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Exam Code: NET Nurse Entrance Test action January 2024 by Killexams.com team

NET Nurse Entrance Test

Test Detail:
The Medical NET (Nurse Entrance Test) is an examination designed to assess the knowledge, skills, and aptitude of candidates seeking admission to nursing programs. It is used by nursing schools and colleges as part of their admission process. Here is a detailed description of the test, including the number of questions and time allocation, course outline, exam objectives, and exam syllabus.

Number of Questions and Time:
The number of questions and time allocation for the Medical NET may vary depending on the specific version or administration of the test. Generally, the exam consists of multiple-choice questions covering various subjects related to nursing. The number of questions can range from 100 to 200, and candidates are typically given a specific time limit, usually ranging from 2 to 4 hours, to complete the test.

Course Outline:
The course outline for the Medical NET covers a wide range of subjects relevant to nursing education. The outline may include the following key areas:

1. Science and Biology: Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology, and Biochemistry.
2. Chemistry: General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Biochemistry.
3. Physics: Basic principles, including Mechanics, Optics, Thermodynamics, and Electricity.
4. English Language and Comprehension: Grammar, Vocabulary, studying Comprehension, and Writing Skills.
5. Mathematics: Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, and Statistics.
6. General Knowledge: Current Affairs, History, Geography, and Social Sciences.

Exam Objectives:
The objectives of the Medical NET are to assess candidates' knowledge and skills in various subjects relevant to nursing education. The exam aims to evaluate the following key areas:

1. Knowledge of scientific principles, including anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and biochemistry, necessary for understanding the human body and its functions.
2. Understanding of basic chemistry concepts and their applications in the field of healthcare.
3. Familiarity with fundamental physics principles and their application in healthcare settings.
4. Proficiency in the English language, including grammar, vocabulary, studying comprehension, and writing skills, to effectively communicate and comprehend healthcare-related information.
5. Proficiency in mathematics, including arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and statistics, for calculations and problem-solving in healthcare scenarios.
6. Awareness of general knowledge, including current affairs, history, geography, and social sciences, relevant to the nursing profession.

Exam Syllabus:
The exam syllabus for the Medical NET typically covers the following subjects:

1. Science and Biology
2. Chemistry
3. Physics
4. English Language and Comprehension
5. Mathematics
6. General Knowledge

Candidates should refer to the official Medical NET study materials and resources provided by the test administrator or nursing schools for accurate and up-to-date information on the specific subjects and content covered in the exam. It is recommended to allocate sufficient time for exam preparation, including studying relevant subjects, reviewing key concepts, and practicing with demo questions.
Nurse Entrance Test
Medical Entrance action

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Medical
NET
Nurse Entrance Test
https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NET
Question: 439
Neurons connect together at a ______.
A. Synergy
B. Terminal site
C. Docking station
D. Synapse
Answer: D
Question: 440
Which of the following is another word for the kneecap in the human body?
A. Pisiform
B. Meniscus
C. Popliteal bursa
D. Patella
Answer: D
Question: 441
Which of the following describes the shoulder joint
A. Ball and socket joint
B. Saddle joint
C. Hinge joint
D. Pivot joint
Answer: A
Question: 442
The organ of Corti is found in what area of the body?
A. Mouth
B. Ear
C. Nose
164
D. Lungs
Answer: B
Question: 443
The condition of rickets is associated with a deficiency in which vitamin?
A. A
B. C
C. D
D. Z
Answer: C
Question: 444
A steroid is considered a ______.
A. Lipid
B. Protein
C. Enzyme
D. Weak acid
Answer: A
Question: 445
The X cranial nerve is the ____ nerve.
A. Abducens
B. Hypoglossal
C. Facial
D. Vagus
Answer: D
Question: 446
165
Which chamber of the heart pumps blood to the systemic circulation?
A. Left Atrium
B. Right Atrium
C. Left Ventricle
D. Right Ventricle
Answer: C
Section 43: Sec Forty Three (447 to 456)
Details: PSB-HO practice questions Question
Question: 447
Vocabulary
The mission was surreptitious in nature. Surreptitious means:
A. transforming
B. dangerous
C. invasive
D. secret
Answer: D
Question: 448
The desert conditions were torrid for the Israeli division operating in the Sinai. Torrid means:
A. excessively hot
B. aggravating
C. lukewarm
D. inhospitable
Answer: A
Question: 449
The adventurer left with a feeling of trepidation. Trepidation means:
166
A. uncertainty
B. extreme depression
C. ambivalence
D. fearfulness
Answer: D
Question: 450
The fish exhibited an unctuous appearance at the fish market. Unctuous means:
A. fresh
B. dirty
C. oily
D. lucid
Answer: C
Question: 451
The venal politician preyed upon his constituents during his time in office. Venal means:
A. barbaric
B. current
C. ambivalent
D. corrupt
Answer: D
Math
Question: 452
897.54 -48.39 =
A. 849.15
B. 813.15
C. 859.15
D. 814.15
167
Answer: A
Question: 453
893.42 + 82.77 =
A. 976.09
B. 976.29
C. 986.19
D. 976.19
Answer: D
Question: 454
A senior paid $3.47, $9.50 and $2.50 for lunch during a basketball tournament. What was the
average amount he paid over three days?
A. $5.18
B. $5.25
C. $5.16
D. $5.37
Answer: C
Question: 455
89.35 x 32.75 =
A. 2826.23
B. 2925.31
C. 2926.21
D. 2837.41
Answer: C
Question: 456
Using the following equation, solve for (x): 3x -4y = 25 and (y)=2
168
A. x =10
B. x = 11
C. x = 12
D. x = 13
Answer: B
169
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Medical Entrance action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NET Search results Medical Entrance action - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/NET https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical U.S. medical schools grapple with first admissions since end of affirmative action

American medical schools are confronting their first major challenge since the U.S. Supreme Court’s June decision to outlaw race-based college admissions.

As medical schools sift through their first round of applications since the ruling, there’s already a nascent response to diminish the impact on the pipeline of future Black doctors.

The National Medical Association, an organization for Black physicians, is raising money for a new scholarship. The Association of American Medical Colleges will get involved in K-12 education for the first time.

Underrepresentation is a long-standing problem: only 5.2% of practicing physicians in the U.S. were Black even before the ruling, despite Black people making up about 14% of the overall population.

But participants at multiple stages of the education process say the ruling laid bare the urgency of eliminating systemic obstacles, many of which begin a lot earlier in a potential medical student’s life than college.

“Underrepresentation has been a consistent problem over many decades,” said Reynold Verret, president of Xavier University of Louisiana, one of about 100 Historically Black Colleges and Universities. “If we do not come to other solutions to bring representation and diversity across our hiring system, you may see fewer students of color at some of our elite institutions.”

The cost of the disparity is substantial, showing up in worse health outcomes for Black patients and deteriorating trust in the health care system.

Experts say there’s no single solution; instead, hurdles from the earliest years of education through medical school and beyond must be removed.

The high court’s decision brings full circle its history of dealing with race and medical education in particular — its landmark 1978 decision in Regents of the University of California v. Bakke struck down racial quotas at a University of California medical school while allowing schools to consider race in admissions.

Here’s a snapshot of where barriers to entry crop up throughout the pipeline for potential Black doctors:

Early Education

It begins in kindergarten, where as few as 3% of Black students display advanced mathematics or science compared with up to 16% of White students, a 2022 study in Gifted Child Quarterly found. The disparities were strongly linked to the greater likelihood of the Black students’ families experiencing economic disadvantage, according to the study, whose authors advocated for programs to increase racial and ethnic representation in STEM subjects to start in elementary school.

At times, teachers can also be discouraging, as Charles Farmer, an emergency physician at Summit Health in New Jersey, found out. When a 12-year-old Farmer expressed an interest in becoming a doctor, his teacher said he wasn’t great at math and wished him luck. “I was one of the only few African Americans and you already feel like you have to compete with your classmates because you want to show that you belong,’’ Farmer, 30, said in an interview. “When you hear stuff like that it makes you feel like you don’t belong.”

In high school, Black student representation falls short in the math and science courses highlighted by the AAMC as useful to prepare for medical training.

The SCOTUS ruling highlighted how “we have more work to do” to create more Black doctors, said Geoffrey Young, who runs the AAMC’s program to Boost diversity in medicine. The group is looking for partner organizations to develop a mentorship program for young students. It’s also advising its member schools on retooling their admissions processes, offering data and help on new approaches such as expanding their network of potential applicants.

Medical Schools

Parents’ education plays an important role. Medical students of any race are more likely to come from households where parents have a bachelor’s degree or higher. This narrows the pool: 28% of Black adults age 25 and older have completed college, compared with 42% of White adults.

The likelihood a Black college student will continue to medical school is also closely linked to where they do their undergraduate studies, and HBCUs produce a disproportionate share. Close to 5% of all Black applicants to medical school in the current term came from three HBCUs — Howard University, Spelman College and Xavier — according to AAMC data, even though HBCUs overall account for less than 2% of U.S. bachelor’s degrees.

The pattern is repeated at medical school. Out of the latest graduating class of about 20,920, almost 7% were Black, according to AAMC data. Three HBCUs — Howard, Morehouse School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College — accounted for 182, or 13%, of these Black graduates.

HBCUs expect more applications following the SCOTUS ruling, and have warned that the influx could strain their resources. The combined endowment of all HBCUs was about $3.9 billion in 2019, according to the Brookings Institution. That’s less than a tenth of the $41 billion for Harvard University that same year.

“HBCUs are less capable of funding these students with the kinds of scholarship dollars that other universities or institutions with large endowments can,” Joseph Tyndall, dean of Morehouse School of Medicine, said in an interview. “The resources have been lopsided.”

Two new medical schools, both connected to HBCUs, are aiming to help Boost diversity in health care.

The Maryland College of Osteopathic Medicine at Morgan State in Baltimore plans to start accepting students in 2025. It wants to create a pipeline of practitioners who will return to provide care in their local communities, John Sealey, the school’s founding dean, said in an interview.

Xavier University of Louisiana, which is also setting up a college of medicine, hasn’t finalized the date for accepting new students. President Verret said the HBCU network is ready to play its role, but it’s “not the wealthiest in the country,” and new facilities require a lot of investment.

Medical Debt

There’s also the enormous cost of medical school. Almost a quarter of medical students come from the richest 5% of households, according to research in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Just 1.7% of Black non-Hispanic families landed in that top income bracket, the smallest share for any race.

David Hallo, 29, finished a pre-med program in 2017 at the University of Virginia with around $15,000 of student loans. He said he’s postponing medical school so he can work full time to pay it off, and is concerned about adding $250,000 of debt to cover a four-year program.

“Going back to medical school as a full-time student is one of my biggest fears,” Hallo said in an interview. “I ask myself: How am I going to juggle this and be able to take on more loans?”

About three-quarters of medical school graduates in 2019 had education debt, and the median amount for those borrowers was $200,000, AAMC data show. The burden weighed heaviest on Black, non-Hispanic graduates both by share of debt (91%) and median amount ($230,000). Students of other races borrowed less.

After the high court ruling, the NMA said it will raise $1 million to fund scholarships to help tackle the shortage of Black doctors in the U.S. It will provide an update on its progress in August, an NMA representative said.

The end of affirmative action makes it even more critical to boost representation of Black students in medical schools, said Kameron Matthews, co-founder of Tour for Diversity in Medicine, an initiative to bring people of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds into the field.

“This is now going to be a driving motivation for us,” she said. “These students are facing a very steep uphill battle of even getting into the health profession.”

Sat, 23 Dec 2023 23:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.columbian.com/news/2023/dec/24/u-s-medical-schools-grapple-with-first-admissions-since-end-of-affirmative-action/
Medical Staff Share Things People Don’t Know About Hospitals No result found, try new keyword!Some of us spend our lives coming and going in and out of hospitals, while others make it through with barely a visit or two. Yet, for all of us, the hospital is an important institution that we want ... Mon, 01 Jan 2024 00:23:06 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ More than 30% of Americans have medical debt: What you need to know about negotiating a medical bill

If you've ever dealt with expensive medical bills or put off going to the doctor because you can't afford the cost, you're not alone. Nearly one in three of U.S. adults has medical debt, according to a Healthcare.com survey. In the U.S., it's estimated there is more than $140 billion worth of medical debt nationwide. There is more medical debt in collections than any other type of debt.

When you get your medical bill following an office visit, diagnostic tests or a bigger procedure, you might be surprised by the amount you have to pay, regardless of whether you have health insurance. It might seem intimidating, difficult and time consuming to contest the bill you just received, but doing so could mean saving hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

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1. Understanding your medical bill

The first step in contesting a medical bill is figuring out what you've been charged for. Interpreting a medical bill is akin to learning about how a credit card or checking account works, Allen says.

"We know we have to check our credit card statements, because errors on those can cost us hundreds or thousands of dollars," Allen says. "In health care, the errors can cost us that much more. And if you talk to experts who look at medical bills for a living, they'll tell you that most of them contain some type of error."

Some estimates claim that nearly 80% of medical bills contain some type of error. After you receive your medical bill, you'll want to request an itemized bill.

Your itemized bill will supply you a list billing codes for all of the services your doctor provided. These billing codes are known as Current Procedural Terminology or CPT codes. CPT codes are five digit numbers that are used to code for and describe health-care services and procedures. They are used by public and private health insurance providers and providers of health-care services.

If you have insurance, you'll also want to make sure the claim was submitted to your insurance company and that the prices represent what you owe after the insurance company has negotiated with the medical provider. (Note: If a health-care provider is considered 'in-network' for your plan, this means that the provider has negotiated a discounted rate with your insurance company, so you'll typically end up paying less by going to providers in your network.)

In order to figure out what your CPT codes mean, you can look them up online. The American Medical Association maintains the full, copyrighted set of CPT codes. Individuals are allowed up to five free CPT code searches a day through the website. Do a search for 99395, and you'll see it's classified as a preventive medicine visit for an individual between the ages of 18 and 39. 

You'll then want to make sure the services you received align with the CPT code that's listed on the bill. Doctors sometimes 'upcode' patients, according to Allen. 'Upcoding' occurs when a patient is charged for a more complicated service or procedure than they actually received, he says. 

Office or emergency room visits may range in complexity from a level 1 to a level 5, with level 1 being the least complicated and level 5 being the most complex, he says. Typically, the higher the level, the higher the cost. 

"A level 3, 4 or 5 emergency room visit requires an extensive examination of you, and it requires an extensive history to be taken, so [the doctor] knows all your other medical conditions, all the different medications you might be on. It also requires medical decision-making that has some degree of complexity," says Allen. "In other words, it requires intensive amounts of care."

If you feel like you've been 'upcoded' or the codes on your bill don't match up with the services you've received, you should get in touch with billing department and explain to them why the services you received are not reflected in the bill you received.

2. Gathering evidence and contesting the bill

In order to successfully negotiate your medical bill, you might need evidence that the care your doctor provided doesn't align with the services you're being charged for, says Allen. You can file a request for the medical records of your visit at your doctor's office or hospital. 

There may be an additional charge for your medical records, but sometimes you can negotiate with them, he says. You may also be able to ask your primary care physician directly to share them with you.

After you've gotten your medical records, you can then use them to bolster your case, says Allen. For example, you can point to the notes in your medical records to show that you were charged for a medical visit that required medical decision-making when your doctor's notes don't show any evidence of that kind of care.

If the billing department is unwilling to budge, you can escalate the issue by filing a claim in small claims court. In small claims court, individuals can sue a person or a company without a lawyer (this may vary by state). According to Allen, in some states like Texas, you can sue for up to $20,000. While you may be charged for filing a case, the fee is likely small ($30 to $40) in comparison to your medical bill.

"And when you file that case, it really flips the power balance," says Allen. "Now [the hospital] has to go in front of a judge...to justify their unfair or inaccurate prices. And they don't want to do that."

Contesting a medical bill can be time consuming and frustrating, but Allen emphasizes that, depending on how expensive the bill is, it could be worth it for you.

3. Paying your bill

When it comes to actually paying off your medical bill, you shouldn't opt to use a credit card unless you're sure you'll be able to pay off your balance in full and on time when it's due. Using a credit card to revolve your balance from month to month could result in you paying a lot more money in interest. 

First, ask about a hospital or doctor's financial assistance policies. Some hospitals offer discounts if you meet certain income requirements. If you don't qualify for a discount, some hospitals may also offer you a payment plan to pay over time which are typically interest-free.

If you must use a credit card to pay for your medical bills consider using a 0% introductory APR credit card, which can supply you a 0% interest rate for up to the first 21 months of card membership.

Two well-regarded options are the the Citi Simplicity® Card which has a 12 month 0% introductory period on purchases from the date of account opening (then, 19.24% - 29.99% variable) or the Wells Fargo Reflect® Card which offers an introductory 0% APR on purchases and qualifying balance transfers for 21 months from account opening; 18.24%, 24.74%, or 29.99% variable after. Balance transfers made within 120 days from account opening qualify for the intro rate, BT fee of 5%, min $5. (See rates and fees)

Another option worth exploring are a medical credit cards like the CareCredit® credit card or the Wells Fargo Health Advantage, which tend to act a bit like zero-interest period cards: they usually have a promotional period with no interest before rates are hiked up.

If you want a financing option that allows you to make monthly installment payments, there are also 'buy now pay later' options for health-care expenses. Opy is a BNPL service specifically for health care, education and auto service and repair. Before you sign up, you'll want to check with your physician's office or your hospital to make sure Opy is available to you.

Opy charges borrowers a fixed interest rate of 9.99% (or lower depending on the merchant) and payment plans can last up to 24 months. Notably, Opy has an interest rate that's lower than the rate offered on most credit cards. Unfortunately, you could still end up paying a lot in interest depending on the amount of medical debt you have to pay off.

Catch up on Select's in-depth coverage of personal financetech and toolswellness and more, and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter to stay up to date.

Information about the CareCredit card, Wells Fargo Health Advantage has been collected independently by Select and has not been reviewed or provided by the issuer of the card prior to publication.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.

Tue, 02 Jan 2024 01:36:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/select/how-to-negotiate-medical-bills/
Denied Care, Deaths in Japan Result from Lack of Emergency Medical Services for American Personnel

At least 24 American service members, civilian Defense Department employees or military dependents have been turned away for emergency medical care from Japanese hospitals in the past two years, and four have died, according to Navy and Marine Corps leadership responsible for personnel in Japan.

In one case, a 7-year-old child who suffered a traumatic brain injury last January died from the oxygen deprivation she experienced as ambulance techs spent 35 minutes searching for a facility that would take her.

Several U.S. military facilities in Japan have emergency rooms, but none are designated as trauma centers, nor are they equipped to handle severe emergencies. According to a command investigation into the 7-year-old's death obtained by Military.com, military treatment facilities at Yokosuka and Okinawa since 2021 have not been able to handle severe injuries to troops or family members, including a gunshot wound, a rappelling accident, a severe car crash or a fall from a bunk bed that resulted in a liver laceration.

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Adm. John Aquilino, commander of Indo-Pacific Command, directed U.S. Forces Japan in October to increase emergency medical care after a service member's spouse "died of an intracranial hemorrhage" when several hospitals in Tokyo denied her admittance, according to a portion of the military order obtained by Military.com.

An investigation into the death "indicated that latency in getting to an operating room was a likely contributor," noted the order.

Aquilino directed Army, Navy and Air Force commanders in Japan to "assess and provide planning estimates" to Boost emergency care access for American patients covered by the Status of Forces Agreement, or SOFA, with the island nation.

"Upon completion of the planning assessments, follow-on orders will direct necessary actions to realize increased access to care," the order stated.

Patients who were turned away from Japanese hospitals and died also included a civilian Defense Department employee who suffered a heart attack and was denied care at 10 hospitals. He succumbed shortly before an 11th facility agreed to accept him, according to the command investigation into the girl's death by the III Marine Expeditionary Force.

"Denial of U.S. military and SOFA status personnel for emergency hospitalization in Japan is not new. SOFA members in Japan have been routinely denied access to emergency care, sometimes to fatal results," stated the investigation, published Feb. 23, 2023, by Lt. Gen. James Bierman, commander of Marine Forces Japan.

Emergency care in Japan differs significantly from the American approach, which includes dialing 911 and having an expectation that an ambulance will transport a patient to the nearest hospital or best-equipped facility for the situation.

In Japan, the emergency medicine specialty was not developed until 2010, and the country does not have enough emergency medicine physicians to cover ERs around the clock. If an emergency specialist is not on duty, the emergency treatment may involve a physician trained in another specialty who is not obligated to treat patients whose condition is outside their capabilities.

As a result, patients can be denied care or diverted. The situation not only affects U.S. and civilian personnel; it also applies to Japanese citizens. In December 2022, more than 8,000 patients were denied emergency services in Japan and another 16,000 were turned away in January 2023, according to the command investigation.

The approach proved tragic for the family of a Marine assigned to 3rd Marine Logistics Group at Camp Kinser on Okinawa. While on a shopping trip at a mall in Urasoe City, the Marine's 7-year-old daughter lost her balance on an escalator and fell more than 50 feet to a floor several levels down.

Suffering a severe head injury, the girl was conscious after her fall -- able to sit up and acknowledge her mother's presence by saying "Mommy" -- but began experiencing respiratory issues and low blood oxygen levels. She also received inadequate and even harmful treatment by a physician who had been dispatched to the scene from a nearby hospital.

Ambulance technicians then spent 35 minutes trying to find a facility that would treat the girl, including one with a pediatric intensive care unit that recommended that U.S. military physicians, with whom they were communicating, consider end-of-life care.

Doctors at that hospital did not want to accept the little girl, because they felt that "heroic measures should not be attempted and withdrawing care would be 'difficult for American people to do in Japanese hospitals due to cultural differences,'" according to the investigation.

The girl eventually was transported to U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa, just nine minutes from where she fell. She was placed in the intensive care unit and monitored by an adult intensive care physician who told investigators they phoned a friend who specializes in pediatric intensive care to help provide critical care via telehealth from San Diego.

The girl was evacuated to Naval Medical Center San Diego, where she died on Feb. 15, 2023, after being removed from life support.

Concerns have been raised in the past several years over the availability of medical care for military personnel, families and civilian Department of Defense employees in Japan. In December 2022, the Defense Health Agency announced that it would treat civilian U.S. employees only on a space-available basis, and it notified longtime patients that they should plan to receive medical treatment from local providers if American military hospitals can't accommodate them.

Following a backlash from affected personnel, DHA clarified the policy in March 2023, announcing that civilians could continue to receive treatment for chronic conditions at military hospitals, but appointments for acute care would remain on a space-available basis.

In June, U.S. military medical staff at Kadena Air Base began informing pregnant service members, spouses and dependents that they should plan to deliver their babies at a facility other than Naval Hospital Okinawa -- a diversion caused by severe staffing shortages at the hospital.

The Defense Health Agency responded to the announcement from the 18th Medical Group at Kadena, saying the hospital had no plans to divert and deliveries would continue. DHA said the shortages were related to personnel moves and authorized a private health services contractor to offer signing bonuses and relocation assistance to attract labor and delivery nurses to Okinawa.

Shortages in the hospital and its affiliated clinics have become more pronounced since the changeover of hospital administration from the military services to the Defense Health Agency, according to Randi Wilson, a civilian Defense Department employee who advocates for military families and Defense Department civilians in Japan.

The move was related to health-care reforms that began nearly a decade ago to align the military medical commands to care for service personnel, while the DHA became responsible for the care of military family members and retirees.

But the recent deaths and lack of access to care has affected U.S. service members as well.

U.S. Forces Japan did not respond to a request from Military.com on Nov. 21 for a copy of Aquilino's order or to questions about the deaths of military patients in Japan. On Wednesday, after a second request for comment, the command sent an unattributed response, saying that it continues to "advocate along multiple lines of effort to address the ongoing medical concerns of the 110,000 personnel and family members in Japan."

According to the statement, commanders have conducted private meetings and working groups with decision-makers and participants in and outside of Japan.

"Advocacy for our personnel and families will not stop as long as there are access-to-care concerns to address and improvements to be made. Bottom line, service members and their families deserve the best medical care possible while serving so far from home," the statement read.

Officials added that they are working with the Defense Health Agency regarding the situation and referred additional questions to DHA.

DHA spokesman Peter Graves said Thursday that Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Dr. Lester Martinez-Lopez, DHA and the military services are "keenly focused on primary, specialty and emergency care" in Japan and that assessments are ongoing.

"This comprehensive review will be provided to the under secretary for personnel and readiness once completed later this quarter," Graves wrote in an email.

The issues of staffing shortages at military medical facilities have garnered the attention of members of Congress, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., who sent letters last year to the Defense Department demanding fixes.

"Providing the best possible services to support service members and civilians deployed overseas enhances readiness, retention, and morale," Warren wrote in a letter in January 2023.

Any fixes, however, will come too late for a Marine family, who may have lost a daughter to traumatic injury even if the accident had happened in the U.S. As the mother sat by her little girl in the stationary ambulance for 35 minutes, she begged the technicians to take them to Naval Hospital Okinawa, according to the investigation.

In an interview with investigators, the mother shared the last words she had with her conscious daughter.

"I said, it's OK. [Mommy's] here with you. You're so beautiful. I love you so much, and it's OK if you need to go and be with Jesus, OK?" she said.

Related: With Hour-Long Drives and Weeks Until Appointments, Pregnant Military Women Feel Pain of Medical Reforms

Story Continues
Thu, 04 Jan 2024 08:27:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.military.com/daily-news/2024/01/04/denied-care-deaths-japan-result-lack-of-emergency-medical-services-american-personnel.html
Inspire Medical Shareholder Action Reminder

Securities Litigation Partner James (Josh) Wilson Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $100,000 In Inspire Medical To Contact Him Directly To Discuss Their Options

If you suffered losses exceeding $100,000 investing in Inspire Medical stock or options between May 3, 2023 and November 7, 2023 and would like to discuss your legal rights, call Faruqi & Faruqi partner Josh Wilson directly at 877-247-4292 or 212-983-9330 (Ext. 1310). You may also click here for additional information: www.faruqilaw.com/INSP.

There is no cost or obligation to you.

Cannot view this image? Visit: https://images.newsfilecorp.com/files/6455/192404_53450c7e84effb45_001full.jpg

New York, New York--(Newsfile Corp. - December 29, 2023) - Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP, a leading national securities law firm, is investigating potential claims against Inspire Medical Systems, Inc. ("Inspire Medical" or the "Company") (NYSE: INSP) and reminds investors of the February 20, 2024 deadline to seek the role of lead plaintiff in a federal securities class action that has been filed against the Company.

Faruqi & Faruqi is a leading minority and Woman-owned national securities law firm with offices in New York, Pennsylvania, California and Georgia.

As detailed below, the complaint alleges that the Company and its executives violated federal securities laws by making false and/or misleading statements and/or failing to disclose that: (1) despite the Acceleration Program, customers were encountering challenges with the prior authorization submission process, including with the scheduling of appointments; (2) a slowdown in prior authorization submissions arising from these challenges led to a shortfall of hundreds of procedures to implant the Company's OSA device; and (3) as a result, Defendants' positive statements about the Company's financial guidance, business, operations, and prospects were materially false and misleading and/or lacked a reasonable basis at all relevant times.

The truth emerged after the close of markets on November 7, 2023, when the Company announced disappointing earnings results for the third quarter of 2023, including "a decline in prior authorization submissions for patients seeking Inspire therapy." Inspire Medical further admitted it had started to "track" problems with the Acceleration Program no later than the second quarter of 2023, the Company "had strong confirmation" of the problems with the Acceleration Program, and the Company "realized we needed to take some corrective action."

In response to this news, shares of Inspire Medical declined approximately 20%, from a closing price of $161.74 per share on November 7, 2023, to a closing price of $129.95 per share on November 8, 2023.

The court-appointed lead plaintiff is the investor with the largest financial interest in the relief sought by the class who is adequate and typical of class members who directs and oversees the litigation on behalf of the putative class. Any member of the putative class may move the Court to serve as lead plaintiff through counsel of their choice, or may choose to do nothing and remain an absent class member. Your ability to share in any recovery is not affected by the decision to serve as a lead plaintiff or not.

Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP also encourages anyone with information regarding Inspire Medical's conduct to contact the firm, including whistleblowers, former employees, shareholders and others.

Attorney Advertising. The law firm responsible for this advertisement is Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP (www.faruqilaw.com). Prior results do not certain or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. We welcome the opportunity to discuss your particular case. All communications will be treated in a confidential manner.

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/192404

Thu, 28 Dec 2023 19:18:00 -0600 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/inspire-medical-shareholder-action-reminder-1032932314
INSP Shareholder Alert: Robbins LLP Reminds Investors of Class Action Filed Against Inspire Medical Systems, Inc. No result found, try new keyword!SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Robbins LLP reminds investors that a shareholder filed a class action on behalf of all persons or entities who purchased Inspire Medical Systems, Inc. (NYSE ... Thu, 28 Dec 2023 02:02:00 -0600 https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20231228073330/en/INSP-Shareholder-Alert-Robbins-LLP-Reminds-Investors-of-Class-Action-Filed-Against-Inspire-Medical-Systems-Inc. Medical News

AI Integration in the Fight Against Age-Related Macular Degeneration

In this interview, Wen Hwa Lee, CEO, and Chief Scientist at Action Against Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AAAMD), offers an enlightening perspective on merging AI with ophthalmology to forge new paths in healthcare and drug discovery.

Tue, 02 Jan 2024 09:59:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/medical/news
Saxena White P.A. Files New Securities Fraud Class Action Against Inspire Medical Systems, Inc. No result found, try new keyword!The Class Action filed by Saxena White is captioned: City of Hollywood Firefighters’ Pension Fund v. Inspire Medical Systems, Inc., No. 23-cv-03884 (D. Minn.). Inspire Medical is a medical ... Fri, 22 Dec 2023 13:38:00 -0600 https://www.nasdaq.com/press-release/saxena-white-p.a.-files-new-securities-fraud-class-action-against-inspire-medical KEAM 2023 - Kerala Engineering Architecture Medical Entrance Examination, 2023

 

KEAM is an entrance examination conducted by the Commissioner of Entrance Examinations (CEE), Government of Kerala for admission to various engineering and medical courses in the state of Kerala, India.

The syllabus for KEAM is based on the subjects studied in classes 11th and 12th in the Kerala state board syllabus. The subjects covered in KEAM are Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics.

The table below presents the various units and subjects included in the syllabus for Physics, Mathematics, and Chemistry:

Syllabus of KEAM 2023

Subject

Topics

Physics

  • Physical World and Measurement

  • Kinetics 

  • Laws of Motion

  • Work, Energy, and Power 

  • Motion of System of Particles and Rigid Body

  • Gravitation

  • Properties of Bulk Matter 

  • Thermodynamics

  • Behaviour of Perfect Gas and Kinetic Theory 

  • Oscillations and Waves 

  • Electrostatics Current electricity

  • Magnetic effects of Current and Magnetism

  • Electromagnetic Induction and Alternating Current 

  • Electromagnetic Waves 

  • Optics 

  • Dual Nature of Matter and Radiation 

  • Atoms and Nuclei

  • Electronic Devices 

  • Communication Systems 

Chemistry

  • Some basic concepts of Chemistry 

  • Structure of Atoms 

  • Classification of elements and periodicity in properties 

  • Chemical bonding and molecular structure 

  • States of Matter: Solids, Liquids, and Gases 

  • Thermodynamics 

  • Equilibrium

  • Redox Reactions and Electrochemistry 

  • Solutions

  • Chemical Kinetics

  • Surface Chemistry  

  • Hydrogen and S-Block Elements (Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals)

  • P-Block Elements 

  • D and F Block Elements 

  • Coordination Compounds 

  • General Principles and Processes of Isolation of Elements

  • Organic Chemistry: Basic Principles and Techniques

  • Haloalkanes and Haloarenes

  • Alcohols, Phenols and Ethers

  • Aldehydes, Ketones and Carboxylic Acids

  • Organic Compounds Containing Nitrogen

  • Biomolecules

  • Polymers

  • Chemistry in Everyday Life

  • Environmental Chemistry

Mathematics

  • Algebra

  • Trigonometry 

  • Geometry 

  • Statistics

  • Calculus

Note: It is important to note that the syllabus might change with each year, candidates are thus advised to check the recent prospectus to keep up with the latest information.

 

Fri, 29 Dec 2023 09:36:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.telegraphindia.com/edugraph/colleges/exams/keam-kerala-engineering-agriculture-medical-entrance-examination/syllabus/35
Inspire Medical Shareholder Action Reminder

Securities Litigation Partner James (Josh) Wilson Encourages Investors Who Suffered Losses Exceeding $100,000 In Inspire Medical To Contact Him Directly To Discuss Their Options

If you suffered losses exceeding $100,000 investing in Inspire Medical stock or options between May 3, 2023 and November 7, 2023 and would like to discuss your legal rights, call Faruqi & Faruqi partner Josh Wilson directly at 877-247-4292 or 212-983-9330 (Ext. 1310). You may also click here for additional information: www.faruqilaw.com/INSP.

There is no cost or obligation to you.

Cannot view this image? Visit: https://images.newsfilecorp.com/files/6455/192404_53450c7e84effb45_001full.jpg

New York, New York--(Newsfile Corp. - December 29, 2023) - Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP, a leading national securities law firm, is investigating potential claims against Inspire Medical Systems, Inc. ("Inspire Medical" or the "Company") (NYSE: INSP) and reminds investors of the February 20, 2024 deadline to seek the role of lead plaintiff in a federal securities class action that has been filed against the Company.

Faruqi & Faruqi is a leading minority and Woman-owned national securities law firm with offices in New York, Pennsylvania, California and Georgia.

As detailed below, the complaint alleges that the Company and its executives violated federal securities laws by making false and/or misleading statements and/or failing to disclose that: (1) despite the Acceleration Program, customers were encountering challenges with the prior authorization submission process, including with the scheduling of appointments; (2) a slowdown in prior authorization submissions arising from these challenges led to a shortfall of hundreds of procedures to implant the Company's OSA device; and (3) as a result, Defendants' positive statements about the Company's financial guidance, business, operations, and prospects were materially false and misleading and/or lacked a reasonable basis at all relevant times.

The truth emerged after the close of markets on November 7, 2023, when the Company announced disappointing earnings results for the third quarter of 2023, including "a decline in prior authorization submissions for patients seeking Inspire therapy." Inspire Medical further admitted it had started to "track" problems with the Acceleration Program no later than the second quarter of 2023, the Company "had strong confirmation" of the problems with the Acceleration Program, and the Company "realized we needed to take some corrective action."

In response to this news, shares of Inspire Medical declined approximately 20%, from a closing price of $161.74 per share on November 7, 2023, to a closing price of $129.95 per share on November 8, 2023.

The court-appointed lead plaintiff is the investor with the largest financial interest in the relief sought by the class who is adequate and typical of class members who directs and oversees the litigation on behalf of the putative class. Any member of the putative class may move the Court to serve as lead plaintiff through counsel of their choice, or may choose to do nothing and remain an absent class member. Your ability to share in any recovery is not affected by the decision to serve as a lead plaintiff or not.

Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP also encourages anyone with information regarding Inspire Medical's conduct to contact the firm, including whistleblowers, former employees, shareholders and others.

Attorney Advertising. The law firm responsible for this advertisement is Faruqi & Faruqi, LLP (www.faruqilaw.com). Prior results do not certain or predict a similar outcome with respect to any future matter. We welcome the opportunity to discuss your particular case. All communications will be treated in a confidential manner.

To view the source version of this press release, please visit https://www.newsfilecorp.com/release/192404

Fri, 29 Dec 2023 00:54:00 -0600 text/html https://stockhouse.com/news/press-releases/2023/12/29/inspire-medical-shareholder-action-reminder




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