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Killexams : Social-Work-Board Certified test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFSW Search results Killexams : Social-Work-Board Certified test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CFSW https://killexams.com/exam_list/Social-Work-Board Killexams : UP graduate tops Sept 2022 licensure exam for social workers

THE Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) has announced that 2,955 examinees hurdled the licensure examination for social workers held this September 2022 out of the 4,723 who took it.

Gian Paul Salanio from the University of the Philippines Diliman led the new batch of social workers after garnering a score of 88.20.

Eight schools were hailed as top-performing with at least 10 or more examinees and with at least an 80 percent passing rate after posting a 100 percent passing rate.

These are the Asian Social Institute (all 10 examinees passed); Ateneo de Davao University (all 20 examinees passed); Bicol University-Tabaco (all 25 examinees passed); Caraga State University Butuan City (all 85 examinees passed); La Verdad Christian College (all 13 examinees passed); Leyte Normal University (all 67 examinees passed); Norte Dame of Marbel University (all 13 examinees passed); and University of the Philippines Diliman (all 19 examinees passed).

The list of successful examinees may be viewed on the PRC website at prc.gov.ph.

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The September 2022 licensure examination for social workers was held in Manila, Baguio, Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Iloilo, Koronadal, Legazpi, Lucena, Pagadian, Pampanga, Rosales, Tacloban, Tuguegarao and Zamboanga, and the results of the examination were released three working days after the last day of examination.

Members of the Board of Social Workers who gave the licensure test were Chairman Lorna Gabad, Rosetta Palma, Fe Sinsona and Ely Acosta.

The newly licensed social workers are reminded to register online for the issuance of their Professional Identification Card (ID) and Certificate of Registration. PRC said the schedule/s for the online registration will be announced at a later date.

Similarly, the board passers should also personally register and sign in the Roster of Registered Professionals.

"The date and venue for the oath taking ceremony of the new successful examinees in the said examination will be announced later," the commission added.

Wed, 28 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.manilatimes.net/2022/09/29/news/national/up-graduate-tops-sept-2022-licensure-exam-for-social-workers/1860199
Killexams : LOOK: Tricycle driver offers free rides after daughter passed social work board exam

Tricycle driver offers free rides after daughter passed social work board exam

KORONADAL CITY — A tricycle driver in this city offered free rides on Wednesday as his way of expressing gratitude after his daughter passed the recent Social Work licensure examination.

Juven Paniza, 47, offered free rides to passengers going to destinations within the city.

Paniza posted a notice at the front of his motorcab saying he is offering the rides for free as a form of thanksgiving for daughter Jona Mae’s recent success.

Paniza has been a transport worker for some 20 years. It is his main source of income to provide for his family’s needs.

On a typical day, Paniza would earn up to P700.

Jona Mae, 23, graduated from Ramon Magsaysay Memorial College Marbel, Inc. last July. She took the board examination on Sept. 19 to 21.

The young social worker said her passing the licensure exam was “an answered prayer” and crowning glory of her parents’ sacrifices.

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Wed, 28 Sep 2022 20:57:00 -0500 en text/html https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1672667/look-tricycle-driver-offers-free-rides-after-daughter-passed-social-work-board-exam
Killexams : HPCC Welcomes Its existing Credential: the Advanced Palliative and Hospice Social Work Certification (APHSW-C)

The APHSW-C certification exam joins the five hospice and palliative programs within the HPCC certification portfolio.

With the strong foundation of social work ingenuity and perseverance built over the past several years, APHSW-C is now proud to lean into the decades of infrastructure and experience that HPCC offers.”

— Laurel Tropeano, LCSW, APHSW-C

PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA, UNITED STATES, September 12, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ -- The Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center (HPCC) and the Advanced Palliative and Hospice Social Work (APHSW) Board of Directors are excited to announce the transition of the Advanced Palliative and Hospice Social Work Certification (APHSW-C) to HPCC. The APHSW-C certification exam joins the five hospice and palliative programs within the HPCC certification portfolio.

“Since 2014, when we changed our name from the National Board for Certification of Hospice and Palliative Nurses to the Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center, HPCC has been paving the way to provide credentialing for social workers and other interdisciplinary team members,” said HPCC Chief Executive Officer Ginger Marshall, MSN, ACNP-BC, ACHPN, FPCN. “Hospice and palliative care social workers are a cornerstone of the interdisciplinary team, and HPCC is proud to offer a credential that validates their expertise and mastery of their practice.”

The APHSW-C certification recognizes bachelor’s- and master’s-level social workers with experience, specialized skills, and competency in hospice and palliative social work. The APHSW-C assures the public that these certificants have the knowledge and skills to provide safe, high-quality care at an advanced level. Individuals eligible for certification include experienced hospice and palliative care social workers who practice in clinical and academic settings in the United States and Canada.

“Because hospice and palliative care are interprofessional and team-based, it only makes sense that the professions should join in their efforts to develop and maintain certification of the involved specialties,” said Barbara Head, PhD, CHPN, ACSW, FPCN, APHSW-C, a member of the APHSW Board of Directors. “I am excited about the synergy that will result when we join forces in this important endeavor.”

The first APHSW-C examination was administered in 2019. Since then, 775 individuals have earned the certification. In becoming a part of HPCC, current and future APHSW-C certificants will benefit from the expansive technologies and services offered by HPCC. HPCC has nearly 30 years of experience managing hospice and palliative care certification programs and has long-standing relationships with industry-leading vendors to ensure that candidates and certificants have a convenient experience- from applying for an exam to renewing a certification.

“With the strong foundation of social work ingenuity and perseverance built over the past several years, APHSW-C is now proud to lean into the decades of infrastructure and experience that HPCC offers,” said Laurel Tropeano, LCSW, APHSW-C, president of the APHSW-C Board of Directors. “The certification will continue to be exclusive to social workers in the specialty of hospice and palliative care. The transition of the APHSW-C exam to HPCC supports our goal to solidify the longevity of this important credential. What a gift!”

“We appreciate the leaders at APHSW-C in entrusting the credentialing of social workers to HPCC,” said Nicole Martin, MBA, BSN, RN, CHPN, CHC, president of the HPCC Board of Directors. “Social workers have always been an instrumental part of the interdisciplinary care team, and HPCC is pleased to include them in our credentialing portfolio.”

HPCC and APHSW-C will work closely together to transition the certification exam, intellectual property, and organizational resources to HPCC’s operations over the next few months. The APHSW-C program will be fully integrated by the end of 2022.

APHSW-C leaders have done an excellent job in establishing this credential. HPCC looks forward to furthering efforts to provide hospice and palliative social workers the opportunity to earn and maintain their APHSW-C credential for years to come.

About the Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center
HPCC is the only organization that offers specialty certification to hospice and palliative nurses. More than 15,000 professionals hold HPCC credentials, which establish a professional commitment to safe, ethical, and evidence-based care. HPCC currently offers five hospice and palliative certification exams for advanced practice nurses (ACHPN®), registered nurses (CHPN®), pediatric palliative nurses (CHPPN®), nursing assistants (CHPNA®), and licensed practical/vocational nurses (CHPLN®). HPCC also maintains the perinatal loss care (CPLC®) and the certified hospice and palliative care administrator (CHPCA) ® credentials. The ACHPN® for advanced practice nurses, the CHPN® for registered nurses, and the CHPPN® for pediatric nurses are accredited by the Accreditation Board for Specialty Nursing Certification.

Ashley Farrington
Hospice and Palliative Credentialing Center
+1 412-282-8210
email us here
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Mon, 12 Sep 2022 04:45:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.koin.com/business/press-releases/ein-presswire/589993867/hpcc-welcomes-its-newest-credential-the-advanced-palliative-and-hospice-social-work-certification-aphsw-c/
Killexams : Should You Pursue Certification in Lifestyle Medicine? Yes

Physician colleagues often ask me what the future holds for lifestyle medicine and whether they should pursue board certification. My short answer to the second question is "Yes, absolutely!" But first I share why I am confident that lifestyle medicine will become a foundation of all health and healthcare and that clinicians should prepare for it.

Cate Collings, MD

There is increasing recognition among policymakers and health leaders of the unsustainable costs — in human suffering and the $4.1 trillion spent on US healthcare in 2020 — of lifestyle- and diet-related chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. COVID-19 and the worse outcomes associated with underlying chronic conditions contributed to awareness of just how sick Americans have become. The pandemic also shone a light on health disparities related to underlying lifestyle-related chronic disease prevalence and insufficient healthcare resources in many communities. Lifestyle medicine offers a promising path to narrow the health disparities gap.

Notably, for the first time in 50 years, the White House hosted a Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health in September, with the goal to "[e]nd hunger and increase healthy eating and physical activity by 2030, so that fewer Americans experience diet-related diseases."

This growing recognition that we must reduce lifestyle-related diseases and prepare future and practicing clinicians to address the root causes of those diseases will ideally accelerate the US transition to high-value care. Lifestyle medicine leverages behavior changes in nutrition, physical activity, sleep, stress management, social connections, and use of risky substances as the first and primary way to treat many conditions, with medications and procedures as adjunctive treatment. It supports the Quintuple Aim of improved outcomes, lower costs, improved patient satisfaction, and improved provider satisfaction and has the potential to address health equity.

There is a strong case that value is precisely what lifestyle medicine can deliver, and this paves the way for paradigm change.

Health systems are increasing recognizing this value. The Health Systems Council, a collaborative community of health systems interested in integrating lifestyle medicine founded by the American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) in May 2021, already has more than 70 health system members. Accountable care organizations with a focus on lifestyle medicine have been created to help providers sustainably implement lifestyle behavior interventions. Even the US military is incorporating lifestyle medicine into its medical care for service members.

Momentum is growing for embedding lifestyle medicine into undergraduate medical education and build a new physician workforce tailored to current and future times. In November 2021, Rep. James McGovern introduced House Resolution 784, a resolution that passed the House supporting activities to ensure that health professional training programs, including medical schools, residency programs, and fellowships, incorporate substantive training in nutrition and diet.

The University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville is the first school to integrate lifestyle medicine into all 4 years of its curriculum. The Lifestyle Medicine Education Collaborative, a collection of open-access lifestyle medicine curricular resources developed there, provides a curriculum that other medical programs can integrate. Medical students have a hearty appetite for lifestyle medicine, and lifestyle medicine interest groups (LMIGs) for medical and other health professions students have exploded from a single campus in 2009 to 95 LMIGs today.

As of September 1, ACLM's Lifestyle Medicine Residency Curriculum (LMRC), a comprehensive curriculum piloted in 2018 that prepares residents to make evidence-based, lifestyle behavior interventions, is being implemented in 200 residency programs across 96 sites, with 1190 faculty and 4185 residents.

Lifestyle medicine education for physicians who trained 10 or more years ago may have consisted only of a few hours of learning about abject nutrient deficiencies and general suggestions to inspire patients to "exercise more" and "eat better." That's why I strongly urge practicing clinicians to pursue certification in lifestyle medicine. Education and certification will modernize their practice to meet current healthcare system needs.

As health systems or practices embrace lifestyle medicine and work within value-based contracts or population health goals, clinicians prepared with lifestyle medicine tools and knowledge will be valued and sought. More and more physicians and other clinicians are pursing board certification. Since 2017, 2004 US physicians and 778 other health professionals have certified.

Physicians are certified by the American Board of Lifestyle Medicine (ABLM). There are two pathways for physicians to qualify to take the exam. One is the experiential pathway for physicians who are already board-certified by a medical specialty board recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties or the American Osteopathic Association. Those physicians must be primary board-certified and have practiced medicine for at least 2 years before qualifying to take the ABLM exam.

 The other emerging pathway is educational. Physicians who complete the LMRC through a residency site are eligible to sit for the certification exam, though certification will not be issued until the physician successfully passes the primary board exam.

To prepare for the board exam, ACLM provides a catalogue of on-line courses for continuing medical education as well as a lifestyle medicine board review course. In addition, ACLM recently became a content provider to Ed Hub, the American Medical Association's online learning platform. And the annual ACLM conference is a learning and networking event in the journey towards board certification.

The healthcare landscape is shifting rapidly. Transformative changes are occurring, and I am confident that lifestyle medicine will be at the forefront to address our alarming trajectory of chronic disease and its associated misery and financial impact.

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Wed, 05 Oct 2022 07:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981797
Killexams : Alabama officials demand better teacher certification exam pass rates The Gordon Persons Building in Montgomery, Ala., is home to the Alabama State Department of Education. © Trisha Crain/al.com/TNS The Gordon Persons Building in Montgomery, Ala., is home to the Alabama State Department of Education.

Want more state education news? Sign up for The Alabama Education Lab’s free, weekly newsletter, Ed Chat.

Alabama state officials on Thursday demanded better certification pass rates from the state’s future teachers and those who prepare them.

Wayne Reynolds, a former superintendent, said he was alarmed about a state report showing 53% of Alabama’s elementary teacher candidates passed the Praxis certification on their first try.

“Fifty percent is not impressive to me,” Reynolds said at a regular monthly meeting of the state Board of Education. He is vice president of the board.

Read more from the Ed Lab about teacher quality:

The first-attempt pass rate was reported by the Alabama Commission on Evaluative Services in September as part of a larger look at enrollment at the state’s teacher preparation programs

ACES sourced those rates to research by the National Council on Teacher Quality that evaluated first-attempt pass rates based on test results from 2015 through 2018.

Reynolds and other board members keyed in on the overall 53% pass rate and the wide range of first-attempt pass rates from the state’s 14 public universities, also published in the report.

State education officials responded by saying while low, the reported rate doesn’t necessarily reflect efforts from Alabama students and future teachers.

Alabama Superintendent Eric Mackey said the pass rates published in the report includes students who aren’t actually enrolled in an Alabama college but chose to have their results sent to that college or to the state department of education.

And some students might not be putting their full effort into that first round of taking the test, Huntingdon College Dean of Education Carolyn Corliss said, because her college pays for students to take the test once.

Deanise Peacock, who leads the teacher testing area at the state department of education, said the test for which the pass rate was published contains four subtests. One each for English language arts, math, science and social studies. A teacher would have to pass all four subtests to count as having passed the test.

But students might take the four subtests the first time simply as a matter of cost.

“Their thought process is to take the bundle. It’s a lower price,” Peacock said. And if they fail to pass one of the subtests, they can take just that test again.

“Which is a fine strategy, but it also hurts the numbers here.”

According to NCTQ, Alabama’s walk away rate – the percentage of test takers that never took the test again after failing on a first attempt – was between 22% and 25% for each of the four subtests for all students. Students of color had higher walk away rates: Between 33% and 37% of students of color didn’t take the test a second time after failing on their first attempt.

Peacock instead provided examples of individual pass rates on each of the four subtests, claiming the low overall passage rates masks much higher individual test passage rates.

An Alabama Education Lab look at NCTQ’s data found that Alabama was one of 16 states to require the same Praxis test, an elementary multiple subjects test. Of those 16 states, first-time pass rates ranged from 34% in New Jersey to 57% in Virginia.

Alabama’s 53% first-time pass rate was the third highest of the 16 states, behind Virginia and Idaho. That was not included in the ACES report.

Board members took education officials, including some deans of the colleges of education in attendance, to task, asking what action will be taken to Strengthen those first-attempt pass rates.

“Some deans focus on open enrollment,” Reynolds said. “They take everybody because they want equal opportunity, which is fine. But somewhere along the line with open enrollment, there has to be some discretion, and some guideposts to allow people to progress. And so that they don’t end up in our classroom as substandard teachers.”

Corliss told board members they now require pre-service teachers to be tutored prior to taking the Praxis for the first time.

Peacock said she talked with test publisher Educational Testing Service earlier in the week, after the published rates were brought to her attention, to try and find a better way of recording and reporting the data.

College officials can review the data monthly, she said, and remove results of test takers who are not enrolled at the college.

Katie Kinney, president of the Alabama Association for Colleges for Teacher Education, told AL.com the limitations of the first-attempt pass rate and what it measures means it isn’t useful in helping increase the quantity or quality of elementary teachers.

“We want data to inform continuous improvement for our programs,” Kinney said, “but first-time attempt pass rate data aren’t the data to aid us in that work.”

©2022 Advance Local Media LLC. Visit al.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Sat, 15 Oct 2022 03:07:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/lifestyle-buzz/alabama-officials-demand-better-teacher-certification-exam-pass-rates/ar-AA12ZNiL
Killexams : RESULTS: September 2022 Social Worker Licensure Examination

The following is a press release from the Professional Regulation Commission.

The Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) announces that 2,955 out of 4,723 passed the Social Worker Licensure Examination given by the Board for Social Workers in Manila, Baguio, Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Davao, Iloilo, Koronadal, Legazpi, Lucena, Pagadian, Pampanga, Rosales, Tacloban, Tuguegarao and Zamboanga this September 2022.

The members of the Board for Social Workers who gave the licensure examination are Lorna C. Gabad, Chairman; Rosetta G. Palma, Fe J. Sinsona and Ely B. Acosta, members.

The results were released in three working days after the last day of examination.

Schedule of online registration for the issuance of Professional Identification Card (ID) and Certificate of Registration will be announced later. Those who will register are required to bring the following: downloaded duly accomplished Oath Form or Panunumpa ng Propesyonal, notice of admission (for identification only), two pieces passport sized pictures (colored with white background and complete name tag), two sets of documentary stamps and one piece short brown envelope. Successful examinees should personally register and sign in the Roster of Registered Professionals.

The date and venue for the oathtaking ceremony of the new successful examinees in the said examination will be announced later.

The top ten performing schools in the September 2022 Social Worker Licensure Examination as per Commission Resolution No. 2017-1058(C) series of 2017:

The successful examinees who garnered the ten highest places in the September 2022 Social Worker Licensure Examination are the following:

Check out the full list of passers here:

Check out the performance of schools here:

Rappler.com

Tue, 27 Sep 2022 09:44:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.rappler.com/bulletin-board/results-social-worker-licensure-examination-september-2022/
Killexams : Double celebration for Leyte university after social worker licensure exam result

TACLOBAN CITY — For the first time since it offered a social worker degree 27 years ago, the Leyte Normal University (LNU) based in this city obtained a 100 percent passing rate in the recent social worker licensure examinations.

All 67 LNU examinees passed the exams and eight of them also made it in the top 10, according to Lilibeth Fallorina, academic chairman of the university’s Arts and Humanities Department.

“I was overwhelmed by the outcome of this year’s licensure exams. I was speechless, especially that this happened when we are still in a pandemic,” she said.

Fiona Yvannie Tonido Murillo ranked third with 87.80 percent followed by sixth placer Geralene Mahinay Terceño (87.20 percent), and seventh placer Eduard Abrera Cañares, (87 percent).

Mary Guen Sablayan, Erika Morales Setosta, and Christelle Erika Canillas Toring placed eighth with a score of 86.60 percent, while Pamela Jane Rojas Pido (86.40 percent,) and Nicu Bernard Egos Baylos (86.20 percent) ranked ninth and tenth, respectively.

Fallorina attributed the unprecedented performance of the students to their rigid training and review conducted before the examination.

“I want to congratulate them for a very commendable performance. I witnessed how they worked so hard to achieve their goals. They all deserve it,” she said.

“However, passing the board or topping the examination is just the beginning. What is important is when they are already working. They must have the dedication to help specifically unprivileged clients,” she added.

The university promised to give cash incentives to those who made it to the top 10.

Cañares, 22, the batch’s magna cum laude, said he was very happy when he learned that he ranked seventh among the 2,955 passers of the social worker licensure examination held from Sept. 19 to 21, 2022.

“All I prayed for was to pass the examination, but God was so good that I made it to the top 10,” he said in a phone interview.

Cañares, a native of Carigara town, Leyte, is the second in a brood of five. His mother, Lydia, 46, is a housewife while his father, Edmundo, 47, is a farmer.

Pido, 25, who is from Alangalang town, also in Leyte, also did not expect that she would get the ninth-highest rating.

“I was browsing the internet at our neighbor’s house when the results of the examination were released. I was shocked when I saw my name in the top 10,” she said.

Pido said she immediately went home and conveyed the good news to her mother who works as a saleslady in a business establishment in Cavite.

“I promised my mother that she will stop working and that I will help send my youngest sister to school. Now that promise will be fulfilled,” she said.

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PRC: 2,955 of 4,723 pass Social Worker Licensure Examination

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Thu, 06 Oct 2022 17:09:00 -0500 en text/html https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1676691/double-celebration-for-leyte-university-after-social-worker-licensure-exam-result
Killexams : Over-the-counter hearing aids are available today. Here’s what to know No result found, try new keyword!Hearing loss is the third most common chronic physical condition in the United States, affecting approximately 30 million people in the country. But starting today, hearing aids will be available for ... Mon, 17 Oct 2022 04:50:00 -0500 text/html https://www.fastcompany.com/90796647/otc-hearing-aid-cost-where-to-buy Killexams : Voters to elect 4 new Chelsea School Board members in November

CHELSEA, MI - After hiring a new superintendent in July, there will be new leadership on the Chelsea School District Board of Education to work with Superintendent Mike Kapolka, with none of the board’s current members with expiring terms seeking re-election in November.

There are three board seats up for grabs during the Nov. 8 election, with six candidates vying for three six-year terms on the board: Michelle Craig, Glenn Fox, Thomas Golding, Ross Greenstein, Kate Henson and Julianne Maley.

Two other candidates, Scott Moore and John Piatt, are seeking election to another partial term expiring on Dec. 31, 2024. Current Chelsea School Board members Shawn Quilter, Laura Bush, Kristin van Reesema and Wayne Welton have opted not to run for re-election.

Craig graduated from Chelsea High School in 1995, before earning a bachelor’s in marking from Western Michigan University in 2000 and an MBA from the Metropolitan College of New York in 2016. She has worked as director of business development at a New York magazine and currently is a small business owner. She has education experience with a Career Culinary Arts degree at the Institute of Culinary Education in 2013.

Fox has more than two decades of teaching, research and administrative experience in higher education. He has earned bachelors, masters and doctorate degrees in Biology at the University of Michigan. Professionally, Fox is a faculty member of the UM Medical School and the director of the UM Anatomical Donations Program. He also has experience as a professor and chair of science at Jackson College and the Michigan Math & Science Scholars program.

Greenstein earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology at the University at Buffalo and a Master of Science degree in Physician Assistant studies at Rutgers University in 2000, specializing in cardiothoracic surgery. He has resided in Chelsea for 14 and-a-half years and has worked at Henry Ford – Jackson during that time. In addition, he has served as president of the quality control committee. Greenstein has three children, including two who currently attend Chelsea School District and one graduate.

Henson graduated from Chelsea High School in 1999 and has gone on to earn a bachelors and masters degree in Business Management. She works as director of programs for General Systems. Henson has created and facilitated two programs for women and girls focused on leadership influence and assertiveness. Her time as a substitute teacher in the district has given Henson an understanding of how students are learning. She and her husband, Damon, have two children.

Mallie has been a resident of Chelsea for 12 years. She is married with two children. Mallie has a degree in industrial engineering from Western Michigan University and has worked for Kellogg for 25 years. For the past 10 years, she has worked as the global capability lead for multiple systems that support the research and development environment.

Moore has worked as a pediatrician with 25 years of experience. He has been part of the Chelsea community since 2002, with three children who have attended school in the district. Moore says he believes the community has the same goals for its students, which include a top notch educational experience for children, a safe and welcoming environment for all students and retention of teachers.

Piatt and Golding did not submit responses for the voter guide.

MLive/The Ann Arbor News partnered with the nonpartisan League of Women Voters of Michigan to provide candidate information for readers. Each candidate was asked to outline their stances on a variety of public policy issues listed below. Information on other state, county and local primary races can be found at Vote411.org.

All responses in the voter guide were submitted directly by the candidate and have not been edited by the League of Women Voters, except for a necessary cut if a reply exceeded character limitations. Spelling and grammar were not corrected. Publication of candidate statements and opinions is solely in the interest of public service and should NOT be considered as an endorsement. The League never supports or opposes any candidates or political parties.

What are your goals should you be elected and how will you work to accomplish them?

Craig:

1. To maximize the social, emotional & mental educational experience for all students. I will work to provide more Gen Ed inclusion for students with special needs. This can be done by hiring Board Certified Behavioral Analysts to work with teachers, teacher consultants and para-pros to create, implement and evaluate IEP’s and by acquiring proven adaptive learning resources for all PK-12 teachers and staff. 2. To continue to ensure that each student has a strong academic and well-rounded education to reach their full potential. I will approve a curriculum that helps all students succeed in school and in life by continuing to fund education in all forms. This includes academics, creative & performing Arts, global culture, environment, community service, skilled trades, mental health, and emotional wellness & mindfulness. To achieve this, we’ll need to create & apply best practices for keeping & acquiring the best teachers & staff as well as improving school infrastructure & security.

Fox:

If elected, my goals include: Support for teachers, parapros, staff, & administrators; Maintain & grow our culture of academic & occupational excellence; Maintain an environment of belonging, diversity, equity, & inclusion; Support the CSD’s Portrait of a Graduate for academic, social, & emotional development; Support for student wellness; Evaluate CSD’s recruitment processes to continue to attract the best workforce; Develop finance plans that meet district needs, support district values, & position the CSD for long term success. To accomplish these goals, I will work tirelessly & cooperatively as a member of a seven person board to support the Superintendent. I will advocate for consensus-based solutions informed by all stakeholders & driven by the best available data. I will use my background as an educator, scientist, & administrator to listen, thoughtfully engage, & effectively collaborate with faculty, staff, administration, students, families, & Chelsea community members.

Greenstein:

To provide our children with an excellent education, we must begin with supporting our teachers. Encourage teacher-parent communication to identify gaps in learning, what is going well and areas for improvement. We need to identify each student’s strengths and weaknesses and guide them towards opportunities that they will flourish. In addition, we must explore alternative learning opportunities for students; trade professions and enforce school policy and procedure for both students and staff with transparency to the public. Additionally: professional development with a focus on academics, retention incentives, providing needed resources, parental volunteerism for recess, etc., political neutrality, ensure our students have a safe learning environment, enforce existing bullying policies, safety from external threats including vape-/drug-free campuses.

Henson:

My goal is to be an effective team member and a reasonable and open minded bridge between the students, staff, community and the board.

Mallie:

I would like to see better engagement and communication between the School Board and the students, parents, and community that they represent. Too many times people have felt unheard by the board when there is no response. All concerns brought forth should be addressed. It does not mean that the resolution or feedback is exactly the community member’s desired outcome, but it should be explained the reason for the outcome. Continued fiscal responsibility and making sure that we are prioritizing spending on direct student instructional costs and properly funding classrooms. Focusing on academics and improving the proficiency of our MStep test scores that have fallen. Finding ways to offer a foreign language in lower elementary and also an genuine computer class that uses a keyboard and mouse and teaches cyber safety. Communication, transparency and trust need to be rebuilt.

Moore:

▶︎School Safety–I will support the recent safety report which recommended hiring a School Resource Officer. This key hire would be pivotal on issues related to building safety, as well as drug use deterrent strategies on school premises. Our Social Work staff will continue to need financial and community support. ▶︎Community--I will use the tools developed over 25 years as a community-based pediatrician. These tools include listening to all points of view, encouraging in-person dialogue, and recognizing that online dialogue often works against all of us. The majority of us have similar hopes and dreams for the schools. How we get there is where we need consensus after respectful dialogue.

What should be done to Strengthen student achievement in the District?

Craig:

While recognizing that grades and test scores are very important, student achievement should be measured by more than just standardized tests. We need to value and grow the whole student and use a ‘portfolio approach’ to what success means. We need to ensure that students are socially, mentally and emotionally healthy, which will also help them to retain more academic information. We can also continue to highlight to students and parents that student achievement can come in many different forms, not just standard higher education but also vocational and technical programs and even entrepreneurship.

Fox:

Many initiatives & interventions can increase student achievement, so it is important to first understand where deficiencies & inequities in student achievement exist so that we may effectively address them. This is the purview of the administration: the superintendent, assistant superintendent, curriculum coordinator, & building principals. Student achievement is directly tied to quality of instruction, the comfort & wellness of learners, & thoughtful & well-integrated curricula guided by outcomes & district values. Some basic strategies may include: Maintaining as low teacher-to-student ratios as the district budget can allow & provide robust parapro support; Integrating more practicing & writing opportunities into curricula; Integrating more formative assessment into curricula; Leveraging technology for student engagement (e.g. iClicker, kahoot, smartboards); Providing clear & manageable expectations & communications with families for student homework

Greenstein:

Academic excellence is more than taking AP classes and earning high grades; It means helping to develop an individual’s capacities and skills to their fullest potential. I believe in the teaching approach of fundamental learning. Therefore, a curriculum focusing on practicing comprehension, writing, arithmetic, English, penmanship, and financial literacy is essential. Additionally, the demand for skilled labor has never been higher. Unfortunately, a stigma is so strong today that young people don’t associate high pay and job security with trade schools. However, unlike a bachelor’s degree, an education in a trade school is far more likely to yield a job in today’s society. I want to ensure that we provide a safe learning environment for EVERY student. I will advocate for increased access to mental health care for families and students. I fully support resource officers on all campuses. We must provide teachers with the proper professional development to learn and grow.

Henson:

To Strengthen on the already impressive student achievement in the district we can continue to build our tools and resources for supporting the social emotional learning of our students to make them well rounds individuals.

Mallie:

A refocus on academics and accountability. Allow teachers to teach their subjects in a politically neutral environment. A solid academic education is essential in helping our children be successful after graduation. Whether that takes them to vocational training, college, or entrepreneurship, we must ensure they are ready to succeed and lead. In the last couple of years, social & emotional had been prioritized due to covid. This is not to dismiss the mental health issues that are still there, those continue to be addressed and communicate with parents about what is going on in school and parents communicate what is going on at home, no secrets.

Moore:

I have spoken with our current administrative team regarding this. I know from those conversations that this is very much on their radar. There are several metrics that they follow. I would very much want to hear the solutions that genuine educators and veteran administrators that we currently have in the district bring forward. It is hard to say they need coached up at this point --they have an excellent track record. Where I would like to see improvement is in ease of access to this data for families in the district and, in particular, on the district’s website. Although metrics are an important way to assess a district they also cannot dictate the only thing a school district should respond to. In fact singular attention to any one metric could have negative affects on certain demographics within the student body. Low performing, high performing and all students in between deserve the resources they need for success.

What are your priorities in balancing the budget?

Craig:

Besides the usual funding for Chelsea’s already excellent educational programs, my budget priorities are high teacher and staff salaries & bonuses, curriculum adaptability resources, SEL & DBEI programs, infrastructure and safety initiatives, and additional student tutoring and counseling staff & resources. To do all this and balance the budget, we’ll need to look at what the district is spending already and remove or scale-down programs that may not be best benefiting the district, reducing our “rainy day fund” to a more reasonable amount, finding new revenue streams and establishing fundraising initiatives for specific programs.

Fox:

District finances must reflect our values & be forward-oriented to maintain future district financial strength. Our current priorities should include faculty & staff compensation, infrastructure maintenance & planning, & investments to support student academic, occupational, social, & emotional development. Chelsea School District is strong financially, with a healthy sinking fund & a series of three bonds which can provide for our short, medium, & long term needs & any unexpected issues. This is the result of good financial stewardship by the current & past Boards & Administrations. We are also fortunate Michigan’s state government passed a record bipartisan education budget with investments that increase per-pupil spending & provide funding for student mental health & wellness, school safety, special education, & infrastructure.

Greenstein:

Our district continues to be fiscally sound, and I will continue to support those efforts and explore opportunities to recover the learning loss due to the COVID pandemic and expand on Chelsea’s career and technical education program.

Henson:

The current board and previous Superintendent have done a fantastic job keeping our budget balanced while meeting the needs of the students, staff and facilities. I know our new Superintendent is purposeful in his decision-making and I look forward to learning more about what expenditures are already in the works and how they will Strengthen the learning environment for our students.

Mallie:

We are lucky to be a District that is financially sound. There are policies in place to make sure we have the money needed to run the district and not have to borrow money to make payroll. We need to keep these policies in place. Review overhead and non-instructional costs to make sure we’re focusing spending on the instructional learning of students.

Moore:

As a business owner a balanced budget is not an option but a must. Without clear vision of cash flow and potential shifts in funding a district can quickly get into real trouble. However, being too conservative can run the risk of having inferior facilities and compensation packages for staff that are not competitive. We are seeing in education that talented teachers have many options in regard to their career futures, and these are not always within the education industry. We, therefore, not only need to be competitive with other districts but potentially non-education career opportunities talented educators may have.

What is motivating you to run for the school board? Do you have an issue you especially care about?

Craig:

My family’s long-standing work and volunteerism in Chelsea has instilled in me the importance of community and public service. I am running as a candidate for the Chelsea School Board because I want to maintain our school district’s excellence. I want to ensure that, together, we’re raising our youth to learn, grow, and develop into the next generation of leaders and innovators. As seen in my goals above, I am also passionate about maximizing the full educational experience for kids with special needs. My best friend has tirelessly advocated in her district for the last 10 years to make sure her son with Autism has the best education and resources possible and that it’s the law for districts to provide those resources. Her work has motivated me to make sure that the same is happening for all kids in the CSD.

Fox:

My major motivation for running for school board is my love for my two children who attend Chelsea schools & a strong desire to ensure that Chelsea schools remain excellent academic institutions where all students are treated with respect, dignity, & equity. I want to contribute to Chelsea schools’ growth & improvement & continue the legacy of community investment in our children’s education. Building upon Chelsea schools’ rigor in academic, social, & emotional development, I want to support the strong community the schools have created. This support will include diversity, belonging, equity, & inclusion initiatives & through their implementation of restorative justice practices as an alternative to some traditional disciplinary processes. I want to invest my time, experience, enthusiasm, & skills for the benefit of Chelsea students, teachers, staff, administration, families, & other stakeholders. If elected, I will work honorably & productively on behalf of our Chelsea community.

Greenstein:

I believe a school board should be responsive, receptive, and transparent to parents, staff, students, and the community while encouraging constructive dialog. Education is one of the most important gifts we give to our children; my efforts as a board member would center on serving all the children in our community by ensuring they receive a quality education, academically and socially. One child is no more important than another. We have excellent policies in place and must ensure they are enforced. To ensure student/teacher/parent engagement and to further augment a child’s education, a detailed curriculum shared with parents is vital so parents can participate and reinforce in-school learning. Parents want information on what is taught in the classroom, not participate in curriculum development.

Henson:

I care deeply for the teachers and staff who showed up everyday in different ways to help my daughter during the pandemic. I wanted to show my appreciation so I started substitute teaching in the district. It was the experience of seeing the challenges, struggles and joys the teachers and students experienced everyday that made me decide to run for the school board. A K-12 education is the foundation for a child’s future success and I want to be part of ensuring our students, my daughters included, continue to have a district that grows and thrives and works together in the face of adversity and celebrates our successes.

Mallie:

I have two elementary aged children that are my primary motivator for running. The last couple of years I didn’t feel heard by the current Board and Administration, I would like that to change. To that end board members should be accessible and encourage open and constructive dialog outside of the twice monthly meetings. All people should feel safe in speaking or communicating questions or concerns to the School Board. Board members must represent their community, not a single constituency.

Moore:

I want to be on the school board because I have a skillset that is needed now. I am a consensus builder. I feel all sides want similar things from our schools: ▶︎top notch educational experience for our kids ▶︎a safe and welcoming environment for all students ▶︎retention of teachers. I value diversity of ideas, backgrounds and beliefs. We are at a point where we are having a hard time hearing each other, and all sides are losing the audience. I feel I could help in my small way to move us forward in understanding and respecting these differences.

What are the greatest challenges that will face the Board of Education in the coming year?

Craig:

There will always be challenges that face the Board of Education. This coming year the CSD Board will have to find ways to bring the community’s parents, teachers, administrators and students together to listen and civilly collaborate. Hopefully, we can communicate better with one another to mitigate the need for further frivolous lawsuits against our district that just take money and resources away from all the children in the community. We need to overcome the growing divisiveness and move forward together by focusing on the health, education and wellbeing of the youth of Chelsea.

Fox:

As we move forward amidst pressures from pandemic, political, & economic crises, the world is different than it was one, & even two, years ago. Despite this, Chelsea Schools continue to excel at serving students & stakeholders. We must support our teachers & administration in their service to students in addressing potential learning losses & disruptions of student wellness. As a community, we must do better in engaging with kindness & civility. In engaging with people of the community of various backgrounds & identities, it seems to me we all share a core desire to have safe & excellent schools where children are prepared for the future & feel a sense of belonging. How we realize those goals may differ, but we must be able to set aside identity politics & move forward on behalf of our children. This may easily begin with a rededication of our efforts in sincere engagement, reaching out with kindness & good intentions, empathically listening, & consensus building.

Greenstein:

The entire country is divided into left and right, we see this filtering into our schools. My goal is to work with teachers, admin, and the community to provide positive, productive guidance for our youth that will be inclusive and tolerant of all members of our society. I believe that most of us are more similar than different and must celebrate our uniqueness and our likenesses. If we can teach our children how to embrace differences and work together despite them, we may achieve more together. Education is one of the most important gifts we give to our children, I want to optimize their potential. We need to identify each student’s strengths and weaknesses and guide them towards opportunities that will open doors to their future where they can flourish. I realize that I will need to be a voice to those that elected me and those that may not have, and my goal is to earn earn their respect and trust by seeking input and making solid decisions that all can embrace.

Henson:

An ever present threat in our chaotic political landscape is a reduction in federal funding for public schools, which would be detrimental. The post covid educational landscape will also be a major challenge for a lot of districts. We must ensure our students are well cared for in all aspects.

Mallie:

The last couple of years have been difficult for students, parents, teachers, and school boards across the nation. Rebuilding trust that has been lost, working on ways to have constructive dialog with the community regarding any concerns, making sure that policies are in place to support an effective teaching environment, and that the policies are followed.

Moore:

Maintaining a staff who enjoys and feels supported by their Board will be the greatest challenge in the coming year. It has been a difficult period of time that we have experienced as a community. The pandemic made transparency into the workings of the school more difficult and mistrust has taken hold for some families. It will be imperative to relay to the community that our teachers and staff wake up each morning to help our students realize and attain their goals. Being an educator is a difficult job and the demands have increased. Among the most stressful new burden is the scrutiny from the community. Much of this scrutiny springs from a loss of trust in our schools. Rebuilding a supportive environment will be the greatest challenge facing the Board of Education in the coming year.

READ MORE:

Meet the 13 candidates vying for 4 Ann Arbor School Board seats

Meet the candidates running for the Dexter School Board in November

Meet the candidates vying for 3 Saline School Board seats

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Mon, 10 Oct 2022 08:17:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor/2022/10/voters-to-elect-4-new-chelsea-school-board-members-in-november.html
Killexams : Channel 9 General Election Guide: CMS School Board candidates

Ahead of the general election on Nov. 8, Channel 9 is asking candidates in several local races why they’re running and what they hope to accomplish if elected. We sent five questions to all candidates contending to represent Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools on the school board and asked them to respond in about 100 words.

READ MORE coverage from The Political Beat HERE

  • How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions, like social distancing, masking, and remote learning?
  • What are the top three qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent?
  • Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more?
  • What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers?
  • What sets you apart from your opponents?

In all, eighteen candidates are vying for the six open district seats on the CMS school board. Four incumbents are running to keep their position in the nonpartisan races.

Below are the complete, unedited responses of each candidate who chose to participate.

District 1

© Provided by WSOC Charlotte

Rhonda Cheek

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? a. I do not believe that health-based decisions should be made by a board of education, but rather by the Mecklenburg County Health Department or the NC Department of Health. This includes decisions about masking and remote versus in-person learning. The school board should not have been making decisions about mask wearing, health professionals should have been the determinants. b. I was an advocate for a safe return to in-person education and did not agree with the board majority, who abandoned the plan developed by staff to send students back to school in-person in August 2020. I stated publicly on numerous occasions that I had great concerns that the vast majority of our students would not do well academically in remote learning, and that unfortunately was true. I voted against continuing remote learning throughout fall of 2020 and remained an outspoken advocate for in-person learning. c. I vehemently opposed the former Superintendent’s recommendation to end all sports and extra-curricular activities in January 2021. When I learned of his plan, I spent 36 hours nonstop lobbying my colleagues on the school board to solidify enough votes to have a public show of non-support on this staff lead operating decision. That lobbying was successful and ultimately, we were able to allow sports and extra-curriculars to continue. As a result, many CMS teams and individual students won state and regional competitions as a result.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent?

a. Integrity is a core quality and non-negotiable

b. Excellent communication skills with all stakeholder groups

c. Visionary and Innovative academic leader with strong management skills; must be able to develop a strong strategic plan to move the district forward, must be able to delegate and manage a team. Must hire/place strong talent in the organization to support his vision, then give them the freedom to move their programs forward under her/his watch.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I support looking research-based practices and evaluating what current programs and initiatives are showing academic gains in students and also look for key indicators and trends in students that are struggling. a. Attendance policy enforcement b. In-person education c. Curriculum integrity across all schools, but allow the school to use flexibility in curriculum delivery. d. Emphasis on small group work in practicing and math, including tutoring and one-on-one interventions e. Integrated afterschool programs that coordinate with school day instruction. f. Summer enrichment programs that are integrated with the school curriculum g. MTSS- Multi tier system of support now being implemented to support students’ holistic needs. h. Enhanced professional development I would also like see the following concepts more deeply implemented a. Improved parental engagement- both at school and in the community. This is the “It takes a village” concept. Schools need to be welcoming and encourage parents to be involved, especially in their children’s education journey. Students with engage parents have higher outcomes overall. b. Community wide literacy program, impacting children beginning at birth. There are civic/faith and non-profits in places that could be united behind this, which should include adult literacy. Children exposed to practicing and books in infancy and pre-schools years develop higher language cognition and are better prepared for K-12 education.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? One crucial issue is the teacher pipeline, less students are entering education programs in college. CMS has its Early College program in education and needs to restart the teacher cadet program in all HS to expose students to the teaching profession. The state requirements to teacher licensure when moving from other states needs to be streamlined and reasonable, so teachers can get into the classroom when they move here from out of state. We also need reasonable licensure requirements for lateral entry type teachers, especially in the trades and STEM areas. Retention of teachers is multifaceted. The board needs to continue to lobby the state for improved pay and benefits, especially for veteran teachers. We must all create and ensure a culture of respect and accountability at all levels. That starts with the Superintendent and travels to every level of the organization. We must also ensure a safe workplace.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I have over 2 decades of experience advocating for the education needs of District 1, both as a community advocate and as an elected leader. I have been an effective, solutions-oriented advocate, who has a long history of building relationships with all stakeholders; students, parents, staff, community leaders, `and local/regional/state/federal lawmakers

Melissa Easley

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? As a member of the high risk community and a child that is unable to get the vaccine, I appreciate the fact that the board took the time to look at all the evidence and listen to our community health experts.Overall I feel the board did the best they could with the ever changing information that was available. I also feel that there were mistakes made along the way, as with any new situations, and I feel that if something like this were to happen again, things would be done differently.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? Three qualities I want to see in the next superintendent are The person is a Visionary. They have clear vision and goals for the future of CMS. Someone who wants to see those goals through and who has had experience in a mixed urban and rural district. The person has many Leadership skills. Someone who not only has the knowledge of best practices and maximizing achievement, but also surrounds themselves with knowledgeable strong people to help support the superintendent and our educators and staff. Finally to be an excellent communicator and relationship builder. This focuses on the culture of CMS, someone that will encourage our community to come together and build on the whole child learning and the journey to become an anti-racist district that CMS has committed to do doing.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I think what the board has done is a great start in getting on the correct path. I think more can be done, but taking on too much can also be a detriment to our progress. School performance grades will not be fixed overnight, or even in this BOE term, but we need to continue to make progress as we have been and in ways even bigger strides. We have the highest growth rate of our surrounding counties. If we continue growing our students for more than one year,like we did this past year, our student achievement will continue to improve.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? Base Salary is something that needs to be addressed at the state level, but the supplement is at the local level. As a board member I can advocate for our educators in Raleigh to fully fund education as I have been for the last 7 years. I will continue to build relationships not only at the state level, but on a county city level as well.

The second way to recruit and retain teachers is by changing the culture of CMS. Making sure that our staff and students’ basic needs are met first. Our staff and students need to feel safe and supported before we can put all of our focus on student achievement.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I am the only candidate in District 1 that is a certified educator in CMS and spent the last 10 years teaching our students.

I am the only democrat who is endorsed on the “Blue Ballot” for district 1.

Not only have I taught in CMS, but I have been a strong public-school education advocate creating connections across Mecklenburg,the state, and in Raleigh.

I am a mother of two elementary school children in CMS. This means I continue to have a vested interest in my children’s and your children’s future in CMS. I will work to continue to build bridges between our community and school board.

Hamani Fisher

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I believe during the unprecedented situation of COVID 19, the board stayed close to the recommendations of the Mecklenburg County Department of Health and attempted to keep our children as well protected as possible. There were a lot of unknown variables as we dealt with the factors surrounding the pandemic. I would like to ensure that there are adequate assessments of lessons learned from what we just experienced on global scale as well as policies authored that will equip us to be better prepared for future instances.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? As we will search for our next Superintendent, the following are 3 qualities that I would like to see reflected in a candidate.

Character- It will be important to discover what each candidate believes in as it relates to their values and educating Children. What is their philosophy of moving the needle in educating children.

Courage- Does the person possess the courage to make a bold move to build a greater CMS. What is their potential forecasted vision for the years down the road and not just for today. It will take courage to be an innovative leader.

Capacity- Does the candidate possess the training, education, and experience to anticipate what is coming down the road as well as possess the ability to proactively navigate thru a crisis that may arise. Experience is a great teacher that can if applied correctly, assist anyone to get out in front of a crisis and allow them proactive and not necessarily reactive.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? In addition, with the current initiatives, high visibility and authentic caring for all stakeholders is crucial. Effecting positive relationships assures that all are working together to assure the best outcome for all students.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? I believe in the approach of returning to the ancient path of respect and highlighting positive initiatives for the continued professional development for teachers. Teachers are professionals in their field of expertise and we must assist them in becoming greater in their proficiency of the curriculums we are requesting them to teach. As a CMS Board it is important to exemplify before teachers that we are vested in their success as well as a balanced life approach. I believe that we should continue to investigate innovative solutions that will afford us the opportunity to raise teacher salaries and offer a equitable bonus incentive system for all employees.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I am proud of my ability to represent the educational values of the community , demand accountability and be a team player as we become collaborative in working with all stakeholders to get the job done! But most of all my over 20 year’s experience of serving the public and being a voice for those who needed an advocate. I have experienced CMS from the perspective of a parent, community partner/leader and advocate. I believe my experience in all these roles has served a catalyst to prepare me to lead in the office I am pursuing.

Bill Fountain

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? The eight women on the school board failed our students, parents, and taxpayers by not allowing in school learning for over a year. This wrong-headed decision steered parents with resources to send their children to private, religious, or home schools, leaving the vast majority to struggle with virtual learning often without adult supervision. Unfortunately, this left a huge learning gap which some say will take years to fill. It damaged children’s social interactions, resulting in loneliness. These eight women should have followed the private and religious school practices of in classroom learning and leaving masking decisions to the children’s parents.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? The three qualities are successfully managing large organizations with innovation, experience as a teacher, and having a high moral character. I would add a fourth qualification that he or she should not be a proponent of woke culture. The woke theme of blaming white people is counterproductive for it tells the black and brown children all their problems stem from white people, so they’re not responsible for their behavior and learning. It also hones in on rejecting traditional morality by promoting sexual deviant lifestyles such as homosexuality and transgender. The lack of discipline sets no behavior standards for students.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? Pre-Kindergarten in small settings for children older than three can help social interaction and reading, writing, and math skills. My reservation is the insistence of teachers, administrators, and school board members of including social emotional learning, which is a disguise for advocating gender identity and telling black and brown children that they’re victims of white supremacy. practicing with phonics is a promising initiative that produced results in Mississippi.

I’d like to see some initiatives on vocational training tied with the community colleges. This path offers students a real shot as a productive member of society.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? The lack of support from administrators for discipline in the classroom is a key reason for many teachers leaving CMS. We see within CMS that disruptive behavior goes unpunished often based on the argument that the troublemaker experienced a difficult childhood. This policy doesn’t support the teacher trying to maintain an orderly learning environment. Too many times it’s the same children causing the disorder.

Teacher’s pay should be commensurate with their educational requirements; however, my sources say many teachers who left CMS went to surrounding counties for less pay but a safer and disciplined learning environment.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I’m the only candidate challenging the woke culture in our schools, which led to low performing and unsafe schools. It’s robbing students of self-esteem, confusing their God given sexuality, and setting no behavior standards.

I’m a retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel fighter pilot and Pentagon defense planner and a retired program manager of two successful hundred million dollars programs. My wife and I moved here 18 years ago. Soon afterwards I left retirement to teach high school for ten years. I also have demonstrated my concern for CMS’s failures by speaking at the school board meetings for over a year.

Ro Lawsin

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I believe the CMS School Board handled COVID-19 decisions poorly by locking down and forcing students to learn remotely longer than ANY school district and county in the state and furthermore, forced students and children to wear masks longer than any other school district despite many neighboring counties making their schools mask-optional. The damage done to students suffering from learning loss as a result of the lockdowns is immeasurable and the damage unknown for years to come.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent?

1. Experienced Superintendent

2. Proven Track Record & History of Success

3. Highly endorsed by former employer, staff, colleagues and teachers

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I firmly believe CMS needs to do MORE to include a significant increase to professional development for our teachers. A study of the teaching methodologies of how our teachers are teaching can help identify areas of improvement teachers can use in the classroom to help students learn better. In addition, identifying successful programs nationwide and implementing “pilot programs” to see if success can be achieved in CMS

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? First and foremost find out the root problems affecting teachers in CMS and identify reasons why they are leaving. To compile this date, conduct EXIT INTERVIEWS of every CMS teacher leaving to apply lessons learned to current teachers in the hopes of keeping them and attracting new, qualified and experienced teachers. Identify key funding needs for increases in teacher pay to make sure all CMS teachers pay is competitive not only in NC but nationwide.

What sets you apart from your opponents? Proven leader in the community, high energy and passionate parent that brings 21 years as a retired Air Force Officer, former small business owner and active community leader that the CMS School Board is sorely lacking. I also bring a sense of empathy, kindness, and listening skills parents deserve in a school board member as well as courage and tenacity to not only fight for but advocate those critical issues most concerning parents.

District 2

© Provided by WSOC Charlotte

Thelma Byers-Bailey

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I believe we made the appropriate decisions based on the medical advice available at the time. I believe that social distancing and masks were effective. I was disappointed in the lack of effectiveness that remote learning was for so many reasons, especially for our minority students.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? Experience as a Superintendent in producing high achievement scores and exceptional growth among a diverse student population in a large urban school district will be my top priority.

I will also consider someone with the classroom and school leadership experience who can spot effective teaching skills and is willing to move staff strategically to produce effective results in every school.

I will be looking to see what types of staff they would be considering to bring with them to fill gaps they perceive we may need to be filled in our management teams.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I believe the current Student Outcomes Focused Governance (SOFG) initiative is helping the district determine what students know and are able to do. This will identify which students are not meeting growth so resources can be put into place help them. By monitoring progress toward the various goals and guard rails each month, we expect the achievement scores for all students to increase while closing the gaps we currently see among student groups.

I also believe that fully funding the current Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) will help to identify and mitigate the barriers that prevent some students from focusing.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? Since school districts receive their funds from federal, state and local government. Our state Constitution has says the state has the primary responsibility to fund education. There have been periods of time when our state has met this mandate and our education system has thrived.

That is no longer the case and local counties have been forced to attempt to pick up the slack. Our state Supreme Court is seriously considering mandating our state to fund education according to the Leandro proposal. If that occurs it will go a long way to funding the education needs.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I have a proven record of getting things done especially with respect to making sure CMS bond packages are fiscally sound and equitably distributed. I have traveled extensively to learn the latest innovations in education. I have brought concepts back to CMS, the latest being the SOFG work our board implemented.

I have served our board as Vice-Chair for 2 years and have been elected to 2 terms on the Board of Directors of the NC School Boards Association (NCSBA). This year our local Pride Magazine selected me as one of the Influential Women Leading the Way in Charlotte.

Juanrique Hall

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I think given everything that they were being told at the time the school board acted in good faith. I hope that we have a lot of lessons learned from this, though, that we can go back and refer to in the event something like this happens in the future..

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? I need to see someone that is capable of inspiring leaders to lead and holding those who are uncapable of leading to account. I understand that school districts need leaders provide a vision for the future, managers that are capable of identifying & communicating the steps needed make the vision achievable AND workers who are able to execute the steps.

Our next superintendent needs to know That the board will hold him accountable for taking action & leading effectively.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I think that the initiatives that have been laid out have been established in good faith So I am willing to see if they can be successful and give credit where it’s due if they are successful and if they aren’t make changes.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? The biggest thing that we can do to address paying retention is to provide more opportunities and incentives for people to enter the workforce as well as exit opportunities to remove those who are failing. One thing that I would really love to do is open Our class rings up to the many military instructors that we have that live in this & state. Most of these instructors have bachelor’s degrees and thousands of hours teaching young adults. They also have navigated difficult and rewarding career successfully and they know how to handle large bureaucracies. So I believe this is an asset that we should investigate using much further.

What sets you apart from your opponents? The current BOE member for District II Could walk down the halls of every school in our district and no one would know who they were. My other opponent is directly tied to religious groups that are unwilling to accept our LGBTQ+ students.

So I believe that I am the only candidate that has support from both conservative organizations and liberal organizations as well as parent, Veteran, Latino, African American & LGBTQ+ organizations.

And most importantly, I know for a fact that I am the only candidate that stands for serving students not sides.

Monty Witherspoon

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I think the best decisions were made earlier in the pandemic according to the available science. However, the negative impact of remote learning is obvious. The school board did not effectively communicate its safety protocol to students, parents, and staff as they prepared to return to in-person learning. It is clear that CMS needs new leadership to address the student achievement gaps that existed prior to the pandemic.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? It is important that he or she establish a supported and effective culture within the district. This involves the Superintendent’s ability to engineer working conditions that promote effectiveteaching and professional growth rather than toxicity, distrust, and low employee morale. Also, theyshould communicate the goals and objectives to employees. The Superintendent should possess an ability to translate complex concepts to individuals and groups in the community who may or may not be engaged with the district.

The Superintendent should possess the capacity to manage change. It is important that they are inclusive and informative rather than forceful and negligent in leading change.

The Superintendent should possesses the ability to manage data. They must be able to anticipate problems and quickly respond or reengineer programs.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I agree with the recent initiatives on student outcomes. However, some members of the board have served for almost a decade or more. They should have been laser-focused on student outcomes well before this recent initiative.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? I support the findings of the 1997 Leandro v. State case, in which the judge directed the State of North Carolina to take action to ensure that students across the state would receive “a sound basic education”, guaranteed them in the North Carolina Constitution. According to Article IX, Section 2 of that Constitution, the State is obligated to fund free public education with equal opportunities provided for all students. Therefore, I believe that public education should be adequately funded by the State.

The state of North Carolina has a $6.2 billion budget surplus which came, in part, fromfederal assistance and sales tax from online spending during the pandemic.

Furthermore, the WestEd report (2018), identified key areas where resources were needed to address that included funding, the teacher pipeline, principal training, lack of Pre-K programs, and the challenges of high-poverty schools. Adequately funding public education was central to the report. One recommendation is to “Provide a qualified, well-prepared, and diverse teaching staff in every school”. It further states, “Working conditions and staffing structures should enable all staff members to do their job effectively and grow professionally while supporting the academic, personal, and social growth of all their students”.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I will be laser-focused on student achievement

District 3

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Gregory “Dee” Rankin

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? The board made calculated and informed decisions during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Having 2 children that attend CMS and a daughter that is an educator in the district, I am glad the board utilized data, followed the state guidelines as well as the CDC, to ensure our students and staff remained safe while still receiving an education. We have to remember, just because students were not in the building 5 days a week, that did not mean learning was taking place and that our educators were not working hard. Students were learning and educators were working diligently to educate our students through a global pandemic.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? The top three qualities I would like to see in our next superintendent are:

1. Data and detailed oriented

2. Possess an equity lens

3. Motivator/Relationship Builder

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? As a district we can always do more to Strengthen student outcomes. As a Board Member, if elected, I would like to have quarterly reports from the academic department as well as the equity department. We must ensure that the assessments throughout the year are aligned with state standards so that we have a better understanding of what our students’ needs are and also provide an opportunity for educators to identify possible improvements in their practices. Consistent reports from the equity department are essential because equity should be at the center of every decision that we make.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? As a board we must continue to lobby to state representatives to increase teacher pay. Also as a district we must commit to investing in our teachers. We must provide professional development to our staff that is relevant. One of the complaints I hear from teachers is that some of the professional development they receive is not relevant. We must implement professional development that promotes growth. As educators grow they feel supported. Supporting our educators to the highest capacity possible is how we will be able to retain teachers other than the obvious, which is increasing teacher pay.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I pride myself on being a systems thinker. I understand that there are multiple disciplines involved when attempting to solve the problem of how do meet the needs of each student in CMS. I have a proven track record serving our community. First I am a former educator, so I understand what it’s like to be in the classroom. I have served on several community organizations in a leadership capacity all with the common mission of helping kids. The capacities in which I have served the community are as follows: Chair of the Mayor’s Mentoring Alliance, Chair of the Education Committee for the Black Political Caucus of Charlotte Mecklenburg, Co-Chair of the Student Wellness Committee on the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools Equity Committee. I understand the importance of creating effective policy and as a board member my goal will be to create policy that is effective and equitable. Being a native Charlottean, educating our kids is personal to me. I want to see our city and county to continue to grow and the only way that can happen is if we educate our kids in a manner that when students receive a diploma from Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools they are prepared to be self-sufficient, productive members of society.

Steven Rushing

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I believe CMS operated in the best interest of the safety of our children with the actions and lenght of time for the distancing, masking and remote learning. I believe the time that CMS used was more than enough to keep our children safe.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? I believe for the next superintendent we need to think outside the Box find someone new with possible radical new ideas. Someone who understands the need to have everyone involved especially but not just the majority but the minorities included in what our teachers and students need. A superintendent that understand the need for help in the Latin community which in some areas makes up a large amoung of the students but a lot of times has no spokesperson except for now with me running in district3 which has a large Latin-American presence. We need perhaps someone younger and with a heart for the teachers and sees the need to support our teachers while the teachers support our students.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I do agree with the initiatives that were detailed and do believe they are a great start but there’s always room for more improvement. There is no such thing as perfect outcome when it comes to our schools performance but we can push ourselves always strive to always work as hard as possible to do the very best for our children and teachers.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? I believe there has to be a push in every direction to get more funding allocated for teachers pay and their supplies needed to offer the best for our children. The best possible education for our children is only possible by having the best teachers so one hand washes the other. We need to cut the fat from areas that can wait or are not needed to provide the much needed pay increase for our teachers at the same time getting and keeping our teachers engaged in what decisions are made in our schools will keep the retention of our teachers high. If our teachers feel like they have skin in the game and have a real voice to be heard our teachers will know they are valued and this will give our teachers a sense of appreciation and support which will keep them in CMS positions.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I will not ever say anything negative about my opponent all I can say is what I bring to the table. I bring a different and fresh new look at things and not the traditional cookie cutter ideology. I bring an eagerness to move the needle on behalf of our children and teachers. I bring also a perspective that comes from the Latin-American parents in the community which doesn’t have much if any support in CMS because I am a Latin-American parent. I bring with me ideas to include the parents that have the availability to be included more in the day-to-day interaction with different programs one of which I call D.O.D. (Dads on Duty) to help teachers with time and student protection while in school. We need programs that drive and push our children to strive for the best in all categories in school.

District 4

© Provided by WSOC Charlotte

Carol Sawyer

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? Many of our CMS students families lost loved ones during the peak of Covid. I hope that we never face a health crisis of that scale again. I believe the Board made the best decisions it could given the ever-changing (and sometimes conflicting) recommendations of the CDC, Mecklenburg County Public Health, ABC Collaborative, and other bodies charged with public health and school recommendations.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent?

I want a superintendent who:

- encourages innovation and risk taking within the parameters of the Board’s goal and guardrails

- balances the needs of the district to provide equal and equitable education experiences across schools, while allowing implementation decisions to be made by the staff members closest to the work

- has high expectations for students, educators, and staff

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I support the strategies adopted to Strengthen student outcomes. However, more work needs to be done the ensure that those strategies are employed with fidelity, and that they reach all the students who need support.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? Educators need respect, support, pay. CMS needs to balance the need to standardize curriculum across schools with the flexibility desired by our most experienced teachers to implement the curriculum with integrity.

I supported increasing the County pay supplement 10%, unfortunately the final budget only funded a 5% increase. The North Carolina General Assembly must raise educator pay so it is comparable to other similarly degreed professionals.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I have served on the Board since 2017. This is a challenging job and I have learned how to do it well. I chair the Policy Committee and previously chaired the Facilities Committee. I shepherded the creation of a new equity policy and a Community Equity Committee. I have fully embraced the Board’s student outcomes focused governance work and dedicate a significant amount of my time to monitoring performance in terms of goals and guardrails.

I am responsive to constituent concerns and questions. I actively reach out to constituencies via social media, eNewsletters, community events, and neighborhood meetings.

Stephanie Sneed

Did not respond to Channel 9′s questions.

Clara Kennedy Witherspoon

Did not respond to Channel 9′s questions.

District 5

© Provided by WSOC Charlotte

Lisa Cline

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? It’s a shame that Washington politicians have made this a political issue instead of looking at the effects that this had on our children, both socially and educationally. By keeping the schools closed the mental health of our children suffered tremendously and the learning loss is going to take a while for the children to recoup.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? This is hard to decide, as there are many qualities the new superintendent must have. 1.A visionary, innovative leader who values transparency. 2. An inspirational leader who is accountable and bases decisions based on what is best for students. 3. Demonstrates high ethical standards and leads with integrity. Strong financial intelligence. Successful teaching and administrative experience. Outstanding communication skills.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? These initiatives are just a beginning. The District must allocate more funds to the 50 schools that are failing by the state standards. Standards need to be raised for all children while supporting those who need additional reinforcement so that all children are performing at or above their grade level. The District must allow our teachers to do what they do best: Teach! Let them design lessons that are appropriate for their students rather than giving them a purchased curriculum. The State provides the Standards to follow and the scores needed for success; teachers do not need to be told to be on a certain lesson on a certain day. Finally take away all the additional workshops our teachers are required to take. Last week, CMS added 4 additional workshops to be completed by January 21, 2023. When do our teachers have time to plan and grade lessons? They are not paid to do these additional requirements!

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? CMS should lead the state by creating an incentive plan for retaining teachers. CMS controls the supplement, the state controls the pay, so CMS should pay the teachers who earn their Masters additional monies as an incentive. Rather than keeping teachers at a step for a number of years, these steps should be increased yearly. The current pay does not help the more experienced teacher.

What sets you apart from your opponents? 39+ years of educational experience, 29+ in CMS! I was a teacher, curriculum developer, and administrator, but more importantly I was a CMS parent for 15 years, serving on the PTSA boards of my children’s elementary, middle, and high schools. I worked on the East, South and West sides of Charlotte, so I understand the needs of the different communities. I was at one of the high schools Judge Manning suggested we close, through the hard work of our teachers and staff, we began to close the gap of our students. My priority is the children. We need to rebuild the broken trust between the community and the school system.

Trent Merchant

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? Hindsight is 20/20, so anyone answering this question will be able to point out mistakes, yet no one can change the past, so a more helpful question for students would be “What are we going to do about it moving forward?”

The Board was correct to go remote in March 2020. Beyond that, it gets more complicated. Almost everyone suffered during COVID. The biggest failure by CMS was that it had poor executive leadership, and it doubled down on that poor leadership. I address this in much greater detail at trentmerchant.com/faq.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent?

  • Success leading a complex organization with multiple sites, and many customers / employees
  • Courage, decisiveness, ability to execute without having all of the information or funding
  • An organization builder, not a resume builder, with a track record of hiring people better than themselves

I’m also looking for an authentic leader who brings

  • high EQ - empathy, self awareness, ability to neutralize toxicity
  • Exceptional communication skills, especially in adaptation and listening for nuance

But that’s just me… The Board needs to listen to input from the community, then work together to agree on which traits are must-haves and would-like-to-haves.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? They are on the right path, but there still is not a big unifying goal to inspire the Board, team, and community.

When I was on the CMS Board 2006-2011, we united around the goal of “Raise the Bar and Close the Gaps” related to student achievement. It was the drumbeat that drove every decision, and provided a cohesive framework for all of our initiatives.

It was incredibly successful, as we won the Broad Prize, based on the best overall gains in student achievement and closing achievement gaps in the USA - despite making massive budget cuts due to the Great Recession.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? I am working on this issue with a school district in California through my consulting practice. The issues vary by county in NC, but in CMS we need to build a culture, which starts with courage and clarity at the top. For teachers, the elements of that culture include:

  • Fostering respect for teachers
  • Ensuring safe schools - physically, intellectually, and emotionally
  • Making licensure / professional development more relevant and less compliance-driven
  • Delivering some clear academic wins so we can advocate effectively for better compensation.

We also need to build better relationships with county and state leaders.

What sets you apart from your opponents? My professional skill set and authentic style are exactly what CMS needs at this point in time. I bring unmatched experience and perspective to the role, including:

  • CMS Board Member 2006-2011, when CMS was incredibly successful
  • Strong Independent Voice and team builder
  • Executive Search Consultant who will make sure we hire the right Superintendent
  • Corporate Leadership experience: Started the first-ever Talent function at company we grew to $5B, then led the International Division
  • Former teacher, coach, theatre director, and school leader
  • CMS Parent 2007-2026

Endorsed by multiple organizations and bipartisan community leaders - see trentmerchant.com/supporters for details

District 6

© Provided by WSOC Charlotte

Summer Nunn

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking, and remote learning? I do not envy the position the board was put in during COVID especially given they are not doctors or disease experts. What I can say is none of them were parents of elementary school kids who couldn’t read or were learning to read. I wish they would have prioritized kids’ needs based on grade level after reviewing the progress and outcomes of students and teacher feedback on what was best. We all wanted them safely back in the classroom quicker as remote and hybrid specifically caused tremendous challenges.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? · Determined. We need to find someone who has been successful at turning a large organization around where performance is falling short and staff satisfaction has declined. Someone who walks towards challenges. · Servant. We need someone who knows the success of an organization is built by those in it and it is finding the right people and being disciplined enough to listen to them as well on the best path to success. We need someone to create an environment where people feel respected and accountable. · Problem solver. We need someone who is relentless in improving student success for all based on the community vision delivered by the board. They need them to create strategies and plans, measure, and optimize. We need someone looking for issues to solve and making sure CMS has the right plans and empowers the right staff to achieve their goals.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I think moving toward the goals and guardrail as a framework to measure student outcomes is the right direction for the board. I am not sure it accomplishes what the community wants from the board since it is heavily focused on test scores at a certain period rather than whole-child learning and meeting the needs of every kid. Moreso, I question if we have all the right goals. I also don’t see enough strategy and plans to accomplish these goals filtering down from the superintendent and their leadership as a parent who sits on the Student Improvement Team (SIT) at my kid’s elementary school. It feels like we have goals and the plan is completely placed on the principal and parent group (SIT) which is why we see such variance through our schools and their performance.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? Overall, the state must start prioritizing funding for public education more than they are now. We now rank at the bottom of per-student spending when looking at the size of NC’s economy. Most teacher pay is dictated at the state level. I look forward to working with the state legislature to get NC back to being one of the top in public education and resourcing teachers properly. The board can start listening to teachers and measuring satisfaction. NC Teacher Working Condition Survey is conducted every two years and roughly 70% of our teachers fill it out. This could be an immediate proxy until we roll out a proper survey. We must understand why they are leaving and then start solving those issues. Some glaring themes are around class size, not enough on-instruction time, too much paperwork and other school duties, enforcement of policies, and lack of professional development. Teachers don’t feel like they can do their job nor are they able to develop further and we have to solve that. That could be technology investments, support staff adjustments, and commitment to communication and development. Also, when they can leave teaching and go get a job making 20-40% more, they need a more livable wage.

What sets you apart from your opponents? I am the mom of 2 elementary school kids who watched my kids start their education career from my home. I am at the beginning of CMS with a Kindergarten and 4th grader. I am also a successful business leader who has served as a corporate marketing executive for multiple Charlotte-based businesses. I have hired the right people and built teams for large multiple-site location organizations. CMS is a large organization with 180 schools and a $2B budget. I have tremendous experience building, collaborating, and securing budgets based on strategy and working with other counterparts to show the return on investment and reallocation needed to achieve goals. I am also honest and transparent and don’t want to play political games nor do I have hidden agendas other than making CMS as great as possible for my kid’s generation and all of the communities in Charlotte.

Sean Strain

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? CMS handled Covid with care and concern, before vaccines were approved and available for students (age 12) and staff. That said, there was still a gulf between the CMS position and that of the Governor/Secy of HHS that cost all of our children tremendously between August 2020 and Spring 2021. Our advisors laid out the pros and cons, the risk/benefit analysis if you will, in a 6-hour Board briefing. Ultimately, the decisions made by the Board were not rational decisions made based on scientific facts, particularly but not exclusively post vaccine availability. We needed to listen to our medical experts, and every week the evidence mounted that schools were, and in-person learning was, “Safe and Essential.”

The data shows the harm of keeping students of school, and now we work to regain the scholastic abilities of all, and holistically repair our students-both physically and mentally. Of course we are a large school system, but we can’t disregard the mental health of many students, which has been affected by closing the CMS doors for this extended period of time. Bringing more counselors on staff, as well as hiring the appropriate amount of teachers/teacher aides will help ease the stress of all. This will lead to success in all areas, for ALL students, not just District 6.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? The top three qualities I will look for in our next Superintendent are:

*Proven leadership of a large ($1B+), complex - preferably services - organization in a regulated industry. Has to have strong, demonstrated track record of establishing culture of accountability, performance management, achieving/exceeding goals, developing a strong team culture of purpose and commitment to the Mission, incenting and rewarding performance while giving counsel to those not meeting goals/performance objectives.

*Accountability; to students/families, faculty/employees and CMS community supporters.

*Accessibility; someone who brings their experience to CMS, but is also open to feedback and input from the BOD, and our community.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I understand and generally agree with the initiatives, but recognize it’s just a start. We have a long way to go to fill the void of the Covid years, let alone to address the decades-old gaps we so often “admire” as opposed to closing. This will require teamwork from teachers/staff, students, our community and families. The Superintendent can establish initiatives, but they will become empty words without follow through and willingness to assess and readjust as needed. All of that being said, with respect the question itself is a bit misplaced as strategy and execution belongs to the Superintendent and the Board’s job is to evaluate his/her performance in achieving them - so while I certainly have an opinion on the defined initiatives (and have provided some feedback), our primary job as a Board is to evaluate progress toward meeting our Goals and assess, incent and reward staff accordingly.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? Teachers should be one of the highest paying professions we have in the world, but sadly this is not true. The quote I have seen-”teachers are in it for the outcome, not the income” is great, but teacher pay needs to be addressed and competitive at all levels. To attract and keep quality teachers, NC needs to offer pay commensurate to the experience and demonstrated proficiency, capability and performance. This needs to be addressed at the state level. All of that being said regarding state pay, we must also establish a culture within CMS where staff want to work - CMS being a destination and retirement job - and that includes addressing all aspects of the workplace culture (incl but not limited to student behavior/conduct, reducing load on the teachers - incl offloading some aspects of work *back* to County services, and general workplace code of conduct issues).

What sets you apart from your opponents? Proven leadership experience. My two opponents are each very qualified - no less qualified than I was 7 years ago. Each of us are business professionals, several with executive experience, each of us longtime parents having experience with CMS (incl SIT/local school policy board) on which to reflect. The key difference is that I also have a record of 5 years of service demonstrating with every discussion, debate and vote that I am Student-centered, Mission-focused, and understand the role - both the content and context - to continue to operate in said role from Day 1. I am known very broadly as “A Voice of Reason” and “A Voice for Students” - and am respected by many, if not most, of those recognizing that this is a public service role for me rather than a political seat. I have the community relationships and support both locally and in Raleigh to move our work forward, and am uniquely qualified in my race to do so.

I am asking voters to look at my voting record, and will continue to fight for our students, our faculty, and quality school experiences. We need to focus on sending career and college readystudents into the world. There are many avenues in which we can achieve this, and I’m happy to sit down with anyone to dive into details.

Michael Watson

How do you feel the school board handled important COVID-19 decisions like social distancing, masking and remote learning? I try to have some grace regarding the decisions related to Covid-19. As a country we were dealing with an unprecedented series of events and there wasn’t necessarily a roadmap to navigate a pandemic. In my opinion, the decisions were made through the lens of an abundance of caution in the interest of saving and preserving life and not within the lens of maintaining a positive learning environment. In retrospect we know now that social distancing and masking could have allowed our students to remain in school with a level of continuity in the learning experience. There also could have been a better job articulating the reasoning behind the decisions with our communities.

What are the top 3 qualities you want to see in the next Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools superintendent? The top three qualities I would like to see are 1. Demonstrated understanding and execution of point leadership, meaning that the next superintendent can surround him/herself with the best support staff to execute a vision. 2. Ability to communicate effectively and transparently to the community, the CMS organization, and the board. The energy to execute and deliver upon the goals and expectations of the CMS Board.

Since the latest round of school performance reports from the state, district officials have detailed various initiatives aimed at improving student outcomes. Do you agree with those initiatives, or do you think the district needs to do more? I think the initiatives put forward have promise but much like initiatives in previous years there is a disconnect between addressing root issues in an individualized manner vs a district wide initiative. It is my desire to see more locally designed solutions to address inequity and achievement gaps as there are unique and nuanced root causes within numbered districts and even at schools within the same districts. We must get better at focusing on data driven outcomes.

What do you think needs to be done to address pay and retention among North Carolina teachers? Recruitment and retention is a serious matter within CMS, and I do not think pay and total compensation tells the whole story. Let me preface that with the statement that our teachers deserve a livable wage, and we should do everything we can to stay competitive within the market. We have challenges filling that gap when our state legislature has not fully funded us but again that is not the whole story. We need to also make sure our educators feel supported and have a reasonable work environment. We could learn a lot from just listening to what they say.

What sets you apart from your opponents? In my district I am the only candidate that has served CMS at every level at some capacity. At the elementary level I served as a 3-year SLT Member and VP of the PTA. At the Middle school level, I served as a 3-year SLT member and President of a PTA. I continue to serve at the High School level on the PTA. In addition, I am on the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board for the College of Engineering at the University of Missouri. I have a passion for education and ensuring all students have positive outcomes. I bring a fresh vision with an emphasis on data driven transformative solutions to make CMS the district of choice for education.

Vote 2022 Stories

Channel 9 General Election Guide: CMS School Board candidates

Channel 9 General Election Guide: North Carolina state House candidates

Channel 9 General Election Guide: North Carolina state Senate candidates

Channel 9 General Election Guide: Mecklenburg County Board of Commissioner candidates

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