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Section Two reading Comprehension
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Killexams : Admission-Tests Comprehension history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LSAT-reading-comprehension Search results Killexams : Admission-Tests Comprehension history - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LSAT-reading-comprehension https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Killexams : How to Use practice tests to Study for the LSAT No result found, try new keyword!Unlike other standardized tests, real LSAT tests are not hard to come by. In fact, the Law School Admission Council ... In 2007, the reading comprehension section began including a comparative ... Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:36:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/law-admissions-lowdown/articles/how-to-use-practice-tests-to-study-for-the-lsat Killexams : Worst results in a generation from US college admission tests

Admission test results for students seeking places at US universities have hit their lowest level in more than 30 years.

Officials blamed disruption to learning caused by the pandemic for the drop in scores. The class of 2022 scored an average of 19.8 out of 36 in the American College Testing (ACT) exam, the first time since 1991 that the average has dropped below 20.

In 2021 the average was 20.3. The latest results mark a fifth consecutive year of declining scores and show 42 per cent of students who took the ACT failed to meet the minimum levels required in English, maths, reading and science.

The ACT creates benchmark scores to determine a student’s likelihood of success in their first year of university. Janet

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 18:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/worst-results-in-a-generation-from-us-college-admission-tests-vmmp0nkpk
Killexams : The problems with CUET

Students appearing for the CUET exam

File Picture

As a teacher of English, I am alarmed rather than elated that more students should have scored full marks in English than in any other subject in the Common University Entrance Test for undergraduate admissions to central universities (proposed to be extended to all public universities). Admittedly, more candidates sat for English than for any other subject. The proportion with a percentile of 100 was only 1.6%. But there are surprises here too: 5.9% in psychology, 1.95% in political science, but only 0.03% in maths and 0.02% in physics.

We accept today that scores in the humanities can match those in the sciences. That is fair enough. An outstanding student deserves the same grade in history or English as in physics or chemistry. But it is puzzling that scores in STEM subjects should be so much lower than in the humanities. How can the chance of a perfect score in English be 53 times that in maths?

I checked out the test for myself. The internet is flooded with mock tests, trial papers and back questions. I clicked my way through one such. It was plain sailing, but I cannot be sure I answered every question correctly. There seemed no way to check my score. That is just as well: it spared my ego and prevented controversy.

One thing I did conclude, however: this test is of no use in identifying the best candidates for an English honours course. There is a special issue with languages, above all a universally current one like English. All students need it as a tool language (to use that unlovely term). A small subgroup studies the literature and culture accessible through English as a humane discipline. These two completely different ends are commonly run together, and tests for the first limited function applied to the second.

The multiple-choice question format is inadequate for both, egregiously so for the second. The bestframed MCQs cannot test anything beyond factual knowledge and basic logic and comprehension (besides notoriously allowing some correct answers through random guesswork). Above all, MCQs cannot test the candidate’s skill in composition and capacity for connected thought. (The latter lacuna affects all subjects, especially in the humanities.) If MCQs are the sole criterion for entry, English honours classes will comprise a random selection of (a) the truly suitable – always a minority, now rendered vastly more so; (b) those with good language skills but no aptitude for humanistic study; (c) those with just enough language skills to clear the MCQs on a good day. The discipline, facing an uncertain future already in India, will be seriously imperilled. 

But what other method can work for a huge nationwide test? Quite simply, none at all. This kind of gigantic exercise across a range of subjects (unlike the JEE or NEET, focused on a single field) will not work well for any subject, still less the humanities; for languages, not at all.

Till now, a few leading institutions held their own admission tests, though generally taking board-level marks into account. Most places relied solely on the latter. Board exams too are tilting heavily towards MCQs; but they retain an element of discursive composition, providing a better basis for assessment.

But doesn’t the earlier system prevent uniformity in standards and content? Of course: that is the whole rationale of higher education. The Procrustean simplism of MCQs is misleading and harmful. Many students clearing that low hurdle stumble over the ups and downs of the genuine college curriculum. The next move, therefore, is to dumb down the curriculum and final assessment. That process too is well under way.

Two arguments are advanced in favour of CUET. First, it solves the problem of standardizing the grading levels of school boards across the country. But it has brought its own challenge of ‘normalizing’ scores across multi-session exams. I leave it to statisticians to assess the two problems dispassionately; but we cannot deny that there is a problem.

The other argument is humane. A centralized CUET spares students the torture of multiple applications, a stressful and expensive process. But the internet reveals how in a single year, CUET has fallen prey to India’s all-devouring coaching industry. This is one industry that grew incrementally during the pandemic. Just as that bonanza is nearing its end, CUET has brought fresh bounty: a market vastly greater than JEE or NEET.

A Google search under CUET listed more coaching outfits than I imagined to exist. Guides and helpbooks abound no less. This staggering marketing exercise feeds on fomenting stress both in the young and in adult stakeholders footing the bill, preying on their dreams and nightmares. It is the latest addition to a battery of forces whereby education is passing out of the hands of the teachers and institutions responsible for its delivery into the control of a powerful commercial nexus with no goal beyond putting students on college registers. It is like giving ambulance paramedics control over the hospital system. The government is the chief facilitator and cheerleader of the process.

A last factor might (or might not) console many readers. Private universities are outside the purview of CUET. They devise their own policies for admissions, teaching and assessment. Inevitably, they will diverge more and more from the public university system. In a handful of high-end institutions, that divergence will be academically beneficial, perhaps markedly so.

There’s comfort yet: these institutions might ensure a decent education for ‘our’ children, at whatever cost to our pockets. The high cost will necessarily restrict their reach, while the decline of public universities reduces the total space of productive tertiary education. We are like climate-change victims insouciantly seeing their land mass shrink till the rising sea-level laps at their toes. Gradually they start pushing each other into the water to clear standing-room for themselves. Finally, they all go under.

‘We’ are educated and enlightened people. Let us find one country in history which has prospered by shrinking and enfeebling its education system as a matter of policy. We could badly do with a model in this otherwise suicidal course.

Sukanta Chaudhuri is Professor Emeritus, Jadavpur University

Sun, 09 Oct 2022 10:24:00 -0500 text/html https://www.telegraphindia.com/opinion/fails-the-test-the-problems-with-cuet/cid/1891095
Killexams : Some Very Contrarian Thoughts on the LSAT (and Law School) No result found, try new keyword!No charge. Here’s a tempest in a teapot for you — should law schools stop requiring applicants to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)? Some people argue vociferously that schools should ... Wed, 12 Oct 2022 22:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/some-very-contrarian-thoughts-on-the-lsat-and-law-school/ Killexams : ACT test scores fall to lowest level in 30 years following pandemic

Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in exact years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was deliver me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 09:50:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/act-college-admissions-test-scores-drop-pandemic-slide/
Killexams : ACT test scores drop to their lowest in 30 years in a pandemic slide

Students at Bear River High School in Grass Valley, Calif., gather to see their school schedules during the first morning of school in August. Elias Funez/AP hide caption

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Elias Funez/AP

Students at Bear River High School in Grass Valley, Calif., gather to see their school schedules during the first morning of school in August.

Elias Funez/AP

PHOENIX — Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in exact years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was deliver me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 07:26:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.npr.org/2022/10/12/1128376442/act-test-scores-pandemic
Killexams : ACT test scores lowest in 30 years

Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

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“Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. “Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses.”

ACT scores have declined steadily in exact years. Still, “the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure.”

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. “Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students,” Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

“All the test did for me was deliver me extra financial money,” Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 23:56:00 -0500 en text/html https://cumberlink.com/news/state-and-regional/act-test-scores-lowest-in-30-years/article_32885bc2-4aa2-11ed-bcc2-dfb93ab17781.html
Killexams : ACT College Admission Test Scores Drop To 30-Year Low As Effects Of Covid-Era Online Learning Play Out

Topline

High school students’ ACT college admission test scores fell to a three-decade low in 2022, according to a new report released Wednesday, falling for the fifth straight year as educators grapple with ongoing learning loss made worse by remote classes during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Key Facts

Students in the graduating high school class of 2022 averaged a score of 19.8 out of 36, the lowest score since 1991 on the admissions test, which colleges use to gauge students’ English, reading, math and science skills.

The average score is down from 20.3 in 2021, and 20.8 in 2018, which were down from a exact high of 21.2 in 2007 (SAT college admission test scores have also dropped slightly from 981 in 2007 to 927 in 2021).

Some 32% of 2022 graduates who took the test passed three out of four benchmarks—indicating whether they have a 50% chance of earning a B or higher in English, reading, math and science—down from 36% of students last year and 38% in 2018.

From 2018 to 2022, the percentage of students who passed the benchmark in the English section dropped from 60% to 53%, while students who passed the math benchmark fell from 40% to 31%.

Only 22% of the students met the benchmark in all four categories, down from 27% in 2018.

ACT CEO Janet Godwin said the decline can’t be blamed exclusively by learning disruptions from online learning and missed classes when schools were shuttered during the Covid-19 pandemic, but by “longtime systemic failures” that were “exacerbated by the pandemic.”

Crucial Quote

“The magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming, as we see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting the college-readiness benchmark in any of the subjects we measure,” Godwin said in a press release,

Key Background

Recent studies have linked online learning during the pandemic—when teachers were forced to completely pivot from in-person classes to lessons online—to disruptions in students’ math and reading comprehension. During that time, students were shown to have connected less with their teachers and classmates, and become distracted more easily while at home. The high school class of 2022 dealt with online learning for more than half of their time in high school, starting in March, 2020. Students who switched to online lessons from in-person classes for just a month missed the equivalent of seven to 10 weeks of math, Harvard University Center for Education Policy Research director Thomas Kane told NPR. The losses held true for younger students, as well. A National Assessment of Educational Progress report released last month found 9-year-olds’ reading levels suffered the biggest fall since 1990, while math scores had their biggest drop ever.

Tangent

Disparities between racial groups also increased over that pandemic, with Black students’ math scores falling 13 points, compared to white students’ scores falling five points, according to the Nation’s Report Card. Analysts at McKinsey & Company attribute the difference between races to variation in access to education, with Black and Hispanic students less likely to have access to internet or live interaction with teachers, despite being more likely to remain in remote classrooms.

Surprising Fact

Washington D.C. students had the highest ACT score (26.9), followed by California and Massachusetts (26.5), while the lowest scores were recorded in Nevada (17.3) and Mississippi (17.8).

Big Number

1.3 million. That’s how many students in the class of 2022 took the ACT test, or roughly 36% of graduating high school seniors, according to the report.

Further Reading

Pandemic-Era Policies Caused Dramatic Education Decline (Forbes)

Pandemic Set Students’ reading Levels Back Two Decades—Here’s Where It Dropped The Most (Forbes)

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Brian Bushard en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/brianbushard/2022/10/12/act-college-admission-test-scores-drop-to-30-year-low-as-effects-of-covid-era-online-learning-play-out/
Killexams : ACT Test Scores Drop to Lowest in 30 Years Following School Closures No result found, try new keyword!PHOENIX (AP) — Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year’s high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning ... Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:52:00 -0500 text/html https://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2022/10/13/act_test_scores_drop_to_lowest_in_30_years_following_school_closures_148318.html?_escaped_fragment_=
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