Real Questions and latest syllabus of ASSET exam

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Exam Code: ASSET Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
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Killexams : Admission-Tests Placement test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASSET Search results Killexams : Admission-Tests Placement test prep - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ASSET https://killexams.com/exam_list/Admission-Tests Killexams : How to Use practice tests to Study for the LSAT No result found, try new keyword!The LSAT is a test ... Admission Council, which administers the exam, has made available more than 70 full, real, past LSAT tests for purchase, either through paperback compendiums of practice ... Tue, 11 Oct 2022 01:36:00 -0500 text/html https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/law-admissions-lowdown/articles/how-to-use-practice-tests-to-study-for-the-lsat Killexams : ACT test scores fall to lowest level in 30 years following pandemic

Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in latest years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was provide me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 09:50:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.cbsnews.com/news/act-college-admissions-test-scores-drop-pandemic-slide/
Killexams : Boston Suspends Admissions Test For Elite test Schools For One Year

Boston will suspend admissions testing for its three elite test schools for a year, in an effort to address educational inequities that have disadvantaged students of color during the pandemic.

The School Committee unanimously approved the temporary change in a 7-0 vote shortly after 1:30 am following a marathon public meeeting that began at 5 p.m. Wednesday.

“I did a big exhale there and I think we can all take a step back and breathe,” school committee chairman Michael Loconto said after the last vote was cast.

“Some may be disappointed, other families might feel a moment of hope, like something far out of their reach is now attainable,” added committee member Jeri Robinson. “I hope we will all come together.”

The new admissions procedures also are intended to address longstanding concerns about the systemic racial inequities that have favored white students at the city’s top schools: Boston Latin School, Boston Latin Academy and the John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Sciences.

For the upcoming round of admissions this winter, seats will be offered based on students’ pre-COVID grade-point averages and MCAS scores. Twenty percent of the invitations to the schools will be reserved for the top-ranking students by GPA citywide.

The remaining 80 percent of invitations will be distributed based on GPA and a student’s zip code. Each zip code will be allocated a number of seats that is proportionate to how many school-age children live there. Students from zip codes with the lowest median income will be given first pick of the school they want to attend.

The plan was created by a working group appointed by Superintendent Brenda Cassellius after she faced the threat of a lawsuit.

NAACP Boston President Tanisha Sullivan, who led the working group, said it met a dozen times in August and September.

"We will achieve greater geographic diversity,” Sullivan said when the plan was unveiled earlier this month. “More neighborhoods across the city of Boston will have students attending an test school. We are also increasing the socioeconomic diversity.”

Students will be selected based on one of two criteria: meeting or exceeding expectations on the English Language Arts or Math MCAS exam, or earning a GPA of B or higher during the first two terms of the 2019-20 school year.

The test schools have been the subject of longstanding charges of bias. Although considered the highest quality schools in the district, the students attending them have not reflected the city’s racial-ethnic diversity, according to a 2018 report from researchers at Harvard’s Kennedy School. The researchers concluded that Black and Hispanic students were “substantially less likely to be invited to test schools,” regardless of academic performance.

For years, the district had been basing admissions to the schools on a student’s grades and the results of the Independent School Entrance Exam, a test used by many independent private schools, including Boston College High School and Milton Academy.

The ISEE, however, has not been shown to accurately predict the high school performance of Black and Hispanic students, who make up the bulk of the district’s enrollment.

Lawyers for Civil Rights demanded that the test be dropped in Boston, threatening a lawsuit against Cassellius just as she was moving into the position.

Earlier this year, the school system stopped using that test. Cassellius, who had cited concerns about its cost, contracted with a new testing company, Oregon-based NWEA, saying it offered an test “aligned with Massachusetts state standards.”

“Administering this new entrance test is an important step forward in expanding access to the test schools for all students,” Cassellius said then.

But in July, the Boston NAACP launched a petition to suspend admissions testing for city’s test schools during the pandemic.

José López, education chair of the Boston NAACP, said that the Harvard research, paired with city data that show that more than 20% of Boston Public School students were academically inactive when schools closed last spring due to the coronavirus pandemic, could spell disaster for students applying to test schools this fall.

Cassellius said in latest weeks that she enthusiastically supports the new plan, which was the result of weeks of study by the nine-member working group.

“Often times when children come to us with less, they get less,” she said. “In this instance, they're getting first access."

Not everyone shares her enthusiasm. Although city officials cited the pandemic as one of the major reasons for the change, opponents said they were concerned it signaled an end to testing to enter the schools.

Sarah Zaphiris, a Boston Latin alum and parent of a rising sixth-grader, noted that SAT testing is still occurring. She started a petition asking the schools to return to testing using the new test that has been vetted for bias.

“I worry that if you put something like this in place, it will be hard to take it away,” Zaphiris said of the new plan. “Inertia takes over.”

And that was exactly what retired BPS teacher Katharine Kilborn, the mother of two white Boston Latin Academy graduates, said she wants to see.

“I will support and demand that this not be a one-year anomaly but will lay the groundwork for a more equitable education throughout Boston,” she said.

First generation parent Sum Tan was one of dozens of Chinese parents who implored committee members to continue the test because its competitive standards offer many immigrant children in the city a path out of poverty and low paying service jobs.

They believe the new admissions system hurts the chances for poor children living in wealthy zip codes like Back Bay, Downtown or Seaport, where there are pockets of poverty.

“Admission by zip code is a form of segregation, not unity,” Tan said. “It will push us backward, not forward.”

School social worker Rebecca Witte testified that she supports the measure, even if it means entrance to an “exam” school may be more difficult for her sixth-grade son who lives in Roslindale.

“I’m OK with this. It’s about what’s right for all, not just about my son,” she said.

The committee also agreed to turn the working group that created the new procedure into a task force so that its work examining school policies could continue and its meetings would be made public.

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 17:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.wgbh.org/news/education/2020/10/22/boston-suspends-admissions-test-for-elite-exam-schools-for-one-year
Killexams : Some Very Contrarian Thoughts on the LSAT (and Law School) No result found, try new keyword!No charge. Here’s a tempest in a teapot for you — should law schools stop requiring applicants to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)? Some people argue vociferously that schools should ... Wed, 12 Oct 2022 22:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/some-very-contrarian-thoughts-on-the-lsat-and-law-school/ Killexams : Worst results in a generation from US college admission tests

Admission test results for students seeking places at US universities have hit their lowest level in more than 30 years.

Officials blamed disruption to learning caused by the pandemic for the drop in scores. The class of 2022 scored an average of 19.8 out of 36 in the American College Testing (ACT) exam, the first time since 1991 that the average has dropped below 20.

In 2021 the average was 20.3. The latest results mark a fifth consecutive year of declining scores and show 42 per cent of students who took the ACT failed to meet the minimum levels required in English, maths, practicing and science.

The ACT creates benchmark scores to determine a student’s likelihood of success in their first year of university. Janet

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 18:46:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/worst-results-in-a-generation-from-us-college-admission-tests-vmmp0nkpk
Killexams : ACT test scores drop to their lowest in 30 years in a pandemic slide

PHOENIX — Scores on the ACT college admissions test by this year's high school graduates hit their lowest point in more than 30 years — the latest evidence of the enormity of learning disruption during the pandemic.

The class of 2022's average ACT composite score was 19.8 out of 36, marking the first time since 1991 that the average score was below 20. What's more, an increasing number of high school students failed to meet any of the subject-area benchmarks set by the ACT — showing a decline in preparedness for college-level coursework.

The test scores, made public in a report Wednesday, show 42% of ACT-tested graduates in the class of 2022 met none of the subject benchmarks in English, reading, science and math, which are indicators of how well students are expected to perform in corresponding college courses.

In comparison, 38% of test takers in 2021 failed to meet any of the benchmarks.

"Academic preparedness is where we are seeing the decline," said Rose Babington, senior director for state partnerships for the ACT. "Every time we see ACT test scores, we are talking about skills and standards, and the prediction of students to be successful and to know the really important information to succeed and persist through their first year of college courses."

ACT scores have declined steadily in latest years. Still, "the magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming," ACT CEO Janet Godwin said in a statement. "We see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting college-readiness benchmarks in any of the subjects we measure."

The results offer a lens into systemic inequities in education, in place well before the pandemic shuttered schools and colleges temporarily waived testing requirements. For example, students without access to rigorous high school curriculum suffered more setbacks during pandemic disruptions, Babington said. Those students are from rural areas, come from low-income families and are often students of color.

The number of students taking the ACT has declined 30% since 2018, as graduates increasingly forgo college and some universities no longer require admissions tests. But participation plunged 37% among Black students, with 154,000 taking the test this year.

Standardized tests such as the ACT have faced growing concerns that they're unfair to minority and low-income students, as students with access to expensive test prep or advanced courses often perform better.

Babington defended the test as a measure of college readiness. "Now more than ever, the last few years have shown us the importance of having high-quality data to help inform how we support students," Babington said.

Test scores now are optional for first-year student admission at many institutions. Some colleges, such as the University of California system, even opt for a test-blind policy, where scores are not considered even if submitted.

But many students still take the tests, hoping to get an edge in admissions by submitting their scores. Tyrone Jordan, a freshman at test-optional Arizona State University, said he took the ACT and the SAT to get ahead of other students and help him receive scholarships.

Jordan, who wants to pursue mechanical engineering, said he thinks his rigorous schedule at Tempe Preparatory Academy prepared him for college, and the standardized tests helped support him and his family financially.

"All the test did for me was provide me extra financial money," Jordan said.

While Jordan was always planning to take the test, many students struggle with access or choose not to take the test since their universities of choice no longer require it. In Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, Tennessee and Wyoming, everyone is tested.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 08:10:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.kasu.org/education-technology/2022-10-12/act-test-scores-drop-to-their-lowest-in-30-years-in-a-pandemic-slide
Killexams : ACT College Admission Test Scores Drop To 30-Year Low As Effects Of Covid-Era Online Learning Play Out

Topline

High school students’ ACT college admission test scores fell to a three-decade low in 2022, according to a new report released Wednesday, falling for the fifth straight year as educators grapple with ongoing learning loss made worse by remote classes during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Key Facts

Students in the graduating high school class of 2022 averaged a score of 19.8 out of 36, the lowest score since 1991 on the admissions test, which colleges use to gauge students’ English, reading, math and science skills.

The average score is down from 20.3 in 2021, and 20.8 in 2018, which were down from a latest high of 21.2 in 2007 (SAT college admission test scores have also dropped slightly from 981 in 2007 to 927 in 2021).

Some 32% of 2022 graduates who took the test passed three out of four benchmarks—indicating whether they have a 50% chance of earning a B or higher in English, reading, math and science—down from 36% of students last year and 38% in 2018.

From 2018 to 2022, the percentage of students who passed the benchmark in the English section dropped from 60% to 53%, while students who passed the math benchmark fell from 40% to 31%.

Only 22% of the students met the benchmark in all four categories, down from 27% in 2018.

ACT CEO Janet Godwin said the decline can’t be blamed exclusively by learning disruptions from online learning and missed classes when schools were shuttered during the Covid-19 pandemic, but by “longtime systemic failures” that were “exacerbated by the pandemic.”

Crucial Quote

“The magnitude of the declines this year is particularly alarming, as we see rapidly growing numbers of seniors leaving high school without meeting the college-readiness benchmark in any of the subjects we measure,” Godwin said in a press release,

Key Background

Recent studies have linked online learning during the pandemic—when teachers were forced to completely pivot from in-person classes to lessons online—to disruptions in students’ math and practicing comprehension. During that time, students were shown to have connected less with their teachers and classmates, and become distracted more easily while at home. The high school class of 2022 dealt with online learning for more than half of their time in high school, starting in March, 2020. Students who switched to online lessons from in-person classes for just a month missed the equivalent of seven to 10 weeks of math, Harvard University Center for Education Policy Research director Thomas Kane told NPR. The losses held true for younger students, as well. A National Assessment of Educational Progress report released last month found 9-year-olds’ practicing levels suffered the biggest fall since 1990, while math scores had their biggest drop ever.

Tangent

Disparities between racial groups also increased over that pandemic, with Black students’ math scores falling 13 points, compared to white students’ scores falling five points, according to the Nation’s Report Card. Analysts at McKinsey & Company attribute the difference between races to variation in access to education, with Black and Hispanic students less likely to have access to internet or live interaction with teachers, despite being more likely to remain in remote classrooms.

Surprising Fact

Washington D.C. students had the highest ACT score (26.9), followed by California and Massachusetts (26.5), while the lowest scores were recorded in Nevada (17.3) and Mississippi (17.8).

Big Number

1.3 million. That’s how many students in the class of 2022 took the ACT test, or roughly 36% of graduating high school seniors, according to the report.

Further Reading

Pandemic-Era Policies Caused Dramatic Education Decline (Forbes)

Pandemic Set Students’ practicing Levels Back Two Decades—Here’s Where It Dropped The Most (Forbes)

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 Brian Bushard en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/brianbushard/2022/10/12/act-college-admission-test-scores-drop-to-30-year-low-as-effects-of-covid-era-online-learning-play-out/
Killexams : SAT bootcamps offer free test prep for New Hampshire students

Published: 10/10/2022 5:40:46 PM

Modified: 10/10/2022 5:40:36 PM

Free SAT bootcamps for New Hampshire students

New Hampshire students are invited to participate in two upcoming free prep courses ahead of the November and December SAT exams. 

The two, four-week bootcamps for students planning to take upcoming SAT tests are: 

October 8 – November 4 (for the Nov. 5, 2022 SAT exam)

November 5 – December 2 (for the Dec. 3, 2022 SAT exam)

Each bootcamp will include eight sessions with 75-minutes each of test prep with a certified, online tutor from Schoolhouse.world. Students will be paired with peers of similar abilities for their sessions, which will focus on mastering skills, building strategies, time management and completing full-length practice exams. Sessions will highlight both practicing and math practice questions. 

To pre-register for one of the sessions, visit SATbootcamp. On average, students who complete the bootcamp Improve their test score by about 90 points across both sections, according to organizers.


Mon, 10 Oct 2022 09:45:00 -0500 text/html https://www.concordmonitor.com/State-offers-SAT-Bootcamp-48364076
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