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ACCUPLACER ACCUPLACER Computerized Placement Tests

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ACCUPLACER Q&A SECTIONS
=========================
Section 1: Sec One(1 to 10)
Details:Mathematics Practice Questions
Section 2: Sec Two (11 to 20)
Details:Basic Operations Practice Questions
Section 3: Sec Three (21 to 29)
Details:Averages and Rounding Practice Questions
Section 4: Sec Four (30 to 49)
Details:Algebra practice questions 1
Section 5: Sec Five (50 to 85)
Details:Basic Mathematics practice questions Question
Section 6: Sec six (86 to 95)
Details:Estimation Sequence practice questions 1
Section 7: Sec Seven (96 to 105)
Details:Fractions and Square Root Practice Questions
Section 8: Sec Eight (106 to 108)
Details:Geometry Practice Test
Section 9: Sec Nine (109 to 144)
Details:Intermediate Mathematics practice questions Question
Section 10: Sec Ten (145 to 160)
Details:Graph Practice Questions
Section 11: Sec Eleven (161 to 175)
Details:Measurement Practice Problems
Section 12: Sec Twelve (176 to 185 )
Details:Percent and Ratio Practice Questions
Section 13: Sec Thirteen (186 to 205)
Details:English Grammar Practice Questions
Section 14: Sec Fourteen (206 to 210)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 1
Section 15: Sec Fifteen (211 to 214)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 2
Section 16: Sec Sixteen (215 to 224)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 3
Section 17: Sec Seventeen (225 to 229)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 4
Section 18: Sec Eighteen (230 to 233)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 5
Section 19: Sec Nineteen (234 to 238)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 6
Section 20: Sec Twenty (239 to 242)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 7
Section 21: Sec Twenty Qne (243 to 249)
Details:Advanced studying Practice 8
Section 22: Sec Twenty Two (250 to 256)
Details:Author's Purpose Practice 1
Section 23: Sec Twenty Three (257 to 258)
Details:Author's Purpose Practice 2
Section 24: Sec Twenty Four (259 to 279)
Details:Grammar Practice Online Questions
Section 25: Sec Twenty Five (280 to 286)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test1
Section 26: Sec Twenty Six (287 to 293)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test2
Section 27: Sec Twenty Seven (294 to 298)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test3
Section 28: Sec Twenty Eight (299 to 303)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test4
Section 29: Sec Twenty Nine (304 to 308)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test5
Section 30: Sec Thirty (309 to 311)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test6
Section 31: Sec Thirty One (312 to 316)
Details:Reading Comprehension Practice Test7
Section 32: Sec Thirty Two (317 to 318)
Details:Reading Comprehension practice questions 8
Section 33: Sec Thirty Three (319 to 324)
Details:Reading Comprehension practice questions 9
Section 34: Sec Thirty Four (325 to 334)
Details:Comma practice questions Questions
Section 35: Sec Thirty Five (335 to 355)
Details:Grammar Practice Questions
Section 36: Sec Thirty Six (356 to 365)
Details:Noun Practice Quiz
Section 37: Sec Thirty Seven (366 to 375)
Details:Reading Main Idea Practice Questions
Section 38: Sec Thirty Eight (376-387)
Details:Reading Vocabulary Practice Questions
Section 39: Sec Thirty Nine (388-407)
Details:Sentence Correction Practice Questions
Section 40: Sec Forty (408-413)
Details:Sentence Flow Practice Questions
Section 41: Sec Forty One (414 to 437)
Details:Word Usage practice questions Questions
Section 42: Sec Forty Two (438-461)
Details:Usage Practice 2
Section 43: Sec Forty Three (462-485)
Details:Word Usage Practice Test3
Section 44: Sec Forty Four (486-495)
Details:Verb Practice Test
Section 45: Sec Forty Five (496-519)
Details:Writing practice questions 1
Section 46: Sec Forty Six (520-540)
Details:Writing practice questions 2
Question: 525
The book lay open at page 77.
A. lay open
B. laid open
C. lied open
D. lain open
E. was laid open
Answer: A
Question: 526
By this time next year, Johanna will begin classes at the University of Colorado.
A. will begin classes
B. will have begun classes
C. has began classes
D. should begin classes
E. should have begun classes
Answer: B
Question: 527
After comparing my air conditioner with the one on sale, I decided that mine was the most
efficient.
A. was the most efficient.
B. should be the most efficient.
C. was the more efficient.
D. was by far the most efficient.
E. should be considered the most efficient.
Answer: C
Question: 528
193
I would have liked to have gone swimming yesterday.
A. to have gone swimming
B. to go swimming
C. to had gone swimming
D. to go to swim
E. to of gone swimming
Answer: A
Question: 529
I wish I read the chapter before I tried to answer the questions.
A. read the chapter
B. would read the chapter
C. should of read the chapter
D. could have read the chapter
E. had read the chapter
Answer: E
Question: 530
Nathanael West said that he'd never have written his satirical novel if he had not visited
Hollywood.
A. have written his
B. would have written his
C. could of written his
D. could have written his
E. should of written his
Answer: A
Question: 531
The smell from the paper mill laid over the town like a blanket.
194
A. laid
B. has lain
C. will lie
D. lay
E. has laid
Answer: D
Question: 532
When I was halfway down the stairs, I suddenly knew what I had wanted to have said.
A. to have said
B. too say
C. to have been said
D. to had say
E. to say
Answer: E
Question: 533
I would be more careful if I had been you.
A. had been
B. would have been
C. was
D. were
E. could have been
Answer: D
Question: 534
They read where the governor has appointed a special committee to Boost the school calendar.
A. where
B. how
C. were
D. of where
195
E. wear
Answer: B
Question: 535
In study hall I sit besides Paul Smith, who is captain of the swim team and one of the best
swimmers in the state.
A. sit besides
B. sat beside
C. have set beside
D. sit beside
E. have sit beside
Answer: D
Question: 536
Anna Karenina has been read with enjoyment for over 100 years.
A. has been read
B. will have been read
C. shall have been read
D. is being read
E. was read
Answer: A
Question: 537
Many 19th-century biographers rely on their imaginations, not on real facts.
A. rely on their imaginations,
B. relied on their imaginations,
C. have relied on their imaginations
D. could have relied on their imaginations,
E. could rely on their imaginations:
196
Answer: B
Question: 538
The private lives of politicians, generals, and other notables fascinates the studying public.
A. fascinates the reading
B. have fascinated the reading
C. will fascinate the reading
D. fascinate the reading
E. has fascinate the reading
Answer: D
Question: 539
The small man chose a seat near the door and carefully sat down.
A. sat
B. will sit
C. could of sat
D. have sit down
E. set down
Answer: A
Question: 540
Last summer I worked in the chemical laboratory at the Brass Company; most of the work came
into the lab for testing marked with the words top priority.
A. words top priority.
B. words-top priority.
C. words: Top priority.
D. words, "Top Priority."
E. words "top priority."
Answer: D
197
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College-Board Computerized exam Questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ACCUPLACER Search results College-Board Computerized exam Questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ACCUPLACER https://killexams.com/exam_list/College-Board Exam board to offer pupils on-screen English GCSEs by next summer

An exam board is offering pupils the chance to be assessed digitally in their GCSE English exams from next year.

Pearson, which runs exam board Edexcel, is aiming for GCSE students to be able to sit on-screen exams in the core subject by summer 2025, if they choose to do so.

Up to 125,000 students in the UK will have the option to take Edexcel’s GCSE English language and English literature exams on-screen for the first time.

The exam board’s on-screen GCSEs in English – which would be assessed in summer next year – are subject to regulatory approval by Ofqual.

Pearson Edexcel hopes to be able to offer an on-screen option for all GCSEs by 2030 to increase accessibility for students, as well as other benefits.

The exam board said it has seen more students using word processing for their responses to GCSE exam questions, as part of access arrangements.

Sharon Hague, managing director for Pearson Schools, said: “This is a pivotal moment for on-screen assessment in the UK. For the first time, in summer 2025, students will be able to sit an exam in a core subject fully on-screen if they choose to do so.

“We’ve heard loud and clear from students and teachers that they want a choice in how they take exams. That is why we’ll offer both on-screen and paper-based exam options.”

Students who take Pearson Edexcel’s GCSE in computer science are already assessed partially on-screen and the exam board has begun rolling out digital assessments for its international GCSEs.

This will be the first time that the main English GCSEs will be offered on-screen.

Ms Hague added: “On-screen is a better experience for students who need accessibility adjustments. Students can zoom in to increase font size and choose colour filters on-screen during exams, something their schools or college would otherwise need to request in advance of their exams.

“On-screen brings benefits for all students too. They can highlight and annotate information, cut and paste text and make easy edits to their answers. It’s what many students are used to doing when they work at home and in the classroom, and it’s undoubtedly how they will work in their careers too.”

Schools will still have the option to offer paper-based exams, as well as on-screen assessments, under the exam board’s plans.

It comes as a number of the UK’s major exam boards have taken steps towards digital assessment.

Last month, exam board OCR announced it would offer a digitally-assessed GCSE in computer science for pupils starting their course in 2025.

Meanwhile, exam board AQA is aiming to roll out on-screen exams over a period of years and it hopes that students will sit at least one major subject digitally by 2030.

The studying and listening components of GCSE Italian and Polish would be the first to move to digital exams in 2026, according to the proposals by AQA.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said: “It is encouraging that exam boards are continuing to explore new forms of digital assessment.

“It’s clear that an examination system that relies purely on pen-and-paper testing is outdated and we know that many students and their teachers will welcome the opportunity to provide typed answers.

“As well as being more accessible for some students, digital exam papers should prove simpler to mark, easier to transport and hopefully less expensive to administer.”

He added: “The move towards online assessment is positive and overdue, but does not come without challenges – including the ongoing disadvantage gap between those who may have more access to technology at home and therefore more familiarity with its demands.

“It’s vital that schools are clearly guided through this process and have the necessary resources to put in place the digital infrastructure they need to deliver online exams going forward.”

Steve Rollett, deputy chief executive at the Confederation of School Trusts (CST), said “On-screen assessment appears to have the potential to support students, especially those with particular needs, who might struggle to access traditional paper exams.

“We hope this development will support children while retaining the overall integrity of the exam system.”

An Ofqual spokesperson said: “Ofqual is committed to supporting well-evidenced innovation in how examinations are taken. Above all, it is critical that examinations are both accessible and fair to all students taking them.

“We will evaluate in detail Pearson’s proposals when they are submitted for review. Our priority will be making sure their approach is fair to all students, whether they take their GCSE on screen or continue to do so on paper.”

A Department for Education (DfE) spokesperson said: “The Department and Ofqual are taking time to understand the opportunities and implications of digital assessment to inform any decisions about the future of on-screen assessments.

“As the independent regulator of qualifications in England, Ofqual requires that any GCSE or A-level moving on-screen will be subject to regulatory approval.”

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 17:01:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/exam-board-offer-pupils-screen-000100729.html
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Exam board to offer digitally assessed GCSE in computer science

An exam board is to offer a digitally assessed GCSE in computer science for pupils starting their course in 2025, in what it described as a UK first.

Jill Duffy, chief executive of OCR, said a pilot of digital exams earlier this year had “shown that digital exams work”.

The exam board said schools can still opt for a paper-based assessment for the OCR computer science qualification if they prefer that approach or do not have the digital infrastructure in place.

Ms Duffy said “other subjects will follow” computer science in offering on-screen assessment, with all of them – including computer science – subject to regulatory approval by Ofqual.

“We’re talking to students and teachers right now to make this work,” she said.

“It’s striking how readily students and teachers have taken to digital mock exams.

Digital assessment is not a hypothetical future, it’s happening now

Jill Duffy, OCR

“Our pilots show that digital exams are quicker, more suited to how students learn, more sustainable and great learning tools.

“Digital assessment is not a hypothetical future, it’s happening now.”

She said OCR’s pilot of digital exams showed students “appreciate being able to type rather than handwrite their answers, seeing wordcounts and timers as they progress”.

“It brings greater clarity to the marking process,” she continued, adding that digital exams are “far closer to real industry and further study experiences”.

Ms Duffy said schools and teachers need support “so that every student can benefit from world-class digital infrastructure”.

“That means investment, training and guidance to realise this enormous opportunity to build a fairer system,” she said.

OCR said 88,350 students took the computer science GCSE in 2023, a 12% year-on-year increase.

In the new digitally assessed GCSE, students will work in a so-called integrated development environment which allows their digital coding to take place and be assessed accurately.

Computer scientist Professor Simon Peyton Jones, engineering fellow at Fortnite creator Epic Games, said he is “delighted” OCR is offering the digital exam.

“It’s no surprise that so many young people want to study and work in computing,” he said.

“From generative AI to gaming, there is a vast range of fulfilling opportunities.

“Digital assessment makes particular sense for computer science: it brings assessment closer to the real world, and will allow young people to demonstrate their capabilities more authentically.”

This clearly makes perfect sense for computer science GCSE but also paves the way for other subjects, giving students the opportunity to type scripts, making it easier for examiners to mark them

Tom Middlehurst, ASCL

Tom Middlehurst, assessment specialist at the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said: “We welcome this important step in moving from pen-and-paper exams towards the use of digital assessment.

“This clearly makes perfect sense for computer science GCSE but also paves the way for other subjects, giving students the opportunity to type scripts, making it easier for examiners to mark them, and reducing the reliance on the industrial-scale operation and carbon footprint of printing and transporting millions of exam papers.”

In England, students have been taking digital mocks in OCR’s GCSE computer science for a year, with GCSE English mocks added this month.

Outside the UK, Cambridge International is offering on-screen mocks for IGCSE and A-level science subjects, with several other subjects launching in 2024.

Meanwhile, exam board AQA is aiming to roll out on-screen exams over a period of years and it hopes that students will sit at least one major subject digitally by 2030.

The studying and listening components of GCSE Italian and Polish would be the first to move to digital exams in 2026, according to proposals by the exam board.

A spokesman for Pearson Edexcel said it has been offering a computer science GCSE with an onscreen practical programming exam and then a written paper for the last two years.

They added: “Looking ahead, we’ll continue to increase our offering for onscreen assessment at GCSE level.

“We’ve already been running International GCSE English exams onscreen, with nearly 3,000 students being assessed in this way in the last two years.

“In 2024 we are adding an additional four subjects to be tested onscreen.”

A Department for Education spokesperson: “As part of delivering a world class education through the Advanced British Standard, the Government will consider how to make better use of digital solutions, such as innovations in on-screen assessments. This is part of long-term reforms which are expected to take a decade to deliver in full.

“As the independent regulator of qualifications in England, Ofqual requires that any GCSE or A-level component moving on-screen will be subject to regulatory scrutiny before it can be launched.”

Tue, 05 Dec 2023 18:22:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/ocr-gcse-aqa-england-exam-b2459100.html
GCSE English pupils will be allowed to type up their exam answers on a computer under new plans - but experts warn it must not spell the end for children's handwriting No result found, try new keyword!An exam board will allow GCSE English pupils to type up their exam answers on a computer under new plans starting next ... students using word processing for their responses to GCSE exam questions, as ... Wed, 03 Jan 2024 21:16:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ GCSE pupils could sit their English exams digitally by 2025, exam board reveals

Do you think all students should have the option to sit GSCE exams digitally? (Image: David Jones/PA)

Some school pupils could be given the opportunity to sit their GCSE English exams digitally, an exam board has revealed.

Pearson, which runs exam board Edexcel has confirmed teenagers will be able to choose this option by the summer of 2025.

However, the exam board’s on-screen GCSEs in English which would be assessed in the summer of next year are subject to regulatory approval by Ofqual.

If this were to go ahead, up to 125,000 students in the UK would have the option to take Edexcel’s GCSE English language and English literature exams on-screen for the first time.

Pearson Edexcel hopes to be able to offer an on-screen option for all GCSEs by 2030 to increase accessibility for students, as well as other benefits.

The exam board said it has seen more students using word processing for their responses to GCSE exam questions, as part of access arrangements.

Sharon Hague, managing director for Pearson Schools, said: “This is a pivotal moment for on-screen assessment in the UK. For the first time, in summer 2025, students will be able to sit an exam in a core subject fully on-screen if they choose to do so.

“We’ve heard loud and clear from students and teachers that they want a choice in how they take exams. That is why we’ll offer both on-screen and paper-based exam options.”

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Up to 125,000 UK students will have the option to take Edexcel’s GCSE English language and English literature exams on-screen for the first time

Up to 125,000 UK students will have the option to take Edexcel’s GCSE English language and English literature exams on-screen for the first time (Image: David Davies/PA)

Students who take Pearson Edexcel’s GCSE in computer science are already assessed partially on-screen and the exam board has begun rolling out digital assessments for its international GCSEs.

Ms Hague added: “On-screen is a better experience for students who need accessibility adjustments. Students can zoom in to increase font size and choose colour filters on-screen during exams, something their schools or college would otherwise need to request in advance of their exams.

“On-screen brings benefits for all students too. They can highlight and annotate information, cut and paste text and make easy edits to their answers. It’s what many students are used to doing when they work at home and in the classroom, and it’s undoubtedly how they will work in their careers too.”Schools will still have the option to offer paper-based exams, as well as on-screen assessments, under the exam board’s plans.

An Ofqual spokesperson said: “Ofqual is committed to supporting well-evidenced innovation in how examinations are taken. Above all, it is critical that examinations are both accessible and fair to all students taking them.

“We will evaluate in detail Pearson’s proposals when they are submitted for review. Our priority will be making sure their approach is fair to all students, whether they take their GCSE on screen or continue to do so on paper.”

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 02:01:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://uk.news.yahoo.com/gcse-pupils-could-sit-english-000100048.html
Nursing exam Pass Rates Appear to Be Rising. Why?

In January 2023, we reported on the reasons why nursing exam pass rates fell in 2020 and 2021. In this report, we follow up on what has happened since.

During the first 2 years of the COVID-19 pandemic, the share of candidates who passed the national licensure exam to work as a registered nurse fell sharply, from 88.2% to 82.5%, for first-time U.S.-educated candidates, with a smaller decline -- from 72.8% to 68.9% -- for all candidates, including internationally educated and repeat test-takers.

In 2022, pass rates continued to drop, averaging 79.9% (8 percentage points lower than in 2019) for first-time U.S.-educated candidates, and 63.4% for all candidates, the lowest point in the last decade.

In 2023, to most experts' surprise, that spiral appears to be turning around.

Things Are Looking Up

The reason for this reversal depends on whom you ask. Test developers have argued that rates improved due to radical transparency and massive outreach to stakeholders, while some online critics have suggested the test simply got easier. Other nurse educators agreed that the increased transparency and outreach impacted rates, but worry those same measures exacerbated a culture of "teaching to the test."

Understanding trends in exam pass rates also requires context.

image
Year-to-Date NCLEX Pass rates for 2023

The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) produces the exam that aspiring nurses take to gain licensure: the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX). This exam uses computerized adaptive testing, which means each test-taker gets virtually a different exam, the difficulty of which changes based on the response given.

Every 3 years, the NCSBN assesses the pass rates for the exam and determines whether the current passing standard is appropriate. If the NCSBN's board of directors decides that the level of clinical judgment required of nurses in practice has increased, it can vote to raise the passing standard.

In December 2022, the NCSBN's board voted to keep the current passing standard on the NCLEX through March 31, 2026. Months later, on April 1, the NCSBN launched the Next Generation NCLEX (NGN), a new version of the NCLEX that aims to more effectively measure test-takers' clinical judgment.

Anytime a new exam is introduced, pass rates tend to dip by a few percentage points in the first two to three quarters, explained Philip Dickison, PhD, RN, CEO of the NCSBN. He said he was naturally a bit concerned about a new exam compounding the "drastic drop in the ability curve" seen during the pandemic, "but it was still the right thing to do."

Keith Rischer, PhD, RN, a nurse educator and owner of KeithRN, a nursing education company, recalled that the last major change to the NCLEX occurred when the passing standard was raised by 0.16 percentage points in 2012. Pass rates fell more than 7 percentage points -- from 90.34% for first-time candidates to 83.04% -- in a single year.

While the NCSBN kept the same passing standard in 2022, the stronger emphasis on clinical judgment and the "unique six-question case studies" in the NGN was predicted to increase the difficulty of the exam in some respects.

"There was an anticipation that this was going to be another precipitous decline in NCLEX pass rates," Rischer said.

Post-Pandemic Rebound

However, that wasn't what happened. Instead, preliminary data showed a jump in pass rates, from 79.9% in 2022 to 88.6% in 2023, for all first-time U.S.-educated candidates. Importantly, the 2023 data exclude the fourth quarter of the calendar year, which typically has the lowest pass rate, experts noted.

Still, Dickison said he was "pretty amazed" at the speed of the recovery. Some viewed the change as a "huge increase," but he stressed that rates were starting from a low baseline following a 3-year period when other variables, namely pandemic-related disruptions, impacted pass rates.

"What I think you're seeing ... is that we have rebounded to pre-pandemic ability levels in our measurements," he said.

Dickison credits the rebound to NCSBN's decision to let educators, regulators, and -- controversially -- preparatory groups "under the hood" of the new exam for several years before the NGN actually launched.

"The idea was to be as transparent as possible to all stakeholders," Dickison said. This meant leveraging opportunities at conferences and during webinars, and sharing what to expect of the new exam -- from case studies and measurement models -- in newsletters. Dickison also credited educators for the big role they played in helping prepare students.

Rayna Letourneau, PhD, RN, executive director of the Florida Center for Nursing, said that while some nurse educators have noted the exam has gotten "too easy," she suggested that perhaps the NGN is simply "a more logical way to measure what nursing students are being taught."

Similarly, she attributes the rise in pass rates to the focus on increased resources and preparation of candidates, including the implementation of "student success" coaching programs.

Teaching to the Test?

Rischer seemed to have a different view, pointing out that the NGN offers partial credit for certain "select-all-that-apply" multiple-choice questions. He said that he believes the real reason for improved pass rates is a shift in nursing education, though he added that his hypothesis is, at this point, "conjecture."

"What we have in the nursing literature for over almost 50 years ... is this widening gap between how nursing is taught in the university and college settings and how it's actually practiced at the bedside," he said. "We're not preparing our graduates for real-world practice realities."

Rischer said he grew even more concerned when he learned from online discussions that some professors were using NGN trial items to teach first-semester students.

"That's called teaching to the test," he argued. Instead of teaching students "alternative multiple-choice items, we need to be teaching our students the open-ended thinking of clinical practice."

For example, for a patient who had an appendectomy, Rischer said the appropriate steps are to take vital signs and conduct a head-to-toe assessment.

"There is not a 'select-all-that apply' multiple-choice item on your forehead that I could say, 'You know what? This is the correct answer,'" he added, noting that the NCSBN "is part of the problem." Currently, the primary mechanism that state nursing boards use to measure a program's performance is their first-time pass rate on the NCLEX, which only "reinforc[es] this unhealthy culture of teaching to the test."

The end result of that, as studies have shown, is that "currently less than 10% [of new nurses] have what practice partners would say is entry-level clinical judgment competency," Rischer said, citing a 2021 study. "Complications develop when a nurse doesn't notice or recognize what's most important until it's too late. So ... clinical judgment competency is a big deal. And teaching to the test ... isn't going to solve that."

He said one solution is to move away from first-time test-taker metrics and potentially allow students to take the exam twice and then average their score.

Another, more dramatic, change would be to include a skills test or what Rischer calls "demonstrable competencies" for essential skills involved in clinical decision making, which could be evaluated by an "objective observer."

"It will take more time. It will take more money, but this is something that we can and should be doing," he said.

'Not the Only Measurement'

For his part, Dickison noted that the NGN, like any exam, has limitations.

While it "measures your cognitive and your thinking ability, our exam does not measure the affective domain, doesn't measure character," he said. For example, the exam cannot assess a "less-than-acceptable social interaction" a student has with a professor, nor does the exam know which student is always late to class.

"If they don't show up to class on time every day, that might be a [sign] that they're not going to show up to a patient when they need to," Dickison explained. "That's why you have a regulatory system. That's why we have an education [system] ... these all have to work together. If you don't pass the NCLEX, you don't go to work, but it is not the only measurement that tells us we have a good nurse."

  • Shannon Firth has been reporting on health policy as MedPage Today's Washington correspondent since 2014. She is also a member of the site's Enterprise & Investigative Reporting team. Follow

Mon, 01 Jan 2024 01:08:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.medpagetoday.com/nursing/nursing/108055
GCSE English will no longer be handwritten under exam board plans No result found, try new keyword!Last month, Oxford, Cambridge and RSA Examinations announced it would offer a digitally assessed GCSE in computer science for pupils starting their course next year. Meanwhile, AQA, the country’s ... Wed, 03 Jan 2024 17:07:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Final A.P. African American Studies Course Avoids Some Disputed Topics

The latest version of the College Board’s A.P. African American studies framework may not fully please its critics — either the discipline’s scholars or politicians who have tried to legislate against it.

The Advanced Placement curriculum, released on Wednesday, leaves out critical race theory and structural racism, which academics say are key concepts. L.G.B.T.Q. issues continue to be mostly absent, except to mention that the civil rights leader Bayard Rustin was gay. And despite the course’s origins around the Black Lives Matter movement in 2020, study of the movement is optional.

The curriculum does mention “systemic oppression” and “systemic marginalization,” ideas closely related to critical race theory and structural racism — terms that have been banned from classrooms in many states.

Those concepts have origins in legal theory, and refer to the idea that racism is embedded in the legal system, education system and other institutions.

The course framework also reinstates the term “intersectionality,” the study of how racism, sexism, classism and other forms of discrimination overlap and shape individuals’ experiences of the world. And the class now requires teaching about Black feminism and police violence.

The College Board did not respond on Wednesday to questions about why some syllabus are excluded. But Brandi Waters, the lead author of the course framework and program manager for A.P. African American studies, said in a statement, “This is the course I wish I had in high school. I hope every interested student has the opportunity to take it.”

The course will launch for credit next fall, and is currently being taught as a pilot program in 700 schools across 40 states.

Since the College Board first officially released a curriculum in February, the class has caused no shortage of headaches for the organization. The course has been subjected to repeated revisions, tense political negotiations and scrutiny from scholars.

African American studies is an interdisciplinary field, melding history with the study of contemporary politics, culture and law. Many of its scholars embrace activism, an orientation that has drawn harsh rebukes from conservatives.

It did not help that the College Board initially concealed from scholars and the public the extent of its discussions with policymakers in Florida regarding the course’s content. That state’s governor, Ron DeSantis, a Republican presidential candidate, has signed multiple laws against what he sees as liberal orthodoxy in public schools.

In emails and meetings with College Board staff, Florida education officials repeatedly raised concerns about specific material in the class framework, such as intersectionality.

After those discussions, the Board removed some of the disputed content, which did not stop Governor DeSantis from announcing he would not permit the class to be offered in Florida.

Then, after intense pressure from leading Black studies scholars, the organization said it had made mistakes in its dealings with the state, and promised to revise the course yet again, and to work closely with academics.

The Florida Department of Education did not immediately respond Wednesday to a request for comment on the revisions.

In revising the curriculum, the College Board said it was guided by subject-matter experts and feedback from teachers and students. Still, the revision took place in a highly politicized environment. Dozens of Republican-led states have passed laws restricting instruction on critical race theory, structural racism and gender. The College Board did not respond to questions about whether it considered these laws in the revision process.

Kimberlé Crenshaw, a leading Black studies scholar and originator of the concept of intersectionality, said some of the board’s revisions were welcome, though she said she would continue to protest the fact that “structural racism” and “Black queer studies” remained “sidelined.”

“What should worry us all at this point is the fact that an institution as powerful and well resourced as the College Board found itself in the crosshairs of a politically motivated censorship campaign,” she wrote in an email.

Matthew Guterl, a professor of Africana studies at Brown University, said the new curriculum framework was “modestly improved” relative to past versions. But he noted what he characterized as a lack of depth on syllabus of political importance over the last several decades, including L.G.B.T.Q. issues, mass incarceration, police violence and poverty.

“After the civil rights movement, the coverage gets spotty and the source material does, too,” he wrote in an email.

The College Board began to develop the class in 2020, hoping to capture young people’s interests in contemporary race issues following mass protests after the murder of George Floyd. The class was also intended to diversify the group of students who enroll in Advanced Placement, a longtime goal of the board.

Amid the rapid decline of the SAT, the Advanced Placement program has become the biggest revenue generator for the College Board, a nonprofit, and African American studies is one of several new courses it has developed in an attempt to draw new students to the program.

The course’s format also represents a shift.

There will be an exam in African American studies, but 10 percent of the final score will be determined by a research project on a syllabu students choose: In previous drafts of the course framework, the project accounted for 20 percent of the final score.

Traditionally, A.P. courses culminate in timed tests, graded 1 to 5, in which students have had to earn 3 or better to qualify for college credit, regardless of their class performance. But given deep disparities in how low-income, Black and Hispanic students perform on those tests, the Board is increasingly experimenting with classes that culminate in projects or presentations.

The new A.P. course contains many syllabus that are typically absent in the American high school curriculum, ranging from the achievements of ancient African civilizations to Black women’s resistance to sexual violence under slavery.

The final framework also adds more information on Black sports figures, including the N.F.L. quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who kneeled during the national anthem to protest police killings of Black Americans.

Tue, 05 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/06/us/ap-african-american-studies-college-board.html
It's the end of an era for the SAT exam | College Connection

The end of an era was marked by the Dec. 2 SAT when students arrived, for the last time, with sharpened No. 2 pencils.

For nearly 100 years, since June 23, 1926, college-bound students engaged in the time-honored ritual of taking the lengthy, paper and pencil exam that would impact their college prospects.

While the SAT still exists and is just as important as ever in gaining admission to many competitive colleges, it’s now a digital exam. The PSAT and SAT exams have embraced technology and are now adaptive, computer-based tests. Students start out by working on a Reading/Writing module consisting of 27 short passages (typically one paragraph long), each followed by one question. The questions test a student’s abilities in studying comprehension and grammar/punctuation skills. Based on a student’s success on the first module, the second module consists of either easier or more difficult questions, which will ultimately impact one’s score.

More: The four most important factors in the college search process | College Connection

After a short break, students then move onto their first Math module, covering a range of syllabus with the most difficult being in Algebra II/Trigonometry. There is no pre-calculus or calculus covered on the SAT, so students should not wait until they are in advanced Math classes to start taking the exam. Here too, based on a student’s success on the first module, the second module consists of either easier or more difficult questions. Students are provided with an online calculator as well as a countdown clock, letting them know, as they progress through the test, exactly how much time they have left. Students are allowed to bring their own calculator to use in place of the online one, and they are provided with scrap paper.

More: College graduation rates often misrepresented | College Connection

According to College Board, even though there are many test-optional colleges, more than 80% of students questioned said they wanted to have the option of submitting SAT scores. In addition to their consideration in the admissions process, SAT scores are often used to allot scholarship money and for placement in college courses. While high school grades are an important reflection of students’ work, College Board reported that the share of students graduating high school with an A average increased from 39% in 1998 to 55% in accurate years. Therefore, SAT scores can allow students to distinguish themselves among their peers.

Susan Alaimo is the founder & director of Collegebound Review, offering PSAT/SAT® preparation & private college advising by Ivy League educated instructors. Visit CollegeboundReview.com or call 908-369-5362.

This article originally appeared on MyCentralJersey.com: SAT exam is now fully digital

Sat, 09 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/end-era-sat-exam-college-100445703.html
Exam board to offer digitally assessed GCSE in computer science

Exam board OCR staged a pilot of digital exams earlier this year and will now introduce it for GCSE computer science (Alamy/PA)

An exam board is to offer a digitally assessed GCSE in computer science for pupils starting their course in 2025, in what it described as a UK first.

Jill Duffy, chief executive of OCR, said a pilot of digital exams earlier this year had “shown that digital exams work”.

The exam board said schools can still opt for a paper-based assessment for the OCR computer science qualification if they prefer that approach or do not have the digital infrastructure in place.

Ms Duffy said “other subjects will follow” computer science in offering on-screen assessment, with all of them – including computer science – subject to regulatory approval by Ofqual.

“We’re talking to students and teachers right now to make this work,” she said.

“It’s striking how readily students and teachers have taken to digital mock exams.

Digital assessment is not a hypothetical future, it’s happening now

Jill Duffy, OCR

“Our pilots show that digital exams are quicker, more suited to how students learn, more sustainable and great learning tools.

“Digital assessment is not a hypothetical future, it’s happening now.”

She said OCR’s pilot of digital exams showed students “appreciate being able to type rather than handwrite their answers, seeing wordcounts and timers as they progress”.

“It brings greater clarity to the marking process,” she continued, adding that digital exams are “far closer to real industry and further study experiences”.

Ms Duffy said schools and teachers need support “so that every student can benefit from world-class digital infrastructure”.

“That means investment, training and guidance to realise this enormous opportunity to build a fairer system,” she said.

OCR said 88,350 students took the computer science GCSE in 2023, a 12% year-on-year increase.

In the new digitally assessed GCSE, students will work in a so-called integrated development environment which allows their digital coding to take place and be assessed accurately.

Computer scientist Professor Simon Peyton Jones, engineering fellow at Fortnite creator Epic Games, said he is “delighted” OCR is offering the digital exam.

“It’s no surprise that so many young people want to study and work in computing,” he said.

“From generative AI to gaming, there is a vast range of fulfilling opportunities.

“Digital assessment makes particular sense for computer science: it brings assessment closer to the real world, and will allow young people to demonstrate their capabilities more authentically.”

This clearly makes perfect sense for computer science GCSE but also paves the way for other subjects, giving students the opportunity to type scripts, making it easier for examiners to mark them

Tom Middlehurst, ASCL

Tom Middlehurst, assessment specialist at the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said: “We welcome this important step in moving from pen-and-paper exams towards the use of digital assessment.

“This clearly makes perfect sense for computer science GCSE but also paves the way for other subjects, giving students the opportunity to type scripts, making it easier for examiners to mark them, and reducing the reliance on the industrial-scale operation and carbon footprint of printing and transporting millions of exam papers.”

In England, students have been taking digital mocks in OCR’s GCSE computer science for a year, with GCSE English mocks added this month.

Outside the UK, Cambridge International is offering on-screen mocks for IGCSE and A-level science subjects, with several other subjects launching in 2024.

Meanwhile, exam board AQA is aiming to roll out on-screen exams over a period of years and it hopes that students will sit at least one major subject digitally by 2030.

The studying and listening components of GCSE Italian and Polish would be the first to move to digital exams in 2026, according to proposals by the exam board.

A spokesman for Pearson Edexcel said it has been offering a computer science GCSE with an onscreen practical programming exam and then a written paper for the last two years.

They added: “Looking ahead, we’ll continue to increase our offering for onscreen assessment at GCSE level.

“We’ve already been running International GCSE English exams onscreen, with nearly 3,000 students being assessed in this way in the last two years.

“In 2024 we are adding an additional four subjects to be tested onscreen.”

A Department for Education spokesperson: “As part of delivering a world class education through the Advanced British Standard, the Government will consider how to make better use of digital solutions, such as innovations in on-screen assessments. This is part of long-term reforms which are expected to take a decade to deliver in full.

“As the independent regulator of qualifications in England, Ofqual requires that any GCSE or A-level component moving on-screen will be subject to regulatory scrutiny before it can be launched.”

Tue, 05 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.standard.co.uk/news/tech/gcse-england-association-of-school-and-college-leaders-fortnite-department-for-education-b1125081.html




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