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Exam Code: LFCS Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
LFCS Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator

Overview
The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) certification is ideal for candidates early in their Linux system administration or open source career. The exam consists of performance-based items that simulate on-the-job tasks and scenarios faced by sysadmins in the real world. Obtaining certification allows individuals to validate their skills to prospective employers, which is particularly valuable if you have little on-the-job experience.

Domains & Competencies
The Linux Foundation worked with industry experts and the Linux kernel community to identify the core domains and the critical skills, knowledge and competencies applicable to each certification. Performance-based exams were then developed based on the competencies that were identified.

- Essential Commands – 25%
- Operation of Running Systems – 20%
- User and Group Management – 10%
- Networking – 12%
- Service Configuration – 20%
- Storage Management – 13%

Essential Commands – 25%
- Log into local & remote graphical and text mode consoles
- Search for files
- Evaluate and compare the basic file system features and options
- Compare and manipulate file content
- Use input-output redirection (e.g. >, >>, |, 2>)
- Analyze text using basic regular expressions
- Archive, backup, compress, unpack, and uncompress files
- Create, delete, copy, and move files and directories
- Create and manage hard and soft links
- List, set, and change standard file permissions
- Read, and use system documentation
- Manage access to the root account

Operation of Running Systems – 20%
- Boot, reboot, and shut down a system safely
- Boot or change system into different operating modes
- Install, configure and troubleshoot bootloaders
- Diagnose and manage processes
- Locate and analyze system log files
- Schedule tasks to run at a set date and time
- Verify completion of scheduled jobs
- Update software to provide required functionality and security
- Verify the integrity and availability of resources
- Verify the integrity and availability of key processes
- Change kernel runtime parameters, persistent and non-persistent
- Use scripting to automate system maintenance tasks
- Manage the startup process and services (In Services Configuration)
- List and identify SELinux/AppArmor file and process contexts
- Manage Software
- Identify the component of a Linux distribution that a file belongs to

User and Group Management – 10%
- Create, delete, and modify local user accounts
- Create, delete, and modify local groups and group memberships
- Manage system-wide environment profiles
- Manage template user environment
- Configure user resource limits
- Manage user privileges
- Configure PAM

Networking – 12%
- Configure networking and hostname resolution statically or dynamically
- Configure network services to start automatically at boot
- Implement packet filtering
- Start, stop, and check the status of network services
- Statically route IP traffic
- Synchronize time using other network peers

Service Configuration – 20%
- Configure a caching DNS server
- Maintain a DNS zone
- Configure email aliases
- Configure SSH servers and clients
- Restrict access to the HTTP proxy server
- Configure an IMAP and IMAPS service
- Query and modify the behavior of system services at various operating modes
- Configure an HTTP server
- Configure HTTP server log files
- Configure a database server
- Restrict access to a web page
- Manage and configure containers
- Manage and configure Virtual Machines

Storage Management – 13%
- List, create, delete, and modify physical storage partitions
- Manage and configure LVM storage
- Create and configure encrypted storage
- Configure systems to mount file systems at or during boot
- Configure and manage swap space
- Create and manage RAID devices
- Configure systems to mount file systems on demand
- Create, manage and diagnose advanced file system permissions
- Setup user and group disk quotas for filesystems
- Create and configure file systems

Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator
Linux-Foundation Administrator test
Killexams : Linux-Foundation Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LFCS Search results Killexams : Linux-Foundation Administrator test - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/LFCS https://killexams.com/exam_list/Linux-Foundation Killexams : Best Linux Certifications

More than 20 years after Linus Torvalds developed Linux, the operating system remains a force in the computing industry. While Linux is not widely used on desktops (making up just over 2.4% of the overall desktop operating system market share in January 2019, according to NetMarketShare), it is extraordinarily strong on the web server side, where it enjoys a market share of almost 54%.

IT professionals invest considerable time learning about server computing for everything from installation, configuration, maintenance and virtualization to application support and security. This also means that many IT professionals are working with and around Linux operating systems daily, often alongside Windows and various UNIX OS brands as well.

The best of the Linux certifications vie for considerable mindshare among IT professionals and present an interesting mix of distribution- or brand-agnostic credentials alongside some pretty formidable vendor-specific credentials. There are multiple well-elaborated certification ladders available to those interested in learning, using, and mastering the Linux operating system environment and all the many bells and whistles it supports.

The results of a job search we conducted on several popular job posting sites show which Linux certifications employers are looking for when hiring new employees. While results vary from day to day (and job board to job board), this table reflects those Linux-related certifications that employers were seeking in the U.S.

Job Board Survey Results (in alphabetical order, by certification)

Certification

SimplyHired

Indeed

LinkedIn Jobs

Linkup

Total

GCUX (SANS GIAC) 30 30 55 12 127
Linux+ (CompTIA) 1,045 1,339 779 547 3,710
LPIC (LPI) 38 41 247 44 370
Oracle Linux OCA 27 31 33 12 103
Oracle Linux OCP 61 69 69 25 224
RHCA (Red Hat) 89 102 190 38 419
RHCE (Red Hat) 467 553 754 267 2,041
RHCSA (Red Hat) 417 504 667 241 1,829

We found that for nearly every certification category listed above, the number of national jobs postings mentioning that certification has increased, in some cases substantially, since we surveyed the same job sites a year ago. Linux system administrators and engineers can expect average earnings in the low $70s and upward, depending on the job role. PayScale lists $70,194 as the average salary for Linux system administrators ($52,000/low and $101,000/high). Glassdoor reports earnings for Linux system administrators averaging $68,884, Linux system engineers at $99,348 and senior Linux system engineers at $122,071.

GCUX: GIAC Certified Unix Security Administrator

The Global Information Assurance Certification (GIAC) program is part of SANS, a highly regarded source of instruction and research in the information security field. SANS also provides breaking news, operates a security alert service and serves on all kinds of government, research and academic information security task forces, working groups and industry organizations.

The SANS GIAC program encompasses 37 information security certifications across several categories, such as cyber defense, penetration testing, incident response and forensics, management, audit, legal, developer and industrial control systems. The GIAC Certified UNIX Security Administrator (GCUX) falls under its Cyber Defense category, and aims at professionals who install, configure, monitor, secure and audit both Unix and Linux systems.

GIAC certifications must be renewed every four years by earning 36 continuing professional experience (CPE) credits. Also, credential holders must pay a certification maintenance fee of $429 every four years.

GCUX Facts & Figures

Certification Name

GIAC Certified Unix Security Administrator (GCUX)

Prerequisites & Required Courses

None; SEC506: Securing Linux/Unix training recommended (classroom, on demand, self-study or private; $6,610)

Number of Exams

One exam (75 questions, two hours, minimum passing score 68%)

Cost per Exam

$1,899 without training (called a GIAC certification attempt; includes two free practice exams) $769 as part of a training course $769 retake fee $429 certification renewal

Exams administered by Pearson VUE.

URL

https://www.giac.org/certification/certified-unix-security-administrator-gcux

Self-Study Materials

Practice tests available on the GIAC exam preparation page (two tests included in exam fee; additional practice exams are $159 each). No GCUX-specific study guides found; GIAC recommends searching for self-study materials based on the GCUX objectives’ knowledge areas and getting practical experience.

Linux+ (CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI)

CompTIA exercises extraordinary certification clout at the entry level in many IT niches. This nonprofit has shown itself as willing to team up with more focused IT organizations, associations and consortia to combine their own market reach and visibility with niche smarts and subject matter expertise on loan from various partners.

One great example is the organization’s partnership with the Linux Professional Institute (LPI), which resulted in the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI credential. This unique certification replaced the original CompTIA Linux+ certification in 2010 and uses the same two exams required for LPIC-1 certification.

As a result of this partnership, IT professionals who are serious about Linux can earn both the Linux+ credential and the LPIC-1 at the same time. Candidates must first earn the Linux+ credential and then submit a request to CompTIA asking that their results be sent to LPI to obtain the LPIC-1 certification. CompTIA exam records are confidential, so candidates must request that their records be forwarded to LPI when taking the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI exams.

Earning the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI requires candidates to pass two exams. The first covers system architecture, installation and package management, GNU and Unix commands, devices, file systems and standard file system hierarchies. The second exam digs into command shells, scripting and data management, user interfaces and desktops, administrative tasks and activities, basic system services, networking fundamentals and security topics. The CompTIA Linux+ Beta exam (XK1-004) closed as of October 22, 2018, though candidates who took the exam prior to the end date can still access those scores and apply a passing grade to their Linux+ certification. The replacement Linux+ 104 exam based on this beta exam will become publicly available in April of 2019.

Note that the Linux+ credential is valid for life.

CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI Facts & Figures

Certification Name

CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI

Prerequisites & Required Courses

None required

Recommended: CompTIA A+, CompTIA Network+ and 12 months of Linux administration experience

Number of Exams

Two exams: LX0-103 and LX0-104 (60 multiple-choice questions each, 90 minutes, 500 required out of 200 to 800 scale to pass). Note that the LX0-104 Beta exam is no longer offered as of October 22, 2018; the replacement 104 exam becomes publicly available in April of 2019.

Cost per Exam

$200 per exam; prices vary by geography

URL

https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/linux

Self-Study Materials

CompTIA maintains a list of training materials and additional study options, including links to study guides, exam crams, practice tests, online and classroom training, CertMaster, and more. Additional third-party reference and review materials can be found on Amazon.

LPI (Linux Professional Institute) Certifications

The Linux Professional Institute (LPI) started up in October of 1999, almost one decade after Linus Torvalds began his pioneering efforts on the Linux kernel. Since then, LPI has become one of the leading certification providers on Linux Topics and technologies. Given the organization’s distribution-agnostic approach to Linux, it offers excellent coverage of a platform that’s available in many forms and flavors in today’s marketplace.

The LPI Certification (LPIC) program is available in three distinct levels:

  • LPIC-1Linux Administrator: A  junior-level Linux certification with no prerequisites. Candidates must pass two exams that cover basic Linux skills, including installing and configuring Linux on a workstation, working at the command line, performing basic maintenance tasks, and making LAN or internet connections. While you can obtain the LPIC-1 credential directly from LPI, candidates should consider obtaining the CompTIA Linux+ Powered by LPI credential first, which qualifies you for both the Linux+ and LPIC-1 credentials.
  • LPIC-2Linux Engineer: An advanced-level Linux certification that requires an active LPIC-1 certification. Candidates must pass two exams that cover significant Linux skills and topics. The first exam covers the kernel, system startup, file system and devices, advanced storage administration, network configuration, system maintenance and capacity planning. The second exam covers web services, file sharing, network client management, email services, system security and troubleshooting, and domain name servers.
  • LPIC-3Linux Enterprise Professional Certification: A senior-level Linux certification that requires an active LPIC-2 and passing any single exam in the 300 series. Valid exam IDs currently include 300: Mixed Environment303: Security, and 304: Virtualization and High Availability. The Mixed Environment exam covers Samba (domain integration, user and group management, name services, share configuration and so forth), plus OpenLDAP, and working with Linux and Windows clients. The Security exam covers network, operations and application security, as well as cryptography and access controls. High availability cluster storage and management, along with virtualization, are covered in the Virtualization and High Availability exam.

In addition to the LPIC-1, 2 and 3 credentials, LPI also offers an entry-level credential, the Linux Essentials Professional Development Certificate (PDC). Linux Essentials focuses on foundational skills, such as creating and running simple scripts, restoring compressed backups and archives, working with the command line, Linux operating system basics, FOSS, and users/groups and file permissions for public and private directories. Linux Essentials is a great way to get started while gaining the skills and knowledge needed for the more challenging LPIC credentials.

LPI’s newest certification is the LPIC-OT DevOps Tools Engineer, which recognizes the effective use of tools for collaboration during system and software development. There are no prerequisites, and the single exam lasts for 90 minutes and has 60 questions.

LPIC credentials are worthwhile for IT pros whose chosen Linux distributions do not warrant their own certification programs, and for those seeking broad, vendor- and distribution-neutral coverage of Linux topics, tools and technologies. They are popular among IT pros and in demand among IT employers.

LPIC-1, LPIC-2 and LPIC-3 Facts & Figures

Certification Name

LPIC-1: Linux Administrator

LPIC-2: Linux Engineer

LPIC-3: Linux Enterprise Professional

Prerequisites & Required Courses

LPIC-1: None, Linux Essentials recommended

LPIC-2: Active LPIC-1 certification

LPIC-3: Active LPIC-2 certification plus completion of one of the 300 series specialty exams

Training is recommended but not required

Number of Exams

LPIC-1: Exam 101-500 and Exam 102-500

LPIC-2: Exam 201-450 and Exam 202-450

LPIC-3: One of the 300 series exams: Mixed Environment (Exam 300-100)

Security (Exam 303-200)

Virtualization and High Availability (Exam 304-200)

Cost per Exam

$200 per exam. Exams administered by Pearson VUE. Linux ID required to register.

URL

http://www.lpi.org/our-certifications/summary-of-certifications

Self-Study Materials

Study guides, courseware knowledge packs, eLearning courses, exam crams, practice tests, online and classroom training, Linux Academy subscriptions and more are available at LPI exam Preparation, LPI Marketplace and Amazon.

Oracle Linux OCA & OCP

When Oracle bought Sun Microsystems in 2010, it acquired a rich and deep UNIX tradition. Oracle started phasing out Solaris almost immediately after finalizing the Sun acquisition.

Today, Oracle offers associate- and professional-level certifications based on Linux rather than harking back to any kind of UNIX roots. These certifications retain enough of their Sun roots, however, so that courses are not mandatory prerequisites to taking the exams for the two Oracle Linux certifications currently available.

As with other vendor-specific Linux certifications, Oracle’s are most appealing to those who work with or around that distribution, or who wish to work for employers who use those distributions.

OCA and OCP Facts & Figures

Certification Name

Oracle Certified Associate (OCA), Oracle Linux 5 and 6 System Administrator

Oracle Certified Professional (OCP), Oracle Linux 6 System Administrator

Prerequisites & Required Courses

OCA: No prerequisites. Recommended training: Oracle Linux S­­ystem Administration OCP: OCA Linux 5 and 6 System Administrator or Linux Administrator Certified Associate (now retired). Recommended training: Oracle Linux System Administration

Number of Exams

OCA: One exam, 1Z0-100 Oracle Linux 5 and 6 System Administration (150 minutes, 80 questions, 61% to pass) OCP: One exam, 1Z0-105 Oracle Linux 6 Advanced System Administrator (150 minutes, 97 questions, 61% to pass)

Cost per Exam

OCA: $245

OCP: $245

URL

https://education.oracle.com/oracle-linux/oracle-linux-administration/product_295?certPage=true

Self-Study Materials

Oracle offers online and in-class training for its credentials, with hit-or-miss coverage for them on the aftermarket. Start with Amazon searches — check exam IDs 1Z0-100 and 1Z0-105 to get a sense for what’s available.

Note: Though there is now an OCA and OCP exam available for Oracle Linux 7 System Administrator, Oracle has yet to announce this new certification or release the details of new Linux 7-based certification tests for OCA and OCP candidates.

Oracle Linux 6 Certified Implementation Specialist Certification

The Oracle Linux 6 Certified Implementation Specialist Certification is a certification available for those who sell, design, configure and implement Oracle Linux 6 solutions. Though any candidate can complete this certification, it is most typically achieved by Oracle partner implementation personnel with strong foundational experience in Linux and previous field experience implementing Linux 6.

Red Hat RHCSA, RHCE & RHCA

If there’s one major star in the vendor-specific Linux certification firmament, it’s got to be Red Hat. The company has major market presence and serious duration as a commercial provider of Linux platforms and technologies.

Red Hat offers a typical administrator, engineer, architect certification ladder. Unlike many other such programs, however, it offers highly regarded and valued credentials at each rung, along with demanding and hands-on oriented exams and an excellent training curriculum to match. All exams for the following Red Hat certifications are performance based and last two hours or longer.

The giveaway for Red Hat certifications is that all come with acronyms that start with RH, as follows:

  • Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA): This foundation certification vets essential skills in handling files, working at the command line and using system documentation, along with managing systems (boot up, identifying processes, start/stop virtual machines, controlling services), configuring storage partitions and logical volumes, and more.
  • Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE): This cornerstone certification is designed to test and validate the skills and knowledge necessary to work as a senior-level Linux system administrator. Topics covered include advanced IP routing and services, managing runtime kernel behavior, working with iSCSI, automating maintenance tasks with shell scripts and working with networking services for Web, FTP, NFS, SMB, SMTP, SSH and more. An RHSCA is a prerequisite for the RHCE.
  • Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA): Red Hat’s pinnacle certification offers two paths to certification, depending on which prerequisite advanced Red Hat certification credentials you have already completed: Red Hat Certified Enterprise Microservices Developers (RHCEMDs) and Red Hat Certified JBoss Developers (RHCJDs) can earn an RHCA in Enterprise Applications, and Red Hat Certified Engineers (RHCEs) can earn an RHCA in Infrastructure. In general, the five additional exams that must be passed to achieve the RCHA in either Infrastructure or in Enterprise Applications are specific to each area of specialization, though a few of the tests can be used to satisfy the five exam requirement in both RHCA tracks. A number of previously available certification exams have been discontinued for new RHCA candidates and renewals, though those exams can still be applied to the RHCA certification if you’ve already passed them. Find out more about discontinued exams that can be counted towards the RHCA credential on the RHCA page under the Candidate Guidance tab.

Because Red Hat Linux is widely used in the business world, the RHCA certification is an excellent choice for those interested in a more platform-focused path into the Linux world. Of course, for those who already work with or around Red Hat, it is a natural certification choice as well.

RHCSA, RHCE and RHCA Facts & Figures

Certification Name:

Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA)

Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE)

Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA)

Prerequisites & Required Courses

RHCSA: No prerequisites Recommended training:

Windows system administrators: Red Hat System Administration I (RH124) (5 days, $3,400) and II (RH134) (4 days, $3,400)Linux/Unix Administrators, RHCSA Rapid Track Course (RH199) (4 days, $3,700)

RHCE: RHCSA credential Recommended training:

Same as for RHCSA, plus

Red Hat System Administration III (RH254) ($3,400)

RHCA:

RHCE-certified (Infrastructure track) – Candidates currently holding an RHCE certification must pass five additional exams from the Infrastructure track below.

RHCJD/RHCEMD-certified (Enterprise Applications track) – Candidates currently holding an RHCJD or an RHCEMD certification must pass five additional exams from the Enterprise Applications track below.

Number of Exams

RHCSA: One exam, EX200 Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) exam (2.5 hours) RHCE: One exam, EX300 Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) exam (3.5 hours) RHCA: Five exams total depending on whether you have already completed an RHCE certification (for the RHCA Infrastructure track), or an RHCEMD/RHCJD (for the RHCA Enterprise Applications track): An RHCE must pass five exams from the following list to achieve the RHCA in Infrastructure:

EX125 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ceph Storage Administration exam

EX210 – Red Hat Certified System Administrator in Red Hat OpenStack exam

EX220 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Hybrid Cloud Management exam

EX236 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Gluster Storage Administration exam

EX248 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Enterprise Application Server Administration exam

EX270 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Container Management (Retired)

EX276 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containerized Application Development (Retired)

EX280 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Administration exam

EX310 – Red Hat Certified Engineer in Red Hat OpenStack

EX318 – Red Hat Certified Virtualization Administrator exam

EX333 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Network Services exam (Retired)

EX342 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Diagnostics and Troubleshooting

EX401 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management exam (Retired)

EX403 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management exam

EX405 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Configuration Management

EX407 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ansible Automation exam

EX413 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Server Security and Hardening exam

EX415 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Linux exam

EX423 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Directory Services and Authentication exam (Retired)

EX429 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in SELinux Policy Administration exam (Retired)

EX436 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in High Availability Clustering exam

EX440 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Messaging Administration exam

EX442 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Performance Tuning exam

RHCSA: One exam, EX200 Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) exam (2.5 hours) RHCE: One exam, EX300 Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) exam (3.5 hours) RHCA: Five exams total depending on whether you have already completed an RHCE certification (for the RHCA Infrastructure track), or an RHCEMD/RHCJD (for the RHCA Enterprise Applications track): An RHCE must pass five exams from the following list to achieve the RHCA in Infrastructure:

EX125 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ceph Storage Administration exam

EX210 – Red Hat Certified System Administrator in Red Hat OpenStack exam

EX220 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Hybrid Cloud Management exam

EX236 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Gluster Storage Administration exam

EX248 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Enterprise Application Server Administration exam

EX270 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Container Management (Retired)

EX276 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containerized Application Development (Retired)

EX280 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Administration exam

EX310 – Red Hat Certified Engineer in Red Hat OpenStack

EX318 – Red Hat Certified Virtualization Administrator exam

EX333 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Network Services exam (Retired)

EX342 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Diagnostics and Troubleshooting

EX401 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management exam (Retired)

EX403 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Deployment and Systems Management exam

EX405 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Configuration Management

EX407 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ansible Automation exam

EX413 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Server Security and Hardening exam

EX415 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Security: Linux exam

EX423 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Directory Services and Authentication exam (Retired)

EX429 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in SELinux Policy Administration exam (Retired)

EX436 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in High Availability Clustering exam

EX440 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Messaging Administration exam

EX442 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Linux Performance Tuning exam

EX450 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Data Virtualization exam

RHCEMDs and RHCJD must pass five exams from the following list to achieve the RHCA certification in Enterprise Applications:

EX288 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Application Development exam

EX248 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Enterprise Application Server Administration exam

EX276 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Containerized Application Development exam (Retired)

EX280 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in OpenShift Administration exam

EX405 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Configuration Management

EX407 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Ansible Automation exam

EX421 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Camel Development exam

EX427 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Business Process Design exam

EX440 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Messaging Administration exam

EX450 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Data Virtualization exam

EX453 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Fast-Cache Application Development exam

EX465 – Red Hat Certified Specialist in Business Rules exam

Cost per Exam

$400 each ($2,000 total RHCA exam costs)

URL

www.redhat.com/training/certifications/#certifications

Self-Study Materials

Red Hat skills assessments and other materials can be located on the training page. Red Hat Training includes multiple training options (online, classroom, self-paced, virtual, video and more). Red Hat Learning Subscription includes all online courses in one package; prices vary by geography, candidates can expect to pay $5,500 for a Basic Subscription and $7,000 for a Standard Subscription. Study guides are on Amazon.

Beyond the Top 5: More Linux certifications

Outside the top five Linux credentials and programs covered in this article, other Linux certifications may be worthy of your time and attention.

The Linux Foundation, a membership-based organization, promotes the development of the Linux kernel through collaboration, conferences and education. The organization’s small but respected certification program includes the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE).

IBM continues to offer a handful of Linux-related certifications. One certification of interest is the Certified Database Administrator, which continues to be in demand for those running DB2 on Linux, Unix and Windows systems.

Many industry experts, including Steven J. Vaughn-Nichols, a long-time user and expert on Linux and Unix operating systems, say that certifications can be an important ingredient in a job candidate’s qualifications. But interviewers should also pay close attention to how many Linux systems candidates have set up, managed or used to get a sense of the scale and scope of their experience.

In other words, when you see a web hosting service advertising for Linux jobs, they’re not looking for people who’ve installed and used Linux at home or in a small business setting; they’re looking for professionals who’ve set up and managed Linux in a highly distributed and virtualized data center environment, with lots of complex networking and services coming into the mix.

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Killexams : Best System Administrator Certifications for 2019

When it comes to managing computer systems, whether in an office environment, on a campus or in an enterprise data center, there’s a long list of tools and technologies SysAdmins need to master. There are numerous certifications can help validate knowledge and skills in those areas.

In addition to server and client configuration and maintenance, many system administrators must understand access controls, network services and resource requirements for applications. They often find themselves working with directory and name services as well as network addressing, database services, web and desktop applications, email, and more.

Making sense of all these different system administrator roles and accompanying certifications is no easy task. After examining various credentials, we came up with a list of our five favorite system administrator certifications for 2019.

The following chart shows the results of an informal job search we conducted that gives you an idea of the relative frequency with which our top five certifications appear in actual job postings. While all the certifications are popular, the CompTIA Server+ stands out as the clear favorite.

Job Board Search Results (in alphabetical order, by certification)*

Certification SimplyHired Indeed LinkedIn Jobs Linkup Total
MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure (Microsoft) 112 247 253 151 773
Oracle Linux System Administrator (Oracle) 311 377 124 304 1,116
RHCE (Red Hat) 507 625 864 286 2,282
Server+ (CompTIA) 98 111 165 25 399
VCP6.5-DCV (VMware)* 219 275 169 192 855

*When searching for VCP – Data Center credentials, we found most job descriptions didn’t indicate a specific version.

Although employers tend to pay SysAdmins less than some of their IT peers, such as network engineers and data architects, a career in system administration is still worth pursuing. SimplyHired reports $77,296 as the national average salary for SysAdmins, in a range from $49,746 to $120,102. Indeed.com pegs averages at $75,967 for plain-vanilla, and $88,032 for senior systems administrators.

MCSE: Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert

The Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE) certification has long ruled the hearts and minds of those who work on Microsoft-based systems, servers and clouds. MCSE certifications focus on the latest technologies for business applications, cloud infrastructures, data management and analytics, mobility, and productivity.

But when it comes to system administration certifications in general, the brightest lights are those that address Windows Server at the enterprise and server administrator levels. While these credentials don’t all specifically use “system administrator” in their descriptions, they all fall well inside the roles and responsibilities of system administration jobs. They’re also in high demand in job postings and classified job advertisements.

The MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure targets IT professionals seeking to promote careers such as information security analysts or computer support specialists. Those obtaining the certification will find that the MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure credential is designed to validate the skills necessary to effectively run a data center, including networking, storage, systems management, virtualization and identity management.

Note: The Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) is Microsoft’s prevailing mid-range IT certification. It covers most administrative job roles, including system administration at both the desktop and server levels, as well as more specialized job roles that include SQL Server and Office 365. MCSA: Cloud Platform is a gateway certification that feeds into these MCSE certifications.

System administration candidates might also want to take a close look at the MCSE: Productivity credential, which garners nearly as many hits on job boards as the MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure cert. The MCSE: Productivity focuses on Microsoft Exchange, SharePoint or Skype For Business. Because communications systems and services of all kinds are so important to business, these are good areas for aspiring and practicing system administrators to specialize in.

The Microsoft Certification Program underwent extensive changes in September 2016. Once you earn one of the latest MCSE credentials, you do not have to recertify within three years as used to be the case. However, by passing an elective exam each calendar year, you add an entry to your transcript that indicates your commitment to staying current on technologies and expanding your skillset.

MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure Facts and Figures

Certification Name Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE): Cloud Platform and Infrastructure
Prerequisites & Required Courses Any one of the following MCSAs is required:

MCSA: Windows Server 2016

MCSA: Cloud Platform

MCSA: Linux on Azure

MCSA: Windows Server 2012

Number of Exams One additional elective exam is required to earn this MCSE. Valid electives include:

70-532 Developing Microsoft Azure Solutions

70-533 Implementing Microsoft Azure Infrastructure Solutions (exam retires December 31, 2018)

70-473 Designing and Implementing Cloud Data Platform Solutions

70-475 Designing and Implementing Big Data Analytics Solutions

70-744 Securing Windows Server 2016

70-745 Implementing a Software-Defined Datacenter

70-413 Designing and Implementing a Server Infrastructure

70-414 Implementing an Advanced Server Infrastructure

70-537 Configuring and Operating a Hybrid Cloud with Microsoft Azure Stack (coming soon)

Candidates are encouraged to check the certification web page for the most current list of qualifying exams.

Cost per Exam $165 per exam in the USA
URL https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/learning/mcse-cloud-platform-infrastructure.aspx
Self-Study Materials Visit the certification web page and Microsoft Learning for practice tests, free online training, Microsoft Official Curriculum in-classroom and on-demand course offerings, books, online resources and more.  Candidates will find links to training resources including practice exams, books, video, and formal training on the exam web page.

Oracle Linux System Administrator

Although known for its database products and solutions, Oracle also has its own distribution of Linux, geared for the enterprise and designed to support cloud environments. In fact, Oracle Linux is optimized for various Oracle products and platforms, such as Oracle Exadata Database Machine, Oracle Exalytics In-Memory Machine, Oracle Exalogic Elastic Cloud and Oracle Database Appliance.

To support Oracle Linux, the company offers the Oracle Linux System Administrator certification at Associate and Professional levels. A single Oracle Linux Certified Implementation Specialist credential is also offered. We focus on the Oracle Certified Professional (OCP) version in this section.

The OCP Oracle Linux System Administrator certification, currently at version 6 (although version 7 should be coming soon), covers a lot of details. Candidates must be well-versed on the Btrfs file system, control groups, Linux containers, advanced storage administration techniques, Oracle cluster management and package management. The certification also tests for knowledge of dump analysis, dynamic tracing, network and security configuration and more.

The OCP Oracle Linux System Administrator certification requires that candidates first obtain the Oracle Certified Associate (OCA) Oracle Linux 5 and 6 System Administrator certification and pass one exam.

SysAdmins who support Oracle Solaris might be interested in the Oracle Solaris System Administrator certification, which Oracle offers at the Associate and Professional levels. Oracle also offers several server-related certifications for SPARC and Fujitsu servers.

Oracle Linux System Administrator Facts and Figures

RHCE: Red Hat Certified Engineer

In the realm of Linux system administrator certifications, Red Hat certs really stand out. Red Hat’s more senior-level certifications are especially popular among IT professionals as well as the employers who hire them. Those holding the Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) credential qualify for job roles such as senior Linux administrator, senior UNIX administrator, senior systems engineer, infrastructure systems engineer, IT analyst and the like.

The RHCE is regarded as a high-level credential that’s not easy to obtain. Candidates must first obtain the Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) credential and then pass a three and a half hour, hands-on, performance-based exam that’s intense and demanding. Those who earn the RHCE can go on to earn the Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA) in Infrastructure credential.

The current RHCE exam is based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7. RHCE certification is valid for three years from the date the certification was achieved. To maintain the certification, a credential holder must pass any RHCA exam or pass the RHCE certification exam again before the end of the three-year period.

Note: In October 2018, IBM announced that it was acquiring Red Hat for the princely sum of $34 billion. It’s too early to tell what impact this may have on Red Hat certification offerings, if any.

RHCE Facts and Figures

Certification Name Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE)
Prerequisites & Required Courses Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) certification (does not have be on the same Red Hat Enterprise Linux version). RHCSA requires one exam: EX200 — Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA).

Note: Courses recommended but not required

Number of Exams One exams:

EX300 – Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) exam, 3.5 hours

Cost per Exam $400 (RHCE exam fee only)
URL https://www.redhat.com/en/services/certification/rhce
Self-Study Materials Red Hat Training offers multiple training options, including classroom, virtual, online, video and private onsite. The Red Hat Learning Subscription offers online and video courses, including cloud-based labs, in Basic and Standard subscriptions. Prices vary by geography. Candidates in the U.S. can expect to pay $5,500 (or 19 training units) for the Basic tier and $7,000 (or 24 training units) for the Standard tier.

CompTIA Server+

CompTIA offers a long list of entry-level certifications, such as the A+ for hardware technicians, Network+ for network admins and Security+ for security specialists, all of which are highly regarded in the computing industry. The CompTIA Server+ certification is no exception. Companies such as Intel, HP, Dell, Lenovo, Xerox and Microsoft, as well as the U.S. Department of Defense, recommend or require that their server technicians earn CompTIA Server+.

The Server+ certification exam focuses on foundational server-related Topics that are vendor-neutral in nature, including server hardware, operating systems, storage systems, networking, the IT environment (documentation, diagrams and best practices), security and disaster recovery, virtualization and troubleshooting.

The Server+ credential, along with sufficient experience, is a great asset for individuals seeking a position as a server or network administrator, systems engineer or website administrator. You can also consider it as a stepping stone to a more focused certification, such as the Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) or the Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA).

Server+ certification requires one exam, SK0-004. CompTIA recommends that candidates have at least 18 months of experience and A+ certification before sitting for the exam.

CompTIA Server+ Facts and Figures

Certification Name CompTIA Server+
Prerequisites & Required Courses Required: None

Recommended: CompTIA A+ certification plus 18 to 24 months of IT experience

Number of Exams One exam: SK0-004 (90 minutes, 100 multiple-choice questions, 750 on a scale of 100-900 required to pass)
Cost per Exam $319. Purchase vouchers through CompTIA Marketplace. exam administered by Pearson VUE.
URL https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/server
Self-study Materials Links to practice questions, exam objectives, eBooks, and other training resources are available on the certification web page. exam study bundles including eBooks and CertMaster practice are available from the CompTIA Marketplace.

VCP6-DCV: VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization

The VMware family of certifications are must-have credentials for IT professionals interested in the field of virtualization. Offering a comprehensive certification program that encompasses all skills levels, VMware credentials are recognized globally as best in class.

The latest incarnation of the VMware vSphere product is Version 6.5. VMware currently offers two credentials which target vSphere V6.5 users: the VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization and the VMware Certified Advanced Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization (Design and Deploy). It’s anticipated that the VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX-DCV) will be available soon.

Although Version 6.5 is the newest version of the vSphere product, interested candidates can still certify on vSphere V. 6. The VMware Certified Professional 6 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP6-DCV) is one of VMware’s most popular credentials with more than 100,000 certified credential holders. The VCP6-DCV prepares credential holders for more advanced certifications, including the VMware Certified Advanced Professional (VCAP6-DCV) and the pinnacle cert, VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX-DCV). For this article, we chose to concentrate on the requirements for the VCP6.5 – DCV since it’s based on the newest version of vSphere.

Training is required for non-credential holders seeking to obtain the VCP6-DCV. VMware offers a variety of training options to meet the training prerequisite: self-paced (on demand), live online and live classroom, some of which include virtual labs. Those possessing a valid VCP5-DCV or VCP6-DCV credential need only pass a delta exam to obtain the credential.

VCP6.5-DCV Facts and Figures

Certification Name VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP6.5-DCV)
Prerequisites & Required Courses Path 1 (non-VCP credential holders):  Gain vSphere 6.5 experience, attend a required training course, pass either the vSphere 6 or 6.5 Foundations exam, and pass the current VCP6.5–DCV exam

Path 2 (active VCP5-DCV or VCP6-DCV credential holders): Gain vSphere 6.5 experience, pass the VCP6.5–DCV or VCP6.5–DCV Delta exam. Training is recommended but not required.

Path 3 (expired VCP-DCV): Gain vSphere 6.5 experience, attend a required training course, pass either the vSphere 6 or 6.5 Foundations exam, and pass the current VCP6.5–DCV exam

Path 4 (active VCP 6, 6.5 or 7 in a different track): Gain vSphere 6.5 experience and pass the VCP6.5–DCV exam. Training is recommended but not required.

See the VCP6.5-DCV web page for list of current approved training courses.

Number of Exams One or two exams depending on certification path.

Foundation exams:

vSphere 6 Foundations Exam, 2V0-620, 115 minutes, 65 questions

vSphere 6.5 Foundations Exam, 2V0-602, 105 minutes, 70 questions

VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization exams:

VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization, 2V0-622, 105 minutes, 70 questions

VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization Delta, 2V0-622D, 106 minutes, 70 questions

Cost per Exam vSphere Foundations exam (V6 or V6.5), $125

VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization exam, $250

VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization Delta exam, $250

URL VCP6.5-DCV:   https://www.vmware.com/education-services/certification/vcp6-5-dcv.html
Self-Study Materials A link to an exam guide, training and a practice exam (if available) appear on each exam page (see the How to Prepare tab). VMware Learning Zone offers exam prep subscriptions. Numerous VCP6-DCV study materials are available through Amazon.com. MeasureUp offers a VCP6-DCV practice tests and a practice labs.

Beyond the Top 5: More SysAdmin Certifications

Beyond the five system administrator certifications featured in this article, there are many other certification programs that can help to further the careers and professional development of IT professionals who work in system administration.

It makes sense to investigate the plethora of vendor-specific programs available for those who work with systems from companies such as Brocade, Dell EMC, HPE, IBM, NetApp, Symantec and so forth. Many of them play into key system specialty areas, such as storage, security or virtualization, while others offer a broad range of platforms for these and other technology areas. Here are some examples:

  • IBM Certified System Administrator (and Advanced Administrator), for WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment, AIX, DB2, Connections, Sametime, Lotus Notes, Informix, IBM i and more
  • NetApp Certified Data Administrator (NCDA), geared toward professionals who manage NetApp data storage controllers running the ONTAP operating system
  • ServiceNow Certified System Administrator, aimed at professionals who are adept at configuring, implementing and managing ServiceNow systems

Likewise, vendor-neutral certification programs also offer a variety of interesting and potentially valuable credentials. For example, the LPI LPIC certifications, which had been in our top five list for several years, are well known and widely recognized in IT shops and operations that depend on Linux servers to handle their workloads. It’s best to think of our top five certifications as a good place to start, while also realizing that there are many other options to consider as well.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10752-best-system-administrator-certifications.html
Killexams : Linux Fu: System Administration Made Easier

Linux can have a somewhat split personality. If you use it as a desktop OS, it has a lot of GUI tools, although sometimes you still need to access the command line. If you use it as a headless server, though, you probably ought to know your way around the command line pretty well. This is especially true if you don’t want to litter up your hard drive (and CPU) with X servers and other peculiarities of the graphical user interface.

Personally, I like the command line, but I am realistic enough to know that not everyone shares that feeling. I’ll also admit that for some tasks — especially those you don’t do very often — it is nice to have some helpful buttons and menus. There are several administration tools that you might be interested in using to handle administration tasks on your Linux machines. I’m going to look at two of them you might want to experiment with that both use a Web browser to provide their interface.

Why two? Well, first, it is certainly in the Linux tradition that there is more than one way to do any particular thing. On top of that — again, sort of a Linux tradition — each tool has its plusses and minuses. The Webmin tool has a huge number of plugins to manage lots and lots of different things. However, Cockpit is more modern and, assuming it supports what you need, probably more usable.

Disclaimer

Oh, and just to get it out of the way. Yes, there are some people who think tools like this are an abomination. I think it depends on your goals. If you are administering a highly-secure server for a giant corporation, maybe these tools shouldn’t be your first stop. As I mentioned, I don’t mind the command line, but I do use Webmin only because it provides Usermin which lets me provide a GUI to my friends who have accounts on my machine so they can do basic administration tasks related to their accounts. I’ve found Cockpit’s system monitoring to be nice even though I don’t do much in the way of changes using the system.

Even if you like using tools like this you really should get comfortable with the command line, at least for common tasks. One interesting tidbit though. Both tools allow you to launch a command line in your browser, at least to some extent.

Webmin

Webmin is probably not going to win any user interface awards. It is really a series of Perl modules that have a common user interface and share some infrastructure. The good news is that Webmin has an open interface and has been around long enough that if you want to manage some obscure piece of software, it is a fair bet that there is a Webmin module for that. You can also disable any modules you don’t want.

As I mentioned, you can also set up Usermin which allows ordinary users to do things via GUI. You can control what they can and can’t do, of course.

Despite being a little clunky, you can issue commands and even use an odd Web browser-based terminal. There are a few things that require Java, and that’s getting harder to find in modern Web browsers. However, most of these have alternatives (for example, there is an HTML file manager and a Java-based one).

Depending on the distribution you use, you can probably just install Webmin using your package manager. There are also plenty of tutorials for installing Webmin on the Raspberry Pi. You can always find the official release on the project’s web site.

Cockpit

Cockpit is from RedHat and is certainly the more modern looking tool. It has graphs and is very responsive. However, there’s just not the range of plugins available for it that you can get for Webmin. However, if you are using Docker, Cockpit has great integration for managing containers.

As you can see below, you can connect to one machine and then have it connect to other machines and monitor them all at one time. The figure shows two boxes, but you can add many more.

Once you drill into a specific box, you have lots of management and monitoring options including access to a shell in the browser.

There are ARM backports of Cockpit available, so depending on the distribution you run your Pi on, you should be able to get it running easily.

Tip

To get the most out of Cockpit, you need to log in as root. However, many systems now don’t have a root password at all. When you log in, you can ask Cockpit to use your password to elevate privileges when necessary. If you don’t check the box, then doing some operations (notably adding a new server) will fail.

This sort of negates the idea of using sudo, to some degree. The whole idea is to force you to reauthenticate from time to time. If you let Cockpit provide your password to sudo, you aren’t really giving yourself that protection. I get the idea that if you don’t check the box, Cockpit should prompt you for a password just like sudo would. However, when adding a new server — at least — it doesn’t. It just fails.

The solution is to check the box when you log in to let it reuse your password. Just be aware that essentially makes using sudo for privileged access meaningless.

Security

Speaking of security. Both tools contain their own SSL servers with a self-signed certificate. Presumably, you know you are connecting to your machine so the self-signed part shouldn’t bother you — you only need the encryption. However, it does mean the browser will provide you a scary warning about the certificate not being trusted.

You can, of course, change out the certificate. Let’s Encrypt is a good source for a “real” certificate at no cost.

However, opening up these interfaces to the outside world is pretty scary. After all, if someone does get it, they could do just about anything. You should consider changing the port numbers, using two-factor authentication (both tools support Google Authenticator), and, if possible, keep the tools listening only on your network and use VPN or an SSH tunnel to access it.

In Closing

Personally? I keep waiting for the whole WIMP (Windows/Icons/Mouse/Pointer) fad to die out leaving us to work on the command line as nature intended. However, that doesn’t seem like its going to happen until after the apocalypse. In all seriousness, for some obscure tasks, having some menu items and dialogs can be a great help. If you don’t do much administration, these tools can be great training wheels. And like I said earlier, Usermin is especially useful if you have users that are not Linux-savvy.

Besides, like it or not, Linux is about choice. I like KDE, but I’m glad people who want to use Cinnamon or other desktop environments have that option. For that matter, when I am running on a small machine, sometimes I’m glad to have other options, too.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 12:01:00 -0500 Al Williams en-US text/html https://hackaday.com/2017/11/09/linux-fu-system-administration-made-easier/
Killexams : Linux Foundation to blaze a path forward for mainframes

Open-source software development will be a key component to keeping the mainframe a vibrant part of current and future enterprise architectures.

With that in mind the Open Mainframe Project, part of the Linux Foundation, this week said at its Open Mainframe Summit that it was forming a working group to promote mainframe-modernization efforts and that it had acqured its own Big Iron to spur future development.

The working group will create a common definition and framework defining what mainframe modernization should look like and promote open-source development on the Big Iron.

The new group will focus on the term modernization, which it says is used to mean different things and so is causing confusion. Some define modernization as moving away from mainframes and COBOL, and others defineiit as updating existing systems in place.

The group includes Broadcom Mainframe Software, IBM, Micro Focus, Model9, Rocket Software, SUSE, and Vicom Infinity. Among its goals:

  • Collaborating on a common definition of mainframe modernization.
  • Creating a framework through which all vendors can highlight their modernization options.
  • Creating one go-to place for information about mainframe modernization.
  • Identifying opportunities for future Open Mainframe projects to enable modernization.

In addition to the new working group, the Open Mainframe Project now has an actual mainframe to work with. Project leaders said that Broadcom’s Mainframe Software Division had donated a IBM z15 mainframe system that will be dedicated to training next-generation talent and developing new open-software technologies.

Copyright © 2022 IDG Communications, Inc.

Wed, 21 Sep 2022 06:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.networkworld.com/article/3674141/linux-foundation-to-blaze-a-path-forward-for-mainframes.html
Killexams : The Linux Foundation and Fintech Open Source Foundation Announce the Conference Schedule for Open Source in Finance Forum New York 2022

25+ sessions (and more to be announced) showcasing latest developments and the direction of open source in financial services and providing unique opportunities to hear from and engage with those who are leveraging open source software to solve industry challenges. 

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and co-host Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit whose mission is to accelerate adoption of open source software, standards and best practices in financial services, today announced the conference schedule for Open Source in Finance Forum New York 2022 (OSFF). The event will take place December 8 in New York City. The schedule can be viewed here.

The Linux Foundation logo

OSFF is the only conference dedicated to driving collaboration and innovation in financial services through open source software and standards. The event will provide practical knowledge and guidance on best practices, tools and technologies, explore how to build a successful community, and provide unparalleled opportunities to network with the executives and individuals driving open source in financial services.

Conference Session Highlights:

Open Source Readiness for Financial Institutions

Keynote speakers and additional conference sessions will be announced in the coming weeks.

Registration is offered at the rate of US$275 through October 19. Members of The Linux Foundation receive a 20 percent discount - members can contact events@linuxfoundation.org to request a member discount code. Members of FINOS can attend at no cost - members can contact osff@finos.org to request the FINOS Member registration code.

Health and Safety
While wearing a mask at this event is strongly recommended, we are no longer mandating masks be worn. Attendees will be required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination or provide a negative COVID-19 test to attend, and will need to comply with all on-site health measures, in accordance with The Linux Foundation Code of Conduct. To learn more, visit the Health & Safety webpage.

Diversity & Need-Based Scholarships and Travel Funding

Applications for diversity and need-based scholarships are currently being accepted here. The Linux Foundation's Travel Fund is also accepting applications, with the goal of enabling open source developers and community members to attend events that they would otherwise be unable to attend due to a lack of funding. We place an emphasis on funding applicants who are from historically underrepresented or untapped groups and/or those of lower socioeconomic status. To learn more and apply, click here.

Sponsor
For information on becoming an event sponsor, click here or email us for more information and to speak to our team.

Press
Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Kristin O'Connell.

About FINOS
FINOS (The Fintech Open Source Foundation) is a nonprofit whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards and collaborative software development practices in financial services. It is the center for open source developers and the financial services industry to build new technology projects that have a lasting impact on business operations. As a regulatory compliant platform, the foundation enables developers from these competing organizations to collaborate on projects with a strong propensity for mutualization. It has enabled codebase contributions from both the buy- and sell-side firms and counts over 40 major financial institutions, fintechs and technology consultancies as part of its membership. FINOS is also part of the Linux Foundation, the largest shared technology organization in the world.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation and its projects are supported by more than 2,950 members. The Linux Foundation is the world's leading home for collaboration on open source software, hardware, standards, and data. Linux Foundation projects are critical to the world's infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, ONAP, Hyperledger, RISC-V, and more. The Linux Foundation's methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at https://linuxfoundation.org/.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world's leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world's largest shared technologies.

Visit our website and follow us on Twitter, Linkedin, and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page:
 www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage
. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. 

Media Contact
Kristin O'Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

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SOURCE The Linux Foundation

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 07:55:00 -0500 en text/html https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/the-linux-foundation-and-fintech-open-source-foundation-announce-the-conference-schedule-for-open-source-in-finance-forum-new-york-2022-1031804254
Killexams : Linux Foundation wants to promote sustainable open source development with new initiatives

During last week’s Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles, the Linux Foundation announced a series of projects designed to promote sustainability and growth in open source development.

We wrote last week about their “Open Source Guides for the Enterprise,” which will see a series of guides by professionals from many different organizations released over the next few months.

Following that, the foundation announced the Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software, or CHAOSS, project. With CHAOSS, the Linux Foundation wants to provide a platform for measuring and analyzing open source projects.

The foundation also announced that it has granted a CII security badge to 100 projects through a voluntary process for open source projects to prove their security measures stack up professionally.

And finally, the foundation is involved in the Kubernetes Certified Service Provider project, which allows companies already versed in Kubernetes technology to become certified support for enterprises hopping on the rapidly growing container management system.

In a post on the foundation’s blog, Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin explained why these projects will be important.

“The big question we ask ourselves at The Linux Foundation is: Of the 64 million open-source projects out there, which are the ones that really matter?” he wrote. “We think that projects with sustainable ecosystems are the ones that really matter. These are the open-source projects that will be supported. They provide the security and quality codebase that you can build future technologies on.”

Zemlin says that the many open source projects in active development at the Linux Foundation and influential projects coming from organizations like the Apache Software Foundation, the Eclipse Foundation and the OpenStack Foundation, all follow the sort of development principles that he believes will promote sustainability.

With these sorts of guidelines and support available, Zemlin says it will become clearer and easier for enterprises to evaluate which open-source projects are worth using and contributing to, which in turn will promote the growth of these worthwhile projects.

Sat, 17 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://sdtimes.com/jim-zemlin/linux-foundation-sustainable-open-source/
Killexams : Test System Administrator at Datafin Recruitment

ENVIRONMENT:

A leading global provider of cutting-edge Telecommunications Solutions seeks a solutions-driven Test System Administrator to join its team. Your core role will be to administer the test systems, deploy new software on the test systems and perform ad hoc testing as needed. You will require a suitable National Diploma and Certifications including MCSE/CCNA, RHCSA, have 3 years’ work experience in a similar role including having managed larger server environments (Microsoft/Linux) and Linux Administration, proficiency with Active Directory, DNS, DHCP and experience monitoring backups and resolution of errors, Configuration Management and Incident and Problem Management.

DUTIES:

  • Configure and monitor test system HW and take corrective action as needed.
  • Configure and monitor test system NW and take corrective action as needed.
  • Monitor system health and take corrective action as needed.
  • Deploy subsystem builds on the test systems and verify their operability.
  • Report deployment procedure issues for rectification.
  • Verify that the test systems remain operational after deployment by using system health features to monitor system alarms, events, etc.
  • Assist with manual system testing.
  • Ensure that system documentation is kept up to date.

REQUIREMENTS:

Qualifications –

  • Minimum: National Diploma; Microsoft MCSE/CCNA; RHCSA.
  • Recommended: BTech, RHCE.

Experience/Skills –

  • Minimum 3 years’ previous experience in a similar role.
  • Manage larger server environments (Microsoft/Linux) and Linux Administration experience.
  • Monitor backups and resolution of errors.
  • Active Directory, DNS, DHCP.
  • System change management, change control processes and procedures.
  • Incident and Problem Management.
  • Configuration Management.

Advantageous –

  • Experience with PHP/Python, and the ability to write administration scripts.
  • SQL and/or programming languages.

ATTRIBUTES:

  • Analytical problem-solving skills.
  • Excellent communications skills.
  • A need to continuously upskill.
  • Have a “can do” attitude to any type of work that needs to be done.
  • Able to balance work and life.

While we would really like to respond to every application, should you not be contacted for this position within 10 working days please consider your application unsuccessful.

COMMENTS:

When applying for jobs, ensure that you have the minimum job requirements. OnlySA Citizens will be considered for this role. If you are not in the mentioned location of any of the jobs, please note your relocation plans in all applications for jobs and correspondence. Please e-mail a word copy of your CV to [Email Address Removed] and mention the reference numbers of the jobs. We have a list of jobs on [URL Removed] Datafin IT Recruitment – Cape Town Jobs.

Desired Skills:

  • Test
  • System
  • Administrator

Learn more/Apply for this position

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://it-online.co.za/2022/10/14/test-system-administrator-at-datafin-recruitment-3/
Killexams : Linux Foundation launches European division © Provided by The Register

Plans to drive more open source – and more transparency – into public sector

Open Source Summit  The body behind the biggest open source project in the world has opened a European division.…

Sometimes, attending a European trade show – even virtually – can provide you a slight feeling of being a supporting feature, with the main act happening in North America, usually some time earlier. So the launch of the Linux Foundation Europe in Dublin last week was a welcome change. After all, the Linux kernel itself was originally a European project, from a member of Finland's Swedish-speaking minority.

On stage to launch the new organization was Gabriele Columbro, who is also the head of the Fintech Open Source Foundation, FINOS, along with Ericsson's Phil Robb, Rob Oshana from NXP Semiconductors, Sachiko Muto from the OpenForum Europe, and Vasu Chandrasekhara of SAP.

Columbro took the time to speak to The Reg about the new organization. He told us the Linux Foundation has "decades of experience running the largest shared technology investment in the world and the biggest open collaboration out there."

He added: "So, we will create an advisory board, but what we will not do is create a separate board of directors for LF Europe, because while we want to foster regional collaboration, we don't want to create silos."

The new organization will be a non-profit that will operate out of Belgium and act as an entry point to the parent organization. "So if you join the Linux Foundation Europe, that means you can join the Linux Foundation as a separate agreement at no additional cost," said Columbro.

As membership is a condition of starting a project under Linux Foundation governance, this should simplify the process for European organizations. It will also be backing the new Open Wallet Foundation.

The Linux Foundation recently sponsored a study entitled "World of Open Source: Europe Spotlight 2022" which is available free of charge. This notes:

Columbro said this was a major goal for LF Europe. "The report shows that really, the public sector is not capitalizing on open source and open collaboration." LF Europe hopes "to bring all the industry constituents together and drive innovation." ®

Mon, 19 Sep 2022 20:33:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/linux-foundation-launches-european-division/ar-AA1213S2
Killexams : Here come the new Red Hat Enterprise Linux distros
Image: RedHat

Red Hat is the Linux distro security leader. And with its latest Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) beta releases, RHEL 8.7 and 9.1, the Linux powerhouse company is continuing to stake out its security claims.

Red Hat is releasing both of these betas at once because while RHEL 9 includes the newest features, there are not a lot of practical differences between the two RHEL distros. Eric Hendricks, RHEL's operations advocate, added that some companies prefer sticking to the tried and true. 

In any case, RHEL 8 will continue to be fully supported with new features until May 2024. Afterward, RHEL 8 goes into maintenance support mode. There, it will still get critical and important security patches -- and if Red Hat so decides, other patches. 

Also: The 5 best linux distros for beginners: You can do this 

In these beta releases, for its older RHEL 8.x and its new RHEL 9.x distros, Red Hat is implementing new built-in security features and profiles. These include:

  • RHEL identity access management (IAM) now incorporates new Ansible, Red Hat's DevOps program, tooling to configure smart card authentication across their entire business.  

  • On the other hand, RHEL can now use other IAM services, such as those provided by Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and others. RHEL has long supported Active Directory (AD) as a third-party IAM resource.

RHEL 9.1 also supports multilevel security (MLS) to match government classified security classifications with IAM. An RHEL 9.1 administrator can also remotely verify the integrity of the remote operating systems' boot environment for extra low-level security.

Red Hat is also improving its Software Bill of Materials (SBOM) with Secure Software Supply Chain methodologies. Red Hat did this by adopting Sigstore, the well-regarded open-source software signing service for its build pipelines and tools. This, in turn, makes RHEL and programs built with it much more trustworthy. 

The company is also incorporating Sigstore into its Podman, its Open Containers Initiative (OCI) rival to Docker. Since Podman works natively with Kubernetes, the incredibly popular cloud orchestration tool, it's become very popular in its own right. 

As usual with RHEL updates, both betas include the latest coding tools, container tools, computer languages, compilers, open-source databases, and web and cache servers. These include:

  • GCC-toolset 12, and the GCC 12 compiler to RHEL 8.

  • New Rust-toolset, LLVM-toolset, and Go-toolset updates.

  • Ruby 3.1, Maven 3.8. .NET 7, and Node.js 18. 

  • RHEL 8.1 also includes Mercurial 6.2, the newest Mercurial distributed source control management tool.

  • While RHEL 9.1 includes the major PHP 8.1 language update. This is not your dad's PHP.

Also: These are the absolute best linux distros for pros 

Put it all together, and you get Linux distros that are ideal for both system and cloud administrators, and programmers. They deserve your attention. In particular, if you work a lot with PHP, RHEL 9.1 will help you get started with the latest, greatest PHP release.

Sun, 02 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/here-come-the-new-red-hat-enterprise-linux-distros/ Killexams : Test System Administrator at Datafin Recruitment – Western Cape Stellenbosch

ENVIRONMENT:

A leading global provider of cutting-edge Telecommunications Solutions seeks a solutions-driven Test System Administrator to join its team. Your core role will be to administer the test systems, deploy new software on the test systems and perform ad hoc testing as needed. You will require a suitable National Diploma and Certifications including MCSE/CCNA, RHCSA, have 3 years’ work experience in a similar role including having managed larger server environments (Microsoft/Linux) and Linux Administration, proficiency with Active Directory, DNS, DHCP and experience monitoring backups and resolution of errors, Configuration Management and Incident and Problem Management.

DUTIES:

  • Configure and monitor test system HW and take corrective action as needed.
  • Configure and monitor test system NW and take corrective action as needed.
  • Monitor system health and take corrective action as needed.
  • Deploy subsystem builds on the test systems and verify their operability.
  • Report deployment procedure issues for rectification.
  • Verify that the test systems remain operational after deployment by using system health features to monitor system alarms, events, etc.
  • Assist with manual system testing.
  • Ensure that system documentation is kept up to date.

REQUIREMENTS:

Qualifications –

  • Minimum: National Diploma; Microsoft MCSE/CCNA; RHCSA.
  • Recommended: BTech, RHCE.

Experience/Skills –

  • Minimum 3 years’ previous experience in a similar role.
  • Manage larger server environments (Microsoft/Linux) and Linux Administration experience.
  • Monitor backups and resolution of errors.
  • Active Directory, DNS, DHCP.
  • System change management, change control processes and procedures.
  • Incident and Problem Management.
  • Configuration Management.

Advantageous –

  • Experience with PHP/Python, and the ability to write administration scripts.
  • SQL and/or programming languages.

ATTRIBUTES:

  • Analytical problem-solving skills.
  • Excellent communications skills.
  • A need to continuously upskill.
  • Have a “can do” attitude to any type of work that needs to be done.
  • Able to balance work and life.

While we would really like to respond to every application, should you not be contacted for this position within 10 working days please consider your application unsuccessful.

COMMENTS:

When applying for jobs, ensure that you have the minimum job requirements. OnlySA Citizens will be considered for this role. If you are not in the mentioned location of any of the jobs, please note your relocation plans in all applications for jobs and correspondence. Please e-mail a word copy of your CV to [Email Address Removed] and mention the reference numbers of the jobs. We have a list of jobs on [URL Removed] Datafin IT Recruitment – Cape Town Jobs.

Desired Skills:

  • Test
  • System
  • Administrator

Learn more/Apply for this position

Thu, 13 Oct 2022 11:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://it-online.co.za/2022/10/14/test-system-administrator-at-datafin-recruitment-western-cape-stellenbosch-3/
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