High marks guarantee with these DES-1B21 sample test

killexams.com is doing continuous struggle to provide valid and up-to-date DES-1B21 exam questions and answers, sample test and practice test. These DES-1B21 questions and answers are exact copy of DES-1B21 actual exam questions and answers that you will face in exam screen.

Exam Code: DES-1B21 Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
DES-1B21 Specialist - Implementation Engineer, Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS)

This test is a qualifying test for the Specialist - Implementation Engineer, Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS) track.
This test focuses on the knowledge and activities involved in implementing and managing ECS solutions. This test also tests the candidates knowledge of key ECS components including ECS OS and ECS software, different data client access and ECS product integrations with Data Domain Cloud Tier, Isilon Cloud Pools and Networker CloudBoost Dell Technologies provides free practice questions to assess your knowledge in preparation for the exam. practice questions allow you to become familiar with the syllabus and question types you will find on the proctored exam. Your results on a practice questions offer one indication of how prepared you are for the proctored test and can highlight syllabus on which you need to study and train further. A passing score on the practice questions does not guarantee a passing score on the certification exam.

1. Achieve the following Associate level certification*
• Associate - Information Storage and Management Version 1.0
• Associate - Information Storage and Management Version 2.0
• Associate - Information Storage and Management Version 3.0
• Associate - Information Storage and Management Version 4.0
• Associate – Cloud Infrastructure and Services Version 2.0
• Associate – Cloud Infrastructure and Services Version 3.0

ECS Overview (10%)
• Describe ECS key features, functions and capabilities
• Describe ECS architecture and components
• Describe the ECS solution, including hardware configuration, typical single and multi-site deployments, and case scenarios
ECS Implementation (33%)
• Describe to how prepare the ECS system for installation, including site preparation and validation
• Describe the ECS core OS installation, network separation and network configuration
• Describe how to perform ECS Software installation, including HAL setup and ECS Services
• Describe the requirements and processes for the ECS initial configuration, including licensing and ESRS configuration
• Describe the most common ECS installation issues and how to troubleshoot them
Management and Monitoring (25%)
• Describe how ECS packages and protects data within a site. Describe ECS failure handling and failover scenarios in single-site and multi-site environments
• Describe how to configure ECS using the portal, including creation of storage pools, VDCs, RGs, namespaces, users and buckets
• Describe how to configure ARM, ACLs, quotas, and retention policies on namespaces and buckets
• Describe ECS D@RE features and functionality and Active Directory integration with ECS
• Describe ECS monitoring and metering capabilities and Syslog support operations
ECS Data Client Access (17%)
• Describe ECS integration with Amazon S3, configuration and management using the ECS Portal, the Amazon S3 browser and REST APIs
• Describe ECS integration with OpenStack Swift, configuration and management using the management interfaces and APIs
• Describe the ECS configuration of object client applications such as Centera CAS and Hadoop HDFS
• Describe ECS NFS file features and functionality
ECS Integrated Solutions (15%)
• Describe the integration between ECS and Data Domain Cloud Tier, including use cases and configuration
• Describe the integration between ECS and Isilon CloudPools, including use cases and configuration
• Describe the integration between ECS and Networker with CloudBoost, including use cases and configuration

Specialist - Implementation Engineer, Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS)
DELL Implementation syllabus
Killexams : DELL Implementation syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DES-1B21 Search results Killexams : DELL Implementation syllabus - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DES-1B21 https://killexams.com/exam_list/DELL Killexams : Best Data Center Certifications

Job board search results (in alphabetical order, by certification)*

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

LinkUp

Total

CCNA Data Center (Cisco)

1,564 2,126 1,649 19 3,876

CCNP Data Center (Cisco)

1,025 1,339 1,508 14 3,145

JNCIP-DC (Juniper Networks)

125 37 14 4 130

VCE-CIAE (Dell)*

81 19 30 14 132

VCP6-DCV (VMware)

32 37 57 38 111

*Search results for the generic phrase “VCE data center engineer”

Regardless of which job board you use, you’ll find many employers looking for qualified people to join their data center teams. SimplyHired lists 114,000-plus data center jobs in the U.S., with more than 172,000 on Indeed, 50,000 on LinkedIn Jobs and 20,000 on LinkUp. With the right credential(s) in hand, one of these jobs is sure to be yours.

Data center job roles start at the network technician level and advance through senior architect. Most of the certifications covered would fit well with an associate- or professional-level network engineer position. According to SimplyHired, the average salary for network engineer jobs is about $79,000, and $111,000 for senior network engineers. Glassdoor reports a U.S. national average salary of about $73,000 for network engineers, and their average for senior network engineers climbs to $94,000.

Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Data Center

Cisco certifications continue to be some of the most recognizable and respected credentials in the industry. The CCNA Data Center certification is a great introductory certification for networking professionals who want to specialize in data center operations and support and have 1-3 years of experience.

Candidates for the CCNA Data Center certification need to understand basic data center networking concepts. These include addressing schemes, troubleshooting and configuring switches with VLANs and routers using Nexus OS, network and server virtualization, storage, and common network services such as load balancing, device management and network access controls.

The CCNA Data Center is valid for three years, after which credential holders must recertify. Recertification requires passing a current version of one of the following exams:

  • Associate-level test (except for ICND1 exam)
  • 642-XXX professional-level or 300-XXX professional-level exam
  • 642-XXX Cisco Specialist test (does not include Sales Specialist exams or MeetingPlace Specialist exams, Implementing Cisco TelePresence Installations (ITI) exams, Cisco Leading Virtual Classroom Instruction exams, or any 650 online exams)
  • Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) written exam
  • Cisco Certified Design Expert (CCDE) written test or current CCDE practical exam

Candidates can also sit through the Cisco Certified Architect (CCAr) interview and the CCAr board review to achieve recertification for CCNA Data Center.

CCNA Data Center facts and figures

Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Data Center

Networking professionals looking to validate their data center skills and achieve a competitive edge in the workplace can’t go wrong with the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) Data Center credential.

Geared toward technology architects, along with design and implementation engineers and solutions experts, the CCNP Data Center identifies individuals who can implement Cisco Unified Computing System (UCS) rack-mount servers; install, configure and manage Cisco Nexus switches; and implement and deploy automation of Cisco Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI). The CCNP Data Center is designed for candidates with 3-5 years of experience working with Cisco technologies.

When pursuing the CCNP Data Center, Cisco lets you choose either a design or troubleshooting track. Related data center certifications include the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA Data Center), for those with 1-3 years of experience, and the Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) Data Center, aimed at professionals with seven or more years of experience.

The CCNP Data Center is valid for three years, after which credential holders must recertify. The recertification process requires candidates to pass a single test to maintain the credential, or to sit for the Cisco Certified Architect (CCAr) interview and the CCAr board review. Credential holders should check the Cisco website for the current list of qualifying exams before attempting to recertify.

CCNP Data Center facts and figures

Certification name

Cisco Certified Network Professional Data Center (CCNP Data Center)

Prerequisites and required courses

Valid Cisco Certified Network Associate Data Center (CCNA Data Center) certification or any Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) certification. Training recommended but not required; classes are usually four or five days and start at $3,950.

Number of exams

Four exams:
  • 300-175 DCUCI – Implementing Cisco Data Center Unified Computing
  • 300-165 DCII – Implementing Cisco Data Center Infrastructure
  • 300-170 DCVAI – Implementing Cisco Data Center Virtualization and Automation
    AND
  • 300-160 DCID – Designing Cisco Data Center Infrastructure
    OR
  • 300-180 DCIT –  Troubleshooting Cisco Data Center Infrastructure

All exams are 90 minutes, 60-70 questions.

Cost per exam

$300 per exam; $1,200 total (price may vary by region). Exams administered by Pearson VUE.

URL

http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/training-events/training-certifications/certifications/professional/ccnp-data-center.html

Self-study materials

The certification page provides links to self-study materials, including the syllabus, study groups, webinars, Cisco Learning Network resources and learning partner content.

JNCIP-DC: Juniper Networks Certified Professional Data Center

Juniper Networks, based in California and incorporated in 1997, develops and sells network infrastructure equipment and software aimed at corporations, network service providers, government agencies and educational institutions. The company has a large certification and training program designed to support its solutions, which includes Data Center, Junos Security, Enterprise Routing and Switching, and Service Provider Routing and Switching tracks.

The Data Center track recognizes networking professionals who deploy, manage and troubleshoot Juniper Networks Junos software and data center equipment. The single test (JN0-680) covers data center deployment and management, including implementation and maintenance of multi-chassis link aggregation group (LAG), virtual chassis and Internet Protocol (IP) fabric, virtual extensible LANs (VXLANs), and data center interconnections.

The JNCIP-DC certification is good for three years. To renew the certification, candidates must pass the current JNCIP-DC exam.

JNCIP-DC facts and figures

VCE-CIAE: VCE Converged Infrastructure Administration Engineer

VCE, short for Virtual Computing Environment, was part of EMC Corporation, which Dell acquired in 2016. The VCE line of converged infrastructure appliances are still being manufactured and widely sold, and the company has a handful of VCE certifications geared toward designing, maintaining and supporting those solutions.

VCE certifications are now part of the larger Dell EMC Proven Professional certification program but have retained some independence. The program currently offers the VCE Certified Converged Infrastructure Associate (VCE-CIA), VCE Converged Infrastructure Administration Engineer (VCE-CIAE) and VCE Converged Infrastructure Master Administration Engineer (VCE-CIMAE) credentials. We focus on the VCE Administration Engineer in this article because it’s available to the public as well as Dell employees and partners, and it ranks well in job board searches.

The VCE-CIAE is a professional-level credential that recognizes professionals who manage and support Vblock Systems. The single test includes syllabus such as system concepts, administration, security, resource management, maintenance and troubleshooting.

Candidates must recertify every two years to maintain a VCE certification. To renew, credential holders must pass the current VCE-CIA test (this is the prerequisite for the VCE-CIAE certification), as well as pass the current VCE-CIAE test or earn a higher-level credential.

VCE-CIAE facts and figures

VCP6-DCV: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization

The VCP6-DCV is one of those credentials that sits firmly on the line between traditional data center networking and cloud management. As such, it appeals to a wide networking audience. In fact, the VMware website states that more than 100,000 professionals have earned VMware VCP6-DCV certification, making it one of the company’s most popular certifications.

VMware offers an extensive certification program with a rigorous Data Center virtualization track, which includes the VCP6-DCV. Candidates must thoroughly understand Domain Name System (DNS), routing and database connectivity techniques, and how to deploy, configure, manage and scale VMware vSphere environments and storage. VMware recommends that candidates have a minimum of six months of experience with VMware vSphere 6 before attempting the VCP6-DCV certification.

New candidates must take a VMware training course and pass two exams. Training courses start at $4,125; pricing is based on the specific course, delivery format and learning partner.

VMware requires credential holders to recertify every two years. Recertification is achieved by taking whatever test is most current for the certification, earning a new VCP certification in a different solution track or advancing to the next-level VMware certification.

Note: VMware certifications are geared toward the VMware vSphere product, the latest incarnation of which is Version 6.5. As of April 2019, VMware is still rolling out various Version 6.5 exams. Currently, Version 6.5 exams are offered for the Professional and Advanced Professional (Design only) levels. We anticipate that Version 6.5 exams and credentials at the Associate, Advanced Professional Deploy and Expert levels will follow soon.

VCP6-DCV facts and figures

Certification name

VMWare Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP6-DCV)

Prerequisites and required courses

Candidates who are new to VMware Data Center Virtualization technology: Six months’ vSphere 6 experience plus one of the following training courses:
  • VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Optimize and Scale [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage plus Virtual SAN Fast Track [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Optimize & Scale [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Bootcamp [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Fast Track [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Design and Deploy Fast Track [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Troubleshooting [V6]
  • VMware vSphere: Troubleshooting Workshop [V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Install, Configure and Manage plus Optimize and Scale Fast Track [V6 or V6.5]
  • VMware vSphere: Optimize and Scale plus Troubleshooting Fast Track [V6]

Note: The cost of VMware training varies; expect to pay from $4,125 for classroom training to more than $6,000 for Bootcamps and Fast Track courses.

Number of exams

Two exams for new candidates, those with vSphere 5 training only, those with an expired VCP in a different solution track or those with an expired VCP5-DCV certification:

One test for candidates with valid VCP5-DCV certification: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization Delta exam, 2V0-621D, 105 minutes, 65 questions

One test for candidates with valid VCP certification, any solution track: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center

Exams administered by Pearson VUE.

Cost per exam

  • vSphere Foundations test (V6 or V6.5): $125
  • VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization exam: $250
  • VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization Delta exam: $250

URL

VCP6-DCV: https://mylearn.vmware.com/mgrReg/plan.cfm?plan=64178&ui=www_cert
VCP6.5-DCV: https://mylearn.vmware.com/mgrReg/plan.cfm?plan=100942&ui=www_cert

Self-study materials

Links to an test guide, training and a practice test (if available) appear on each test page (see the How to Prepare tab). VMware Learning Zone offers test prep subscriptions. Numerous VCP6-DCV study materials are available through Amazon. MeasureUp offers a VCP6-DCV practice test ($129) and a practice lab ($149).

Beyond the top 5: More data center certifications

While not featured in the top five this year, the BICSI Data Center Design Consultant (DCDC) is a terrific certification, designed for IT professionals with at least two years of experience in designing, planning and implementing data centers. This vendor-neutral certification is ideal for data center engineers, architects, designers and consultants. Another good vendor-neutral certification is Schneider Electric’s Data Center Certified Associate (DCCA), an entry-level credential for individuals who design, build and manage data centers as part of a data center-centric IT team.

CNet’s Certified Data Centre Management Professional (CDCMP) and Certified Data Centre Technician Professional (CDCTP) are also worthy of honorable mention. Based in the U.K., these certifications don’t appear in a lot of U.S. job board postings but still deliver solid results from a general Google search.

IT professionals who are serious about advancing their data center careers would do well to check out complementary certifications from our featured vendors. For example, Cisco also offers a number of certifications in data center design and support, including application services, networking infrastructure, storage networking and unified computing. VMware also offers additional data center virtualization certifications worth exploring, including the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization Design (VCAP6.5-DCV Design) and the VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX6-DCV). Also, the Dell EMC Proven Professional certification program offers a bevy of data center-focused certifications, including the Dell EMC Implementation Engineer (EMCIE) and the Dell EMC Certified Cloud Architect (EMCCA).

Because of the proliferation of data center virtualization and cloud computing, you can expect the data center networking job market to continue to remain strong soon. Achieving a certification can be a real feather in your cap, opening the door to new and better work opportunities.

Tue, 28 Jun 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10777-data-center-certifications.html
Killexams : RCC Awarded $40K for Artificial Intelligence Incubator Network

Last January, the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), Dell Technologies and Intel announced a joint commitment to grow Intel’s AI for Workforce Program from 18 states to 50 by 2023. Rockland Community College was one of 15 colleges across the country to be awarded $40K for an Artificial Intelligence (AI) Incubator Network project. The funds will go towards building an AI incubator on the College’s main campus in Suffern, NY, for greater access to AI computing power, tools and resources, aiming to foster the skills needed for future jobs in our increasingly digital world.

In addition to receiving the grant, RCC has also joined the AI Incubator Network to connect with community colleges across the nation on strategic economic development opportunities, participate in discussions about learning pathways, strategize on student engagement in AI programs, and gather best practices from each other and industry leaders.

“AI has become an increasingly important focus for community colleges as providers of workforce education for multiple industries,” says Walter G. Bumphus, Ph.D., President and CEO, AACC. “Working together with peers and across sectors will enhance the ability of our colleges to advance and scale this curriculum across the nation to ensure that students earn the skills needed to fill these jobs and begin meaningful careers.”

“RCC is proud to be the first college in New York to participate in Intel Corporation’s AI for Workforce program,” says Dr. Susan Deer, RCC’s Officer in Charge. “Together with Dean of the School of STEM Dr. Melanie Rie, Professor of Cybersecurity Christopher Flatley and Professor of Math and Computer Science James Liporace, RCC is working to imbed the Intel AI Curriculum in our Cyber Security, Computer Information Systems and Computer Support Specialist programs.”

The incubator will have dedicated space in a new computer lab being dedicated to RCC’s Cyber Security and Computer Studies departments. It will house 15 student workstations in addition to an instructor workstation used for teaching and demonstrations. At first, the AI incubator will be used for students in the Introduction to AI course, which is currently under development as a Cyber Security and Computer Studies elective and will eventually be offered across disciplines. The incubator will also be available to students in other Cyber Security, Computer Information Systems, and Computer Support Specialist courses that will be updated to reflect the increasing reliance on AI throughout the industry. Development and implementation of higher-level AI courses, such as Natural Language Processing and Introduction to Machine Learning will follow, offering higher-level skills to students in the Computer Science degree program.

“Today’s students will enter a technology workforce where every organization will focus in some capacity on applying AI to solving problems and creating value for organizations,” says Carlos Contreras, Senior Director of AI and Digital Readiness at Intel.  “We are excited to partner with the AACC and Dell Technologies to democratize AI technology and enable students at RCC to enter that workforce with AI experience.”

“Dell Technologies is committed to transforming 1 billion lives by 2030 by providing learning content for in-demand technology skills and creating artificial intelligence labs for teaching and learning at community and technical colleges across the US,” says Adrienne Garber, Senior Strategist, Higher Education, Dell Technologies. “With collaborators like RCC, we are creating opportunities for underrepresented populations in artificial intelligence, machine learning, data analytics and the like to enter careers and fill job openings in much-needed technology fields.”

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 05:01:00 -0500 User Submitted en-US text/html https://riverjournalonline.com/schools/rcc-awarded-40k-for-artificial-intelligence-incubator-network/34194/
Killexams : USING E-BOOKS IN SCHOOL:

21st Century Classroom: Transforming the Textbook

In 21st century classrooms, blackboard chalk is on the endangered list, the pop quiz has been replaced with clicker questions, and bowling alley technology (overhead projector transparencies) has disappeared, thanks to digital projectors and document cameras.

But if you’re going to point to any aspect of the classroom that still hasn’t covered much ground on its trip into the 21st century, it has to be the textbook. This ubiquitous accessory has been beset by editorial controversy as we have seen recently in Texas; has seen consistently high price increases of an average of six percent per year; and still inspires parental derision for the outdated information often portrayed.

And then there’s the matter of weight. The heft of textbooks was the subject of a 21-page report written in 2004 in California for the state’s board of education. According to researchers, the combined weight of textbooks in the four “core” subjects (social studies, math, reading/ language arts, and science) ran, on average, from eight pounds at the first grade level to 20 pounds at the 11th grade level. Legislation to mandate weight limitations quickly followed in that state.

As this comparison of two school districts on opposite sides of the country and economic spectrum illustrates, in a world rich with alternative methods of delivery of content exemplified by digitized conversation, Google books, the Kindle and iPad, the textbook is the next classroom object worthy of transformation.

Realigning the Budget with Netbooks

“Everyone has a different 1:1 approach,” says Gary Brantley, chief information systems officer for the Lorain City School District. “Ours was to eliminate the books.”

Lorain City Schools is located in a city 35 miles from Cleveland. The district has 18 schools and 8,400 students. By moving to digital delivery of textbooks Superintendent Cheryl Atkinson saw an opportunity to address several larger district challenges than simply replacing outdated texts. A majority of families are low-income; its schools were struggling to meet yearly academic progress measures; and the district had just come out from under a state-mandated “fiscal watch.”

And, recalls Brantley, Atkinson was sincerely concerned about the weight of the textbooks being hauled around by the kids in her schools.

That was the atmosphere under which initial discussions began, he says. The district quickly realized that adopting a 1:1 program with digital textooks at the heart of the initiative could reduce textbook expenses and help bring students into the 21st century. “We’re an inner city school district,” says Brantley. “We saw this as a way to level the playing field for our kids and deliver them equal access and opportunities with technology.”

After a pilot program in 2007 and 2008, the district went after a federal grant to partially fund a full rollout to 9th and 10th graders for the following year. In January 2009, the district used federal Title 1 and Ohio state educational technology grant funds to lease Dell Inspiron 910 netbooks. The following year that program was expanded to 6th, 7th, 8th, and 11th grades, and the district switched to Acer Aspire One AOD150-1577 netbooks. This fall the district hopes to add 12th graders to the program.

The publishers the district is working with on the program are the traditional ones: Pearson Prentice Hall; Holt McDougal; and McGraw-Hill/Glencoe. They have provided versions of the texts, Brantley says, that go beyond simply being a PDF of the book. “It’s interactive. For example, if you have someone like Martin Luther King or John F. Kennedy in a history book, you can click on a picture, and it will tell you information about [that person] or [you can] do a search from the book to get more information about that particular person.”

Brantley is quick with numbers. He says that for 2,600 math books—the number of texts needed for grades nine through 12—the cost was going to be about $182,000. That’s $70 per book. The e-book edition for that same math book was about $15,000. The savings on that one text alone covered a large part of the expense of that first rollout of digital textbooks. The savings don’t stop there. An English textbook was priced at $163,673.05 for 2,475 books—about $66 per book. The digital version of the same volume was a fourth of the cost—$36,554.45.

Explains Brantley, Superintendent Atkinson “was very persistent” that the district find a content provider for the program, even if it wasn’t one of the three or four big textbook publishers. The publishers were willing to try the program in pilot mode. “A lot of trust was built on both sides to make this happen,” he says.

Now, says Brantley, students don’t have to travel to labs to gain access to computers. “Basically, there’s a lab in every classroom. Every kid is using that netbook as a textbook and as a computer.”

Brantley knows the technology is making an impact. “I think it’s pushed us a long way. It’s allowing the students to become a lot more creative in what they do and how they do it. It’s also leveled the playing field. A lot of these kids don’t have computers or internet access at home. Because the books are loaded on the hard drive, [Superintendent Atkinson] has given kids the ability to work on things they’d only have access to in a limited time within the classroom or in the lab.”

Although Brantley says student testing scores have gone up, he can’t confidently point to quantifiable results tied directly to the digital textbooks. “We brought different pieces of technology into the district in the same period, so we have to let the program run for a little while,” he explains.

“But Why Do We Care?”

The Campbell Union High School District, next door to San Jose in California’s Silicon Valley consists of six sites, five of which have been designated by the state as excellent. During the 2009-2010 school year, they performed a pilot program to experiment with the replacement of textbooks with e-readers. Director of Technology Charles Kanavel and his IT team of five distributed 270 Sony Reader Touch model PRS-600s into English classes across the district’s sites.

“These kids get technology. They go home and look at YouTube all day. An e-reader isn’t that hard for them,” Kanavel explains. The goal of the pilot was to get a “true sense of what’s it like for the everyday student to use one of these things in terms of wear and tear and what they wanted to see on the device.”

The effort was spurred by the Williams Settlement, Kanavel says. That California statute calls for California schools to have sufficient educational materials and conditions to meet curriculum standards. In order to meet standards of currency, textbooks need to be replaced every seven years—an expensive proposition in a district with 8,000 students. “It’s $180 for a biology textbook. That’s just one. With e-readers and how ubiquitous they’ve become,” Kanavel recalls asking, “Why do they need to carry 80 pounds worth of books around, when we have the technology to do this differently?”

But that initial test might never have come about if Kanavel hadn’t persisted in trying to woo Sony to participate in the proof of concept, a process that took seven months. The Campbell director focused on Sony because of its durability, price, and open platform. “Kindle, if you drop it, it’s game over,” he says. “With the Nook you have to buy everything from Barnes & Noble. The [Apple] iPad with 32 or 64 Gb, that’s $600 to $800. With one iPad, I can get four e-readers from Sony at around $200 each.”

But persuading the manufacturer to pay attention to education’s needs wasn’t an easy sell. Kanavel, who has a background in investment banking, studied the company’s financial reports and figured out how many e-readers had probably been sold through its nearby Silicon Valley area store, the largest Sony store in the United States.

When he approached the company about doing a test, it replied, “Yeah, yeah, yeah, interesting. But why do we care?” In response, he used this argument: “You sold 14,000 at the Valley Fair store in a three month period. Those are respectable numbers. But realistically, our district is 8,000 kids. You’d sell me 8,000 units. Then I’d have to buy a quarter of that every year forever. Once I start on it, I can’t get off.” He also pointed out that Campbell was only a medium-sized district. “Take San Jose Unified —55,000 students right next door. That would make your store numbers look like nothing. And there are 32 districts in Santa Clara County alone. Think of the entire country. Then they started caring.”

Once Sony was on board, the next hurdle was the textbook publishers trying to safeguard the pricing model, according to Kanavel. He estimates that a single school might have 300 copies of a particular book. On average the textbook will cost $120 on the low side and $180 on the high side. That’s a total outlay of $36,000 to $54,000 for a single textbook in a single school in the Campbell district.

For English classes, however, many of the books contained classic works of literature that are now in the public domain and available on various digital book websites. “Shakespeare is Shakespeare. The guy’s not writing a new version,” Kanavel says. He has been able to make a deal with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for some digital textbooks in PDF format; but others—particularly novels —came from the Sony Reader Store; on Project Gutenberg (a good source for Shakespeare, he says); and via the OverDrive School obtain Library.

The challenge faced by textbook publishers, he points out, is that they have to change their business model. Kanavel wants to set up a site license with the publishers, but so far those negotiations are still on-going, and, besides, many still have to convert their textbooks into the epub format.

But the financials, as this former numbers guy points out, still work out nicely for the district. “For example, historically we have paid $9 a book for paperback copies of Macbeth and 70 to 80 percent of them come back unusable at the end of the year. Now with the e-reader, that replacement cost goes to zero.”

On average 15 out of every 100 books in the district need to be replaced because they’re damaged, lost, or stolen. Often, the same student loses multiple books when he or she loses a backpack. “If you’re a parent, you have to pay to replace all of those books. If your student loses a history book, biology book, math book, and English book, that’s about $600,” Kanavel says. “If they lose an e-reader or it breaks, you pay for the replacement cost of the e-reader —$200 -- then we just obtain the content.” This, he adds, “has long-term implications for budgeting and funding.”

So far, Kanavel says, the pilot has been successful with students. “They’ve taken good care of them. I’ve only had three break out of 270, which is pretty good.” He plans to add an additional 200 e-readers to the district for the next school year. “One thing I’ve been very focused on with this pilot is offsetting the cost of textbook replacement with this device and making it easier on the kids.” He believes the district is on the right track.

Teachers and students are discovering other advantages. The e-readers have built-in dictionaries. If a reader has a visual impairment, text can be upsized quickly. Users can annotate, draw, and take notes—something that’s forbidden with traditional textbooks. When the year is over, the kids will return the devices, and that added material can be wiped from the hard disk.

But e-readers still aren’t perfect, he adds. First, not every book is available in a digital format. He cites a high school classic, Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, as an example. Many textbooks have already been put on CD, but those are designed to be used in a PC. Publishers haven’t made huge inroads into converting their materials into the standard epub format that works with the major e-readers. But Kanaval is hopeful those gaps will diminish with time.

With the expected expansion of the pilot, negotiations with Sony continue. “We’ve proven that the kids can take care of them. The technology does work,” Kanavel says. “The next thing is to get Sony to build something bigger—an eight and a half by 11 inch format. And there are a lot of features that we don’t use. We’ve given them feedback on those things. There may be ways to cut cost by eliminating feature sets that can help them balance the cost of manufacturing.”

Textbook Smackdown

So given the experiences of these two districts—and others—how does a standard textbook stack up against an e-book? If a publisher needs to repair the mistakes introduced in the text, as happened with math books issued in Sacramento County in spring 2010, it won’t have to arrange to destroy the outdated books and incur shipping costs for the new ones; it can correct the errors and electronically distribute new versions of the content. In the face of a quickly evolving business model, publishers will be forced to adjust their pricing schemes—no doubt, to the advantage of the districts. In the matter of weight— well, the Acer netbook comes in under three pounds, and the Sony device is a little over 10 ounces. Those are metrics anyone can use no matter how much digital content sits on the devices.


Building the E-Book Structure

Although every e-book initiative shares common aspects—hardware, bandwidth, content, and professional development—how the program unfolds in your district will be unique. For example, should you connect e-readers to the internet?

In order to have a successful 1:1 implementation, you need hardware, bandwidth, content, and teacher professional development and buy in. But each district will be unique in its approach to implementing each aspect and the entire program. The question of when in implementation a district allows connection to the internet is a case in point. Campbell Union High School District in Silicon Valley wants students to stay on task as it implements e-books. Therefore, the Sony Reader Touch devices being used there don’t include web access. Although Sony does make a model of its e-reader that includes WiFi, according to Director of Technology Charles Kanavel, the decision to leave that feature out helps simplify the transition teachers have to make in integrating the device in the classroom.

“If I’m a teacher and I have these new devices in class, it affects my lesson planning,” he explains. “Without administrative control of access to the internet, some smart kid will make the thing text another e-reader. Then once that kid knows, all the kids will know. In class, instead of reading, they’re texting each other, surfing MySpace, and doing everything else. Have I just disrupted an entire class with this device? So let’s get the adoption in first. Let’s get the hurdles out of the way surrounding usage of content, usage of technology, and how it integrates into your standards in the classroom. Once that’s outlined, then we’ll figure out how to do WiFi.”

That absence of web access has also streamlined professional development. The district had 270 devices, which it handed out in English classes spread fairly evenly across its six sites. To ensure that the pilot wouldn’t get put on the back-burner by teachers uninterested in using the ereader, Kanavel had the principals at those sites nominate teachers to participate who were a “little bit tech savvy.”

From there, his IT team called teachers in for a demonstration of the Sony product they’d be using with their students. “That was it,” he says. “Maybe 30 minutes of Q&A with teachers, and off we went. The devices aren’t that complicated. You turn it on, pick your book, turn to the page, and that’s it.”

To make sure the program is on track, Kanavel has been doing evaluation of it in “real time.” “It’s not something we threw out there and said we’ll come back to you in six months. Every couple of weeks I’m pinging these teachers. They have direct lines back to me. As they’ve noticed things, they’ve emailed me.” Along with that, device maker Sony has put out surveys for the users too.

It’s Complicated

What complicates implementation of digital content in a 1:1 program is when the device being deployed is used for other purposes too. That’s the case at Lorain City School District in Ohio, which has distributed Acer netbooks to 9th, 10th, and 11th grade students. The goal there is to deliver its students access to technology and the wider world it can deliver. Many don’t have computers or an internet connection at home. Therefore, Chief Information Systems Officer Gary Brantley has chosen to implement WiFi on the devices.

The devices, which cost about $300 with software and maintenance, are loaded with a gigabyte of RAM, a 150 Gb or 160 Gb hard drive, an Intel Atom processor, a webcam, Windows XP Professional, Microsoft Office, a couple of calculators, 802.11 b/g WiFi, and, of course, digital textbooks.

Teachers have an interest in educating students about social networking, so, although access to the internet is filtered, the devices do allow access to sites such as Twitter, and Facebook. But that, says Brantley, “is being carefully monitored.”

Also, connectivity is necessary for implementation of CompuTrace, a program from Absolute Software that provides a service for tracking down lost, stolen, or missing devices. “We were finding that we were spending a lot of money replacing textbooks,” Brantley explains. “Now, we actually are spending less. If CompuTrace doesn’t find the netbook within 60 or 90 days, they pay for it. I can tell you they have found every single one.”

To simplify operations, the district uses only two images for the netbooks. Every middle school book in use is on every middle school netbook; and the same with all high school books. That approach, says Brantley, makes IT’s work easier since they don’t have to worry about granular inventory or “fool around” with what books any given student should be able to access.

The district has tackled the challenge of teacher acceptance from multiple sides. First, there was a teachers’ union aspect. Would it promote the change in teaching approaches necessary for success? To gain support, Brantley took the head of the union to a 1:1 conference to show her what could be done. After that, he says, “She came on board for the professional development piece.”

The next aspect was putting together programs and teams for professional development. Since the district has an “early release” day once a week, “that’s the block of time that increasingly is being dedicated to helping teachers learn how to integrate the technology into their classes. Gaining traction in that area is a longer haul,” Brantley admits. “It takes a while to get teachers on board with this.”

Next up for the Lorain district: implementation of a teacher recognition program and some type of graduate credit to motivate the teachers to try out new methods of instruction.

An area where Brantley has seen success is having the kids teaching the teachers. “That’s one thing that we’ve been trying to push,” he says. “Don’t be afraid to let the kids show you something as well. It becomes a collaborative effort.”

Challenges have surfaced in two IT areas. First, the sheer number of new devices has put a strain on Brantley’s department, which has 10 employees. “We’ve doubled the number of computers in the district but didn’t add one staff member,” he says. Second, IT has to be able to supply technical support to students in a timely manner. “Turnaround can’t be longer than a day. Even though we have spares, we still have to turn around these machines really quickly, so kids aren’t left without their books.”

But these burdens aren’t slowing down the district’s dreams. Brantley says eventually the netbook and digital textbook program could be expanded to every student in the district, from the fourth grade up.

Sat, 09 Jul 2022 04:48:00 -0500 en text/html https://thejournal.com/pages/cdwg/21st-century-classroom_e-books.aspx
Killexams : UNICEF and YuWaah mark World Youth Skills Day; launched #YoungWarriorNXT report on life skills delivery for young people at scale

New Delhi : UNICEF and YuWaah (Generation Unlimited in India) marked World Youth Skills Day with the launch of the #YoungWarriorNXT report in partnership with Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and Udhyam Learning Foundation. The launch event saw dignitaries engaging in pertinent conversation on delivering life skills to young people in India at scale. The event was graced by Sh. Sanjay Kumar, Secretary, Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports, who addressed the event as the Chief Guest, along with Dr. Chintan Vaishnav, Mission Director, Atal Innovation Mission, Dr. Biswajit Saha, Director, Skill Education and Training, CBSE, Mr. Yasumasa Kimura, UNICEF India Representative a.i., Ms. Geeta Goel, Managing Director – India, Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and Abhishek Gupta, Chief Operating Officer, YuWaah.

With a long-term vision to mainstream life skills training in the country, YuWaah, UNICEF, Michael & Susan Dell Foundation and Udhyam Learning Foundation came together in July 2021 to respond to the imperative need to build the life skills of young people in India and initiated the Young Warrior NXT (#YWNXT) programme. At its core, YW NXT aims to equip five lakh adolescents with the relevant life skills to make them employable and future-ready, by galvanizing partnerships with diverse stakeholders and leveraging existing content, technology and human resources in the ecosystem.

A key part of YW NXT was also experimentation and evidence-generation, towards which a sandbox environment was created in year one – to pilot, monitor and evaluate – differentiated models of life skills delivery. To this end, 15 pilot programmes were run with experienced, reputed implementation partners, each unique with respect to the course content, medium of delivery, and level of facilitation. The 15 interventions collectively reached ~88,000 young people across 12 states of India. Alongside, a successful, chat-based learning programme –- Young Warrior NXT FunDoo Mini — was rolled out nationally at scale, to allow asynchronous engagement and learning of life skills from the safety of home, accessed by 500k+ young people.

The #YoungWarriorNXT report – ‘Life Skills Delivery for Young People – Scalable Solutions for India’ captures the programme implementation methodology, data-led findings and recommendations for scale.
The learnings from YW NXT have paved a path forward, having produced an implementation playbook with at least 9 successful delivery model identified, as well as capturing programmatic learnings on delivering life skills in different contexts.  Basis the program, the Report also recommends some key aspects to scaling life skills, highlighting the need to-

  • Integrate life skills into the school curriculum, and therefore, garner support from SCERTs and state resource groups to identify and codify important life skills in each state

  • Invest in the capacity building of teachers, including training on appropriate pedagogical practices and building teacher-aids like codified classroom scripts, assessment tools and teacher-mentor programs

  • Involve parents, family members and community leaders in establishing value proposition, creating accountability, and delivering content to influence on enrolment, engagement, and impact positively

  • Build a common vocabulary for life skills to help converge efforts

  • Create an accessible repository of life skills content, mapped to state-specific adoption frameworks and proficiency levels using standard definitions.

  • Develop and adopt standardised life skills assessment tools, contextualised and relevant to India

Commenting on the launch of the report, Yasumasa Kimura, UNICEF India Representative a.i. said, “For a country like India, with a large youth population, it is important that a holistic approach to education is adopted. Life skill development is a critical component of that approach, training for which should start early on in life. The Young Warrior NXT report brings together much-needed data and evidence on approaches that can be deployed at scale to empower young people and help in the effective delivery of life skills education.”

Ms. Geeta Goel, Country Director – India, Michel & Susan Dell Foundation said, “Twenty-first century life and employability skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, leadership, resilience, and digital literacy are important to bridge the employability gap and are essential for the well-being of young people. For India to truly deliver Life Skills at scale there is an urgent need to integrate these in the school curriculum, and to adopt standardised tools that can measure progress on these skills.”

Abhishek Gupta, Chief Operating Officer, YuWaah said, “Young people, if provided with proper skills and training, can excel in unprecedented ways. To address and understand the reasons behind the skill gap and economic opportunities, we have joined hands with partners to bring forward the #YWNXT report, which not only attempts to find ways across levels of facilitations and access to technology, but also pivots its way towards finding impactful and scalable solutions for life skill delivery.”

YW NXT provides a strong starting point, but there is a need to continue testing innovative models and contributing learnings back for wider ecosystem growth, including measuring the impact of life skill interventions through robust experimental evaluation techniques like randomized control trials (RCTs) can further help understand the magnitude of incremental impact.

Fri, 15 Jul 2022 08:19:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://indiaeducationdiary.in/unicef-and-yuwaah-mark-world-youth-skills-day-launched-youngwarriornxt-report-on-life-skills-delivery-for-young-people-at-scale/
Killexams : Building a High-Performance, Inclusive Culture

Photos from the DEI: From Talk to Action event, which was held on Thursday, May 5, 2022. Photos by Jodie Andruskevich.

Tue, 15 Jun 2021 11:54:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nhbr.com/dei/
Killexams : UNICEF and YuWaah launches #YoungWarriorNXT report on life skills, marks World Youth Skills Day

UNICEF and YuWaah (Generation Unlimited in India) has marked World Youth Skills Day with the launch of the #YoungWarriorNXT (YW NXT) report in partnership with Michael and Susan Dell Foundation and Udhyam Learning Foundation. The #YoungWarriorNXT report – ‘Life Skills Delivery for Young People – Scalable Solutions for India’ captures the programme implementation methodology, data-led findings and recommendations for scale.

The report recommends some key aspects to scale life skills, highlighting the need to integrate life skills into the school curriculum, and therefore, garner support from SCERTs and state resource groups to identify and codify important life skills in each state. Other findings include investing in the capacity building of teachers, including training on appropriate pedagogical practices and building teacher-aids like codified classroom scripts, assessment tools and teacher-mentor programs.

The report further suggests to involve parents, family members and community leaders in establishing value proposition, creating accountability, and delivering content to influence on enrolment, engagement, and impact positively. Along with recommendations to build a common vocabulary for life skills to help converge efforts, create an accessible repository of life skills content, mapped to state-specific adoption frameworks and proficiency levels using standard definitions, develop and adopt standardised life skills assessment tools, contextualised and relevant to India.

“For a country like India, with a large youth population, it is important that a holistic approach to education is adopted. Life skill development is a critical component of that approach, training for which should start early on in life. The Young Warrior NXT report brings together much-needed data and evidence on approaches that can be deployed at scale to empower young people and help in the effective delivery of life skills education,” Yasumasa Kimura, UNICEF India Representative said.

“Young people, if provided with proper skills and training, can excel in unprecedented ways. To address and understand the reasons behind the skill gap and economic opportunities, we have joined hands with partners to bring forward the #YWNXT report, which not only attempts to find ways across levels of facilitations and access to technology, but also pivots its way towards finding impactful and scalable solutions for life skill delivery,” Abhishek Gupta, Chief Operating Officer, YuWaah said,

Furthermore, YuWaah, UNICEF, Michael and Susan Dell Foundation and Udhyam Learning Foundation came together in July 2021 to respond to the imperative need to build the life skills of young people in India and initiated the Young Warrior NXT (#YWNXT) programme.

At its core, YW NXT aims to equip five lakh adolescents with the relevant life skills to make them employable and future-ready, by galvanising partnerships with diverse stakeholders and leveraging existing content, technology and human resources in the ecosystem.

Read also: IIM Shillong collaborates with Alba Graduate B-school for students exchange programmes

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 23:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.financialexpress.com/education-2/unicef-and-yuwaah-launches-youngwarriornxt-report-on-life-skills-marks-world-youth-skills-day/2595466/
Killexams : Finding Common Ground

Oh, summer …

A time when teachers, leaders, and students recharge their batteries, shake off the stress from last year, and take time to focus on reading books that do not involve education. That’s a good thing, because according to an Education Week Research Center survey , “91percent of teachers experience job-related stress sometimes, frequently, or always.” Teachers are not alone in the job-related stress department. A well-known combined study by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) and the Learning Policy Institute (LPI) found that 42 percent of school principals have considered leaving their jobs .

The issue with summer is that when teachers and leaders recharge, they promise themselves that they will do things differently in their classrooms and school buildings, but when the school year begins, many times they revert to old habits.

I have been guilty of continuing on that same hamster wheel. As a teacher and former school leader I used to to suffer from anxiety, as well as never feeling like I gave enough to the schools where I worked. As an author and workshop facilitator, I was on the road about 45 weeks a year prior to COVID. I used to wear that as some sort of badge of honor because it showed how busy I was and that my work was in demand. Then, in March 2020, COVID came crashing into our lives, and everything stopped as far as road travel and in-person professional learning was concerned.

I quickly had to pivot my work into remote sessions to accommodate schools and organizations that were trying to focus on instructional leadership, which was the focus of my book that came out the month before COVID.

My Mental Health Flourished

Something that was more important happened for me at that time. I was home. I had always promised myself and my partner that I would be on the road less, but I never held the promise. How many teachers and leaders promise their partners, spouses, and children that they will not work on the weekends or late into the night and then find themselves backtracking on those promises? During COVID, I found myself with the opportunity to be home. Yes, I was in my office from the very early morning to late in the evening due to transferring everything from in person to remote, along with working in different time zones. However, once a week, I would go up north to stay with my mom, who was in her mid-80s. My siblings and I were worried about her being isolated because she still lived alone in the house she and my dad built in 1959.

On those nights I stayed up at my childhood home, my mom and I would bring dinner over to my sister Trish and brother-in-law Hassan. My nephew Khalil and his wife, Richele, would come over with their dog, Elbie. During the warm months, we sat on their back deck. In the colder months, we sat in the garage with a heater. My sister was going through her second battle with cancer, and we needed to be careful because all this was before we had a vaccine.

At heart, I was always a bit of a mama’s boy because I called her almost every day, even while I was traveling, just to check in on her. Trish and my oldest brother, Frank, talked every day through text. My mom and sister always came with me on at least one work trip per year, and we vacationed together with my partner once a year as well. This time, however, our trips did not revolve around my work. Those promises of being home more were coming true, and I became one of the people who actually benefited from COVID, because I was forced to find a work-life balance and I was happy to do so.

What does this have to do with teaching and leading?

Teachers and leaders are fully committed to their jobs and many times think that anything other than working seven days a week means they don’t care about their work. I know it was an opinion I held. COVID forced many of us to find a balance between being innovative and actually being present with family and friends. In my case, I didn’t understand how distracted I was until I committed to being more present with my family.

In fact, in the fall of last year, I began writing a book called De-implementation: Creating the Space to Focus on What Works (Corwin Press, 2022), because I was heavily concerned about the mental health of leaders and teachers. I was tired of hearing people say that well-being and mental health were just about giving teachers and leaders the opportunity to breathe. In my experience, mental health and well-being are about doing what you love but making time to spend time with those you love. Mental health and well-being is about doing things that are impactful personally and professionally and not spending energy on those things that waste our time, and that is what de-implementation is all about.

Van Bodegom-Vos L et al. (2017) says that de-implementation is the process of “abandoning existing low value practices.” Farmer RL, Zaheer I et al. (2021) suggests that low-value practices are those practices:

  • that have not been shown to be effective and impactful,
  • that are less effective or impactful than another available practice,
  • that cause harm, or
  • that are no longer necessary.

While researching the course and writing the book, I began to suggest that there are two ways to approach de-implementation. Those are:

  • Partial reduction – What do we not need to do as much?
  • Replacement action – What can we get rid of because it doesn’t work, and what is something more impactful we can replace it with?

I also, through research and working with leaders and teachers, found that there are two types of de-implementation, which I suggest are:

  • Informal de-implementation – A team is not required, and this action can be taken immediately. One of the most popular suggestions was that of reducing the number of times we check email or deliver assessments to students.
  • Formal de-implementation – A team is needed to make this decision. An example could be replacing zero-tolerance policies with restorative-justice practices. For formal de-implementation, I created a de-implementation checklist and pacing chart and provided other samples that will help leaders and teachers formalize the process.

For full disclosure, every school team can find an initiative that they can focus on for the formal de-implementation process, but we need not wait for a team to engage in the informal de-implementation process. Every single day we wake up matters, and we should look at the time we do control and make sure that we are engaging in valuable actions during those times.
In actuality, de-implementation is as much about how we implement as it is about what we need to suspend or get rid of because we found something more impactful. It is about finding the balance between work and home, and it certainly doesn’t mean we care less about our students and job. Instead, it means we want to take action to be more committed to our everyday lives. What I didn’t realize during writing the book is that I would once again learn how important work-life balance truly is because life is precious.

In the End

We often promise ourselves that we will slow down or that we will take more time to find the elusive work-life balance we always strive for as we get older. Unfortunately, we revert to old habits because we tell ourselves that if we work less, we must care less about our profession or the kids. I believe now that the opposite is true, because I feel that when we have a better balance between home and work, we are more impactful in what we do. Stepping back allows us the time to focus on what matters, and that is good for our mental health and well-being.

During COVID, Frank, whom I am close with, had a massive heart attack, which scared us all. That emphasized for me that being home more was important because family will not always be around. Having lost our dad in 1982, we knew all too well how precious life is but somehow forgot as time went on. Thankfully, Frank is doing well now.

After writing the first draft of the de-implementation book, though, my mom passed away. It was the day before last Thanksgiving, and Trish, Frank, and I were there to say goodbye. Four months later, Trish passed away surrounded by family, including Frank and me. My mom and sister are two major reasons for any success that I may have, because they urged me to get an associate degree. I am the first in my family to get a college degree. I never let them forget how grateful I was to have had them in my corner.

As we approach this coming school year, don’t take for granted that family will always be there or that your mental health can take a backseat to something more important like your work. Don’t get me wrong. I loved being a teacher for 11 years, a principal for eight years, and coaching and running workshops based on my own work for the last eight years, but we will all be better at our work if we spend every day that we can connecting with family and friends and having a life, too.

Sun, 17 Jul 2022 00:18:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.edweek.org/teaching-learning/opinion-find-whats-impactful-get-rid-of-whats-not-your-mental-health-depends-on-it/2022/07
Killexams : When SEL Curriculum Is Not Enough: Integrating Social-Emotional Behavior Supports in MTSS

Whether you’re just getting started with social-emotional learning (SEL) or want to strengthen your program, register for guidance on building capacity to implement a robust SEL program that serves the needs of all students.

Over the past two years, many districts have adopted SEL curricula. But high-quality resources are just a small part of an SEL program’s success. For an initiative to have the greatest impact, systematic implementation is needed, including supporting adult SEL; embedding social-emotional behavior (SEB) supports within your multi-tiered system of support (MTSS); and using data to Improve practice and outcomes.

You’ll learn:

  • Tips for advocating for investment in SEB supports
  • Strategies for implementing SEB supports across all tiers
  • How to utilize SEB assessments and whole child data to guide implementation and ensure strong outcomes for students
  • Steps for designing professional learning that supports effective, sustainable implementation

Nathaniel von der Embse, Ph.D., NCSP

Associate Professor, University of South Florida

Laura Rutherford, Ph.D., NCSP

Consulting and Research Psychologist, Devereux’s Center for Effective Schools

For all webinars broadcast by Education Week after August 1, 2019, Certificates of Completion are available to all registered live attendees who attend 53 minutes or more of this webinar. Educators can obtain a PDF certificate verifying 1 hour of Professional Development credit. As with all professional development hours delivered, Education Week recommends each educator verify ahead of the webinar broadcast that the content will qualify for professional development in your school, district, county, or state with your supervisor, human resources professional, and/or principal or superintendent’s office.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 08:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.edweek.org/events/webinar/when-sel-curriculum-is-not-enough-integrating-social-emotional-behavior-supports-in-mtss
Killexams : MBA in Business Analytics Online

MBA in Business Analytics Program Overview

Combine a well-rounded graduate program with an in-demand concentration when you earn the Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Business Analytics at Southern New Hampshire University.

"In today’s world, data is everywhere, including in management-style decisions," said Amelia Manni, MS, an adjunct faculty member and a subject-matter expert at SNHU. "This concentration allows those seeking their MBA to get a leg up and begin to understand how data works and best practices for implementing it into their decision-making."

This focused graduate degree program can prepare you for the application of tools and techniques of data analytics. And with these analytical skills, you can become a more valuable asset to your current – and future – employers.

"This program concentration offers learners a practical approach to business analytics," said Dr. Jessica Rogers, associate dean at SNHU. "Each course has been developed with a strong focus on the needs and demands of business today."

This program also has the potential to save you both time and money: By attending full time, you can complete the degree in about 12 months, and the 30-credit program costs less than $19K total.

Learn how to:

  • Analyze and interpret data to make decisions
  • Synthesize functional expertise, innovation, leadership and entrepreneurship to develop and foster adaptable strategies for an organization
  • Evaluate and implement various models and processes in the design and continuous improvement of organizations and their practices
  • Lead and collaborate with stakeholders to cultivate globally aware and culturally responsive teams and organizations
  • Drive the creation and implementation of plans that articulate organizational culture, align with ethical and legal standards, and promote sustainable business practices

Looking for a degree that's more focused? SNHU also offers an online master's in business analytics program as well as an online master's in data analytics program.

Career Outlook

These days, data analytics is necessary for business. All business.

Amelia Manni with the text Amelia Manni"In a world of degrees that focus solely on the technical or business side, organizations are finding themselves with a gap," said Amelia Manni, MS, an adjunct faculty member and a subject-matter expert at Southern New Hampshire University. "One side cannot talk to the other in an efficient way. That is where someone with this business analytics concentration comes in. They have all the knowledge and skills around great management and business acumen as well as how to incorporate data and information into their decision-making. That is a game-changer – and a good skill to have."

The future for management analysts looks excellent. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the field is projected to grow 14% through 2030 – faster than the average for all jobs.1 That means almost 100,000 openings are projected each year, on average, over the next decade.

Plus, May 2020 data shows that the median salary for management analysts is $87,660, which is more than double the median salary for all workers.1 The highest 10% of analysts earned a median salary of $156,840.1

As a management analyst, you could have the opportunity to work in a variety of settings. In 20201, they worked in:

  • Professional, scientific and technical services: 31%
  • Government: 17%
  • Self-employed workers: 16%
  • Finance and insurance: 13%
  • Management of companies and enterprises: 5%

Monique Jordan with the text Monique Jordan"An analyst can work across industries in positions such as business intelligence analyst, market analyst, operations research analyst, sports analyst, healthcare analyst and more," said Monique Jordan, senior associate dean of business at SNHU.

Many management analysts work as consultants. The BLS projects that the demand will continue to grow, as organizations work to become more efficient. In fact, the increase could be strong in smaller consulting companies that specialize in specific industries or types of business function.1

Courses & Curriculum

In 2021, Southern New Hampshire University introduced a completely revised curriculum for its 30-credit online MBA program. Just months later, it rolled out the business analytics concentration. That's a huge benefit for students, since it means you get to take part in one of the most innovative MBA programs on the market today.

"In each step of the curriculum building, we thought about what is needed in the workforce today and what gaps there are that this concentration could help fill," said Amelia Manni, MS, an adjunct faculty member and a subject-matter expert at Southern New Hampshire University. "We thought about the technical skills that students could face when they are on the job as well as how they can get that hands-on experience. ... This concentration really took what the industry is lacking – data-driven business professionals – and created a program to educate that next generation of data thinkers."

Manni was just one of a number of academics who helped create an MBA in Business Analytics program at SNHU.

Dr. Jessica Rogers with the text Dr. Jessica Rogers"Our instructional designers and subject-matter experts worked together to create a top-notch learning experience that guides learners toward creating real-world artifacts and addressing real business problems," said Dr. Jessica Rogers, an associate dean at SNHU.

Building off the 7-course core that's required of all online MBA students – no matter the concentration – business analytics students will take 3 more courses that round out the curriculum.

These include:

  • Business Analytics
  • Descriptive Analytics
  • Predictive Business Analytics

Within the courses are scenario-based assignments, which provide immersive, real-world opportunities that align with industry standards and business environment trends.

An added benefit of SNHU's MBA in Business Analytics program is the opportunity for credentialing.

Thomas A. Woolman with the text Thomas A. WoolmanLike the "AICPA Data Analytics Certificate program, which is available through this program," said Thomas A. Woolman, MBA, MS, MS, an adjunct faculty member and subject-matter expert at Southern New Hampshire University. "This offering is of great benefit to accounting and finance professionals of any size organization, from any industry interested in learning and applying data analysis techniques to help their organization make informed, data-driven business decisions."

You'll have the option to earn other certificates, as well.

"There are certifications along the way that students will earn that are a great way to boost their resume," Manni said.

Knowledgeable instructors can help you along the way, since they're well versed in what's happening with analytics today.

"Adjunct faculty teaching in the concentration are hand-picked for their experience in the field," Rogers said. "Our faculty bring a wealth of experience to share with our learners as well as have a passion to mentor."

Dr. Brian D. Letort with the text Dr. Brian D. LetortDr. D. Brian Letort, an adjunct faculty member and subject-matter expert at SNHU, agreed.

"Instructors who teach in this field are often skilled in analytics, but have been applying it to business opportunities for many years," he said.

Overall, the program at SNHU was well thought out – by data professionals, for future analytics specialists.

"This program and concentration sets a student up to learn skills with each class and implement them at work, if they are currently already in a role that they can use them, or create an arsenal of skills they can build their resume up with and get the job they are looking for to take that next step in their career," Manni said. "This program is designed for the student who wants to have that background in business and management but also be hands on and understand what it takes to get to those data-driven decisions."

Don't have a business background? No problem. Our MBA is accessible to everyone. Interested students must have a conferred undergraduate degree for acceptance, but it can be in any field. Those without an undergraduate degree in business or a related field may be asked to complete up to 2 foundation courses to get started. These foundations cover essential business skill sets and can be used to satisfy elective requirements for the general-track MBA. With foundations, the maximum length of your online MBA would be 36 credits.

Attend full time or part time. Students in the MBA have the option to enroll full time (at 2 classes per term) or part time (with 1 class per term). Full-time students should be able to complete the program in about 1 year, while part-time students could finish in about 2 years. SNHU students are busy, often juggling jobs, family and other obligations, so you may want to work with your academic advisor to identify the course plan that works for you. The good news is, you can switch from full time to part time and back again as often as you want.

Tuition & Fees

Tuition rates for SNHU's online degree programs are among the lowest in the nation. We offer a 25% tuition discount for U.S. service members, both full and part time, and the spouses of those on active duty.

Online Graduate Programs Per Course Per Credit Hour Annual Cost for 15 credits 
Degree/Certificates $1,881 $627 $9,405 
Degree/Certificates
(U.S. service members, both full and part time, and the spouses of those on active duty)*
$1,410 $470 $7,050 

Tuition rates are subject to change and are reviewed annually.
*Note: students receiving this rate are not eligible for additional discounts.

Additional Costs:
$150 Graduation Fee, Course Materials ($ varies by course)

Wed, 27 Oct 2021 18:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.snhu.edu/online-degrees/masters/mba-online/mba-in-business-analytics
Killexams : Master's in Supply Chain Management Online

Register By: August 20 Classes Start: August 22

Online Master's in Supply Chain Management and Operations MBA Overview

Fit your professional goals into your busy schedule when you earn the new Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Operations and Supply Chain Management from Southern New Hampshire University.

This MBA degree can deepen your understanding of procurement, transportation planning, inventory control and warehouse management. It can also help strengthen your knowledge of customer service standards in both national and global markets.

With curriculum revised in 2021, this MBA program is filled with business practices that are key to supply chain. And the leadership skills taught throughout the program have been designed to help you impact teams and individuals throughout an organization.

SNHU's online MBA program is one of the most affordable in the nation – now with a total tuition investment of $18,810. And coursework can be completed in about a year if you opt to enroll full time. And while SNHU’s MBA program is efficient and cost effective, students will still find the rigor and complexity expected from a Master of Business Administration program.

From recent undergraduates to established professionals, this program is ideal for anyone looking to strengthen their marketability, enhance their business skill sets and increase career opportunities with a business degree.

Learn how to:

  • Integrate, synthesize and apply business practices in an operations management context
  • Analyze and interpret data for decision-making
  • Develop and foster adaptable strategies for an organization
  • Evaluate and implement various models and processes in the design and continuous improvement of organizations and their practices
  • Cultivate globally aware and culturally responsive teams and organizations
  • Create and implement plans around culture, ethical and legal standards, and sustainable practices

Career Outlook

A growing understanding of the critical nature of supply chain operations makes this program a highly valued degree. The MBA in Operations and Supply Chain Management from Southern New Hampshire University combines quantitative, analytical and problem-solving skills. This results in an education that can prepare you to succeed in a high-demand industry.

The ability to combine operational function with technology, data analysis and automation are crucial for a wide array of business operations. With the workforce more remote than ever, the more skilled you are in business practices, finance, economics and especially decision-making, the better positioned you may be to lead.

Our master’s in supply chain management MBA program is designed to set you up for success in this increasingly important and in-demand field.

Earning your MBA in Operations and Supply Chain Management degree online at SNHU can help you develop a diverse set of leadership and management skills. This program may position you for an exciting career in the following roles:

  • Logistician: Analyze and coordinate an organization’s supply chain. In this role, you would be responsible for the life cycle of creating a product, including production, distribution and delivery.
  • Operations or supply chain manager: Manage a company’s overall supply chain, including logistics strategy and operations. Strong interpersonal skills are helpful in this role, because managing relationships with vendors and distributors is key.
  • Operations research analyst: Use data mining and statistical analysis to solve high-level problems for your organization. An interest in economics, math and finance are helpful with this role.
  • Management analyst: Seek ways to reduce costs and increase revenue for your company. Strong analytical and communication skills are helpful here.
  • Purchasing manager: Apply a high level of finance and accounting skills. You’ll negotiate contracts, assure product quality and purchase goods and services needed for your business to run smoothly.
  • Inventory control manager: Manage large inventories for organizations. You’ll put your logistics skills to work in this role.
  • Quality assurance manager: Coordinate your organization’s quality control policies while improving efficiencies. This role can involve increasing profitability by reducing waste.
  • Industrial production manager: Oversee daily operations of a factory or other business. You could be responsible for the staffing and processes that result in creating a wide array of goods and services.
  • Plant, warehouse or materials manager: Monitor storage and shipping logistics for an organization. This role involves logistical and analytical skills as well as strong staff management and teamwork skills.

Dr. Zuzana Buzzell with the text "Dr. Zuzana Buzzell"“(Supply chain) is a very sought-after career,” said Dr. Zuzana Buzzell, associate dean of business programs at SNHU. Working in supply chain management “is beneficial for learners looking to enter the field of operation management or someone switching careers with other experiences.”

MBA graduates are still some of the most sought after and employable in today's market. It is one the most respected and versatile degrees in business, and demand remains high by both degree-seekers and employers.

Job prospects for those with an MBA in supply chain management appear to be much faster than other occupations in the coming years.1 The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects employment of logisticians to grow 30% between now and 2030, with a median annual salary of $76,270.1

Furthermore, job opportunities for operations research analysts are predicted to grow quite a bit, at 25% predicted job growth between now and 2030, with a median annual salary of $86,200.1

Thinking about those positions from a leadership perspective, it's important to note that an MBA qualifies you for management level or above careers across many business disciplines (operations, marketing, finance, human resources, etc.) Through 2030, the BLS projects 9% growth.1 The salary is impressive, as well: In 2020, the median annual wage for management occupations was $109,760, which was the highest of all the major occupational groups.1

According to a Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) Enrolled Student Survey, almost 8 in 10 enrolled students agree that a graduate business education is a worthwhile investment, even in times of economic uncertainty.2 Most survey respondents felt confident in their employability in the face of the many challenges imposed by the global coronavirus pandemic.2

Even in the wake of so much change, we continue to persevere. Take a look at some of the most significant findings from the 2021 GMAC Demand for Graduate Management Talent Survey3:

  • Demand for graduate management talent is returning to pre-pandemic levels
  • Growth in the technology sector has fueled hiring of business school grads
  • Transforming business models are in need of MBAs to help with holistic re-structuring (fueled by pandemic)
    • MBAs have crucial skills necessary in times of uncertainty, like strong abilities in problem solving, strategic planning, and communication
  • MBAs command some of the highest average starting salaries: $115,000 median starting salary for MBAs
  • Top needed skills from MBAs include; leadership, strategy and innovation, decision making, and strategic and systems skills,
    • All of the above are incorporated into the SNHU MBA, and embedded industry-aligned credentials are offered in many of these skill areas
  • 84% of online MBA programs saw application growth in 2021

Courses & Curriculum

Revised in 2021, our supply chain online MBA program was decreased to just 10 courses – giving you the ability to complete the degree in just over a year, should you attend full time.

Benefits of the new curriculum include the opportunity to earn credentials throughout your program, multimedia content and scenario-based learning activities.

Dr. Mark Hobson with the text Dr. Mark Hobson"Scenario-based learning provides learners the ability to practice using what they learn and apply it to a real-world scenario of a likely business problem," said Dr. Mark Hobson, senior associate dean of business at Southern New Hampshire University. "It will appear in every course. It places the learner inside a novel experience with learning tools and an instructor who acts like a coach and mentor."

Of the 10 classes that make up the online master’s in supply chain management MBA program, 7 of them are part of your business core. Here, you'll learn traditional syllabus like marketing, accounting and decision-making, but instead of learning about each class by class, they're woven throughout the curriculum, so you can better learn how the skills you're developing work with each other.

You’ll then have 3 courses that make up the concentration dedicated to the close application of operations and supply chain principles, including courses like:

  • Quantitative Analysis for Decision Making: Survey the mathematical, probability and statistical tools available for assisting in the operation and management of industrial organizations.
  • Operation Management: Study key concepts of production and operations. It includes study of a variety of methods and techniques used in their management.
  • Supply Chain Management: Analyze the role and activities of those involved in supply chain management decision making. The course emphasizes the importance of all aspects of managing the supply chain, including transportation planning, inventory control and warehouse management.

The supply chain courses provide supplemental material to that of the major core. You'll graduate knowing how to provide the right product at the right time in the right quantity to meet customer needs.

This degree program “provides a balanced skills-based curriculum to provide learners with a fast track career advancement opportunity,” said Dr. Zuzana Buzzell, associate dean of business programs at Southern New Hampshire University.

Southern New Hampshire University's MBA programs include cross-cutting themes of leadership, strategy, ethics, management, technology and innovation. The program is integrated with new learning experiences and formats including;

  • Scenario-based learning, where learners practice and problem-solve within real-world business scenarios and instructors act as mentors
  • Multimedia, including animations for complex topics, video featuring industry leaders sharing business insights and video communication tools
  • Timely resources, like carefully selected, relevant resource material from leading professional organizations and publications 
  • Embedded credentials from external partners, allowing for the chance to earn more than just their degree, students partake in a selection of either integrated or optional credentialing opportunities as a way to enhance their learnings and their overall marketability in the field
    • Credentialing opportunities include foundational and advanced hands-on learnings in tools such as Power BI, MS Excel and Tableau as well as enhancement of soft skills such as human intelligence and strategy implementation.
  • Fluid learning paths, with more flexibility than ever before in assignment due dates and fluidity of learning with assignments that span multiple modules with interconnected themes to draw relationships between business principles

Online MBA students can also pursue a graduate certificate in supply chain management beyond the standard degree program. This option allows you to list another significant credential on your resume with minimal additional coursework. The certificate consists of 4 required courses plus an additional 6 credits of your choice of several different operations and supply chain management courses.

Don't have a business background? No problem. Our MBA is accessible to everyone. Interested students must have a conferred undergraduate degree for acceptance, but it can be in any field. Those without an undergraduate Logistics and Transportation, business or a related field may be asked to complete up to 2 foundation courses to get started as to adequately prepare themselves for the rigor that is to be expected with any MBA program. These foundations cover essential business skill sets and can be used to satisfy elective requirements for the general-track MBA. With foundations, the maximum length of your online MBA would be 36 credits.

Attend full time or part time. Students in the MBA have the option to enroll full time (at 2 classes per term) or part time (with 1 class per term). Full-time students should be able to complete the program in about 1 year, while part-time students could finish in about 2 years. Our SNHU students are busy, often juggling jobs, family and other obligations, so you may want to work with your academic advisor to identify the course plan that works for you. The good news is, you can switch from full time to part time and back again as often as you want.

Tuition & Fees

Tuition rates for SNHU's online degree programs are among the lowest in the nation. We offer a 25% tuition discount for U.S. service members, both full and part time, and the spouses of those on active duty.

Online Graduate Programs Per Course Per Credit Hour Annual Cost for 15 credits 
Degree/Certificates $1,881 $627 $9,405 
Degree/Certificates
(U.S. service members, both full and part time, and the spouses of those on active duty)*
$1,410 $470 $7,050 

Tuition rates are subject to change and are reviewed annually.
*Note: students receiving this rate are not eligible for additional discounts.

Additional Costs:
$150 Graduation Fee, Course Materials ($ varies by course)

Wed, 12 Aug 2020 15:35:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.snhu.edu/online-degrees/masters/mba-online/mba-in-operations-and-supply-chain-management
DES-1B21 exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List