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Killexams : Teacher-Certification Examinations test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CSET Search results Killexams : Teacher-Certification Examinations test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CSET https://killexams.com/exam_list/Teacher-Certification Killexams : Fact check: Florida teaching certificate law only applies to military veterans, not their spouses

The claim: A Florida law allows military veterans’ spouses to receive teaching certificates without bachelor's degrees

On July 1, a new Florida law took effect that allows military veterans to receive five-year teaching certificates without a bachelor's degree. Soon after this initiative was announced, its details became muddled across social media.

One user on Facebook shared a post describing a claimed occurrence in a Florida classroom as a result of the law.

"Today in my classroom, I had a soon to be teacher observe me in my classroom for 2 hours," the July 27 post claims. "She did not have a bachelor's degree. Her husband did 4 years in the military 30 years ago. The state of Florida gave her a five-year teaching certification because she's married to a veteran... The only thing she had to do to get this teaching certification was to observe certified teachers and their classrooms for a total of 12 hours."

The post was shared over 35,000 times in its first two days. Similar viral iterations have been published on Facebook and Twitter.

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The occurrence described in the viral claims cannot have happened, however. Spouses and family members are ineligible for the program created by Florida Senate Bill 896.

USA TODAY reached out to the user who shared the claim for comment.

A giant United States flag drops in behind a military color guard during the national anthem before a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the Milwaukee Brewers, Saturday, July 30, 2022, in Boston. The Red Sox and the Home Base organization honored Black veterans during a pregame ceremony. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

New law doesn't apply to spouses

The Florida Department of Education website states that in order to be eligible for the Military Veterans Certification Pathway, veterans must meet several criteria:

  • Minimum of 48 months of U.S. active duty military service with an honorable/medical discharge

  • Minimum of 60 college credits with a 2.5 grade-point average

  • Passing score on a subject area exam(s) of their choice

  • Evidence of employment in a Florida school district

  • Cleared background screening

If accepted, the law requires veterans to be assigned to a teaching mentor for a minimum of two years.

The wording on the Florida education website was initially misleading, as it announced a plan to "provide opportunities for members of the United States Armed Forces, veterans and their spouses to become part of our team." This wording was present on the website as recently as July 18, but as of July 28, an extra disclaimer was added.

"Military spouses and families are not eligible for this certification pathway," the update reads.

Fact check: Kentucky amendment requiring mothers to report pregnancy status wasn't real proposal

There is a separate act, titled the Don Hahnfeldt Veteran and Military Family Opportunity Act, that allows military personnel, veterans and their spouses to request waivers for initial certification fees and certification examination fees.

Cassie Palelis, an education department spokesperson, reiterated the requirements for eligibility for the Military Veterans Certification Pathway via email with USA TODAY.

"With the Military Veterans Certification Pathway, veterans will have five years to fulfill the requirements for a professional certificate, including obtaining a Bachelor’s degree," Palelis said. "The Military Veteran Certification Pathway is not available for spouses of military veterans, unless they also meet the requirements stated above. Florida offers fee waivers for initial certification fees and certification test fees for military personnel, veterans and their spouses."

Our rating: False

Based on our research, we rate FALSE the claim that a Florida law allows military veterans’ spouses to receive teaching certificates without bachelor's degrees. Though the wording on the Florida education department website was initially misleading, the law never allowed spouses to receive these certificates, only veterans. So the scenario presented in the post cannot have taken place.

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fact check: Florida SB 896 doesn't apply to veterans' spouses

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 13:58:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/video/fact-check-florida-teaching-certificate-015856558.html
Killexams : Vouchers available for teachers to retake exam

To assist candidates seeking Oklahoma educator certification, the Certification Examinations for Oklahoma Educators (CEOE) program, in conjunction with the Office of Educational Quality and Accountability (OEQA), are excited to announce the establishment of free third-attempt retake vouchers.

Effective March 28, 2022, examinees who score within three points of the established passing score on the first and second attempt, will be eligible for a free test fee voucher for registering for a third attempt of the test. Candidates are eligible for up to one voucher per each test. Test fee vouchers will be automatically emailed to eligible candidates up to two weeks after the release of their score for their second attempt.  

“OEQA recognizes the time, effort and resources required to complete the certification process and hopes to lessen that burden for our future educators with this opportunity,” Renee Launey-Rodolf, interim executive director, OEQA.

Information: OEQA, (405) 522-5399. 

Tue, 02 Aug 2022 02:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.muskogeephoenix.com/news/schools/vouchers-available-for-teachers-to-retake-exam/article_b22d6b82-0310-5487-8f53-9047fe00e57e.html
Killexams : New efforts to combat teacher shortages don't address the real problems

Aug. 9 (UPI) -- States have recently focused their efforts to reduce the nation's teacher shortage by promoting strategies that "remove or relax barriers to entry" to quickly bring new people into the teaching profession.

California, for example, allows teacher candidates to skip basic skills and subject matter tests if they have taken approved college courses. New Mexico is replacing subject skills tests with a portfolio to demonstrate teaching competency.

Similarly, Oklahoma eliminated the Oklahoma General Education Test as a certification requirement. Missouri no longer looks at a prospective teacher's overall grades -- just the ones earned in select courses required to become a teacher. Alabama has moved to allow some who score below the cutoff scores on teacher certification exams to still get a teacher's license, and Arizona's education requirements for teachers now allow people without a college degree to begin teaching -- so long as they are currently enrolled in college.

All of these efforts focus on recruiting new teachers, mostly by lowering requirements to make it easier for people to become certified to teach in public schools.

But these approaches do not address the genuine causes of the nationwide teacher shortage. As we found doing research for our book How Did We Get Here?: The Decay of the Teaching Profession, college students who are interested in becoming teachers and current teachers agree: The root cause of the problem is a longstanding overall lack of respect for teachers and their craft, which is reflected by decades of low pay, hyperscrutiny and poor working conditions.

Disrespect to profession

Even before COVID-19 hit, teachers were leaving the profession at an increasing rate. In the late 1980s, annual teacher turnover was 5.6%, but it has grown to around 8% over the past decade.

The stress of teaching through a pandemic has been speculated to drive away even more teachers. About 1 in 6 teachers expressed that they would likely leave their job pre-pandemic, but this increased to 1 in 4 by the 2020-21 school year. While teachers continue to leave classrooms, fewer people are signing up to replace them.

In fact, the number of incoming teachers declined from 275,000 in 2010 to under 200,000 in 2020 and is projected to be under 120,000 by 2025. And even those staying on the job are so unhappy, many have been striking.

We found that the reasons teachers are leaving primarily revolve around the disrespect they and the profession consistently face. For example, teachers earn about 20% less than similarly educated professionals.

They also faced an escalating workload, even before the pandemic placed additional demands on their time, energy and mental health.

In addition, teachers have been experiencing diminishing control over what and how they teach. They are also regularly exposed to a continued tide of disrespectful student behavior and parental hostility, as highlighted by a survey of 15,000 educators that revealed a growing trend of students verbally and physically harassing teachers, as well as parents engaging in online harassment and retaliatory behaviors for teachers simply doing their jobs.

This overall lack of respect drives turnover from existing teachers and discourages potential teachers from considering the profession.

One college student told us, "I looked into teaching as a career pretty strongly ... and every person I talked to, be it a grade school teacher or college professor, told me the same thing -- that it was a lot of work, it was an unstable work environment, and the pay was very poor for the amount of work that you put in." Unsurprisingly, she chose another career path.

Wrong solutions

A growing number of states have eliminated or have proposed to remove basic skills and subject matter test requirements for teacher certification. Those prerequisites have long served as quality control checks for prospective teachers. While they do not ensure effective teaching, they do serve as a minimum qualification threshold.

We believe efforts to loosen requirements for new teachers will bring more disrespect to the profession. History also suggests that they will make it so that schools that serve mostly students of color will have even fewer certified and experienced teachers than they already do.

But more directly, these efforts to boost teacher recruitment don't address the reasons teachers are leaving the profession in the first place, which drive 90% of the demand for new teachers.

Lowering the standards to allow more people to enter the teaching profession may, for a short period, boost the number of people available to stand in front of classrooms. But that approach does not make teaching an attractive profession to consider, nor worthwhile for someone to stay and thrive in. Solving the teacher shortage problem requires solutions that reduce the numbers of teachers leaving the field and specifically address the lack of respect, low pay, hyperscrutiny and poor working conditions that they regularly endure.The Conversation

Henry Tran is an associate professor of education leadership at the University of South Carolina. Douglas A. Smith is an associate professor of education at Iowa State University.

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of the author.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 00:08:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.upi.com/Voices/2022/08/09/teacher-shortages-low-pay-respect/6711660045550/
Killexams : New York state facing teacher shortage

As millions of students prepare to get back in the classroom, schools across the country are facing a teacher shortage.

It’s causing school districts and law makers to find ways to combat the problem that’s been a growing problem for years now.

New York State is not immune to the problem.

NewsChannel 13 looked at an online application system for educators and right now schools in the Capital Region are now looking to fill nearly 400 teaching jobs.

New York is expected to need 180,000 new teachers in the next decade. However, there may not be enough educators to fill those roles.

According to the U.S. Department of Education, enrollment in the state’s teacher’s union declined by 53% since 2009.

The state teacher retirement system projects that one-third of teachers could retire in the next five years.

The Board of Regents made it a little easier to become a teacher. In April, the board voted to remove a national assessment test as a requirement for certification. The board is also loosening teaching certificate restrictions.

The proposed new literacy certificate would allow teachers to do 50 hours of in-class teaching, instead of 100, to get certified for teaching all grade levels.

If adopted, it would be implemented beginning September 28.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 09:49:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://wnyt.com/top-stories/new-york-state-facing-teacher-shortage/
Killexams : Back to School 2022: What to know about the changes to teacher certifications in Alabama

Alabama Superintendent of Education Eric Mackey, left, and Tonya Chestnut, of the Alabama State Board of Education, right, following their meeting in Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday May 13, 2021.

The Alabama State Department of Education recently made some changes to teacher certification standards.

The changes have brought on some concerns that teaching standards will be lowered, but Alabama State Superintendent Dr. Eric Mackey said that would not be the case.

Here’s what to know to get caught up.

So, what are the changes?

Most notably, would-be teachers who fail the Praxis test within one standard error of deviation can still receive their teaching license, as long as their teaching field GPA is higher than the usual requirements: 2.75 rather than 2.5.

A couple of hundred teachers failed the Praxis within one standard error of measure between 2019 and 2021.

The other major change is that superintendents in districts with “extraordinary critical need” can potentially hire a would-be teacher with a Praxis score within two standard errors of measure, or around 10 points, according to Mackey.

“We will look at a waiver,” said Mackey. “If a superintendent says to us, ‘I simply cannot find anyone else, but I have this person who has a college degree in social studies, they have demonstrated they know the material, and I believe in this person.’”

This waiver — an emergency certificate — can only be renewed twice, meaning it can be active for only three years. After that, the emergency teacher would need to have received a teacher’s license or the superintendent will need to have found a new teacher.

MORE: Alabama streamlines special-education certification in bid to remedy teacher shortages

RELATED: Alabama Senate committee approves 'historic' raises for experienced teachers

How far back will my GPA and Praxis score be honored?

For GPA, Mackey said that there is no time limit.

The Praxis score is a little more complicated. Mackey said it would need to have been from the current version of the Praxis, but he did not supply a specific year.

Will this lower standards for teaching certification?

Mackey insisted that will not happen.

He brought up the raised GPA needed for teachers to receive their certification. He also said principals are the safeguard and would be able to prevent any major issues with teachers, whether they received their licenses through these new pathways or the old standards.

“There's always a safety measure, and that's the principal,” said Mackey. “And, so, we even know now, we do have teachers on occasion to pass the Praxis with flying colors. They pass all their coursework, they pass the EdTPA and they get in the classroom, they can't hack it. And the principal says, ‘You know what, this is not a person, [a] high quality teacher, that I want in my building.’”

Mackey said these changes also should not affect the full reciprocity Alabama has with other states in terms of teacher certificates.

Alabama seems to be making a lot of changes to teaching this year. How’s that going?

The whole country has a teaching shortage at the moment. Alabama is included in that, and, as Mackey told the Advertiser previously, Alabama has had a teaching shortage longer than it’s had a global pandemic.

Earlier in the year, changes made emergency certifications available for special education. Also, the Alabama Legislature passed a major overhaul to the teaching pay schedule, meaning many teachers saw massive raises.

Mackey said that these changes are working.

“For the first time in a long time I'm getting more calls from superintendents saying, 'Hey, we don't have a true teacher shortage anymore,'” he said. “These measures are working. We're getting applicants for jobs. Now that being said, we still have parts of the state, particularly the rural Black Belt, where there is still a shortage, and I would even say there's still a crisis, because they simply have economic challenges.”

I think I qualify for my teaching license under these changes. What do I do?

Mackey said if you think you qualify, you should reach out to the university or college where you received your degree for the next steps.

Jemma Stephenson is the children and education reporter for the Montgomery Advertiser. She can be reached at jstephenson@gannett.com or 334-261-1569.

This article originally appeared on Montgomery Advertiser: What to know about the changes to teacher certifications in Alabama

Mon, 01 Aug 2022 14:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/back-school-2022-know-changes-020104272.html
Killexams : Lawmakers are solving the wrong problem in teacher shortage, experts say

CLEVELAND — Right now, it seems to be debatable whether the nation is actually in the midst of a teacher shortage crisis. Whether we are or not, several states are taking action to lure more educators into the classroom. Here in Ohio, lawmakers have temporarily lowered the requirements you need to meet to become a substitute teacher. Through 2024, you don’t need a post-secondary degree to get the job if the applicant meets a school district’s educational requirements. And we’re just one example.

According to an article by University of South Carolina Associate Professor Henry Tran and Iowa State University Associate Professor Doug Smith, California is allowing teacher candidates to skip basic tests, Oklahoma eliminated a certification requirement for teacher candidates, and Alabama lowered the score required on teacher certification exams. But the authors, who also co-edited the book “How Did We Get Here: The Decay of the Teaching Profession,” say these states are offering the wrong solution.

Smith told News 5 that lawmakers shouldn’t be focused on making it easier to become a teacher. They need to make it better to be a teacher.

The professors say the problem facing teachers these days can be summed up in one word: disrespect. Teachers are dealing with an ever-growing workload and doing it all with less pay. They earn about 20% less than other professionals with similar educations.

“It starts with pay and it starts with compensation and compensating teachers, at least to the equivalent of like-educated bachelors or master’s degree equivalent professions,” Smith said.

Teachers are also finding themselves with less control over the contents of their lesson plans as states pass legislation limiting certain Topics considered divisive. Lawmakers here in Ohio are considering such a bill. On top of all that, Smith said teachers are dealing with a tidal wave of disrespectful behavior from both students and parents.

“It’s OK to disagree with teachers or the school boards, but we have to do it with a position of respect. We shouldn’t – it should not be normalized to go to school, boards screaming and yelling that a teacher is doing something in a classroom,” he said. The authors say one survey found a growing trend of students physically and verbally harassing teachers, while parents engage in cyberbullying and retaliatory behavior.

At the end of the day, the authors say we don’t need to lower our standards to get more people at the front of a classroom. We need to make sure the educators already standing there want to stay.

“Giving teachers what they need to be successful in the classroom and making it possible for them to teach in a way that they don’t need to have a GoFundMe page to get the necessary classroom materials to be successful in their job,” Smith said.

RELATED: 'It's a shortage of respect': Teacher shortage not as dire in Northeast Ohio, but they want issues fixed

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 09:11:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/education/back-to-school/lawmakers-are-solving-the-wrong-problem-in-teacher-shortage-experts-say
Killexams : Mississippi First and Study.com Partner to Tackle Miss. Teacher Shortage Crisis

Study.com will donate 500 test prep scholarships to the state

JACKSON, Miss., Aug. 8, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Mississippi First, an education policy non-profit founded in 2008, is partnering with Study.com, a national EdTech platform, to launch Keys to the Classroom in the state of Mississippi. The initiative aims to help aspiring educators prepare for the Praxis, a required test with a pass rate of 50% for first-time test takers, to earn their teaching credential.

(PRNewsfoto/Study.com)

Through this partnership, Study.com will donate comprehensive, cost-free materials and resources to aspiring Mississippi teachers to help them prepare and pass their teacher certification tests. Mississippi districts that have diverse student bodies, as well as those that have low socioeconomic conditions, will be prioritized for the licenses in an effort to address the rising teacher shortage crisis and ensure the demographics of Mississippi students are being represented in the classroom and across the state's teacher pipeline.

"The state of Mississippi is facing an overwhelming shortage of teachers and Study.com's Keys to the Classroom will to help tackle this crisis head-on," says Rachel Canter, Executive Director of Mississippi First. "Partnering with Study.com will allow Mississippi First to continue our mission to ensure educational excellence for every Mississippi child."

This partnership comes on the heels of Mississippi First's 2022 'Voices of the Shortage' survey of 6,496 Mississippi public education teachers, which provides the state's most comprehensive current resource for understanding the critical teacher shortage in Mississippi from teachers' perspectives.

The teachers surveyed reported compensation as a top reason for potentially leaving the profession, but even current teachers consider their exit, aspiring new teachers face challenges to enter, including the difficulty of passing their teacher certification tests such as the Praxis.

In fact, according to a 2019 report from the National Council on Teacher Quality, half of teachers fail their first certification test and a quarter never pass. In contrast, 92% of teachers who used Study.com's test prep resources reported passing their test on the first try.

In addition to a worsening teacher shortage, Mississippi also faces a decreasing number of both aspiring and current teachers of color. According to a report from Mississippi Department of Education, while 57% of Mississippi P-12 students identified as non-White; 70% of Mississippi teachers are White.

"Creating a more diverse and representative teacher pipeline is necessary to ensure students feel represented and encouraged. As Mississippi statistics show, this isn't being reflected in the classroom but is statistically proven and needed," said Study.com's Senior Vice President of Social Impact Dana Bryson. "Our goal with bringing Keys to the Classroom to Mississippi is to diversify the teacher pipeline and help reduce the teacher shortage by removing the barriers to becoming a teacher."

Study.com first launched Keys to the Classroom initiative last winter in Nevada, which had a teacher shortage of about 3,000. Since then, Study.com has donated 600 teacher test prep licenses in Nevada and has partnered with numerous educational organizations to support aspiring teachers and Improve educational outcomes. Study.com also recently launched Keys to the Classroom in South Carolina this Spring.

The Keys to the Classroom initiative is part of Study.com's commitment to Pledge 1%, a corporate philanthropy movement dedicated to making the community a key stakeholder in every business. Pledge 1% continues the company's commitment to Making Education Accessible through social impact programs focused on increasing access and equity in education for underserved learners, non-traditional students, and educators.

For more information on Study.com's Keys to the Classroom scholarship, please visit
https://bit.ly/keystotheclassroom.

About Study.com

Study.com is a leading online education platform providing academic support for learners and educators. Recognized on the GSV EdTech 150 as a leading EdTech company, Study.com simplifies learning for over 30 million learners and educators a month. Study has donated $24 million in-kind value across social impact programs committed to Making Education Accessible through our Pledge 1% partnerships and programs focused on increasing access and equity in education for underserved learners.

About Mississippi First

Founded in 2008, Mississippi First is a nonprofit education organization whose mission is to champion transformation policy solutions ensuring educational excellence for every Mississippi child. Driven to change the fact that Mississippi has historically been last, our founders set a bold vision: a Mississippi first in education nationally. Today, Mississippi First is a leading voice for early childhood education, high-quality public charter schools, rigorous learning standards, commonsense testing and accountability policies, and strengthening Mississippi's educator pipeline.

Cision

View original content to get multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mississippi-first-and-studycom-partner-to-tackle-miss-teacher-shortage-crisis-301600958.html

SOURCE Study.com

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 01:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/mississippi-first-study-com-partner-130000433.html
Killexams : Tests show Indiana 3rd graders below normal reading levels

Secretary of Education Katie Jenner, center, and Board of Education member William E. Durham, Jr., right, talk July 13, 2022, after a board meeting Indianapolis. The board heard a presentation on the Department of Education's 2022 ILEARN test results.

Wed, 10 Aug 2022 02:02:00 -0500 en text/html https://missoulian.com/lifestyles/health-med-fit/tests-show-indiana-3rd-graders-below-normal-reading-levels/article_323ec57d-fa68-5e99-a811-57d7d7debde3.html
Killexams : State Education Leaders Advance Controversial New Teacher Compensation Proposal

This story originally published online at NC Policy Watch.

With just a few weeks left before the start of a new school year, districts are scrambling to fill teaching vacancies.

North Carolina educators, and those in other states, are leaving the profession in large numbers on the heels of the traumatic COVID-19 pandemic that, at its worst, led to school closures, remote learning, and unprecedented stress and burnout for teachers.

Moving forward, the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics projects that there will be more than 124,000 openings for elementary school teachers and 77,400 high school teachers each year for at least the next decade. Some North Carolina districts have reported hundreds of teacher resignations.

Undoubtedly, the past two years have been among the toughest teachers have faced in decades. Pandemic-related stresses along with parent uprisings over school closures, mask mandates, and attacks on curricula by elected officials and others have left teachers feeling disrespected and unappreciated.

Now, North Carolina educators might have another reason to look for different work: a new licensing and compensation proposal backed by state education leaders would replace the state’s seniority-based teacher salary system with one that partially rewards teachers for student performance on state tests.

The Professional Educator Preparation and Standards Commission (PEPSC) presented a draft proposal of the new system—labeled “North Carolina Pathways to Excellence for Teaching Professionals”—to the State Board of Education in April. If the proposal is approved and implemented, standardized tests, principal and peer evaluations, and student surveys would be used to determine whether a teacher is effective.

Supporters say the new plan would help to attract more candidates to the teaching profession, increase teacher pay, and retain veteran teachers with the promise of advancement and higher pay.

“We’re trying to address the ongoing, pervasive challenge that many teachers feel that they do all of this extra work, which is tantamount to volunteer work that they’re not compensated for,” State Superintendent of Public Instruction Catherine Truitt said in April during a State Board of Education meeting.

Teachers, however, are vigorously pushing back against the proposal, which they contend is an unwanted move to a system of “merit pay” that places too much emphasis on student scores on standardized tests. They argue that a better strategy to recruit and retain teachers—a stated goal of the new proposal—is to pay them a fair wage. The average annual teacher salary in North Carolina is $54,150. The state is ranked 33rd nationally in average teacher pay and much lower when salaries are compared to what individuals with comparable education and experience can earn in each state’s private sector.

“North Carolina needs a teacher licensure program that respects teachers’ expertise, rewards their time in the profession, and offers support throughout the duration of their career,” said Tamika Walker Kelly, president of the NC Association of Educators.

Meanwhile, academic studies examining merit pay show mixed results. A 2020 study (Teacher Merit Pay: A Meta-Analysis) conducted by a team of researchers from Vanderbilt University, Kansas State University, and UNC-Chapel Hill was one such study. As the authors reported: “We found that when a merit pay program motivates

“We found that when a merit pay program motivates teachers, it also tends to produce positive effects on student test scores. However, differing effects imply that not all merit pay programs are motivating to teachers. The literature also suggests that merit pay can potentially increase teacher recruitment and retention but teachers are less likely to stay once the incentives run out.”

Educators express deep concerns

Justin Parmenter, a Charlotte-Mecklenburg middle school teacher and education policy commentator who writes at the website at Notes from the Chalkboard, has taken on a leading position in pushing back against the new licensing and compensation model.

“There are some serious flaws with this proposal and widespread teacher objections [to it],” Parmenter told Policy Watch. “It’s not just one loud-mouthed teacher in Charlotte who is complaining about it.”

Indeed, the new licensing and pay proposal has been syllabu Number One among educators on various social media platforms this summer. And more than 1,000 educators reportedly joined Walker Kelly in a accurate tele-townhall meeting to voice concerns about the proposal.

The NC Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) also conducted several regional listening sessions to collect feedback from teachers and found widespread concern about what many teachers view as a backdoor attempt to move them to an unwanted system of merit pay, something that many educators nationwide have rejected.

“By and large, the feedback that they got was all negative,” said Parmenter, who has combed through numerous public documents to better inform teachers about the new licensing and compensation plan.

Teachers wonder in particular how such a plan can be administered fairly when data show students in wealthy, predominately white schools perform better on state exams, he said.

“One concern I keep hearing being raised by teachers is that if we know that our pay and career advancement is going to be determined by students being successful on a standardized test, then who’s going to want to teach in Title I [low-wealth] schools that routinely have abysmal test results?”

Parmenter noted, however, that it might be advantageous to teach in such a school if the pay proposal rewards educators for improving academic growth from one year to the next.

In addition to revising how teachers are paid, the new proposal would also create a system of entry-level certifications with the goal of bringing more people into the profession. One certification under the plan would serve essentially as a learner’s permit, that would allow aspiring educators with associate degrees to teach for two years while they earn a bachelor’s degree.

Some veteran educators see that move, however, as one that will negatively impact the quality of the instruction students will receive.

“This is a move toward the de-professionalization of teaching,” said Michelle Burton, president of the Durham Association of Educators. “It’s being done in a very sneaky, underhanded way.”

The new model creates multiple steps at which educators can advance in the profession, including “expert” and “advanced” teaching roles that allow them to earn higher pay for taking on additional responsibilities such as coaching novice teachers.

Walker Kelly, though, said North Carolina already has policies and pathways to support teacher recruitment and retention.

“But they lack execution with fidelity and funding commitments from the North Carolina General Assembly,” she said. “For the sake of our children and the teaching profession, we need to fund what we know works adequately. We don’t need to reinvent the wheel on licensure and compensation with a pipeline plan designed to leak.””

Merit pay or not?

Truitt has pushed back against claims that the “North Carolina Pathways to Excellence for Teaching Professionals” is a merit pay plan. She doubled down on that stance last month during an interview on WFAE radio’s “Charlotte Talks.”

“There’s a lot of misinformation out there right now, some of it deliberate, some of it not, about this proposed pay plan which is still in the development phases,” Truitt said in the interview, which Parmenter shared on Notes from the Chalkboard. “And it is absolutely false to say that this is merit pay. Merit pay means that you are comparing a teacher against another teacher. That’s not what this pay plan proposes.”

Parmenter challenged Truitt’s remarks in a July 28 post.

“State Superintendent Catherine Truitt continued to insult the intelligence of North Carolina’s teachers this week, repeating her absurd claim that paying teachers based on their perceived merit is not merit pay,” Parmenter said.

The debate over labels and definitions seems likely to prove important in how the proposal is received by educators. A 2014 report by UNC-Wilmington researchers found that less than 10 percent of the state’s teachers agreed that “performance-based pay would incentivize teachers to work more effectively,” attract and retain teachers or Improve student learning.

The study also found that 89 percent of teachers believe merit pay would disrupt collaboration in teaching. Only 1 percent of teachers agreed that pay for performance would have a positive impact on teacher morale, retention or quality.

Battles over messaging and access to records

Parmenter submitted dozens of public records requests to learn more about who’s behind the push for a new system of teacher compensation. Indeed, he submitted so many requests that the NC Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) has threatened to charge him thousands of dollars to process future requests.

“Our team has worked with others at the agency to ensure each request was completed and we have done so without charge,” DPI Communications Director Blair Rhoades informed Parmenter via email last month. “However, as stated on the NCDPI Records Request form, and pasted below, we reserve the right to charge.”

Notwithstanding the agency’s warning, Parmenter’s efforts have borne fruit. Among other things, his requests uncovered evidence of a concerted effort by Truitt, PEPSC leaders, and members of the Human Capital Roundtable, a group of state education leaders working to find solutions to the state’s teacher shortage issues, to thwart EducationNC, an online media outlet, from conducting its own teacher survey to find out how teachers feel about the Pathways proposal.

A similar strategy to control messaging about the proposal was employed when the Public School Forum of North Carolina, a nonprofit education policy think tank, offered to hold focus groups to collect feedback on the proposal.

“There are some specific things teachers object to [in the proposal], but the problem is how much of these [public records] show a concerted effort to market this plan instead of working on trying to figure out what’s wrong with it,” Parmenter said. “I believe stakeholders can supply them some ideas on how to fix it, but there’s this major effort like trying to lean on EdNC to not to do a survey, which is all about controlling the public narrative and making sure people only get positive messaging about this proposal.”


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Tue, 09 Aug 2022 21:57:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://indyweek.com/news/northcarolina/merit-pay-teacher-plan-truitt/
Killexams : The most accurate efforts to combat teacher shortages don't address the real problems

States have recently focused their efforts to reduce the nation’s teacher shortage by promoting strategies that “remove or relax barriers to entry” to quickly bring new people into the teaching profession.

California, for example, allows teacher candidates to skip basic skills and subject matter tests if they have taken approved college courses. New Mexico is replacing subject skills tests with a portfolio to demonstrate teaching competency.

Similarly, Oklahoma eliminated the Oklahoma General Education Test as a certification requirement. Missouri no longer looks at a prospective teacher’s overall grades – just the ones earned in select courses required to become a teacher. Alabama has moved to allow some who score below the cutoff scores on teacher certification exams to still get a teacher’s license, and Arizona’s education requirements for teachers now allow people without a college degree to begin teaching – so long as they are currently enrolled in college.

All of these efforts focus on recruiting new teachers, mostly by lowering requirements to make it easier for people to become certified to teach in public schools.

But these approaches do not address the genuine causes of the nationwide teacher shortage. As we found doing research for our book “How Did We Get Here?: The Decay of the Teaching Profession,” college students who are interested in becoming teachers and current teachers agree: The root cause of the problem is a longstanding overall lack of respect for teachers and their craft, which is reflected by decades of low pay, hyperscrutiny and poor working conditions.

Disrespect to the profession is driving teachers away

Even before COVID-19 hit, teachers were leaving the profession at an increasing rate. In the late 1980s, annual teacher turnover was 5.6%, but it has grown to around 8% over the past decade.

The stress of teaching through a pandemic has been speculated to drive away even more teachers. About 1 in 6 teachers expressed that they would likely leave their job pre-pandemic, but this increased to 1 in 4 by the 2020-21 school year. While teachers continue to leave classrooms, fewer people are signing up to replace them.

In fact, the number of incoming teachers declined from 275,000 in 2010 to under 200,000 in 2020 and is projected to be under 120,000 by 2025. And even those staying on the job are so unhappy, many have been striking.

We found that the reasons teachers are leaving primarily revolve around the disrespect they and the profession consistently face. For example, teachers earn about 20% less than similarly educated professionals.

They also faced an escalating workload, even before the pandemic placed additional demands on their time, energy and mental health.

In addition, teachers have been experiencing diminishing control over what and how they teach. They are also regularly exposed to a continued tide of disrespectful student behavior and parental hostility, as highlighted by a survey of 15,000 educators that revealed a growing trend of students verbally and physically harassing teachers, as well as parents engaging in online harassment and retaliatory behaviors for teachers simply doing their jobs.

This overall lack of respect drives turnover from existing teachers and discourages potential teachers from considering the profession.

One college student told us, “I looked into teaching as a career pretty strongly … and every person I talked to, be it a grade school teacher or college professor, told me the same thing – that it was a lot of work, it was an unstable work environment, and the pay was very poor for the amount of work that you put in.” Unsurprisingly, she chose another career path.

In early 2022, New Mexico’s teacher shortage got so bad that the governor called in the National Guard to serve as substitutes. AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio

The wrong solutions for the problem

A growing number of states have eliminated or have proposed to remove basic skills and subject matter test requirements for teacher certification. Those prerequisites have long served as quality control checks for prospective teachers. While they do not ensure effective teaching, they do serve as a minimum qualification threshold.

We believe efforts to loosen requirements for new teachers will bring more disrespect to the profession. History also suggests that they will make it so that schools that serve mostly students of color will have even fewer certified and experienced teachers than they already do.

But more directly, these efforts to boost teacher recruitment don’t address the reasons teachers are leaving the profession in the first place, which drive 90% of the demand for new teachers.

Lowering the standards to allow more people to enter the teaching profession may, for a short period, boost the number of people available to stand in front of classrooms. But that approach does not make teaching an attractive profession to consider, nor worthwhile for someone to stay and thrive in. Solving the teacher shortage problem requires solutions that reduce the numbers of teachers leaving the field and specifically address the lack of respect, low pay, hyperscrutiny and poor working conditions that they regularly endure.

This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit news site dedicated to sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by: Henry Tran, University of South Carolina and Douglas A. Smith, Iowa State University.

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The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 00:21:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/most-recent-efforts-combat-teacher-122133541.html CSET exam dump and training guide direct download
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