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Exam Code: DP-100 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
DP-100 Designing and Implementing a Data Science Solution on Azure

Set up an Azure Machine Learning workspace (30-35%)
Create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• configure workspace settings
• manage a workspace by using Azure Machine Learning Studio
Manage data objects in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• register and maintain data stores
• create and manage datasets
Manage experiment compute contexts
• create a compute instance
• determine appropriate compute specifications for a training workload
• create compute targets for experiments and training

Run experiments and train models (25-30%)
Create models by using Azure Machine Learning Designer
• create a training pipeline by using Designer
• ingest data in a Designer pipeline
• use Designer modules to define a pipeline data flow
• use custom code modules in Designer
Run training scripts in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create and run an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning SDK
• consume data from a data store in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• consume data from a dataset in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• choose an estimator
Generate metrics from an experiment run
• log metrics from an experiment run
• retrieve and view experiment outputs
• use logs to troubleshoot experiment run errors
Automate the model training process
• create a pipeline by using the SDK
• pass data between steps in a pipeline
• run a pipeline
• monitor pipeline runs

Optimize and manage models (20-25%)
Use Automated ML to create optimal models
• use the Automated ML interface in Studio
• use Automated ML from the Azure ML SDK
• select scaling functions and pre-processing options
• determine algorithms to be searched
• define a primary metric
• get data for an Automated ML run
• retrieve the best model
Use Hyperdrive to rune hyperparameters
• select a sampling method
• define the search space
• define the primary metric
• define early termination options
• find the model that has optimal hyperparameter values
Use model explainers to interpret models
• select a model interpreter
• generate feature importance data
Manage models
• register a trained model
• monitor model history
• monitor data drift

Deploy and consume models (20-25%)
Create production compute targets
• consider security for deployed services
• evaluate compute options for deployment
Deploy a model as a service
• configure deployment settings
• consume a deployed service
• troubleshoot deployment container issues
Create a pipeline for batch inferencing
• publish a batch inferencing pipeline
• run a batch inferencing pipeline and obtain outputs
Publish a Designer pipeline as a web service
• create a target compute resource
• configure an Inference pipeline
• consume a deployed endpoint

Set up an Azure Machine Learning workspace (30-35%)
Create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• configure workspace settings
• manage a workspace by using Azure Machine Learning sStudio
Manage data objects in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• register and maintain data stores
• create and manage datasets
Manage experiment compute contexts
• create a compute instance
• determine appropriate compute specifications for a training workload
• create compute targets for experiments and training

Run experiments and train models (25-30%)
Create models by using Azure Machine Learning Designer
• create a training pipeline by using Azure Machine Learning Ddesigner
• ingest data in a Designer designer pipeline
• use Designer designer modules to define a pipeline data flow
• use custom code modules in Designer designer
Run training scripts in an Azure Machine Learning workspace
• create and run an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning SDK
• consume data from a data store in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• consume data from a dataset in an experiment by using the Azure Machine Learning
SDK
• choose an estimator for a training experiment
Generate metrics from an experiment run
• log metrics from an experiment run
• retrieve and view experiment outputs
• use logs to troubleshoot experiment run errors
Automate the model training process
• create a pipeline by using the SDK
• pass data between steps in a pipeline
• run a pipeline
• monitor pipeline runs

Optimize and manage models (20-25%)
Use Automated ML to create optimal models
• use the Automated ML interface in Azure Machine Learning Studiostudio
• use Automated ML from the Azure Machine Learning SDK
• select scaling functions and pre-processing options
• determine algorithms to be searched
• define a primary metric
• get data for an Automated ML run
• retrieve the best model
Use Hyperdrive to rune tune hyperparameters
• select a sampling method
• define the search space
• define the primary metric
• define early termination options
• find the model that has optimal hyperparameter values
Use model explainers to interpret models
• select a model interpreter
• generate feature importance data
Manage models
• register a trained model
• monitor model history
• monitor data drift

Deploy and consume models (20-25%)
Create production compute targets
• consider security for deployed services
• evaluate compute options for deployment
Deploy a model as a service
• configure deployment settings
• consume a deployed service
• troubleshoot deployment container issues
Create a pipeline for batch inferencing
• publish a batch inferencing pipeline
• run a batch inferencing pipeline and obtain outputs
Publish a Designer designer pipeline as a web service
• create a target compute resource
• configure an Inference pipeline
• consume a deployed endpoint

Designing and Implementing a Data Science Solution on Azure
Microsoft Implementing candidate
Killexams : Microsoft Implementing candidate - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DP-100 Search results Killexams : Microsoft Implementing candidate - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DP-100 https://killexams.com/exam_list/Microsoft Killexams : I'm a partner engineer at Microsoft. Here's how I made the leap from junior to senior level employee and what you can learn.
  • Kun Chen is a partner level engineer at Microsoft.
  • Chen breaks down how to prove your L5 skills by solving ambiguous problems.
  • The skills a senior engineer needs are ideation, prioritization and delegation.
  • This is a syndicated post from his blog, Tech Career.

Ever wondered what it takes to become a senior software engineer? My name is Kun. I'm a partner level engineer at Microsoft, and in this post I'll share with you what I wish I knew when I was getting started. There is also a video version that you can find at the bottom of this article.

What is a senior engineer

Senior software engineers is a title that typically maps to L5 in the standard leveling system. Reaching this level is a big milestone in a software engineer's career. It signals that you are now carrying significant responsibility for your team's success, and being looked up to as a role model for junior engineers.

A common misconception that I keep hearing is that to become a senior engineer, you need to be really good at coding, and learn a lot of different design patterns, programming languages or technology stacks.

That is… wrong. Throughout my career, I've known over a hundred senior engineers, and not a single one of them got there by simply learning how to write more beautiful code or how to use more languages.

To understand how to get to this stage, you first need to know the key differences between L4 and L5. I covered this in my previous post.

Long story short, L4s are typically given a clear direction to build a well defined feature or solution to a problem. They do need to handle some complexity, but generally speaking they are told what needs to be built.

L5s however are expected to solve ambiguous problems that don't always have clear solutions. For example, how to reduce the latency of an API, or how to Improve user engagement of a product feature.

It's their responsibility to help the team figure out what the right solutions are, and potentially work with other people on the team to get the solutions built. Promotion typically happens when you have proven your L5 skills by solving a few of such problems for the team.

So now the question becomes — what does it take to solve an ambiguous and complex problem?

Solving ambiguous problems

First, let's talk about getting into the right mindset.

As L4s, you are expected to build well defined solutions. As long as you have built your features according to the spec, you are meeting expectations. This typically results in L4 engineers having a mindset of focusing on activities, which means being productive, writing a lot of documentation and test cases, and communicating a lot.

However, because L5s need to solve problems, they can't just focus on activities alone. They need to focus on the outcome, or impact of their activities. It doesn't matter how much code they write, or how beautiful the code looks, if it didn't actually solve the problem, they failed.

The mindset of focusing on impact is the first leap you should take to accelerate your transition into a senior engineer.

Once you have internalized that, you then need a proper skillset to help you solve the problems. Let's walk through the problem solving process to show you what it looks like.

When you get assigned an ambiguous problem, the first thing you should realize is that there can be a lot of different potential solutions to it. We call that a solution space.

Ideation

The first skill you will need is Ideation, which is the process of mapping out this solution space and enumerating all the potential solutions.

Team brainstorming is necessary to finding all possible solutions.
Courtesy of Kun Chen

This can be done in multiple ways, but generally speaking I recommend that you don't do this alone. The more problems you solve, the more you realize how limited a single person's perspective usually is. So instead, you want to exchange thoughts with other people. And this is called brainstorming.

Now the thing with brainstorming is that the brains are not going to storm themselves. Someone needs to identify the need for a brainstorm and get it initiated. And if you are a senior person on the team, you should assume that's on you to make it happen.

Of course, you can also flag this to your PM or designers and see if they want to facilitate the process as well, in which case you can delegate the work to them, and be a contributor who provides inputs in the process, and makes sure it does produce useful outputs that help you enumerate potential solutions to the problem.

I will have a future article that specifically talks about how to host effective brainstorming sessions. Please remember to follow if you don't want to miss it.

Prioritization

Once you map out the solution space, what you will soon realize is that it's going to take too much time to build all the potential solutions. This is where you need the second skill — prioritization, which is how you assess the return of investment for each candidate solution, and can then create a ranked list of ideas so you can work on the ones that deliver you the highest chance of success.

Prioritization is such an important skill. If you look at some of the highest performing engineers who achieve a lot more impact than their peers, you'll notice that they have the same 24 hours in a day as everyone else. But, oftentimes 80% of the impact is achieved through 20% of the work. And what these high performing engineers do really well is that they are very smart about prioritization and always focus their time on those 20% high impact work.

There are many different frameworks to help you with prioritization. I will cover them in a future post as well.

Delegation

Sometimes after you prioritized the list of ideas, you will realize there's a lot of work to be done, and if you do it all by yourself, it's not going to meet your team's timeline. This is where you'll need the 3rd skill — delegation.

Senior engineers must prove they can delegate.
Courtesy of Ken Chun

L5 engineers don't always do this, because it depends on the situation. But it's safe to assume that all L5 engineers need to prove they are capable of delegating effectively, so that they can do it when needed.

Delegation is a leadership skill and is very beneficial to master even beyond L5. It also deserves its own future post as well, but for now I'll share two recommendations.

One, take an intern if you have the opportunity. Working with an intern gives you a direct environment to practice leadership skills that you may not get otherwise. You will be able to learn what it takes to coach someone else, to influence their decisions, and enable them to succeed.

Secondly, take a training called situational leadership. There are many YouTube videos available as well. This gives you the key concepts you need to understand before you can effectively delegate.

Measurement

Once you got the solutions built, you would need the next skill — measurement. This is where you use a data-driven approach to validate whether the solution has indeed solved the problem or not.

Ideally, the success criteria or measurement plan is defined upfront before you even start implementing the solutions, so that the measurement itself can be baked into your execution plan and timeline. For example, you might need to do some logging to make the results measurable.

Having proper measurement helps you track progress, validate success and communicate impact. Doing this is an essential part of how senior engineers operate.

Alright, I hope this gave you a good overview of what the leap looks like from junior to senior engineer. If you found this helpful, please click the clap button so that more people can benefit from it. I will continue to make more content to help software engineers like you succeed. See you next time!

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 02:03:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-how-to-go-from-junior-to-senior-engineer-07-2022
Killexams : Microsoft Certified: Azure Administrator Associate

ItJob met ID 468206 niet gevonden.

Request ID: Twk-tc3-web4_240.9.1_397098_62f37da728ad12.21838545
Wed, 29 Jun 2022 03:29:00 -0500 NL text/html https://tweakers.net/carriere/it-banen/468206/microsoft-certified-azure-administrator-associate-schiphol-microsoft
Killexams : Microsoft Certified: Devops Engineer Expert

ItJob met ID 476066 niet gevonden.

Request ID: Twk-eun-web1_240.9.1_1696695_62f37da7296bc7.64406054
Tue, 19 Jul 2022 13:07:00 -0500 NL text/html https://tweakers.net/carriere/it-banen/476066/microsoft-certified-devops-engineer-expert-schiphol-microsoft
Killexams : Business Analyst

Our client has a position available for 12 months in a remote working environment. The candidate can thus work from anywhere. The candidate must have experience in the Financial Services Sector
PLEASE NOTE; ONLY THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES WILL BE CONTACTED. ONLY APPLY IF YOU QUALIFY IN FULL

Diploma in Business Analysis and
Bachelor of Science / BCom (Computer Engineering/Information Technology)

  • Experience in financial services sector
  • Experience in fund administration would be beneficial
  • Must be a self-starter, able to work independently.
  • Reporting to Project Manager
  • Exceptional analytical and conceptual thinking skills.
  • The ability to influence stakeholders and work closely with them to determine acceptable solutions.
  • Advanced technical skills.
  • Excellent documentation skills.
  • Fundamental analytical and conceptual thinking skills.
  • Experience creating detailed reports and giving presentations.
  • Competency in Microsoft applications including Word, Excel, and Outlook.
  • A track record of following through on commitments.
  • Excellent planning, organizational, and time management skills.
  • Experience leading and developing top-performing teams.
  • A history of leading and supporting successful projects.

The business analyst will join the project team and will work alongside other business analysts and report directly to the project manager.
Main tasks will include performing detailed requirements analysis, documenting processes, and performing some user acceptance testing.
To succeed in this role, you should have a natural analytical way of thinking and be able to explain difficult concepts to non-technical users.

Responsibilities:

  • Evaluating business processes, anticipating requirements, uncovering areas for improvement, and developing and implementing solutions.
  • Leading ongoing reviews of business processes and developing optimization strategies.
  • Staying up-to-date on the latest process and IT advancements to automate and modernize systems.
  • Conducting meetings and presentations to share ideas and findings.
  • Performing requirements analysis.
  • Documenting and communicating the results of your efforts.
  • Effectively communicating your insights and plans to cross-functional team members and management.
  • Gathering critical information from meetings with various stakeholders and producing useful reports.
  • Working closely with clients, technicians, and managerial staff.
  • Ensuring solutions meet business needs and requirements.
  • Performing user acceptance testing.
  • Managing projects, developing project plans, and monitoring performance.
  • Updating, implementing, and maintaining procedures.
  • Prioritizing initiatives based on business needs and requirements.
  • Serving as a liaison between stakeholders and users.
  • Monitoring deliverables and ensuring timely completion of projects.

Desired Skills:

  • Experience in financial services sector
  • Experience in fund administration
  • Self Starter

Learn more/Apply for this position

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 00:31:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://it-online.co.za/2022/07/11/business-analyst-308/
Killexams : Turning People into Corporations

Mills along the lower Columbia River. Photo: Jeffrey St. Clair.

You’ve heard about corporations being treated like people. It’s one of the outrages of the Citizens United decision some years back by the Supreme Court, that corporations have a right to free speech just like individuals and therefore can contribute unlimited money to candidates running for office. Bye-bye, democracy.

Now there’s a movement afoot to go the other way and turn people into corporations.

Yes, I know, some people like Elon Musk and Donald Trump already act pretty much like corporations. When the famous turn themselves into brands—pop stars, mega-athletes—they basically transform themselves into businesses.

But I mean a real corporation, one that issues stocks.

That’s the idea of Daniil and David Liberman, two entrepreneurs originally from Russia who are trying to popularize their idea of personal corporations among Silicon Valley investors. As profiled in The New Yorker, the brothers came up with the idea as a way to stop the large-scale transfer of wealth from young to old.

The old are indeed picking the pockets of the young, thanks to such factors as rising school loans at one end and pension fund payouts at the other. Those who are 24 and younger hold an average of nearly $11,000 of debt, which rises to over $27,000 for folks between 24 and 40 (not counting mortgages). The opposite is true on the other end of the age spectrum, where America’s oldest are now America’s wealthiest. As Forbes explains:

The relative affluence of today’s elderly is historically unprecedented. Never before have the 75+ had the highest median household net worth of any age bracket. Today, the typical 80-year-old household has twice the net worth of the typical 50-year-old household. As recently as 1995, they were about equal.

The Libermans’ solution to this problem is for young people to gain access today to their earning potential of tomorrow. To understand how this might work, let’s see how a would-be comic book artist named Brittany might benefit from becoming a joint-stock company.

Brittany, 18 years old, draws in the basement of her parents’ house. She has amassed a certain following on TikTok and Instagram, but no publishing companies have come calling. Her parents want her to go to college. She doesn’t see the point. Once her comic strip about a rabbit with superpowers goes viral, she’ll be set for life. Why go into student debt when success beckons just around the corner?

But Brittany needs money. Her parents aren’t rich. She’s been relying on a clunky old computer to produce her images. She needs some real equipment. Her part-time job at Dunkin’ Donuts doesn’t bring in anywhere near what she needs. Nor does she know anyone with the money or the connections to help her realize her dream.

Enter the Libermans, who suggest that Brittany incorporate herself and issue shares, at a reasonable price. She convinces everyone she knows to buy them. Suddenly, in a stroke of luck, a hedge fund manager discovers her new corporation and buys a huge number of shares in the expectation that Brittany will indeed hit it big and her shares will rise in value.

Investing in Brittany, in other words, quickly becomes the equivalent of buying shares in Amazon or Starbucks or Microsoft before they became famous. Brittany, meanwhile, can use all the money she’s raised through her initial stock offering to buy new equipment, hire a publicity agent, and—ka-ching!—get her strip in front of Netflix execs eager to greenlight a new animated series.

Cue up Brittany’s TedTalk….

But really, how would this scheme actually shift wealth away from the old and into the pockets of the young? Issuing shares in one’s self has the same hit-it-big randomness of a lottery. A few people, particularly early adopters, would be able to take advantage of this innovative way of raising capital. A lot more would try it out and fail either because they had a flawed business plan or couldn’t market themselves. Millions and millions of GoFundMe pages—which this scheme essentially boils down to—eventually produce diminishing returns.

And what about the mass of ordinary young people who just want stable jobs? What sugar daddy is going to buy up their shares?

The Libermans are channeling the spirit of the age. Their idea of personal corporations is not just an expression of uber-entrepreneurialism. It reflects a faith that the market, if shaped a certain way, can solve all of the world’s problems.

And that is a dangerous delusion.

Gaming the Market

The farmers market around the corner from me is fabulous. Growers from around the area bring their produce directly to the consumer. The prices, which are as good as or better than the supermarket, are established through competition among the local producers. The best produce sells out, and unsuccessful growers turn to other products or professions.

Markets can be a wonderfully efficient method of regulating supply and demand.

The problem arises when the Market becomes a deity invested with omnipotence, a god that is invoked at every opportunity to solve every problem.

That’s the major flaw in the Libermans’ plan. It’s not just the scheme’s internal challenges (what about taxes? corporate governance? insider trading? a futures market that hedges bets on the individual’s success?). It’s that the Market is not in fact the most efficient method of addressing the underlying problem of the generational shift in wealth. The obvious solution would be to deliver debt relief to students and/or make college more affordable, while paying for those reforms by raising taxes on the wealthy. But those would be government actions, and who in Silicon Valley wants to invest in the state?

A similar mismatch between problem and solution can be found with climate change. The simplest approach to reducing carbon emissions is for states to use carrots and sticks to push through enormous changes rapidly. The carrots would include incentives for businesses and individuals to shift to renewable energy plus job-retraining programs, investments into public transportation, and the like. The sticks would include major penalties for continuing to rely on dirty energy sources. Some states—Uruguay, Denmark—have indeed followed this path.

But another line of thinking involves carbon markets with credits, generated by a reduction in carbon emissions, that companies and countries trade both nationally and globally. Such a scheme would, like tax incentives from the state, seem to nudge economic actors to make environmentally responsible decisions that help countries meet their nationally determined contributions (NDCs) under the Paris agreement. As one of the boosters of carbon markets, the World Bank, explains:

Carbon markets help mobilize resources and reduce costs to deliver countries and companies the space to smooth the low-carbon transition. It is estimated that trading in carbon credits could reduce the cost of implementing NDCs by more than half – by as much as $250 billion by 2030. Over time, carbon markets are expected to become redundant as every country gets to net zero emissions and the need to trade emissions diminishes.

Sounds good. Cue the TedTalks about how great carbon markets are…

Carbon trading schemes have been around for a while. Quite a number have been tested out, such as the cap-and-trade system in California and the European Union’s emissions trading system. The last COP, in Glasgow, effectively endorsed this approach by developing rules for a global system.

These carbon trading systems, at least as they are currently constituted, have some major flaws. For one thing, they mostly just move the problem around. “Carbon offsetting is (at best) a zero-sum game and does not lead to global emission cuts since greenhouse gas reductions in one place are cancelled out by continued pollution elsewhere,” observes Khaled Diab of Carbon Market Watch.

In California, the cap-and-trade system may have played a part in the impressive reduction in the state’s carbon emissions, but it hasn’t addressed the equity problem: low-income communities still suffer disproportionately from the health impacts of carbon emissions. Back in 2019, before the pandemic upended the statistics on carbon emissions, ProPublica looked at the data and discovered that “carbon emissions from California’s oil and gas industry actually rose 3.5% since cap and trade began. Refineries, including one owned by Marathon Petroleum and two owned by Chevron, are consistently the largest polluters in the state. Emissions from vehicles, which burn the fuels processed in refineries, are also rising.”

The European Union launched its emissions trading system in 2005, and it has grown to include over 30 countries and 10,000 power plants and industrial sites. By one benchmark, the system has helped reduce carbon emissions in specific sectors (such as steel production, aviation, and the chemical industry) by over 40 percent since the launch of the scheme.

One of its problems, however, has been that it doesn’t cover all the sectors that emit carbon, which has prompted the EU to push to expand the system to include construction, road transport, and the maritime sector. Those reforms face considerable political hurdles, not to mention the challenge of reduced energy imports from Russia because of the war in Ukraine.

One of the virtues of the EU system, however, is that the European authorities are working to remedy its flaws, such as the gaps in coverage. Or consider the problem of the “free allowances” given to energy-intensive industries, which actually cover 94 percentof emissions from that sector. Such allowances end up acting like subsidies for polluters. The European Parliament is currently debating a phase-out of these allowances.

But even if we grant that carbon markets could play a role in reducing overall carbon emissions, is the Market still the best tool for handling a problem like climate change?

State v. Market

Free-market enthusiasts used to pooh-pooh the necessity of government action in the face of climate change. The market, they claimed, would eventually respond to the laws of supply and demand to address the problem. Oil companies would eventually become obsolete or transform entirely into solar panel companies. The invisible hand would steer the energy transition.

But the market didn’t act this way—because that’s not how markets operate. Markets don’t respond to planetary needs, only to human desires. Also, powerful economic actors manipulate markets for their own ends. Oil companies spent decades and millions of dollars disseminating false information about climate change. They have collectively supported the maintenance of huge fossil fuel subsidies—which amounted to nearly $6 trillion in 2020. These malevolent actions behind the scenes constitute the real invisible hand.

So, why will carbon markets act any differently?

You could argue, certainly in the case of the European Union, that governments are shaping carbon markets so that they operate more transparently, have fewer loopholes, and meet clearly established benchmarks (like the goals established by the Paris agreement). You could also argue that most governments are not prepared to follow the examples of Uruguay or Denmark to enact state-led policies to bring us out of this climate crisis. The private sector is a powerful player; why not leverage that power?

Those are important arguments. But let’s return to the notion of individuals as corporations. The Libermans’ scheme—an example of the audacious, outside-the-box thinking that so captivates entrepreneurs, hackers, and venture capitalists—would end up advantaging the few and leaving the rest where they started. Wealth would remain in the hands of the wealthy, regardless of their age.

I fear that the same holds true for carbon markets. Some schemes are simply shell games that move the carbon around. Others, like the EU arrangement, have more potential, but will also end up rewarding the powerful players who have figured out ways to game the system.

Put another way, climate change is too serious and too urgent a threat to leave to the Market. How do we push states and international institutions to step into the breach and take this threat more seriously? That’s the ultimate twenty-first-century challenge for We, the People—and not we, the corporations.

Sun, 07 Aug 2022 17:57:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.counterpunch.org/2022/08/08/turning-people-into-corporations/
Killexams : PSC Announces Jobs with up to Ksh153k Salary: How to Apply

The Public Service Commission (PSC), through the Women Enterprise Fund, has announced vacancies for jobs with up to Ksh153,000 salaries.

In a notice dated Tuesday, July 26, the Fund had various openings in different job groups including Deputy Manager, assistant manager legal affairs, credit officers, audit and risk officers, senior administration officers, and clerical officers among others. 

The applicants ought to provide various documents including a detailed CV, copies of academic certificates, professional qualifications, testimonials, day-time telephone numbers, names and addresses of three professional referees.

Kenyans queued for jobs during a past recruitment exercise.

The Standard

How to Apply

Candidates who fit the bill are advised to deliver their applications at the Fund's offices located at Britam Tower, 11th Floor in Nairobi before August 8, 2022, by 5:00 pm.

Deputy Manager, Information Communication Technology 

Basic Pay- Ksh116,094 to Ksh153,101

The role will involve reporting to the Chief Executive Officer and is tasked with the overall process of formulating, implementing and monitoring ICT policies, strategies, standards and programmes for the Fund.

Duties and responsibilities

1. Formulation, implementation and coordination of ICT policies, strategies and programmes

2. Keeping up to date with emerging information communication technological trends communication, innovative and technological trends.

3. Ensuring timely implementation of ICT standards in line with the needs of the Fund and effective maintenance of ICT systems. 

4. Preparation of ICT status reports and ensuring professional standards and guidelines are adhered to;

5. Management and coordination of the department and supervision of ICT staff;

6.  Safeguard the integrity of the organization’s data;

7.  Manage usage of ICT resources to ensure effectiveness and efficiency.

Specifications

A degree in Computer Science, or any other ICT-related discipline from a recognized University/institution;

 A Master’s Degree in Computer Science, Strategic Management, or any other ICT-related discipline from a recognized Institution is a Mandatory requirement.

They ought to have served in the ICT sector with at least nine years of relevant experience, with at least three years in a managerial position.

The candidate ought to possess qualifications in database management such as SQL Server, MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer), web design and management. 

They must demonstrate a high level of professional competence and outstanding management qualities in computerised information systems.

They must have a membership in a relevant professional body and be in good standing.

Deputy Manager, HR Management and Training

Basic Pay- Ksh116,094 to Ksh153,101

Duties and Responsibilities

• They will be required to initiate, develop, interpret, implement and review the Human Resource and Training policies.

• Overseeing staff inductions and complementing HR efforts at succession plan.

• Carrying out evaluation and monitoring of training.

• Updating skills inventory for all Fund’s employees.

• Develops, reviews and monitors the Human Resources and Training Budget.

• Leads in the Development of staff benefits and rewards framework for the Fund to attract and retain talent.

Specifications

• A Bachelor’s Degree in a Business related field with a specialization in Human Resource Management.

• MBA/ MSC in Human Resource Management /Business Administration /Commerce /Public Administration from a recognized university is a mandatory requirement.

• At least nine years previous relevant work experience with a least three years in a managerial position in a reputable organization.

• Professional Qualifications / Membership to a relevant professional body and be in good standing.

Jobseekers queuing on Wabera Street, Nairobi, waiting to be interviewed by The Sarova Stanley on May 26, 2018

Daily Nation

Assistant Manager, Legal Affairs 

Basic Pay - Ksh85,021 to Ksh128,609

Duties and Responsibilities

• Implement Fund policies and strategies as regards the legal function and advise the Management on any legal implications likely to arise as a result of their decisions and actions.

• Drawing and interpreting contracts and agreements with service providers and other stakeholders.

• Execute legal-based audits as per the annual work plan and deliver reports.

• Managing court cases including attending hearings and providing recommendations or remedial alternatives for resolution of disputes involving or affecting the Fund.

• Advising on legal, regulatory and governance matters.

• Bachelor’s Degree in Law.

• Post Graduate Diploma in Law.

• Master’s Degree in Law is an added advantage.

• Served in a comparable position with at least 7 years relevant work experience in a reputable organization.

• Professional Qualifications / Membership to professional bodies.

• Must be an advocate of the High Court of Kenya.

• Possession of CPS (K) and membership in the ICPSK is an added advantage.

• Be in possession of a Current Law Practicing Certificate.

Assistant Manager, Partnerships and Resource Mobilisation

Basic Pay - Ksh85,021 to Ksh128,609

Duties and Responsibilities

• Translate the Fund’s resource mobilization strategy and plans into action.

• Establish systems for identification and response to calls with templates to identify opportunities for resource mobilization and manage the activities of resource mobilization. 

• Coordinate the development and writing of highly competitive resource mobilization proposals and contribute to proposals.

• Develop and maintain databases and records for project activities and partnership implementation status.

Specifications

• Bachelor’s degree in any Social Sciences.

• Master’s degree in International Development/Communications/Marketing/ Economics/International Relations or its equivalent is an added advantage.

• Served in a comparable position with at least 7 years relevant work experience in a reputable organization.

• Shown merit and ability as reflected in work performance and results.

• Membership in a relevant professional body and be in good standing.

Assistant Manager, Finance and Administration

Basic Pay - Ksh85,021 to Ksh128,609

Duties and Responsibilities

• Contribute to formulation and implementation of financial, administrative and accounting policies and procedures.

• Supervise staff under the officer within Finance & Administration Department, preparing work schedules and assigning specific duties to them.

• Preparation and implementation of the Fund’s annual budget and work plans and reporting on the Fund’s performance/status on a quarterly basis.

• Budgetary controls and management of accounting methods and financial returns; and prioritization of projects and activities for the purpose of financial allocation and reporting.

• Assist in budget preparation and administration.

• Assist in the preparation of management reports and financial statements.

Specification

• Bachelor’s Degree in a business-related field (Accounting or Finance Option) from a recognized university.

• Master’s Degree in Business Administration (MBA), Economics, Finance, Commerce or in a financial related discipline is an added advantage.

• Served in a comparable position with at least 7 years relevant work experience in a reputable organization.

Senior Administrative Officer 

Basic Pay - Ksh60,460 to Ksh80,025

Duties and Responsibilities

• Administration and management of transport in the Fund.

• Overseeing office accommodation, equipment, furniture, office supplies and employment cards.

• Provision and administration of clerical, auxiliary and telephone services staff.

• Settling of bills and facilitating necessary documentation for those traveling.

Specifications

• Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration/Management, Human Resource; Management/Development, Public Administration or equivalent qualifications in a relevant field from a recognized Institution.

• Served satisfactorily for at least five (5) years in a comparable position.

• Proficiency in computer applications.

• Demonstrated professional competence and administrative ability in administrative work.

• Ability to prioritize work and thrive under pressure.

Credit Officer

Basic Pay - Ksh49,539 to Ksh65,561

Duties and Responsibilities

• Assisting in coordinating all aspects of the lending cycle under the existing lending channels for the respective constituencies.

• Compiling of monthly and quarterly credit reports such as loan uptake and repayment status and ensuring timely reconciliations.

• Monitoring and following up on loan repayments and enlisting of key stakeholders’ support to ensure timely recovery of loans.

Specifications

Bachelor’s Degree in a business-related course from a recognized university.

• Served satisfactorily in a comparable position in a recognized institution for at least three years.

• Demonstrated competence in credit control work.

• Proficiency in computer applications.

Audit and Risk Officer

Basic Pay - Ksh49,539 to Ksh65,561

Duties and Responsibilities

• Implementing internal audit policies, strategies and plans.

• Analysing data for preparing an annual internal audit plan.

• Performing information systems Audits.

• Conducting internal Audits and preparing audit reports and following up on audit findings.

• Reviewing internal controls in the Fund. 

Specifications

• A Bachelor of Commerce Degree (Accounting/Finance option) or Bachelor’s in Information Technology from a recognized university/institution and passed CPA II or CISA certification.

• Served in a reputable organization for at least three years in a similar position.

• Proficiency in computer applications.

• Possession of a certification or diploma in Information Technology will be an added advantage.

Clerical Officer

Basic Pay - Ksh34,034 to Ksh45,098

Duties and Responsibilities

• Compiling statistical records based on routine or special sources of information.

• Carry out transactions related to accounts or personnel information, handle receipts and loan records and file them appropriately.

• Perform other similar clerical duties that may be assigned by senior officers.

• Any other duties that may be assigned from time to time.

Specifications

For appointment to this grade, a candidate must be in possession of a Diploma in a business-related course and Proficiency in computer applications; or a Diploma in Information Communication Technology.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 05:07:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kenyans.co.ke/news/77695-psc-announces-jobs-ksh153k-salary-how-apply
Killexams : Business Analyst – Western Cape Cape Town

Our client has a position available for 12 months in a remote working environment. The candidate can thus work from anywhere. The candidate must have experience in the Financial Services Sector
PLEASE NOTE; ONLY THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES WILL BE CONTACTED. ONLY APPLY IF YOU QUALIFY IN FULL

Diploma in Business Analysis and
Bachelor of Science / BCom (Computer Engineering/Information Technology)

  • Experience in financial services sector
  • Experience in fund administration would be beneficial
  • Must be a self-starter, able to work independently.
  • Reporting to Project Manager
  • Exceptional analytical and conceptual thinking skills.
  • The ability to influence stakeholders and work closely with them to determine acceptable solutions.
  • Advanced technical skills.
  • Excellent documentation skills.
  • Fundamental analytical and conceptual thinking skills.
  • Experience creating detailed reports and giving presentations.
  • Competency in Microsoft applications including Word, Excel, and Outlook.
  • A track record of following through on commitments.
  • Excellent planning, organizational, and time management skills.
  • Experience leading and developing top-performing teams.
  • A history of leading and supporting successful projects.

The business analyst will join the project team and will work alongside other business analysts and report directly to the project manager.
Main tasks will include performing detailed requirements analysis, documenting processes, and performing some user acceptance testing.
To succeed in this role, you should have a natural analytical way of thinking and be able to explain difficult concepts to non-technical users.

Responsibilities:

  • Evaluating business processes, anticipating requirements, uncovering areas for improvement, and developing and implementing solutions.
  • Leading ongoing reviews of business processes and developing optimization strategies.
  • Staying up-to-date on the latest process and IT advancements to automate and modernize systems.
  • Conducting meetings and presentations to share ideas and findings.
  • Performing requirements analysis.
  • Documenting and communicating the results of your efforts.
  • Effectively communicating your insights and plans to cross-functional team members and management.
  • Gathering critical information from meetings with various stakeholders and producing useful reports.
  • Working closely with clients, technicians, and managerial staff.
  • Ensuring solutions meet business needs and requirements.
  • Performing user acceptance testing.
  • Managing projects, developing project plans, and monitoring performance.
  • Updating, implementing, and maintaining procedures.
  • Prioritizing initiatives based on business needs and requirements.
  • Serving as a liaison between stakeholders and users.
  • Monitoring deliverables and ensuring timely completion of projects.

Desired Skills:

  • Experience in financial services sector
  • Experience in fund administration
  • Self Starter

Learn more/Apply for this position

Mon, 11 Jul 2022 00:31:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://it-online.co.za/2022/07/11/business-analyst-western-cape-cape-town-3/
Killexams : Misinformation, security of elections on secretary of state candidates’ minds this election

The security, transparency and misinformation surrounding the state’s election system are all top of mind for candidates hoping to be Washington’s next secretary of state.

The race has drawn eight candidates hoping to fill the spot left by former secretary Kim Wyman last year. Wyman left to join the Biden administration, leaving Gov. Jay Inslee to appoint former state Sen. Steve Hobbs to fill her spot. The winner of this year’s election will serve the remainder of Wyman’s term, which ends in 2024.

Inslee’s appointment of Hobbs marked the first time since 1964 that a Republican is not holding that office.

This primary, Hobbs will face seven challengers.

The candidates include Pierce County Auditor Julie Anderson, who is running with no party preference; Republican state Sen. Keith Wagoner; former Republican and Democratic state legislator Mark Miloscia; Republican Bob Hagglund, a Republican who works as a data scientist with United Health; Democrat Marquez Tiggs; Tamborine Borrelli, who identifies with the “America First (R)” party; and Kurtis Engle, who lists his affiliation as the “Union” party.

The top two candidates will face each other in the November elections.

The candidates with the most donation money as of Friday are Hobbs, with more than $386,000, and Anderson, with almost $150,000. The third candidate by donations is Miloscia, who has almost $53,700.

Experience working in elections

The secretary of state’s role includes archiving government records and providing information and access to the business community about corporations and charities. One of its biggest roles, however, is serving as the state’s head of elections.

Hobbs received some criticism, especially from county auditors, for not having enough experience in election administration.

Hobbs said he thinks his background in cybersecurity and his current role as secretary of state make him the best candidate for the job. The role is different from the auditor in that he does more oversight, reviews and certifications, whereas auditors run elections, he said.

He said the secretary of state needs to have more knowledge on cyberthreats and combating misinformation now.

“I’m the only candidate that actually has the experience at this level because the secretary of state role has evolved,” he said.

Wagoner had a similar response, pointing to his leadership experience.

“It’s not a super auditor position,” he said. “It’s a leadership position that leads across a whole bunch of different departments.”

When asked what she could do better if elected, Anderson said “pretty much everything.” She pointed to her experience in preserving public records, registering licenses, managing archives and working closely with each county’s election officials.

“This isn’t something that I’m dabbling in,” Anderson said. “This is something that I do.”

Anderson is running as a nonpartisan candidate because she does not feel the job needs any “unnecessary conflict by belonging to a political party.” The work is challenging enough, she added.

Addressing election misinformation

Following the 2020 election, misinformation surrounding election systems and widespread fraud have drawn concerns for most of the candidates.

When asked about the baseless claims regarding widespread fraud in the 2020 election, most said they did not think that there was fraud that could have overturned the election in favor of former President Donald Trump or Republican gubernatorial candidate Loren Culp.

Hobbs, Tiggs, Engle and Anderson all said there was not widespread fraud.

Wagoner and Hagglund both said there is always some instances of fraud but not enough to overturn the results as some candidates’ supporters have said.

Miloscia said there is always fraud in the system, but did not say whether he thought there was enough to overturn an election. Instead, he said the secretary of state needs to do a better job at investigating “holes in the system” to prevent fraud in the first place.

Borrelli wrote in an email that there were a number of concerns during the 2020 election that could have led to widespread fraud, including “unexplainable vote flipping,” noncitizens who were registered to vote without their knowledge and security breaches of voter data.

Borrelli is the director of the Washington Election Integrity Coalition United, which has sued several counties alleging voter fraud in the 2020 election. The group has a number of lawsuits pending and a number that were dropped or dismissed.

The group and its attorney was recently ordered to pay more than $28,000 by the state Supreme Court for suing Inslee on meritless claims about widespread voter fraud, according to the Seattle Times.

According to a press release from the group, they most recently have filed a petition in Franklin County under the Public Records Act seeking election records in the 2020 general election.

Most candidates acknowledged there should be better communication with the public about what happens with their ballot.

“We have taken elections for granted, but the public doesn’t really know what goes on behind the scenes,” Hobbs said.

Since becoming secretary of state, Hobbs said he has worked to get more money in the office’s budget to create a division dealing with information integrity. That division works to inform the public on what happens with their ballot.

He said his office must also continue to push back against misinformation that might occur surrounding elections.

Anderson said there is skepticism and a lack of trust in elections, but many people who have concerns are concerned with national news or what’s happening in other states.

“The closer you get to home, the more people say that our systems are OK,” she said.

Miloscia said the people’s trust and confidence in the country’s elections system is at “an all-time low.”

He said there needs to be a focus on continuous improvement and fixing issues within the election system that are not producing good results. He pointed to improving the audit system, the election observer system and cleaning up voter rolls.

“That’s how you lose the trust in voters,” Miloscia said. “When the voters feel like you’re not fixing things, or you’re not getting good results, trust goes down.”

Wagoner agreed, saying he wants the secretary of state to be focused on constant improvement, “sort of like updating your computer.” He pointed to updating voter rolls and routine audits as a way to do that.

“I think doing a better job is how you build back confidence in the system,” he said.

Increasing transparency, security of election systems

To address those concerns, most candidates said they wanted to increase transparency and awareness of how the state’s election system works.

Anderson said often when she explains to people with concerns that there are checks and balances and securities in place, it helps them understand. There are some technical things she would like to do, however, to increase transparency and security.

One idea is conducting a risk limiting audit for state measures or races. All counties currently conduct random post-election audits that compare paper ballots with machine results, but there are not any similar statewide audits right now.

That means that counties are often each auditing different races the day after the election.

“Who’s auditing in a comprehensive, statistically relevant way a statewide race, like a gubernatorial race?” she said.

Anderson’s idea would take statistically valid samples from each county for statewide races and include the public in the process.

Anderson also wants to create a nonpartisan election observer corps that would be staffed by nonpartisan volunteers that are trained by the secretary of state. They would then observe election operations and review voter registration records statewide.

If elected, Miloscia’s plans include establishing fraud and audit divisions in every county and the secretary of state office, doing mandatory random audits for counties and precincts; and redesigning and implementing new standards for the state’s election observer program.

Hagglund said the way to fight misinformation is to be open and transparent. He said his background in data science and consulting would help with this, if elected.

“That’s really what it comes down to,” he said. “We have to reveal everything.”

Borrelli said she wants to clean voter rolls and educate voters on the chain of custody of their ballot.

“I would fight misinformation with verifiable truth of every way our current system is not transparent, secure or publicly Verified and how we can change that,” she said.

The security of the state’s elections from bad actors is another issue concerning many of the candidates.

With his background in the National Guard, Hobbs made cybersecurity a priority when he was appointed by Inslee.

He said he has put more money to double the cybersecurity staff and Improve the existing relationships with cyberunits in the National Guard. Hobbs said he also has backed up VoteWA – the state’s voter database – in the cloud as opposed to just a hard drive to Improve security of the voting systems.

Wagoner said he would like to help county auditors update voter rolls that are outdated and do routine spot audits across the state.

Hagglund said in his current role for United Health, he deals with confidential data and knows how to keep it secure. He said if elected, he would work more on making sure parts of the state’s elections system, such as tabulation, are not connected to the internet so they remain secure.

Other issues, candidates

Tiggs said he is running to provide a diverse pool of candidates because representation matters and diversity in the candidates matters.

“People want to see that,” he said. “Voters don’t want to keep seeing the same people run for these types of positions.”

His top issues include expanding voter access and decreasing voter suppression of people of color.

Engle is running as a member of the Union party, which he said he did because he is “extremely dissatisfied” with what the Republicans are doing and he wanted to be in a party that is neither Democratic nor Republican.

He said he is running to keep Washington voters informed about the threat of China to Washington.

Sun, 10 Jul 2022 12:43:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.spokesman.com/stories/2022/jul/10/misinformation-security-of-elections-on-secretary-/
Killexams : Digiday+ Research: Beyond the hype, how publishers are actually using AR and VR

This is the first part of a research series on the most popular emerging technologies. The series follows up on a report Digiday produced five years ago to discover how technologies previously reported on have evolved and to explore new technologies that have since emerged, including blockchain and robotics. In this segment, we look at how publishers are using virtual reality and augmented reality. 

Publishers to date have been reluctant to invest in virtual reality and augmented reality. In fact, they have decreased their use of both since Digiday last surveyed them in 2017. 

“We’ve seen the stats where there is an initial interest curve,” said Vincent Cirel, chief technology officer at Gannett. “Everybody was implementing and experimenting with AR and VR. Now there’s a bit of a retrenchment, backing away from it. That’s because people have played with it. They’ve learned something and now they’re trying to figure out the best way to monetize that.” 

With the U.S. augmented, virtual and mixed reality market worth $28 billion in 2021 and projected to reach more than $250 billion by 2028, according to Statista, publishers have a strong incentive to find a solution to that problem and to consider investing more in both technologies. And with companies like Meta and Google spending more to build out virtual and augmented reality tools, improving hardware and software for headsets and smart lenses and glasses, these virtual and mixed environments are being primed for publisher participation.

Despite often being grouped together for having similar technical foundations, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are two distinct technologies. For publishers, in particular, they offer unique opportunities: VR — which includes 360-degree video — allows for immersive storytelling and community experiences – and the ability to place ads in a virtual space; AR lends itself more readily to marketer applications, like allowing consumers to virtually try on clothing or makeup, or overlay a car into a driveway to gauge its size — but it offers publishers the ability to overlay data and insights on real-world surroundings. 

The pandemic further propelled the usage of and interest in these technologies since VR and AR offered potential solutions for people to remotely gather when in-person events were canceled – though success has so far been mixed.

For this report, Digiday+ Research surveyed 388 industry professionals, including publishers, agencies, brands and retailers, to uncover how they’re currently using AR and VR – and how they plan to incorporate the technologies in the future.

01

Key findings

  • The number of publishers using VR and AR has decreased significantly since 2017.
  • More than 50% of publishers had used some type of VR in 2017, but less than 20% do so now. 
  • Publishers use VR primarily to create entertaining experiences and as a new revenue stream, but the majority no longer think it is relevant to their business.
  • Meta-owned platforms are the main host platforms for VR, with fewer disruptors in the space compared to AR. 
  • Less than 15% of publishers use AR in 2022, down from nearly 20% in 2017. 
  • Even though publishers have decreased use of AR, marketers are using it more, indicating that publishers may have to build out AR capabilities to create better ad experiences in the future. 
  • All survey respondents have continued to use AR mainly for entertainment purposes, with social media and camera filters being the most-used applications, and almost half of respondents using AR for gaming.
  • Owned-and-operated platforms were the primary host space for AR technology in 2017 but have fallen in favor of third-party platforms. 
  • Meta-owned platforms top the list of platforms on which all respondents host AR technology.

02

Publishers pulled back from VR and AR

The number of publishers using VR and AR has decreased significantly in the last five years. In particular, publisher use of VR has dropped steeply, down 34 percentage points from 2017, when 51% of publisher respondents said they used some type of VR, to just 17% in 2022. The decrease may be surprising considering that VR is well-suited for publishers’ storytelling needs and, as Digiday noted in 2017, publishers everywhere were giving VR a shot. At the time, The New York Times had received wide acclaim for an immersive piece on children displaced by war, and the Financial Times made a splash with an Olympics-related exploration of the landscape of Rio de Janeiro.

However, the 34 percentage-point drop is likely due to a combination of the technology’s novelty having worn off a bit, high cost of implementation and slow user adoption rates. “Early on, with things like Google Cardboard [headsets], we were trying to do VR with our phones, and it just doesn’t work,” said Adam Simon, executive director for IPG Media Lab. “That was fun, the first time we did it, but no one did it more than a handful of times. It’s too much of an ask for users, and the quality was not good enough.”

On the other hand, publisher use of AR has declined less precipitously since 2017, down just five percentage points. But adoption rates of AR were not high for publishers in the first place, with only 18% of publishers using the technology when Digiday surveyed them in 2017 versus 13% in 2022. Five years ago, Digiday found that publishers’ lukewarm attitude toward the technology came from a lack of utility, with some publishers wondering whether AR could tell a story better than already existing technology like interactive graphs or images. 

Simon said he’s noticed a decline in the amount of strategy and consulting the company does around both technologies since 2017. “We used to do a ton of in-market activations,” he said. “Now, we do maybe one every two months, a handful of them a year.”

03

Publishers use VR to expand beyond journalistic purposes

When publishers first began experimenting with VR, it was anticipated that they would largely use the technology to provide immersive storytelling experiences for their audiences and to place ads within those environments — virtual extensions of two key publisher services. 

Some news organizations are giving users the option to engage in virtual environments or 360-degree video livestreams to experience a news event rather than just read about it. The BBC, for example, has a unit within its research and development division devoted to building its VR and 360-degree video capabilities to enhance its journalism, narrative and educational content. Most larger media outlets have experimented with the technology in latest years. 

“Almost everybody this year is talking, directly or indirectly, about this concept of immersive journalism and what that looks like for the future,” said Gannett’s Cirel. “If you think back 20 or 25 years, the news was [watching] CNN or practicing a newspaper. Now that’s evolved into the web, mobile and Web3 among other things.” 

Cirel said the technological landscape is primed for expansion, giving consumers the opportunity to dip in and out of various virtual news experiences. For example, a user could potentially follow links from a news report about Parliament to a virtual tour of the legislative gathering, or hop into a 360-degree immersive travel experience of London. 

“One story can lead [somewhere else] when it comes to storytelling and immersive journalism,” he said. “The tentacles of a story can expand out and branch into other domains, and technology hasn’t been prepared to deliver a solution until now. Current and forthcoming generations are going to understand and consume storytelling and news in completely different ways than have been done historically.”

In a similar vein, many publishers who do currently offer VR activations are using the technology to provide another layer to journalistic storytelling: entertainment. 77% of surveyed publishers said they use VR to create entertaining experiences, and 46% use it as a new revenue stream, in addition to the more traditional ones like selling ad space and tickets for events. 

Publisher Blavity has used its virtual conferences to generate revenue from sponsored ads and attendee fees, while at the same time providing educational experiences. The company said it saw an uptick in attendance and sponsorship – and therefore revenue – year over year: Ticket prices increased between 57-75%, and the number of sponsors went up from 120 in 2020 to 170 in 2021. 
Blavity’s second virtual AfroTech conference hosted on eXp World Holdings’ virtual world platform included everything from a digital job expo hall and program stages to avatars designed to resemble the real-life conference attendees, including incorporating a full range of skin tones, hair styles, facial features and outfits that users could choose from to build their custom characters.

During the pandemic, Complex Networks, owned by BuzzFeed, similarly shifted its in-person ComplexCon fashion and music festival to a VR entertainment event, ComplexLand. While largely seen at the time as options of last resort, these experimental virtual environments offered the chance to continue having large gatherings with a real sense of presence without the in-person health risks. Neil Wright, head of experiential for Complex Networks, said the company wanted not only to push the boundaries of technology beyond a simple video call by creating a virtual experience, but also maintain audience engagement and generate a revenue stream for brands that relied on ComplexCon for a portion of their yearly profits. 

“It is a brand play for engagement of both our brand partners, the energy brands or streetwear brands, as well as attendees,” he said. “But also it is a pretty solid revenue opportunity for us with our clients as well. As we evolve it, there are unique opportunities we haven’t really scraped the surface of … Is it a video game? Is it e-commerce? Actually, it’s all of that. It’s really been interesting to see how fast technology is moving across the board with virtual environments and virtual opportunities. Each year, the conversations become easier because these activations and platforms are more commonplace marketing or commerce tactics at this point.”

04

Publishers lay some groundwork for an emerging metaverse

Virtual events like ComplexLand and Blavity’s AfroTech conference offer glimpses of what the future might hold for the metaverse. The metaverse is defined as a “successor state” to the modern internet that will allow users – and companies – to generate and own content and assets that can then be distributed freely across the touchpoints and platforms that will compose a widely accessible and connected digital world. Many of the nodes composing this digital world will be virtual – or at least that’s the current plan. 

But for now, the metaverse is an abstract potential hovering over an emerging set of siloed virtual islands. Current online platforms allow users to move about somewhat freely within the confines of specific services, but limit interoperability between platforms. Right now, even so-called metaverse precursors such as video game “Fortnite” don’t allow players to recreate their own user-generated content or carry over collected assets to many other platforms. 

The metaverse is in its infancy, but publishers would be wise to start experimenting with it now, according to Gannett’s Cirel. “Central to the [metaverse] is VR and to a lesser extent, but it will grow, is AR,” he said. “Particularly when it comes to storytelling, you’ve got the reality of the world, and that’s the story that you’re telling. How do you augment that reality with different factoids, but really come under the broader umbrella of immersive journalism? That’s the secret sauce, the recipe that everybody’s got to figure out.”

Mass media owner and publisher Hearst isn’t waiting: They hope to sail their virtual airpship straight into the metaverse – whether it exists right now or not – and gain customers and create buzz at the same time. New customer acquisition and creating buzz are tied as the third-most-popular uses of VR among publishers, with 31% saying they use VR for those reasons.

Hearst launched the airship in the fall of 2021 to show new and future clients the potential for building immersive, co-branded VR experiences in the metaverse, hopefully resulting in branding partnerships down the road. Although, Hearst’s Nancy Berger, svp, publishing director and CRO of the Youth & Wellness Group, told Digiday the airship was not “necessarily going to be about revenue generation.”

Hearst, and other companies eager to place ads within virtual environments, need not fret about whether users will be receptive to the advertising, according to IPG Media Lab’s Simon. “We’ve seen in gaming in general that users and gamers don’t mind when there’s branding in places where there would be branding in the real world,” he said. “It’s totally normal, and they’re totally fine with that.”

Vadim Supitskiy, chief technology officer at business magazine Forbes, says there are advantages to using VR for events and that continued experimentation and buzz creation within virtual spaces is crucial for growth. Forbes, for example, launched a virtual billionaires NFT collection to engage consumers and has hosted several internal VR events for employees. 

“We’ll need to continue building out those experiences to make them more realistic and interactive,” Supitskiy said. “A lot of things are done to gain buzz and to get some publicity, but it’s important for publishers to experiment with the technologies and really start engaging their audiences in the space. It will change the way we interact. It will be the future. And if you don’t start now, you will be left behind.”

05

The VR platform landscape remains largely unchanged

Although publishers are experimenting with how best to use VR, the platforms that host VR experiences haven’t shifted much from 2017 to 2022. Owned-and-operated platforms, Meta-owned platforms and Google’s YouTube continue to be the main VR hosts among all survey respondents. That’s notable when compared to AR, which had greater shifts in host platforms from 2017 to 2022, with new players like TikTok overtaking legacy platforms.

VR’s lack of platform change is likely due to few players investing in VR tools, aside from Meta, which is betting big – including the name change – by essentially subsidizing the technologies to encourage adoption. Meta’s first-quarter 2022 earnings report showed that the company spent $3.7 billion on its VR and AR division, Reality Labs – though it took in only $700 million in revenue.

Perhaps it’s not surprising then that a Meta-owned platform overtook owned-and-operated platforms to become VR’s main player. Quest took the first-place spot with 45% of survey respondents saying they use the platform to reach VR consumers. Owned-and-operated platforms fell to a close second place at 42%; but they also had the greatest overall decrease in usage, down from 71% percent in 2017. Meta-owned platform Facebook came in third at 39%, and YouTube retained a healthy percent of usage at fourth place with 31% of respondents saying they use the platform for VR versus 40% in 2017.

Despite investments in VR tools by companies like Meta, VR apps and services still struggle to reach consumers. “When you look at [Facebook’s] engagement on owned-and-operated apps like Horizon Worlds, they only have about 300,000 people on a regular basis,” said IPG Media Lab’s Simon. “Facebook is buying up a lot of companies to try to jumpstart [the gaming market]. But the thing that will start to expand that, is when we see companies like Apple moving into the space and bringing a pathway to bring some of the smartphone apps into the headset space.”

06

Publishers struggle to find uses for AR

While VR has the potential to be more immediately endemic to a publisher’s mission, AR – which layers digital elements over a real-world view, often through a camera lens – can be harder for publishers to apply. The technology lends itself more readily to marketer applications, like allowing consumers to virtually try on clothing or makeup, or overlay a piece of furniture into a living space before deciding whether to buy it. In fact, product demonstration via virtual try-on and real-world overlay has seen the greatest increase in AR usage in the past five years.

But for publishers, AR thus far hasn’t proven an effective tool to disseminate information, and fewer publishers are using it now than were five years ago. Only 13% of publisher respondents said they use AR in 2022, down five percentage points from 2017 when 18% of publishers reported using the technology. And fewer publishers overall are using AR than VR. One concern for publishers, and a likely barrier to adoption, is how to use AR to present information or tell a story better than can be done with existing technology like on-screen interactive graphs or images. 

The anticipated boom of AR devices, like smart lenses for eyeglasses, has yet to materialize, although the technology has become more accessible on smartphones through apps’ use of their cameras. “You can have a decent AR experience on mobile,” said IPG Media Lab’s Simon. “You won’t have longer experiences, but [you can have] snackable, tactile content….Even if the tech is not quite there yet, it’s getting there and it’s improving every year.”

What usage there is remains largely hedonic, and entertainment purposes continue to be some of the top reasons all respondents use AR, with social media and camera filters taking the No. 1 spot and almost half of respondents using AR for gaming. And, while publishers are using AR less than they did five years ago, Digiday’s survey revealed that marketers have been using it more – and the next installment of this series examines marketers’ use of AR and VR. 

AR also has a large addressable market. Snapchat alone, for example, has over 250 million users engaging with AR every day on average. Increased marketer use combined with vast audience numbers signals that publishers might have to build out their AR capabilities moving forward to allow for better ad experiences. 

Complex Networks, for one, experimented with AR through a partnership with Snapchat at its return to an in-person, reduced-capacity ComplexCon in November 2021. “People physically at the event would hold up their AR filter and see [virtual] ComplexLand through it,” said Wright. “So it was like a multiverse, metaverse if you will. It combined both.

“And we had shopping capabilities. When [product] drops happen within [virtual] ComplexLand, they fall from the sky and your avatar has to go chase them. It’s very similar to ComplexCon, where participants would hold up the filter and [products] would drop from the sky as AR creative artwork. Those are really interesting ways you can leverage this technology, especially if you’re doing a physical event and there is reduced capacity because of Covid. People can still participate.”

But there are pockets of more journalistic pursuits. The New York Times, for example, has doubled down on AR, creating an AR division or “AR Lab” in collaboration with Meta, which it says is devoted to AR-driven reporting on Instagram. Many of The New York Times’ AR news reports focus on demonstrating specific subjects or events, for example, skiers executing jumps at the winter Olympics or masks blocking Covid particles by overlaying virtual models enacting an example into the readers’ space – such as a living room – using smartphone cameras. 

The publication has also created a hub page on its website to house reports that use AR for storytelling. And, perhaps bucking the trend of favoring VR over AR, the publication also did away with its in-house VR app, though users can still access VR content via mobile devices on the Times’ website, among other ways.

Sporting events may be one area in which publishers can use AR equally as well as – if not better than – the written word to cover news. Like The New York Times, The Washington Post and USA Today used AR to report on the summer 2021 Olympics. The Post, for example, tapped into the technology to show Olympic climber Brooke Raboutou climbing a 15-meter wall in about 10 seconds. Users scanned a QR code within a news story to see the event in their own space at scale. 

For Post editors, it came down to how to best tell the story. “We could write a long paragraph on sprinting up a 50-meter wall in 10 seconds, but we try to figure out how to show that to you, in your own space, how tall 50 meters is,” said Elite Truong, director of strategic initiatives at The Post. 
Political coverage has also benefited from the use of AR, in some cases providing a sense of proximity to a candidate. Verizon Media (since acquired by Apollo Global Management and rebranded as Yahoo) and Gannett partnered to create an AR viewing experience of an interview with then presidential candidate Andrew Yang in 2019. USA Today’s and Yahoo News’ apps hosted the experience. Readers could hear Yang discuss issues while watching a 3D version of the candidate, whose image was overlaid on top of the reader’s own surroundings.

07

Meta-owned platforms unseat Snapchat to top the list of AR hosts

Unlike VR, which hasn’t had many changes in host platforms over the last five years, AR platform deployment has shifted massively since 2017, and mostly in one direction. Meta-owned platforms dethroned Snapchat to now top the list of platforms that host AR content among all survey respondents — a distinction Meta also holds among VR host platforms. Owned-and-operated platforms, which were by far the primary AR hosts in 2017, have fallen down the list to third place, in favor of third-party platforms. 

Meta’s Instagram is the leading AR host platform (and the leading third-party platform), taking the No. 1 spot with 64% of survey respondents saying they produce content for the platform. Facebook, also owned by Meta, came in second at 44%. Snapchat, which held the first-place spot among third-party platforms (and was second overall) five years ago, fell to fifth overall with 33% of respondents using the platform in 2022. New entrant TikTok overtook Snapchat by a small margin, with 34% producing content for the video platform. Amazon and Google’s YouTube and ARCore rounded out the list.

Notably, owned-and-operated platforms shrunk as the primary host space for AR technology, dropping from the No. 1 slot in 2017 with 76% of respondents using them at the time to third place in 2022 at 36%. One reason for the drop may be that as AR technology becomes more widely available and third-party platforms build out the technology, respondents need to rely less on their own first-party capabilities – as they may have for early skunkworks experiments. And compared to VR, which depends on potentially cost-prohibitive headsets, AR offers ease of consumer access through ubiquitous smartphone cameras, reachable by scores of apps. 

“We do not have mainstream augmented headsets yet,” said IPG Media Lab’s Simon. “We have [Microsoft] HoloLens, which are high-end and enterprise-focused. But we can get a really good AR experience for bite-sized pieces of content on our phones.”

This shift in technology accessibility was also reflected in how respondents are building their AR applications. In Digiday’s survey, the majority of respondents favored working with a third-party vendor (48%) or a mix of third-party vendors and in-house offerings (31%) to build AR apps. Only 21% of respondents favored building AR applications in-house.

08

Despite hurdles, some publishers play VR, AR long game

Consumer interest in AR and VR appears to be growing, with the worldwide market for AR and VR headsets increasing 92.1% in 2021 over the prior year and headset shipments reaching 11.2 million units, according to the International Data Corporation (IDC). But both technologies face challenges to widespread publisher adoption, as publishers struggle to find appropriate, repeatable and monetizable ways to use the technologies for storytelling and more. 

Sixty-two percent of publisher respondents who are not currently using VR said VR was not relevant to their business, and 59% who are not currently using AR said the same about AR. When asked why they weren’t investing in the technologies, publishers cited a lack of relevance as the main reason for not spending. 

Secondarily, low consumer adoption of and interest in the technologies kept publishers from committing resources. Consumers tend to use VR mainly for gaming, and they use AR to virtually try on products like makeup or place items like artwork in their homes. Most do not use the technologies to enhance their consumption of news or even feature articles and other web content, a primary publisher offering. 

While many publishers find neither AR nor VR technologies immediately relevant to their businesses in 2022, 36% of publishers not currently using AR still plan to invest in AR in the future, and 33% not currently using VR plan to invest in the future. 

“The willingness of companies to invest, or how they’re going to invest, is not really any different for AR or VR … than it was for any technologies that have emerged over the last 20 years,” said Gannett’s Cirel. “In the late 1990s, we were asking the same question about the web. The business fundamentals don’t change. How much is the investment? What is the ROI?” 

Cirel noted that beyond devoting funds to AR and VR, publishers who find the most success with the technologies in the future will be the companies who approach them from a long-term perspective rather than just to create momentary excitement. 

“Lots of companies put out press releases to generate buzz … and 10 to 15 minutes after the press release goes out [they’re looking] at the financial sites to see if it moved the needle on share price,” Cirel said. “Companies are throwing a bunch of stuff against the wall to see what might stick. But the companies that take their time — they do the proper foundational business analytics — those are the companies that are going to benefit the most from these emerging technologies.”

09

Costs behind VR tech are still prohibitive for many

When it came to VR, publishers selected the cost of building and implementing the technology as the third most important reason they aren’t laying out funds, putting it above lack of technical skills as a barrier – though cost and technical skills are linked through hiring and spending on certified to work on the technology. Developing virtual apps can be costly, with companies spending tens of thousands of dollars depending on software and which platform they’re targeting. A lack of spending for development leads to a lack of technical skills.

Joe Ferencz, CEO at video game development company Gamefam, pointed out that larger companies like Meta and Google are investing in VR technology and platform build-out and he thinks widespread use of the technology will occur. But content creation — and this where publishers have a crucial role — will need to keep pace. Without strong content, VR isn’t yet at a stage to attract mass users.

“Whether Meta or other competitors bring VR hardware to the market, eventually the hardware will find wider adoption,” he said. “It might take three to five years, or even 10 years, but we will get there with mass-market VR. For Meta to build enough high-quality content to meet demand is not realistic. If you look at big companies, like Google, they’re not in the content business. They’re always in the platform business [because] making content is hard and isn’t as scalable.” 

Meanwhile, user headsets can be out of financial reach for many consumers. Meta’s subsidized Quest 2 starts at around $300, while premium headsets can range up to $1,000 or more. The Quest 2 was the most popular headset purchased in 2021, with 78% share of the combined AR and VR market, according to IDC. But as IPG Media Lab’s Simon noted, the overall number of consumers investing in the technology is minor compared to market size. 

“VR right now is stuck in a weird limbo,” he said. “The total addressable market [for Facebook, for example] is about 10 million people. But we also know a lot of VR headsets aren’t in active use….People went through a bit of interest in things like [Google] Cardboard, and that’s not something consumers are interested in anymore. AR is just easier for people to dip into.”

10

AR technology is user-ready, but distribution still lags

AR technology, however, has moved past the basic stages of platform build-out and has become more accessible to consumers via their smartphones, making adoption much smoother for companies. According to Artillery Intelligence, there are currently about 1.1 billion AR-capable devices, a number expected to grow to 1.73 billion by 2024. 

Because of increasing user access to AR via smartphone apps, publishers don’t have to spend as much to develop AR features. They can focus instead on creating content to attract users, although much of that content still lacks sophistication. As seen in the survey results, publishers placed the cost of building and implementing the technology (14%) slightly lower on their list of reasons not to invest in AR than they placed lack of technical knowledge (16%). 

Despite the proliferation of smartphones, Simon pointed out that distribution for AR activations can be a challenge. “As we look towards more dedicated hardware for AR, one of the questions is whether we are going to have an app store model,” he said. “[Software developer] Niantic is definitely pushing the idea of channels, which I think is right. If we fast forward 10 years, users could have an AR device they wear all day, in which they could turn on or off different information channels, for example, restaurant reviews or a game they want to engage with.”

11

Ease of access and market size may determine VR, AR future

As the technology behind VR grows and companies like Meta continue to spend to create more accessible options for users and publishers, adoption may increase among both. Still, VR will likely need to achieve the same ease of access that AR has discovered, particularly through the release of new, less obtrusive hardware, before widespread publisher adoption can take hold. But the draw of potential revenue can move mountains, and with the market size for AR and VR expected to increase by a compound annual growth rate of 41.6% from 2021 to 2030, according to Allied Market Research, publishers may find themselves drawn to both technologies in the not too distant future.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 03:09:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://digiday.com/media/digiday-research-how-publishers-are-actually-using-ar-and-vr/
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