your capacity to tackle multidimensional problems through research-rich education.

Second year

The second year of the programme builds on the Year 1 courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. You will develop a firm grasp of core analytical methods and apply them to a range of problems. You will also choose one outside option from another department (a whole unit or two half units in Michaelmas Term and Lent Term, respectively).

Microeconomics II (1.0)

This intermediate-level course will help students understand key microeconomic questions and challenges and also evaluate possible solutions using a variety of approaches and student projects.

Macroeconomics II (1.0)

This intermediate-level course will help students understand key macroeconomic questions and challenges, and evaluate possible solutions using a variety of approaches and student projects.

Econometrics II (1.0)

Intermediate-level course to teach students the theory of econometrics, the practical problems of empirical research, and how to do empirical research  themselves in a student project.

Principles of Finance or optional course (1.0)

Third year

In your third year you will have the opportunity to specialise according to your interests.

You will choose one course from three options. You will then take two further economics options. You will also complete a thesis in quantitative economics on a research question of your choosing.

Two economics options

Quantitative Thesis (1.0)

Either
Econometric Theory (1.0))
Gives an introduction to the asymptotic theory of estimation and inference of economic models.
Or
Games and Economic Behaviour (1.0)
Reviews fundamental concepts in economic theory and presents some of its most successful applications.
Or
Problems of Applied Econometrics (1.0)
Provides a solid grounding in latest developments in applied econometrics. 

For the most up-to-date list of optional courses please visit the relevant School Calendar page

Where regulations permit, you may also be able to take a language, literature or linguistics option as part of your degree. Information can be found on the Language Centre webpages.

You must note however that while care has been taken to ensure that this information is up-to-date and correct, a change of circumstances since publication may cause the School to change, suspend or withdraw a course or programme of study, or change the fees that apply to it. The School will always notify the affected parties as early as practicably possible and propose any viable and relevant alternative options. Note that the School will neither be liable for information that after publication becomes inaccurate or irrelevant, nor for changing, suspending or withdrawing a course or programme of study due to events outside of its control, which includes but is not limited to a lack of demand for a course or programme of study, industrial action, fire, flood or other environmental or physical damage to premises.

You must also note that places are limited on some courses and/or subject to specific entry requirements. The School cannot therefore certain you a place. Please note that changes to programmes and courses can sometimes occur after you have accepted your offer of a place. These changes are normally made in light of developments in the discipline or path-breaking research, or on the basis of student feedback. Changes can take the form of altered course content, teaching formats or assessment modes. Any such changes are intended to enhance the student learning experience. You should visit the School’s Calendar, or contact the relevant academic department, for information on the availability and/or content of courses and programmes of study. Certain substantive changes will be listed on the updated undergraduate course and programme information page.

Sat, 18 Jun 2022 18:58:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.lse.ac.uk/study-at-lse/Undergraduate/degree-programmes-2023/BSc-Econometrics-and-Mathematical-Economics?from_serp=1
Killexams : International Accounting with Analytics

Overview

This unique programme offers you the ability to advance your accounting career as well as acquire practical analytics skills.

Summary

Qualified accountants are always in high demand and the profession provides excellent employability and earning prospects. The MSc International Accounting with Analytics offers you the ability to advance your accounting career as well as acquiring practical analytics skills essential to the accounting profession.

This programme is designed for business and accounting graduates to combine study for a Master’s degree, while also gaining exemptions from professional examinations and gaining an understanding of and expertise in accounting and business analytics.

The programme is informed and shaped by the needs of the accounting, finance and taxation professionals of tomorrow. The programme encourages critical and creative thinking, teamwork and communication, and develops a diverse range of professional attributes which equip graduates to excel in the accounting profession and to become the business leaders of the future.

Significant exemptions from the Chartered Accountants Ireland examinations will be available on completion. Graduates of the MSc should be granted full exemption from their CAP2 examinations and therefore have only two final admitting examinations to complete after graduation.


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About this course

Attendance

Full-time - one year

Start dates

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Learning and Teaching

The range of modules offered on this course allows a varied and interesting mix of methods to be used, to enhance knowledge and understanding as well as allowing you to practice and develop your professional and transferable skills.

For each module on this course you will have weekly lectures and seminars. Lectures are used to explain and develop the skills identified as being important to you in developing your professional and personal development within the subject areas. Lectures provide the framework for directing independent student learning activity and skills development. Weekly seminars will provide opportunities for you to engage in an in-depth appreciation of theoretical and practical issues related to the subject area. A number of modules will utilise the simulation suite available on campus to enhance your learning experience. In addition, a number of modules involve small group teaching in a workshop format.

Assessment

Considerable effort has been devoted to ensuring that the assessment requirements built into each module on this course are appropriate to the learning outcomes, qualities and abilities being assessed. Assessment methods range from class tests, essays, business reports, group projects and practical skills audits, a variety of group and individual presentations incorporating self and peer assessment, practical simulations, case study applications, reflective portfolios, on-line assessment, class tests, management reports, projects and work-based assignments and unseen end of semester examinations.

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until near the start date and may be subject to change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days of attendance will often be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Masters courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be via one method or a combination e.g. examination and coursework . Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have four learning outcomes, and no more than two items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6 (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Masters degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Academic profile

The Department of Global Business and Enterprise has strong ties with the major professional accountancy and taxation bodies including:

  • Chartered Accountants Ireland (CAI)
  • The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA)
  • The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)
  • The Institute of Certified Public Accountants in Ireland (CPA)
  • The Irish Taxation Institute (ITI)

All accounting staff in the department are members of professional accountancy bodies with a number of lecturers also having obtained additional qualifications in areas such as taxation and financial services. Many staff have trained and worked in the Big Four professional services firms as well as having experience advising within small and medium sized practices and in industry.

All lecturing staff within the Department of Global Business and Enterprise are Fellows/Senior Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (20%) or Lecturers (55%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advanced HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and provide a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2021-2022.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Strategic Leadership for International Accounting

Year: 1

The aim of this module is to develop students' appreciation of strategic leadership in accounting, in an international context. The module will emphasise the role of high level financial techniques, technology and analytics in leading strategic change within an organisation.

International Audit and Assurance

Year: 1

This module explores the conceptual and theoretical fundamentals of auditing, combined with the practical application of auditing principles and the issues encountered in the international audit environment. The use of data analytics and emerging technologies are also explored for the conduct of the audit.

Advanced UK Taxation

Year: 1

This module explores the legislation and practice governing the income tax, capital gains tax, inheritance tax and stamp tax exposure of an individual within the scope of UK taxation. It also explores the taxation implications for a corporate entity from a corporation tax, capital tax and stamp tax perspective. The scope, legislation and practice for VAT is also explored for both business and property transactions.

International Financial Reporting

Year: 1

This module explores the concepts underlying financial accounting, current regulations and how these concepts inform regulation including the preparation of internal and external financial reports.

Strategic Finance

Year: 1

This module covers key concepts, principles and theories in strategic finance and will be of particular relevance to professionals either employed or seeking employment in medium and large sized entities. Key syllabus will include financial strategy formulation, investment decision making, financing sources, dividend policy, company valuation, mergers and acquisitions and financial risk management.

Strategic Management Accounting

Year: 1

This module covers key concepts, principles and theories in strategic management accounting and will be of particular relevance to professionals either employed or seeking employment in medium and large sized entities. Key syllabus will include frameworks /for performance management, performance management decisions, IT and data analytics, behavioural aspects of budgeting, approaches to budgeting, budgetary control, variance analysis, divisional performance measures and ethics, transfer pricing and corporate governance.

Data Analytics for Finance Professionals

Year: 1

This module is designed to introduce the student to the role of data analysis, data visualisation and reporting using within accountancy and business. The module will provide students with the skills and know to work with data and apply data analysis techniques to inform client management strategies, business advisory approaches and reporting.

International Corporate Reporting and Tax Planning

Year: 1

This module explores the financial accounting legislation and regulations, including IFRS and local GAAP, needed for the practical preparation of financial statements for groups. The module also explores the legislation, procedures and practice governing the most common aspects of UK corporation tax for UK companies and multinational groups operating in the UK.

Research Methods for Finance Professionals

Year: 1

This module provides students with knowledge and understanding of the research process in the broad area of international accounting, finance and analytics. It will equip students with an in depth understanding and ability to develop a research question, undertake a critical literature review, and identify a justifiable research methodology to match the research question.

Dissertation

Year: 1

This module is optional

The master's dissertation enables students to carry out research on a chosen syllabu within the field of international accounting, finance or analytics. Students will gain an in depth understanding of the academic research process. Completing the dissertation enables the student to build on the knowledge and skills gained throughout their masters programme, to produce a major piece of academic writing.

Applied Research Project

Year: 1

This module is optional

The applied research project module provides students with the skills to apply their technical knowledge and capabilities to research an opportunity, problem or challenge in an organisation in the area of international accounting, finance and/or analytics and come up with an effective solution for the organisation. The module integrates the knowledge gained throughout the programme so that students can critical apply financial, analytical and technical skills to a research project.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must be able to satisfy the University's general admissions requirements in one of the following ways:

Applicants must:

(a) have gained
(i) a second class honours degree in an accounting discipline or better from a university of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, or from a recognised national awarding body, or from an institution of another country which has been recognised as being of an equivalent standard; or

(ii) an equivalent standard (normally 50%) in an accounting discipline in a Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate, Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma or an approved alternative qualification;

and

(b) gained CAP 1 chartered accounting examinations

and

(c) provide evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent).

Alternatively, applicants must demonstrate their ability to undertake the course through the accreditation of prior experiential learning.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Accounting specialists with knowledge of accounting, finance and the business environment are always in great demand. The combination of subjects you will study on this course will provide you with a sound basis to become a future business leader. The knowledge you will acquire will enable you to work in any industry sector and across all areas of business including financial reporting, accounting, finance, taxation or management in public, private or not-for-profit organisations.

The analytics element of the programme is essential to prepare graduates for their professional career by enabling them to ‘add value’ to the business decision making processes within an organisation or for a client business. Graduates will gain practical understanding of and expertise in the use of analytics tools to enable them to help businesses uncover valuable insights within financial information, identify process improvements to help businesses increase efficiency, and to ensure the better management of exposure to risk.

Due to the exemptions available, you will also be a step ahead in your professional accountancy training. On successful completion of this course, you will only be required to undertake a three year training contract and will only have two more examinations to undertake to become a Chartered Accountant.

Fees and funding

Important notice - fees information

Fees illustrated are based on academic year 22/23 entry and are subject to an annual increase.

If your study continues into future academic years your fees are subject to an annual increase. Please take this into consideration when you estimate your total fees for a degree.

Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees.

Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply.

Fees (total cost)

Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland and EU Settlement Status Fees

£7,940.00

International Fees

£15,360.00

Additional mandatory costs

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot certain the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.
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Killexams : BSc Accounting

Overview

Degree awarded
BSc (Hons)
Duration
3 years full-time
Typical A-level offer
Grades AAA. Native languages accepted. General Studies accepted if one of four A-levels passed in the same sitting. We expect you to complete three A-levels in one sitting and will also consider the subjects you have taken - view our full entry requirements for more information.
Typical contextual A-level offer
Grades AAB. Native languages accepted. General Studies accepted if one of four A-levels passed in the same sitting. We expect you to complete three A-levels in one sitting and will also consider the subjects you have taken - view our full entry requirements for more information.
Find out more about contextual admissions.
Refugee/care-experienced offer

Applicants who have been in local authority care for more than three months or have refugee status may be eligible for an offer two grades below the standard requirements.

Find out more about contextual admissions.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer

36 points overall. 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

Students without GCSE/iGCSE Maths at grade A (or 7) will need to achieve 6 in any one of the following SL subjects; Maths, Maths: Analysis and Approaches or Maths: Applications and Interpretation. Alternatively we can accept grade 6 in Middle Years Programme Maths. We do not accept Maths Studies for BSc (Hons) Accounting applicants for the purposes of meeting our Maths subject requirements.

Students without GCSE/iGCSE English Language at B (or 6) will need to achieve 5 in SL Language A: English Language and Literature or Language A: Literature. If Language B: English is offered at SL we would need you to achieve a 6.

Applicants studying the International Baccalaureate Career Related Programme (IBCP) should contact the academic School prior to applying so that their academic profile can be considered.

Full entry requirements

Number of places/applicants

492 applications for 53 places (2020 entry)

How to apply

Course description

This unique, professionally-oriented course has been designed alongside the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) Undergraduate Partnership Programme (UPP).

It will provide you with a fast track to an accountancy qualification and the four-year degree  offers you the opportunity of a full-year paid work placement in your third year of study.

Open days

We're continuously reviewing all of our recruitment events on campus, and now offer a blend of in-person and virtual activities.

If you're a prospective student, you can also find out more about student life by chatting with our student ambassadors at a time that suits you, and ask any questions you may have about life at Manchester.

Please check our Coronavirus FAQs for the most up to date information regarding events.

You can also look at our virtual open day content to help you learn more about the University.

Fees

Tuition fees for home students commencing their studies in September 2022 will be £9,250 per annum. Tuition fees for international students will be £26,000 per annum. For general information please see the undergraduate finance pages.

Policy on additional costs

All students should normally be able to complete their programme of study without incurring additional study costs over and above the tuition fee for that programme. Any unavoidable additional compulsory costs totalling more than 1% of the annual home undergraduate fee per annum, regardless of whether the programme in question is undergraduate or postgraduate taught, will be made clear to you at the point of application. Further information can be found in the University's Policy on additional costs incurred by students on undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes (PDF document, 91KB).

Scholarships/sponsorships

The Manchester Bursary is available to UK students registered on an undergraduate degree course at Alliance MBS who have had a full financial assessment carried out by Student Finance England. 

In addition, Alliance MBS will award a range of Social Responsibility Scholarships to UK and international/EU students. These awards are worth £2,000 per year across three years of study. You must achieve A*AA at A-level (or equivalent qualification) and be able to demonstrate a significant contribution and commitment to social responsibility. The School will also award a number of International Stellar Scholarships to international students achieving A*AA at A-level (or equivalent qualification). Additional eligibility criteria apply - please see our scholarship pages for full details.

Courses in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of courses in related subject areas.

Entry requirements

A-level

Grades AAA. Native language A-Levels are accepted. General Studies is normally accepted if one of four A-Levels passed in the same sitting. In most circumstances we will expect candidates to complete three A-Levels in one sitting to demonstrate the ability to manage a high level and volume of study.

Preferred A-Level subjects

We will consider the subjects you have taken in addition to your individual grades. Due to the popularity of our courses we may prioritise applicants based on the number of preferred subjects that they are studying. We may also take into consideration the combination of subjects taken. Please use the list below to check our preferred subjects for BSc (Hons) Accounting:

Accounting, Business Studies, Economics, English Language/Literature, Geography, Government and Politics, Law, Mathematics/Further Mathematics, Politics, Quantitative Methods and Statistics.

AS-level

AS level results are not considered as part of the standard admissions process at The University of Manchester.

Unit grade information

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit information where available.  Like all other information provided by applicants this may be taken into consideration when assessing your application.  Unit grades will not normally form part of an offer conditions.

GCSE

Applicants must demonstrate a broad general education including acceptable levels of Literacy and Numeracy, equivalent to at least Grade B or 6 in GCSE/iGCSE English Language and Grade A or 7 in Mathematics. GCSE/iGCSE English Literature will not be accepted in lieu of GCSE/iGCSE English Language.

Please note that if you hold English as a second language iGCSE qualification, we require you to achieve a higher grade in your iGCSE than the one stated above or to offer one of our  acceptable equivalent qualifications .

International Baccalaureate

36 points overall. 6,6,6 in Higher Level subjects.

Students without GCSE/iGCSE Maths at grade A (or 7) will need to achieve 6 in any one of the following SL subjects; Maths, Maths: Analysis and Approaches or Maths: Applications and Interpretation. Alternatively we can accept grade 6 in Middle Years Programme Maths. We do not accept Maths Studies for BSc (Hons) Accounting applicants for the purposes of meeting our Maths subject requirements.

Students without GCSE/iGCSE English Language at B (or 6) will need to achieve 5 in SL Language A: English Language and Literature or Language A: Literature. If Language B: English is offered at SL we would need you to achieve a 6.

Applicants studying the International Baccalaureate Career Related Programme (IBCP) should contact the academic School prior to applying so that their academic profile can be considered.

Other international entry requirements

Alliance MBS is a truly global business school welcoming undergraduate students from over 80 countries. We accept a wide range of qualifications from different countries - please see our international entry requirements for more information.

Scottish requirements

Scottish Advanced Highers are normally required in one of the following combinations:

  • Three Advanced Highers at grades AAA
  • Two Advanced Highers at grades AA and two additional Highers at grades AA

Students without Maths as one of their Higher or Advanced level subjects in the above requirements will need either; National 5 at grade A, Intermediate 2 at grade A or Standard Grade General at grade 2. Students without English language as one of their Higher or Advanced level subjects in the above requirements will need either; National 5 at grade B, Intermediate 2 at grade B or Standard Grade General at grade 3.

We will consider the subjects you have taken in addition to your individual grades. Due to the popularity of our courses we may prioritise applicants based on the number of preferred subjects that they are studying. We may also take into consideration the combination of subjects taken. Please check the individual course profile pages for our list of preferred subjects, you can find this under 'Entry Requirements' and 'Preferred A-Level subjects'. Our preferred Scottish Higher/Advanced Higher subjects are the same as our preferred A-Level subjects.

Welsh Baccalaureate

The University welcomes and recognises the value of the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate and usually requires two A Levels or equivalent to be included within this. We require minimum grade A from the Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma/Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate plus grades AA at A-level.

If you require further clarification about the acceptability of this qualification please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.

European Baccalaureate

The University of Manchester welcomes applicants with the European Baccalaureate. We require an overall average of 85% in the European Baccalaureate with 80% in English and 83% in Maths.

AQA Baccalaureate

The University recognises the benefits of the AQA Baccalaureate and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills.

In making offers, the University will focus on the three A Levels taken within the AQA Baccalaureate. Students need to check the standard A Level requirements for their chosen course.

The units of broader study, enrichment activities and the Extended Project are considered to be valuable elements of the AQA Baccalaureate and we would therefore strongly encourage students to draw upon these experiences within their personal statement.

Foundation year

The University recognises a number of foundation programmes as suitable for entry to this undergraduate programme - please visit the international foundation year pages of our website for details of recognised programmes, including INTO Manchester and NCUK.

Pearson BTEC qualifications

We consider the following BTEC Nationals for entry provided you have studied a subject relevant to the chosen course. Please contact us at  ug.ambs@manchester.ac.uk  if you wish to check your eligibility.

  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma  at grades D*D*D*
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Diploma  at grades D*D* plus grade A at A-Level
  • Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate  at grade D* plus grades AA at A-Level

Please note, we do not accept General Studies as an A-Level option and we do not accept A-Level subjects which are the same as your BTEC qualification.

Please note, the National Diploma and the National Extended Certificate must be studied alongside A-Levels. We are unable to accept combinations of the BTEC qualification.

Legacy BTEC qualifications (pre-2016)

The University of Manchester welcomes applications from students who have achieved legacy BTEC qualifications (pre-2016) such as the BTEC Extended Diploma, BTEC Diploma, BTEC Subsidiary Diploma, and BTEC Certificate.  The grades required are likely to be the same or vary similar to the new BTEC qualifications (first teaching 2016, awarded 2018). Please contact us at  ug.ambs@manchester.ac.uk  if you wish to check your eligibility.

OCR Cambridge Technical qualifications

We consider the following Cambridge Technical qualifications from the 2016 suite for entry provided it is in a subject relevant to the chosen course and studied alongside A-Levels. Please contact us at  ug.ambs@manchester.ac.uk  if you wish to check your eligibility.

  • Cambridge Technical Extended Diploma  at grades DDM plus grade A at A-Level
  • Cambridge Technical Diploma  at grades D*D* plus grade A at A-Level
  • Cambridge Technical Foundation Diploma  at grades DM plus grades AA at A-Level
  • Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate  at grade D* plus grades AA at A-Level

Please note, we do not accept the Cambridge Technical Certificate or Cambridge Technical qualifications from the 2012 suite.

Access to HE Diploma

We require a QAA-recognised Access to HE Diploma. The subject of your Access to HE qualification will be taken into consideration when making a decision on your application. Please note, we only accept the Access to HE qualification when studied at a centre in the UK.

60 credits are required with 45 credits at Level 3 at Distinction.

Cambridge Pre-U

We consider applicants offering Pre-U Principal subjects, or a mix of Pre-U and A Level subjects, provided a minimum of three distinct subjects overall is taken. We consider the below combinations.

  • D3 D3 D3 over 3 Principal subjects
  • D3 D3 over 2 Principal subjects plus grade A at A-Level
  • D3 in a Principal subject plus grades AA at A-Level

Please contact us at ug.ambs@manchester.ac.uk if you wish to check your eligibility.

Extended Project Qualification (EPQ)

The University recognises the benefits of the Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) and the opportunities it provides for applicants to develop independent study and research skills. Although the Extended Project will not be included in the conditions of your offer, we strongly encourage you to provide information about the EPQ in your personal statement and at interview. A number of our academic Schools may also choose to take your performance in the EPQ into account should places be available in August for applicants who narrowly miss the entry grades for their chosen course.

Core Maths

The University welcomes and recognises the value of Level 3 core mathematics qualifications (e.g. AQA Certificate in Mathematical Studies). 

Core Mathematics is not a compulsory element of post-16 study and as a result we will not normally include it in the conditions of any offer made to the student. However, if a student chooses to undertake a core mathematics qualification this may be taken into account when we consider their application, particularly for certain non-science courses with a distinct mathematical or statistical element.

We advise students to contact the academic School, who will clarify whether their specific portfolio of qualifications is acceptable for entry on to their chosen course.

Home-schooled applicants

If you are a student who has followed a non-standard educational route, e.g. you have been educated at home; your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course for which you are applying. You will be required to demonstrate that you meet the specified academic entry requirements of the course. We will also require a reference from somebody who knows you well enough, in an official capacity, to write about you and your suitability for higher education. If you are a home schooled student and would like further information or advice please contact the academic School for your chosen course who will be able to help you. 

Non-standard educational routes

Mature students are some of our most well-equipped learners, bringing skills and attributes gained from work, family and other life experiences.  Students come from a whole array of backgrounds, study every kind of course, undertake full-time and part-time learning and are motivated by career intentions as well as personal interest.  There is no such thing as a typical mature student at Manchester.  The application process is the same as for other prospective undergraduates.  If you require further clarification about the acceptability of the qualifications you hold please contact the academic School(s) you plan to apply to.  

Further information for mature students >>  

English language

All applicants to the University (from the UK and Overseas) are required to show evidence of English Language proficiency.  The minimum English Language requirement for this course is either:

  • GCSE/iGCSE English Language grade B/6,   or;
  • IELTS 6.5 overall, with no less than 6 in any individual component, or;
  • An acceptable equivalent qualification.

For details on acceptable equivalent qualifications to this course please see Alliance Manchester Business School's  English Language information page .

If you hold English as a second language iGCSE qualification, we require you to achieve a higher grade in your iGCSE than the one stated above or to offer one of our acceptable equivalent qualifications.

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) requires that every student from outside the UK and the EU must show evidence of a minimum level of English Language in order to be granted a UK visa (Tier 4 visa) to study at undergraduate or postgraduate level. This level is often referred to as the 'B2 level'. At Alliance Manchester Business School we require a higher English Language proficiency than the B2 level. Further information about the English Language policy at the University can be found  here . Details on acceptable English Language tests to this course can be found on Alliance Manchester Business School's  English Language information page .

English language test validity

Some English Language test results are only valid for two years. Your English Language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Relevant work experience

Work-related experience is not essential but can provide useful evidence of your team-working skills and ability to take responsibility. Relevant work experience can provide evidence of interest in and commitment to the subject.

Application and selection

How to apply

Advice to applicants

Mitigating circumstances may be personal or family illness, other family circumstances, change of teachers during a course, problems with school facilities or an unusual curriculum followed by your school or college. We recommend that information on mitigating circumstances that have affected or are likely to affect your academic performance will be included in the referee's report. We cannot usually take into account information that is supplied after an adverse decision has been made on an application by the admitting School. If you encounter mitigating circumstances after you have submitted your application, please inform the admissions staff in the School to which you applied as soon as possible.

Where mitigating circumstances have already been taken into account, for example by the relevant test board, we will not be able to make further allowances.

Unit grade

The University of Manchester welcomes the provision of unit grade information which, like all other available information, will form the consideration of application.

A*

Alliance Manchester Business School does not issue offers on the Grade A* as standard practice. It may however be taken into account at the point of confirmation to inform decisions on candidates who have narrowly missed the terms of their offer.

A-levels in a native or heritage language

We consider applications holistically taking into consideration the overall educational environment. Where native langue A levels are offered we will consider them in line with other subjects that the student has undertaken.

How your application is considered

Predicted Grades

Strong examination results are the main factor in admitting students to our courses. We consider other information to ensure we admit students with the most outstanding potential. This is assessed within a structured framework and includes prior and predicted grades. Your referee should provide realistic grade predications for all qualifications that you are currently studying at the top of their reference. If you attend a non-UK school or college that does not provide predicted grades your referee should explain this policy within their reference. Further guidance for referees is provided by UCAS (www.ucas.com).

Skills, knowledge, abilities, interests

We are looking for evidence of your interest in this subject, and your commitment to studying it.

Interview requirements

We do not as a rule interview applicants. However, we reserve the right to interview candidates with non-standard backgrounds, eg. Mature students and students aged under 17.

Returning to education

The University encourages applications from applicants returning to education after employment or other experience. Your application will be considered against the standard entry criteria of the course to which you applied. However, we recognise that standard selection measures and procedures may not enable you to demonstrate fully your suitability for your chosen course. Where appropriate, admissions staff will seek and consider alternative evidence in order to provide you equivalent consideration. Where they deem this alternative evidence to meet entry criteria fully, you will not be required to meet the standard academic entry requirements.

Overseas (non-UK) applicants

Alliance MBS is a truly global business school welcoming undergraduate students from over 68 countries. Please see our international entry requirements for details of country-specific entry requirements.

Deferrals

Applications for deferred entry are considered equally to other applications up to the point of confirmation. Deferred entry is granted on the discretion of admissions staff, and is normally granted for one year only and 2 years at the maximum. Some English Language test results, such as IELTS or TOEFL, are only valid for two years from the test date.

Policy for applicants who resit their qualifications

We consider applicants who are resitting their qualifications. Whilst we do not increase our entry requirements for the first resit this would be considered for subsequent resits.

Policy for applicants who take their examinations in more than one sitting

In most circumstances, we will expect candidates to have completed three A-levels in one sitting to demonstrate that they have the ability to successfully manage a high level and volume of study that will be expected of them once at university.

Re-applications

If you applied in the previous year and your application was not successful you may apply again. Your application will be considered against the standard course entry criteria for that year of entry.  In your new application you should demonstrate how your application has improved.  We may draw upon all information from your previous applications or any previous registrations at the University as a student when assessing your suitability for your chosen course. If you are applying for a place for the same year of entry through UCAS Extra, you should provide additional evidence of your suitability for the course. If you are applying through clearing you are required to meet the clearing requirements. In both UCAS Extra and clearing the places will be subject to availability.

Transfers

We are unable to accept any transfers directly into the second or third year due to the assessment and study options followed by our first year students at Alliance Manchester Business School. All undergraduate degree programmes at Alliance Manchester Business School are full degree programmes with a September start and students must commence the programme from year one and meet our entry criteria.

If you are currently studying at The University of Manchester on an alternative course, and wish to transfer to first year study at Alliance Manchester Business School, please contact  ug.ambs@manchester.ac.uk  to check your eligibility.

Course details

Course description

This unique, professionally-oriented course has been designed alongside the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) Undergraduate Partnership Programme (UPP).

It will provide you with a fast track to an accountancy qualification and the four-year degree  offers you the opportunity of a full-year paid work placement in your third year of study.

Special features

The ICAEW hold networking events at Alliance Manchester Business School which provide you with the opportunity to meet companies who offer internships through the UPP, such as Ernst & Young, Goldman Sachs, Grant Thornton, Mazars and PwC.

The course integrates study of the theory and practice of accounting, and offers significant exemptions from the examinations of professional accountancy bodies, particularly those of the ICAEW. You could gain exemptions from ICAEW ACA papers and qualify as a chartered accountant two years after graduation.

You will be taught by staff who are leading researchers in their fields, some of whom are also qualified accountants.

Teaching and learning

You will normally study four or five course units per semester. Each week there are usually two hours of lectures for each course unit and a one hour workshop in alternate weeks, although this varies slightly. You are expected to double this in private study. Group work and group or individual presentations will form a regular part of your assignments.

Coursework and assessment

Essays, multiple choice tests, project reports and presentations, in-class tests and weekly assignments constitute the coursework component of assessment, although the nature and proportion of coursework varies across course units. The remainder of assessment is by unseen examination. Depending on the degree course, in your final year you can choose to do a research-based dissertation or project. We aim to strike a balance between examinations and assessed coursework as well as providing opportunities for feedback on progress through non-assessed work.

Course unit details

The focus of the degree is on accounting and finance. Other relevant subjects such as management, law, mathematics, statistics and economics are also covered. There is some scope for you to study related subjects to broaden your knowledge of business and management, subject to the requirements of professional accreditation. You will receive a strong theoretical and practical grounding in the principles of accounting and acquire appropriate transferable skills.

Course content for year 1

Your first year is designed to introduce you to the foundations of accounting and finance. You will also study course units in mathematics, statistics, economics and law. A specialist course unit will introduce you to the skills and techniques required by the accountancy profession and will begin to prepare you for the workplace. Your first year project involves you preparing a competitive tender for an audit with support from employers such as KPMG*.

* Beever Struthers, RSM and PWC.

Course units for year 1

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

Course content for year 2

Your second year will develop your analytical skills and provide you a more in-depth understanding of accounting. You will take core course units in accounting and finance, plus a ten-credit business law course unit. You will develop your understanding of business strategy, accounting and auditing practice through a specialist course unit.

You will also select an optional 10-credit course unit - either from the list of optional second-year course units below, or from a range of University College level 2 course units, including the Manchester Leadership Programme .

Course units for year 2

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

Course content for year 3

Your final year is designed to allow you to choose from a range of more specialised topics. You will put theory into practice, develop transferable skills and gain an insight into the accounting profession. You will also study a core 40 credit project course unit involving an individual company project. You will continue your studies in business law and take core course units in taxation, accounting and finance. Your remaining course units will be chosen from a range of accounting, finance, economics or management subjects.

Course units for year 3

The course unit details given below are subject to change, and are the latest example of the curriculum available on this course of study.

Scholarships and bursaries

The Manchester Bursary is available to UK students registered on an undergraduate degree course at Alliance MBS who have had a full financial assessment carried out by Student Finance England. 

In addition, Alliance MBS will award a range of Social Responsibility Scholarships to UK and international/EU students. These awards are worth £2,000 per year across three years of study. You must achieve A*AA at A-level (or equivalent qualification) and be able to demonstrate a significant contribution and commitment to social responsibility. The School will also award a number of International Stellar Scholarships to international students achieving A*AA at A-level (or equivalent qualification). Additional eligibility criteria apply - please see our scholarship pages for full details.

What our students say

'I chose this course because it was different to anything on offer elsewhere. I was really excited by the opportunity to spend a year out between my second and final year in an internship with a high-calibre accountancy firm - I will be joining KPMG's audit department in Canary Wharf. Interns in big four accountancy firms don't just make the tea; I expect to be given the same jobs as a first year graduate recruit.'

- Andrew Simner

'As an aspiring accountant this course seemed perfectly geared towards my career. My course allows me to receive maximum exemptions from professional accounting exams, enabling me to accelerate my career.'

- Bansari Kamdar

Facilities

John Rylands University Library is renowned as one of the most extensive libraries in the world. This is complemented by our specialist business and management Eddie Davies Library which provides a dedicated service to Alliance Manchester Business School undergraduates. There is increasing provision of information via various web-based services and much of your practicing material will be available through e-journals. These and other standard computing services, such as access to the internet and word processing, are available through computer clusters across campus in departmental buildings, libraries and halls of residence. Many buildings in and around the campus are also equipped with free wifi access.

Personal development plans

PDPs are aimed at helping you develop awareness of generic transferable and subject-specific skills, Excellerate independent learning and provide a record of your academic learning and achievement.

Academic advisors

All new Alliance Manchester Business School students are allocated an academic advisor who you will meet in regular sessions as part of a first-year course unit. Where possible, you will keep the same academic advisor throughout your time here. Your advisor will support you throughout your studies on matters of an academic nature, from providing feedback on a practice essay in preparation for your `formal' assessment at the end of each semester to discussing your PDP or writing you a reference. We also have a dedicated undergraduate assessment and student support centre within the School, who will be your first point of contact for any ill health or other personal problems which are affecting your work.

Student mentoring

We operate a peer mentoring scheme which aims to provide you with a second or final year 'mentor' to provide practical assistance with orientation and induction as well as advice and information on any aspect of student life.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email:  dass@manchester.ac.uk

Careers

Career opportunities

The University has its own dedicated  Careers Service  that you would have full access to as a student and for two years after you graduate. At Manchester you will have access to a number of  opportunities to help boost your employability .

The ultimate aim of the programme is to empower you to achieve long-term career success and become the leading professionals of tomorrow. We aim for you to be `employability ready' by the start of second year so that you can apply to and choose from a range of summer internships and placements. The programme has partnerships with ICAEW, CIPFA, ACCA, CFA and CIMA. You'll benefit from these partnerships through test exemptions, work experience offers and training.

What jobs do our Accounting graduates go into?   Examples of jobs latest graduates have gone onto include: audit associate, forensic accountant, internal auditor, procurement intern, risk analyst, tax advisor and trainee chartered accountant.

Who employs them?   A wide range of companies including: BDO, Deloitte, Ernst & Young, Grant Thornton, HM Revenue & Customs, KPMG, NHS, PwC, RBS and The National Audit Office.

What about further study?   Accounting graduates have gone on to further study in accounting, banking and finance at institutions such as Cambridge, Imperial College London and London School of Economics.

All examples are taken from the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

Accrediting organisations

This is a professionally oriented degree programme developed in consultation with the ICAEW. Completion of the core modules on this programme will ensure you receive substantial exemptions from the ICAEW's professional qualification, the ACA (Associate of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales). A significant number of exemptions are also available from other professional accounting qualifications, including ACCA, CIMA and ICAS.

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Killexams : BSc Econometrics and Mathematical Economics

The degree involves studying courses to the value of 12 units over three years, plus LSE100. You will also have the opportunity to apply for a year abroad at one of our global exchange partners. 

First year

In Michaelmas Term of the first year of the programme you will gain an essential foundation in economics and learn the necessary quantitative skills. In Lent Term you will take introductory courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. You will also choose an outside option course from a rich array of courses from other departments – this can be a whole unit course or two half unit courses in Michaelmas Term and Lent Term, respectively. In addition, you will ​also take LSE100.

Michaelmas Term

Economics (0.5)

Principles economics course to introduce students to traditional and topical economic questions and how both established and new economic approaches can deal with them. 

Quantitative Methods (0.5)*

The aim of this course is to develop the basic mathematical tools necessary for further study in economics and related disciplines.

Elementary Statistical Theory (0.5)

The course provides a precise and accurate treatment of introductory probability theory, statistical ideas, methods and techniques. 

Outside option


Lent Term

Microeconomics I (0.5)

This course provides a foundation to help students understand key microeconomic questions using a variety of established and new approaches.

Macroeconomics I (0.5)

This course provides a foundation to help students understand key macroeconomic questions using a variety of established and new approaches.

Econometrics I (0.5)

Introduction to econometrics to teach students the theory and practice of empirical research in economics.

Outside option

*Students can opt to take Mathematical Methods (1.0) in place of Quantitative Methods (0.5) and the Lent Term outside option (0.5).

LSE100*
A half unit, running across Michaelmas and Lent Term in the first year, LSE100 is compulsory for all LSE undergraduate students, and is designed to build your capacity to tackle multidimensional problems through research-rich education.

Second year

The second year of the programme builds on the Year 1 courses in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. You will develop a firm grasp of core analytical methods and apply them to a range of problems. You will also choose one outside option from another department (a whole unit or two half units in Michaelmas Term and Lent Term, respectively).

Microeconomics II (1.0)

This intermediate-level course will help students understand key microeconomic questions and challenges and also evaluate possible solutions using a variety of approaches and student projects.

Macroeconomics II (1.0)

This intermediate-level course will help students understand key macroeconomic questions and challenges, and evaluate possible solutions using a variety of approaches and student projects.

Econometrics II (1.0)

Intermediate-level course to teach students the theory of econometrics, the practical problems of empirical research, and how to do empirical research  themselves in a student project.

Principles of Finance or optional course (1.0)

Third year

In your third year you will have the opportunity to specialise according to your interests.

You will choose one course from three options. You will then take two further economics options. You will also complete a thesis in quantitative economics on a research question of your choosing.

Two economics options

Quantitative Thesis (1.0)

Either
Econometric Theory (1.0))
Gives an introduction to the asymptotic theory of estimation and inference of economic models.
Or
Games and Economic Behaviour (1.0)
Reviews fundamental concepts in economic theory and presents some of its most successful applications.
Or
Problems of Applied Econometrics (1.0)
Provides a solid grounding in latest developments in applied econometrics. 

For the most up-to-date list of optional courses please visit the relevant School Calendar page

Where regulations permit, you may also be able to take a language, literature or linguistics option as part of your degree. Information can be found on the Language Centre webpages.

You must note however that while care has been taken to ensure that this information is up-to-date and correct, a change of circumstances since publication may cause the School to change, suspend or withdraw a course or programme of study, or change the fees that apply to it. The School will always notify the affected parties as early as practicably possible and propose any viable and relevant alternative options. Note that the School will neither be liable for information that after publication becomes inaccurate or irrelevant, nor for changing, suspending or withdrawing a course or programme of study due to events outside of its control, which includes but is not limited to a lack of demand for a course or programme of study, industrial action, fire, flood or other environmental or physical damage to premises.

You must also note that places are limited on some courses and/or subject to specific entry requirements. The School cannot therefore certain you a place. Please note that changes to programmes and courses can sometimes occur after you have accepted your offer of a place. These changes are normally made in light of developments in the discipline or path-breaking research, or on the basis of student feedback. Changes can take the form of altered course content, teaching formats or assessment modes. Any such changes are intended to enhance the student learning experience. You should visit the School’s Calendar, or contact the relevant academic department, for information on the availability and/or content of courses and programmes of study. Certain substantive changes will be listed on the updated undergraduate course and programme information page.

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Killexams : International Accounting with Analytics

Overview

This unique programme offers you the ability to advance your accounting career as well as acquire practical analytics skills.

Summary

Qualified accountants are always in high demand and the profession provides excellent employability and earning prospects. The MSc International Accounting with Analytics offers you the ability to advance your accounting career as well as acquiring practical analytics skills essential to the accounting profession.

This programme is designed for business and accounting graduates to combine study for a Master’s degree, while also gaining exemptions from professional examinations and gaining an understanding of and expertise in accounting and business analytics.

The programme is informed and shaped by the needs of the accounting, finance and taxation professionals of tomorrow. The programme encourages critical and creative thinking, teamwork and communication, and develops a diverse range of professional attributes which equip graduates to excel in the accounting profession and to become the business leaders of the future.

Significant exemptions from the Chartered Accountants Ireland examinations will be available on completion. Graduates of the MSc should be granted full exemption from their CAP2 examinations and therefore have only two final admitting examinations to complete after graduation.


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About this course

Attendance

Part-time

Start dates

Teaching, Learning and Assessment

Learning and Teaching

The range of modules offered on this course allows a varied and interesting mix of methods to be used, to enhance knowledge and understanding as well as allowing you to practice and develop your professional and transferable skills.

For each module on this course you will have weekly lectures and seminars. Lectures are used to explain and develop the skills identified as being important to you in developing your professional and personal development within the subject areas. Lectures provide the framework for directing independent student learning activity and skills development. Weekly seminars will provide opportunities for you to engage in an in-depth appreciation of theoretical and practical issues related to the subject area. A number of modules will utilise the simulation suite available on campus to enhance your learning experience. In addition, a number of modules involve small group teaching in a workshop format.

Assessment

Considerable effort has been devoted to ensuring that the assessment requirements built into each module on this course are appropriate to the learning outcomes, qualities and abilities being assessed. Assessment methods range from class tests, essays, business reports, group projects and practical skills audits, a variety of group and individual presentations incorporating self and peer assessment, practical simulations, case study applications, reflective portfolios, on-line assessment, class tests, management reports, projects and work-based assignments and unseen end of semester examinations.

The content for each course is summarised on the relevant course page, along with an overview of the modules that make up the course.

Each course is approved by the University and meets the expectations of:

Attendance and Independent Study

As part of your course induction, you will be provided with details of the organisation and management of the course, including attendance and assessment requirements - usually in the form of a timetable. For full-time courses, the precise timetable for each semester is not confirmed until near the start date and may be subject to change in the early weeks as all courses settle into their planned patterns. For part-time courses which require attendance on particular days and times, an expectation of the days of attendance will often be included in the letter of offer. A course handbook is also made available.

Courses comprise modules for which the notional effort involved is indicated by its credit rating. Each credit point represents 10 hours of student effort. Undergraduate courses typically contain 10- or 20-credit modules and postgraduate course typically 15- or 30-credit modules.

The normal study load expectation for an undergraduate full-time course of study in the standard academic year is 120 credit points. This amounts to around 36-42 hours of expected teaching and learning per week, inclusive of attendance requirements for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical work, fieldwork or other scheduled classes, private study, and assessment. Part-time study load is the same as full-time pro-rata, with each credit point representing 10 hours of student effort.

Postgraduate Masters courses typically comprise 180 credits, taken in three semesters when studied full-time. A Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) comprises 60 credits and can usually be completed on a part-time basis in one year. A 120-credit Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) can usually be completed on a part-time basis in two years.

Class contact times vary by course and type of module. Typically, for a module predominantly delivered through lectures you can expect at least 3 contact hours per week (lectures/seminars/tutorials). Laboratory classes often require a greater intensity of attendance in blocks. Some modules may combine lecture and laboratory. The precise model will depend on the course you apply for and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. Prospective students will be consulted about any significant changes.

Assessment

Assessment methods vary and are defined explicitly in each module. Assessment can be via one method or a combination e.g. examination and coursework . Assessment is designed to assess your achievement of the module’s stated learning outcomes. You can expect to receive timely feedback on all coursework assessment. The precise assessment will depend on the module and may be subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Coursework can take many forms, for example: essay, report, seminar paper, test, presentation, dissertation, design, artefacts, portfolio, journal, group work. The precise form and combination of assessment will depend on the course you apply for and the module. Details will be made available in advance through induction, the course handbook, the module specification and the assessment timetable. The details are subject to change from year to year for quality or enhancement reasons. You will be consulted about any significant changes.

Normally, a module will have four learning outcomes, and no more than two items of assessment. An item of assessment can comprise more than one task. The notional workload and the equivalence across types of assessment is standardised.

Calculation of the Final Award

The class of Honours awarded in Bachelor’s degrees is usually determined by calculation of an aggregate mark based on performance across the modules at Levels 5 and 6 (which correspond to the second and third year of full-time attendance).

Level 6 modules contribute 70% of the aggregate mark and Level 5 contributes 30% to the calculation of the class of the award. Classification of integrated Masters degrees with Honours include a Level 7 component. The calculation in this case is: 50% Level 7, 30% Level 6, 20% Level 5. At least half the Level 5 modules must be studied at the University for Level 5 to be included in the calculation of the class.

All other qualifications have an overall grade determined by results in modules from the final level of study. In Masters degrees of more than 200 credit points the final 120 points usually determine the overall grading.

Figures correct for academic year 2019-2020.

Academic profile

The Department of Global Business and Enterprise has strong ties with the major professional accountancy and taxation bodies including:

  • Chartered Accountants Ireland (CAI)
  • The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA)
  • The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA)
  • The Institute of Certified Public Accountants in Ireland (CPA)
  • The Irish Taxation Institute (ITI)

All accounting staff in the department are members of professional accountancy bodies with a number of lecturers also having obtained additional qualifications in areas such as taxation and financial services. Many staff have trained and worked in the Big Four professional services firms as well as having experience advising within small and medium sized practices and in industry.

All lecturing staff within the Department of Global Business and Enterprise are Fellows/Senior Fellows of the Higher Education Academy.

The University employs over 1,000 suitably qualified and experienced academic staff - 59% have PhDs in their subject field and many have professional body recognition.

Courses are taught by staff who are Professors (25%), Readers, Senior Lecturers (20%) or Lecturers (55%).

We require most academic staff to be qualified to teach in higher education: 82% hold either Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education Practice or higher. Most academic staff (81%) are accredited fellows of the Higher Education Academy (HEA) by Advanced HE - the university sector professional body for teaching and learning. Many academic and technical staff hold other professional body designations related to their subject or scholarly practice.

The profiles of many academic staff can be found on the University’s departmental websites and provide a detailed insight into the range of staffing and expertise.  The precise staffing for a course will depend on the department(s) involved and the availability and management of staff.  This is subject to change annually and is confirmed in the timetable issued at the start of the course.

Occasionally, teaching may be supplemented by suitably qualified part-time staff (usually qualified researchers) and specialist guest lecturers. In these cases, all staff are inducted, mostly through our staff development programme ‘First Steps to Teaching’. In some cases, usually for provision in one of our out-centres, Recognised University Teachers are involved, supported by the University in suitable professional development for teaching.

Figures correct for academic year 2021-2022.

Modules

Here is a guide to the subjects studied on this course.

Courses are continually reviewed to take advantage of new teaching approaches and developments in research, industry and the professions. Please be aware that modules may change for your year of entry. The exact modules available and their order may vary depending on course updates, staff availability, timetabling and student demand. Please contact the course team for the most up to date module list.

Year one

Advanced UK Taxation

Year: 1

This module explores the legislation and practice governing the income tax, capital gains tax, inheritance tax and stamp tax exposure of an individual within the scope of UK taxation. It also explores the taxation implications for a corporate entity from a corporation tax, capital tax and stamp tax perspective. The scope, legislation and practice for VAT is also explored for both business and property transactions.

International Financial Reporting

Year: 1

This module explores the concepts underlying financial accounting, current regulations and how these concepts inform regulation including the preparation of internal and external financial reports.

Strategic Finance

Year: 1

This module covers key concepts, principles and theories in strategic finance and will be of particular relevance to professionals either employed or seeking employment in medium and large sized entities. Key syllabus will include financial strategy formulation, investment decision making, financing sources, dividend policy, company valuation, mergers and acquisitions and financial risk management.

Strategic Management Accounting

Year: 1

This module covers key concepts, principles and theories in strategic management accounting and will be of particular relevance to professionals either employed or seeking employment in medium and large sized entities. Key syllabus will include frameworks /for performance management, performance management decisions, IT and data analytics, behavioural aspects of budgeting, approaches to budgeting, budgetary control, variance analysis, divisional performance measures and ethics, transfer pricing and corporate governance.

Research Methods for Finance Professionals

Year: 1

This module provides students with knowledge and understanding of the research process in the broad area of international accounting, finance and analytics. It will equip students with an in depth understanding and ability to develop a research question, undertake a critical literature review, and identify a justifiable research methodology to match the research question.

Year two

Strategic Leadership for International Accounting

Year: 2

The aim of this module is to develop students' appreciation of strategic leadership in accounting, in an international context. The module will emphasise the role of high level financial techniques, technology and analytics in leading strategic change within an organisation.

International Audit and Assurance

Year: 2

This module explores the conceptual and theoretical fundamentals of auditing, combined with the practical application of auditing principles and the issues encountered in the international audit environment. The use of data analytics and emerging technologies are also explored for the conduct of the audit.

Data Analytics for Finance Professionals

Year: 2

This module is designed to introduce the student to the role of data analysis, data visualisation and reporting using within accountancy and business. The module will provide students with the skills and know to work with data and apply data analysis techniques to inform client management strategies, business advisory approaches and reporting.

International Corporate Reporting and Tax Planning

Year: 2

This module explores the financial accounting legislation and regulations, including IFRS and local GAAP, needed for the practical preparation of financial statements for groups. The module also explores the legislation, procedures and practice governing the most common aspects of UK corporation tax for UK companies and multinational groups operating in the UK.

Dissertation

Year: 2

This module is optional

The master's dissertation enables students to carry out research on a chosen syllabu within the field of international accounting, finance or analytics. Students will gain an in depth understanding of the academic research process. Completing the dissertation enables the student to build on the knowledge and skills gained throughout their masters programme, to produce a major piece of academic writing.

Applied Research Project

Year: 2

This module is optional

The applied research project module provides students with the skills to apply their technical knowledge and capabilities to research an opportunity, problem or challenge in an organisation in the area of international accounting, finance and/or analytics and come up with an effective solution for the organisation. The module integrates the knowledge gained throughout the programme so that students can critical apply financial, analytical and technical skills to a research project.

Standard entry conditions

We recognise a range of qualifications for admission to our courses. In addition to the specific entry conditions for this course you must also meet the University’s General Entrance Requirements.

Entry Requirements

Applicants must be able to satisfy the University's general admissions requirements in one of the following ways:

Applicants must:

(a) have gained
(i) a second class honours degree in an accounting discipline or better from a university of the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, or from a recognised national awarding body, or from an institution of another country which has been recognised as being of an equivalent standard; or

(ii) an equivalent standard (normally 50%) in an accounting discipline in a Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate, Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma or an approved alternative qualification;

and

(b) gained CAP 1 chartered accounting examinations

and

(c) provide evidence of competence in written and spoken English (GCSE grade C or equivalent).

Alternatively, applicants must demonstrate their ability to undertake the course through the accreditation of prior experiential learning.

English Language Requirements

English language requirements for international applicants
The minimum requirement for this course is Academic IELTS 6.0 with no band score less than 5.5. Trinity ISE: Pass at level III also meets this requirement for Tier 4 visa purposes.

Ulster recognises a number of other English language tests and comparable IELTS equivalent scores.

Careers & opportunities

Career options

Accounting specialists with knowledge of accounting, finance and the business environment are always in great demand. The combination of subjects you will study on this course will provide you with a sound basis to become a future business leader. The knowledge you will acquire will enable you to work in any industry sector and across all areas of business including financial reporting, accounting, finance, taxation or management in public, private or not-for-profit organisations.

The analytics element of the programme is essential to prepare graduates for their professional career by enabling them to ‘add value’ to the business decision making processes within an organisation or for a client business. Graduates will gain practical understanding of and expertise in the use of analytics tools to enable them to help businesses uncover valuable insights within financial information, identify process improvements to help businesses increase efficiency, and to ensure the better management of exposure to risk.

Due to the exemptions available, you will also be a step ahead in your professional accountancy training. On successful completion of this course, you will only be required to undertake a three year training contract and will only have two more examinations to undertake to become a Chartered Accountant.

Fees and funding

Important notice - fees information

Fees illustrated are based on academic year 22/23 entry and are subject to an annual increase.

If your study continues into future academic years your fees are subject to an annual increase. Please take this into consideration when you estimate your total fees for a degree.

Additional mandatory costs are highlighted where they are known in advance. There are other costs associated with university study.

Visit our Fees pages for full details of fees.

Correct at the time of publishing. Terms and conditions apply.

Fees (total cost)

The price of your overall programme will be determined by the number of credit points that you initiate in the relevant academic year.

For modules commenced in the academic year 2022/23, the following fees apply:

Fees
Credit Points NI/ROI/GB Cost International Cost
5 £220.55 £426.65
10 £441.10 £853.30
15 £661.65 £1,279.95
20 £882.20 £1,706.60
30 £1,323.30 £2,559.90
60 £2,646.60 £5,119.80
120 £5,293.20 £10,239.60
180 £7,939.80 £15,359.40

NB: A standard full-time PGCert is equivalent to 60 credit points per year. A standard full-time PGDip is equivalent to 120 credit points per year.

Additional mandatory costs

It is important to remember that costs associated with accommodation, travel (including car parking charges) and normal living will need to be covered in addition to tuition fees.

Where a course has additional mandatory expenses (in addition to tuition fees) we make every effort to highlight them above. We aim to provide students with the learning materials needed to support their studies. Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals, as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. Computer suites and free Wi-Fi are also available on each of the campuses.

There are additional fees for graduation ceremonies, examination resits and library fines.

Students choosing a period of paid work placement or study abroad as a part of their course should be aware that there may be additional travel and living costs, as well as tuition fees.

See the tuition fees on our student guide for most up to date costs.

Disclaimer

  1. The University endeavours to deliver courses and programmes of study in accordance with the description set out in this prospectus. The University’s prospectus is produced at the earliest possible date in order to provide maximum assistance to individuals considering applying for a course of study offered by the University. The University makes every effort to ensure that the information contained in the prospectus is accurate but it is possible that some changes will occur between the date of printing and the start of the academic year to which it relates. Please note that the University’s website is the most up-to-date source of information regarding courses and facilities and we strongly recommend that you always visit the website before making any commitments.
  2. Although reasonable steps are taken to provide the programmes and services described, the University cannot certain the provision of any course or facility and the University may make variations to the contents or methods of delivery of courses, discontinue, merge or combine courses and introduce new courses if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. Such circumstances include (but are not limited to) industrial action, lack of demand, departure of key staff, changes in legislation or government policy including changes, if any, resulting from the UK departing the European Union, withdrawal or reduction of funding or other circumstances beyond the University’s reasonable control.
  3. If the University discontinues any courses, it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. In addition, courses may change during the course of study and in such circumstances the University will normally undertake a consultation process prior to any such changes being introduced and seek to ensure that no student is unreasonably prejudiced as a consequence of any such change.
  4. The University does not accept responsibility (other than through the negligence of the University, its staff or agents), for the consequences of any modification or cancellation of any course, or part of a course, offered by the University but will take into consideration the effects on individual students and seek to minimise the impact of such effects where reasonably practicable.
  5. The University cannot accept any liability for disruption to its provision of educational or other services caused by circumstances beyond its control, but the University will take all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to such services.
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