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MB-230 Microsoft Dynamics 365 for Customer Service

Candidates design and implement service management visualizations and reports provided by and in collaboration with the Solution Architect. Candidates collaborate with the Dynamics 365 administrator to implement and upgrade Power platform components, including knowledge base and Forms Pro.

Candidates must have strong applied knowledge meeting user needs through the Dynamics 365 Customer Service, including in-depth understanding of cases, knowledge base, queues, entitlements, Service Level Agreements (SLAs), visualizations, and Unified Service Desk.

Candidates should understand industry terminology, priorities, standards, methodologies, customer service operations, and best practices. Candidates should include a comprehensive understanding of the Customer Service application's role in relationship to the Dynamics 365 suite of applications along with a basic understanding of the solution architecture and quality assurance.

Perform configuration (25-30%)
Configure Service Management settings
May include but not limited to:
• describe process of record creation and update rules
• configure queues
• configure holiday schedule
• configure customer service schedule
• configure user work hours
• configure categories and subjects
• configure cases
• configure customer service security roles
• configure goal management components
• create routing rules
• configure services
Configure processes
May include but not limited to:
• configure custom business process flows
• implement business process flows from Microsoft AppSource
Create and configure customer service visualizations
May include but not limited to:
• configure customer service content pack for Power BI
• configure customer service dashboards
• design and create customer service charts
• execute and analyze customer service reports

Manage cases and the knowledge base (30-35%)
Create and manage cases
May include but not limited to:
• manage case list
• create and search for case records
• convert activities to cases
• perform case resolution
• implement case routing rules
• implement parent/child cases
• merge cases
• configure status reason transitions
Create and manage the knowledge base
May include but not limited to:
• configure entities for knowledge management
• link an article with a case
• use the knowledge base to resolve cases
• create and manage knowledge base article lifecycle
• create and manage knowledge base articles
• search for articles

Manage queues, entitlements, and SLAs (25-30%)
Create and manage queues
May include but not limited to:
• differentiate queue types
• add cases and activities to queues
• implement case routing
• configure entities for queues
• configure queue email settings
• configure record creation and update rules
Create and manage entitlements
May include but not limited to:
• define and create entitlements
• manage entitlement templates
• activate and deactivate entitlements
• renew or cancel an entitlement
• assign an entitlement to a case
Create and manage SLAs
May include but not limited to:
• determine SLA conditions
• define and create SLAs
• implement actions and details
• use SLAs on-demand
• manage cases with SLAs
• create and manage SLA items

Configure voice of the customer (15-20%)
Notice of planned skills update: In April 2020, Voice of the Customer skills and test questions will be replaced with Forms Pro skills and questions. Please prepare for your test accordingly.
Create surveys
May include but not limited to:
• create a theme and upload images
• add pages to a survey and personalize data
• identify survey question types
• add survey questions
• identify respondent types
• configure response routing
• configure survey scoring
• configure survey unsubscription options
Preview, test, and publish surveys
May include but not limited to:
• distribute survey link using email
• embed a survey in a web page
• clone, import, and translate surveys
Manage survey responses
May include but not limited to:
• summarize survey results
• determine report types
• implement workflow conditional logic for survey actions
• create business actions based upon survey responses

Microsoft Dynamics 365 for Customer Service
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Mon, 25 Jul 2022 04:25:00 -0500 Entrepreneur Store en text/html https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/432001
Killexams : She had it better than most Arizona prisoners, but says she still faced racism and labor abuse.

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Killexams : Hydrogen fuel cells could provide emission free backup power at datacenters, Microsoft says

In 2018, Microsoft collaborated with engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, to power a rack of computers with a 65-kilowatt PEM fuel cell generator. Then, in 2020, the team hired Power Innovations in Salt Lake City, Utah, to build and test a system that could power 10 racks – a row – of datacenter servers for 48 consecutive hours with a 250-kilowatt hydrogen fuel cell system.

After that successful proof-of-concept demonstration, the team set out to prove the viability of a three-megawatt system, which is of sufficient size to replace a diesel generator at a datacenter.

The problem, Monroe noted, was that nobody made PEM fuel cell systems that large – three megawatts is more than 10 times bigger than the system the company tested in Utah. Three megawatts is enough energy to power about 10,000 computer servers or 600 homes.

‘The coolest thing’

The challenge to build a three-megawatt fuel cell system resonated with engineers at Latham-based Plug, a pioneer in the commercial development of fuel cell and green hydrogen technologies. Today, the company offers solutions throughout the green hydrogen ecosystem — from production and transportation to storage, handling and dispensing.

“Drawing it on the whiteboard and saying, ‘Okay, we know we can do this, we know we can do this,’ was a lot of fun,” said Scott Spink, the director of engineering for Plug. “The real challenge for this project was that we didn’t get to rely on one proven technology. Every piece of that fuel cell system came through a team that was at the forefront of what they were doing.”

The 125-kilowatt fuel cells – 18 of which are packed into each shipping container – are the largest the company has ever made, and the three-megawatt fuel cell system is Plug’s biggest application. Because the system is larger than anything built before, so too are all the components, from compressors and heat exchangers to grid-scale inverters and the pipes for hydrogen delivery.

The system was assembled piecemeal on a concrete pad adjacent to a parking lot behind the company’s headquarters for research and development and manufacturing of its ProGen line of fuel cells. Exposed wires and tubes go this way and that and the hat of radiator fans overhangs the containers giving the system the appearance of a first-iteration prototype.

The engineers that Spink assembled to build the system were unfazed by the motley appearance.

“This is the coolest thing I’ve ever done,” said Hannah Baldwin, a next-generation electrical engineer for the high-power stationary group at Plug, who was hired to work on the project. “I don’t know how I’m going to top this in my career. There’re just so many pieces of the puzzle that have to come together. And seeing them all coming together and working well and stable is rewarding.”

Hannah Baldwin, an electrical engineer for the high-power stationary group at Plug, stands in front of a fuel cell and checks its health with a software program running on an open laptop in her hand.
Hannah Baldwin, an electrical engineer for the high-power stationary group at Plug, checks the health of a fuel cell in the three-megawatt hydrogen fuel cell system in Latham, New York. Photo by John Brecher.

Backup power

After the fuel cell generator hit the three-megawatt milestone, Microsoft’s James jumpstarted the testing to prove it could perform in real-world conditions.

“I’ve asked two questions,” he said. “My first one’s been answered: Can this technology all integrated together produce the power that I need? My second question is can it perform like a diesel? A diesel engine can produce a lot of power very quickly. That’s the key. So, we’re going to start simulating a datacenter duty cycle and one of those is a power outage.”

When a power outage occurs, batteries in the UPS can keep the datacenter running for several minutes, which is more than sufficient to ramp up a diesel – or hydrogen – generator. Once ramped up, backup generators, in theory, can keep the datacenter running indefinitely, as long as they have a fuel supply.

Starting that June day in Latham and for the next several weeks, Spink’s team ran the three-megawatt hydrogen fuel cell system through the tests Microsoft uses to qualify diesel generators to prove it could function reliably, including simulated power outages and hours-long runs.

“I’m just tickled,” Monroe said. “This is a continuation of the journey that we started back in 2018. And in 2020, when we announced the work that were doing on the smaller tests, we alluded to the fact that we were going to run a three-megawatt test sometime in the future. The future is now.”

With the prototype testing complete and concept proven, Plug is focused on rolling out an optimized commercial version of high-power stationary fuel cell systems that have a smaller footprint and a more streamlined and polished aesthetic than the one on the pad adjacent to the parking lot in Latham.

Microsoft will install one of these second-generation fuel cell systems at a research datacenter where engineers will learn how to work with and deploy the new technology, including the development of hydrogen safety protocols. The date of first deployment at a live datacenter is unknown, though it will likely occur at a new datacenter in a location where air quality standards prohibit diesel generators, James noted.

“I’m going to turn around when the excitement dies down and start to ask, ‘Okay, we did one, where can I get 1,000?’” he said. “We’ve got a commitment to be completely diesel free, and that supply chain has got to be robust – we’ve got to talk about scale across the entire hydrogen industry.”

Perspective, ground-level image of the three-megawatt hydrogen fuel cell system shows a pair of 40-foot-long shipping containers, each holding 18 PEM fuel cells. A cap of radiator fans sits on top of each container.
The three-megawatt hydrogen fuel cell system consists of a pair of 40-foot-long shipping containers, each holding 18 PEM fuel cells. A cap of radiator fans sits on top of each container. Photo by John Brecher.

Hydrogen economy

Hydrogen is the lightest and most abundant element in the universe. It’s long been eyed on Earth for its clean energy potential. A challenge is that while stars such as the sun consist mostly of hydrogen, on Earth hydrogen only naturally occurs in compound form with other elements – think water or hydrocarbons such as natural gas and petroleum.

The high cost and technology required to separate hydrogen from these natural compounds, store it, transport it and wring power from it at scale have limited its use. Over the past decade, that calculus has begun to change, according to Darin Painter, a vice president of sales and product management for stationary power at Plug.

The change is driven by advances across the hydrogen ecosystem coupled with a growing interest in and commitment to sustainability, he said.

For example, abundant and inexpensive wind and solar energy is enabling the cost-efficient generation of so-called green hydrogen with machines called electrolyzers. These machines operate like a fuel cell in reverse – they use energy to split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. If the energy used to run the electrolyzer is from renewables, then the hydrogen produced is considered green.

The hydrogen used during the Latham test was a low-carbon “blue” hydrogen obtained as a byproduct in the industrial production of chlorine and sodium hydroxide. Plug is in the process of scaling up green hydrogen production at facilities throughout the US and Europe to meet the growing demand, Painter said. Microsoft plans to use only green hydrogen in production datacenters.

At the other end of the hydrogen ecosystem, technological advances have led to denser and more efficient fuel cell stacks that combine hydrogen and oxygen to generate electricity, heat and water.

“All of that has to happen before you can get to a viable solution at scale,” Painter said. “If we would have tried to build this three-megawatt system 10 or 15 years ago, I don’t think we could have.”

Monroe and his colleagues saw this change in the calculus when they ran the numbers at the start of their hydrogen fuel cell project in 2018. On a per-watt basis, Monroe said, power produced from hydrogen fuel cells is well on the way to becoming competitive with power from other sources such as diesel generators.

To accelerate breakthroughs in clean energy solutions, the US Department of Energy announced the first Energy Earthshot – Hydrogen Shot – in June 2021, with a goal to reduce the cost of clean hydrogen by 80% to US$1 for 1 kilogram within 1 decade. A kilogram of hydrogen has roughly the same energy content as a gallon of gasoline, Monroe noted.

What’s needed, he added, is a catalyst to scale up the production of green hydrogen and fuel cells, which will drive down costs and increase adoption of the technology.

Microsoft and other players in the datacenter industry are uniquely positioned to be that catalyst, according to Joppa, who in addition to his role as chief environmental officer is Microsoft’s representative on the Hydrogen Council, a global initiative of leading energy, transport and industry companies that was formed to promote hydrogen’s role in the clean energy transition.

Microsoft’s business and sustainability needs for fuel cells and green hydrogen send a demand signal into the marketplace, Joppa noted. What’s more, if Microsoft invests in hydrogen technology and the technology works, other companies will feel more confident investing in hydrogen too, he added.

“So, if we feel confident in using these to ensure continuity of our datacenter services, that’s a big measure of faith,” Joppa said.

Steam is seen venting from pipes at the top of the shipping containers during a test of the three-megawatt fuel cell system. PEM fuel cells combine hydrogen and oxygen in a chemical reaction that generates electricity, heat and water. While most of the water drains out in liquid form, a portion vents out as steam.
PEM fuel cells combine hydrogen and oxygen in a chemical reaction that generates electricity, heat and water. While most of the water drains out in liquid form, a portion vents out as steam. Photo by John Brecher.

City-scale solutions

A robust green hydrogen economy could also help cities transition to 100% renewable energy, noted James. That’s because excess energy produced by wind and solar farms can be used to run electrolyzers, in effect storing this excess energy in hydrogen. Then, when the sun is not shining and the wind is not blowing, this green hydrogen can power fuel cells without generating any carbon emissions.

“We want to power our cloud off the sun – free clean energy,” he said. “Well, practically, how do you do that? You have to get really good at storing energy, and hydrogen is a great way to do that.”

James envisions a future where datacenters are outfitted with hydrogen fuel cells, hydrogen storage tanks and electrolyzers to convert water molecules into hydrogen with excess renewable energy. During periods of high energy demand or when the sun stops shining and the wind stops blowing, Microsoft can ramp up the fuel cells, taking the datacenter load off the grid, freeing up grid power for others to use.

The challenges of bringing a version of this vision to reality is what compels the next-generation electrical engineer Baldwin to stick with a career in the hydrogen economy, a career path, she admits, that was not top of mind before she worked on the fuel cell project.

“I’m excited about the idea of working on something that can make a difference in the world, and hydrogen has a ton of potential to be a huge game changer,” she said. “When a lot of people think of renewable energy, they think of wind turbines and solar panels, and they don’t necessarily think of hydrogen. I know I didn’t. I think that will definitely change.”

Related:

Learn more about environmental sustainability at Microsoft

Learn more about Plug

Read: Microsoft datacenter batteries to support growth of renewables on the power grid

Read: Microsoft tests hydrogen fuel cells for backup power at datacenters

Read: Microsoft’s virtual datacenter grounds ‘the cloud’ in reality

Read: Microsoft finds underwater datacenters are reliable, practical and use energy sustainably

Read: To cool datacenter servers, Microsoft turns to boiling liquid

Top image: Microsoft tested a prototype three-megawatt hydrogen fuel cell system that can provide emissions free backup power to datacenters. Photo by John Brecher.

John Roach writes about Microsoft research and innovation. Follow him on Twitter.

Thu, 28 Jul 2022 11:28:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://news.microsoft.com/innovation-stories/hydrogen-fuel-cells-could-provide-emission-free-backup-power-at-datacenters-microsoft-says/
Killexams : Certiport Names 2022 Microsoft Office Specialist World Champions

The winners of the 2022 Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) World Championship have been announced by Certiport, the leading provider of performance-based IT certification exams that accelerate academic and career opportunities for learners.

SALT LAKE CITY, July 27, 2022 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- The winners of the 2022 Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) World Championship have been announced by Certiport, the leading provider of performance-based IT certification exams that accelerate academic and career opportunities for learners.

In its 20th year, the competition attracted more than one million contestants from around the world. Students, ages 13 to 22, competed with peers to prove their superior skills in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, culminating in the most popular technology skills competition on Microsoft Office—and the only one endorsed by Microsoft since its inception in 2002.

To enter the competition, students took a qualifying Microsoft Office Specialist certification test to demonstrate their mastery of Microsoft Office technology. Regional competitions were held worldwide, and 95 finalists qualified to compete in the final round of competition held in Anaheim, CA from July 24-27.

The 2022 MOS World Champions are:

Microsoft Word (Microsoft 365 Apps and Office 2019)

  • First place: Gabriel Stanciu, Romania

  • Second place: Trong Khai Nguyen, Vietnam

  • Third place: Chen Yuen Wong, Hong Kong

Microsoft PowerPoint® (Microsoft 365 Apps and Office 2019)

  • First place: Tristan Pesqueira, USA

  • Second place: Mihail Iliev, Bulgaria

  • Third place: Himanish Angrish, Canada

Microsoft Excel® (Microsoft 365 Apps and Office 2019)

  • First place: Duy Phong Nguyen, Vietnam

  • Second place: Nikolaos Rapanis, Greece

  • Third place: Heero Ramadhana Sipayung, Indonesia

Microsoft Word (Office 2016)

  • First place: Rohan Matthias Vargas, Ireland

  • Second place: Ching Chi Tsao, Taiwan

  • Third place: Ngoc Tung Chi Dao, Vietnam

Microsoft PowerPoint® (Office 2016)

  • First place: Cong Minh Bui, Vietnam

  • Second place: Benjamin Rands, USA

  • Third place: Amanda Gabriela Castillo Diaz, Mexico

Microsoft Excel® (Office 2016)

  • First place: Ondrej Cach, Czech Republic

  • Second place: Andrew Chuang Saladin, USA

  • Third place: Nicolas Stigler Yanez, Peru

In the concluding round, competitors participated in a two-part skills demonstration. The first skills demonstration was a 30-minute timed exam. The second part is an advanced three-hour research project, in which students research their given topic, formulate an opinion, and represent their conclusions and research in an asset appropriate to the competition application (Word report, Excel workbook, or PowerPoint presentation). This is the second year where finalists were required to complete a free-form project.

At the final event in Anaheim, Certiport and Microsoft recognized the top student competitors in the MOS World Championship Awards Ceremony and presented each First place winner with a $7,000 cash prize, Second place with $3,500 and Third place with $1,500.

"The pandemic put our live MOS Championship events on hold. We are so thrilled to be able to return to in-person competitions," said Ray Murray, Vice President and General Manager, Certiport. "It is inspiring to see students from 21 countries come together to 'speak Microsoft'. The winners receive extra praise, but every single student who entered has earned a valuable workforce credential that will help them find success in college and in their career. The last two years have highlighted the importance of IT skills for tomorrow's professionals and it's incredible to see so many young people get introduced to IT certifications through the MOS World Championship."

Microsoft Office Specialist is the only official Microsoft-recognized certification for Microsoft Office globally and serves as a powerful instrument for assessing students' skills and preparing them for real-world application of their knowledge.

"The Microsoft Office Specialist World Championship is one of our favorite events annually, because these students are thrilled to compete and they inspire all of us with their competitive spirit and crowning achievement," said Rick Herrmann, Vice President Worldwide Public Sector, Education, Microsoft. "These students work diligently to earn valuable industry-recognized certifications, and we know that the future is bright with upcoming business and technology leaders like those we met at the MOS World Championship."

Next year, Certiport will host the 2023 Microsoft Office Specialist World Championship at Orlando, Florida, from July 30-August 2, 2023.

See what our competitors and other news outlets are saying by searching the event hashtag #MOSWC on Facebook and Twitter.

About Certiport

Certiport, a Pearson VUE business, is the leading provider of certification test development, delivery and program management services delivered through an expansive network of over 15,000 Certiport Authorized Testing Centers worldwide. Certiport manages a sophisticated portfolio of leading certification programs including: the official Microsoft Office Specialist certification program, the Microsoft Certified Fundamentals certification program, the Microsoft Certified Educator program, the Adobe® Certified Professional certification program, the Autodesk Certified User certification program, the Intuit certification program, the App Development with Swift certification program, the Unity Certified User certification program, the Communication Skills for Business certification program, the IC3 Digital Literacy certification, and the Entrepreneurship and Small Business certification program. Certiport reliably delivers over three million tests each year throughout the secondary, post-secondary, workforce, and corporate technology markets in 148 countries and 26 languages worldwide. For more information visit http://www.certiport.com or follow Certiport on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/certiport.
"Certiport" is a registered trademark of NCS Pearson, Inc. in the United States and other countries. The names of real companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

Media Contact

Greg Forbes, Pearson VUE, +44 7824 313448, greg.forbes@pearson.com

Hannah Davis, Certiport, +1 801 319 9835, hannah.davis@pearson.com

Twitter, Facebook

SOURCE Certiport

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 10:15:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://finance.yahoo.com/news/certiport-names-2022-microsoft-office-221500403.html
Killexams : What we hope to learn at Supercloud22

The term supercloud is relatively new, but the concepts behind it have been bubbling for years.

Early last decade when the National Institute of Standards and Technology put forth its original definition of cloud computing, it said services had to be accessible over a public network — essentially cutting the on-premises crowd out of the conversation. Chuck Hollis, the chief technology officer at EMC and prolific blogger, objected to that criterion and laid out his vision for what he termed a private cloud. In that post he showed a workload running both on-premises and in a public cloud, sharing the underlying resources in an automated and seamless manner – what later became more broadly known as hybrid cloud.

That vision, as we now know, really never materialized and we were left with multicloud — sets of largely incompatible and disconnected cloud services running in separate silos. The point is, what Hollis put forth – the ability to abstract underlying infrastructure complexity and run workloads across multiple heterogeneous estates with an identical experience – is what supercloud is all about.

In this Breaking Analysis we’re excited to share what we hope to learn at Supercloud22 next week.

On Tuesday, Aug. 9, at 9 a.m. PDT, the community is gathering for Supercloud22, an inclusive and open pilot symposium hosted by theCUBE and made possible by VMware Inc. and other founding partners. It’s a one-day, single-track event with more than 25 speakers digging into the architectural, technical, structural and business aspects of supercloud. This is a hybrid event, with a live program in the morning and pre-recorded content in the afternoon featuring industry leaders, technologists, analysts and investors up and down the technology stack.

The seeds of supercloud were sown early last decade

After the very first re:Invent, Amazon Web Services Inc.’s annual cloud conference, we published our Amazon Gorilla post seen in the upper right above. And we talked about how to differentiate from Amazon and form ecosystems around industries and data and how the cloud would change information technology permanently.

In the upper left we put a post up on the old Wikibon.org wiki and we talked about the importance of traditional tech companies and their customers learning to compete in the Amazon economy. We showed a graph of how IT economics were changing and cloud services had marginal economics that looked more like software than hardware at scale. And we posited that this would reset opportunities for both technology sellers and industries for the next 20 years.

This came into sharper focus in the ensuing years, culminating in a milestone post by Greylock’s Jerry Chen called Castles in the Cloud, an inspiration and catalyst for us using the term supercloud in John Furrier’s post prior to re:Invent 2021.

The CTO Advisor’s take

Once we floated the concept, people in the community started to weigh in and help flesh out this idea of supercloud — where companies of all types build services on top of hyperscale infrastructure and across multiple clouds, and going beyond multicloud 1.0, which we argued was really a symptom of multivendor.

Despite its somewhat fuzzy definition, it resonated with people because they knew something was brewing. Keith Townsend, the CTO Advisor, even though he wasn’t necessarily a big fan of the buzzy nature of the term supercloud, posted this awesome blackboard talk on Twitter:

Keith has deep practitioner knowledge and lays out a couple of options. Especially useful are the examples he uses of cloud services, which recognize the need for cross-cloud services and the aspirational notion of VMware’s vision. Remember this was in January 2021. And he brings HashiCorp into the conversation. It’s one of the speakers at Supercloud22. And he asks the community what they think.

Which is what we’re asking you. We’re trying to really test out the viability of supercloud and people like Keith are instrumental as collaborators.

Not everyone is on board

It’s probably not a shock to you to hear that not everyone’s is not on board with the supercloud meme. In particular, Charles Fitzgerald has been a wonderful collaborator just by his hilarious criticisms of the concept. After a couple of supercloud posts, Charles put up his second rendition of supercloudafragilisticexpialidocious. It’s just beautiful.

To boot, he put up this picture of Baghdad Bob asking us to “Please Just Stop.” Bob’s real name is Muhammad Saeed al-Sahhaf. He was the minister of propaganda for Saddam Hussein during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, making outrageous claims of U.S. troops running Saddam’s elite forces in fear.

Charle’s laid out several helpful critiques of supercloud, which has led us to further refine the definition and catalyze the community’s thinking on the topic. One of his issues, and there are many, is we said a prerequisite of supercloud was a superPaaS layer. Gartner’s Lydia Leong chimed in (see above) saying there were many examples of successful platform-as-a-service vendors built on top of a hyperscaler, some having the option to run in more than one cloud provider.

But the key point that we’re trying to explore is the degree to which that PaaS layer is purpose-built for a specific supercloud; and not only runs in more than one provider, as Lydia said, but runs across multiple clouds simultaneously, creating an identical developer experience irrespective of estate. Now maybe that’s what she meant… it’s hard to say from a tweet.

But to the former point, at Supercloud22 we have several examples we’re going to test. One is Oracle Corp.’s and Microsoft Corp.’s accurate announcement to run database services on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Microsoft Azure, making them appear as one. Rather than use an off-the-shelf platform, Oracle claims to have developed a capability for developers specifically built to ensure high performance, low latency and a common experience across clouds.

Another example we’re going to test is Snowflake Inc. We’ll be interviewing Benoit Dageville, co-founder of Snowflake, to understand the degree to which Snowflake’s accurate announcement of an application platform is purpose built for the Snowflake Data Cloud. Is it just a plain old PaaS – big whoop as Lydia claims – or is it something new and innovative?

By the way we invited Charles Fitz to participate in Supercloud22 and he declined, saying, in addition to a few other semi-insulting quips:

[There’s] “definitely interesting new stuff brewing [that] isn’t traditional cloud or SaaS. But branding it all supercloud doesn’t help either.

Indeed, we agree with the former sentiment. As for the latter, we definitely are not claiming everything is supercloud. But to Charles’ point, it’s important to define the critical aspects of supercloud so we can determine what is and what isn’t supercloud. Our goal at Supercloud22 is to continue to evolve the definition with the community. That’s why we’ve asked Kit Colbert, CTO of VMware, to present his thinking on what an architectural framework for cross-cloud services, what we call supercloud, might look like.

The analysts’ take

We’re also featuring some of the sharpest analysts in the business at Supercloud22 with The Great Supercloud Debate.

In additional to Keith Townsend, Maribel Lopez of Lopez Research and Sanjeev Mohan, former Gartner analyst and now principal at Sanjmo, participated in this session. Now we don’t want to mislead you and imply that these analysts are hopping on the supercloud bandwagon. But they’re more than willing to go through the thought experiment and this is a great conversation that you don’t want to miss.

Maribel Lopez had an excellent way to think about this topic. She used TCP/IP as an historical example, saying:

Remember when we went to TCP/IP, and the whole idea was, how do we get computers to talk to each other in a more standardized way? How do we get data to move in a more standardized way? I think that the problem we have with multicloud right now is that we don’t have that. So that’s sort of a ground level of getting us to your supercloud premise.

Listen to Maribel Lopez share here thoughts on the base level requirements for supercloud.

As well, Sanjeev Mohan has some excellent thoughts on whether the path to supercloud will be achieved via open-source technology or a de facto standard platform.

Now again, we don’t want to imply that these analysts are all out banging the supercloud drum. They’re not necessarily. But it’s fair to say that, like Charles Fitzgerald, they believe something new is bubbling up. And whether it’s called supercloud or multicloud 2.0 or cross-cloud services, or whatever name you want to choose, it’s not multicloud of the 2010s.

Our goal here is to advance the discussion on what’s next in cloud. Supercloud is meant to be a term that describes the future. And specifically the cloud opportunities that can be built on top of hyperscale compute, storage, networking, machine learning and other services at scale.

Addressing the top 10 questions around supercloud

That is why we posted the piece on answering the top 10 questions about supercloud, many of which were floated by Charles Fitzgerald and others in the community.

Why does the industry need another term? What’s really new and different and what is hype? What specific problems does supercloud solve? What are the salient characteristics of supercloud? What’s different beyond multicloud? What is a superPaaS? How will applications evolve on superclouds?

All these questions will be addressed in detail as a way to advance the discussion and help practitioners and business people understand what’s real today and what’s possible in the near future.

Who will build superclouds?

One other question we’ll address is: Who are the players that will build out superclouds and what new entrants can we expect? Below is an Enterprise Technology Research graphic we showed in a previous episode of Breaking Analysis. It lays out some of the companies we think are either building superclouds or are in a position to do so.

The way the Y axis shows Net Score or spending velocity and the X axis depicts presence in the ETR survey of more than 1,200 respondents.

The key callouts to this slide, in addition to some of the smaller firms that aren’t yet showing up in the ETR data, such as ChaosSearch and Starburst and Aviatrix and Clumio, are the really interesting additions that are industry players. Walmart and Azure, CapitalOne and Goldman with AWS, Oracle Cerner: These, we think, are early examples of industry clouds that will eventually evolve into superclouds.

They may not all be cross-cloud today (Oracle/Microsoft is and perhaps Goldman’s cloud fits, since it connects to on-prem systems), but the potential is there. So we’ll explore these and other trends to get the community’s input on how this will play out.

Experts address key questions at Supercloud22

We have an amazing lineup of experts to answer your questions: Technologists such as Kit Colbert, Adrian Cockcroft, Marianna Tessel, Chris Hof, Will Laforest, Ali Ghodsi, Benoit Dageville, Muddu Sudhakar, Steve Mullaney, Priya Rajagopal, Lori MacVittie, Howie Xu, Haseeb Budhani, Rajiv Ramaswami, Vittorio Viarengo, Kris Rice, Karan Batta. Investors such as Jerry Chen, In Sik Rhee, the analysts we featured earlier, Paula Hansen talking about going to market in a multicloud world, Gee Rittenhouse, David McJannet, Bhaskar Gorti of Platform9 and more.

And of course you.

Please register for Supercloud22. It’s a really lightweight registration; we’re not doing this for lead gen, we’re doing it for collaboration, and if you sign in, you can chat and ask questions in real time. Don’t miss this inaugural event on Aug. 9 starting at 9 a.m. PDT.

Keep in touch

Thanks to Alex Myerson, who does the production, podcasts and media workflows for Breaking Analysis. Special thanks to Kristen Martin and Cheryl Knight, who help us keep our community informed and get the word out, and to Rob Hof, our editor in chief at SiliconANGLE.

Remember we publish each week on Wikibon and SiliconANGLE. These episodes are all available as podcasts wherever you listen.

Email david.vellante@siliconangle.com, DM @dvellante on Twitter and comment on our LinkedIn posts.

Also, check out this ETR Tutorial we created, which explains the spending methodology in more detail. Note: ETR is a separate company from Wikibon and SiliconANGLE. If you would like to cite or republish any of the company’s data, or inquire about its services, please contact ETR at legal@etr.ai.

Here’s the full video analysis:

All statements made regarding companies or securities are strictly beliefs, points of view and opinions held by SiliconANGLE Media, Enterprise Technology Research, other guests on theCUBE and guest writers. Such statements are not recommendations by these individuals to buy, sell or hold any security. The content presented does not constitute investment advice and should not be used as the basis for any investment decision. You and only you are responsible for your investment decisions.

Disclosure: Many of the companies cited in Breaking Analysis are sponsors of theCUBE and/or clients of Wikibon. None of these firms or other companies have any editorial control over or advanced viewing of what’s published in Breaking Analysis.

Image: SiliconANGLE

Show your support for our mission by joining our Cube Club and Cube Event Community of experts. Join the community that includes Amazon Web Services and Amazon.com CEO Andy Jassy, Dell Technologies founder and CEO Michael Dell, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger and many more luminaries and experts.

Fri, 05 Aug 2022 02:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://siliconangle.com/2022/08/05/hope-learn-supercloud22/
Killexams : Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 review: A low-cost Surface of middling value
At a glance

Expert’s Rating

Pros

  • Budget-ish price
  • Fingerprint reader works well

Cons

  • Performance just doesn’t quite hold up to the competition
  • Rivals offer more value
  • Other laptops offer a better screen for the price

Our Verdict

While the original Surface Laptop Go survived among a sea of budget laptops, there are a number of comparably priced laptops that simply offer more value than the Surface Laptop Go 2. Just keep an eye out for price drops that could make a difference.

Price When Reviewed

$799.99

Best Prices Today: Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2

Microsoft’s Surface Laptop Go 2 laptop tries to convince you that a processor upgrade is enough to sway you over the competition while tweaking the price configurations and adding a new color. And you know what? The jump to an 11th-gen Core chip does matter, especially when you adjust the Windows 11 performance settings.

We’ll introduce you to the best of what the Surface Laptop Go 2 has to offer (an excellent fingerprint reader), but also point out some comparably-priced laptops that may offer more of what you’re looking for. You’ll also want to pay close attention to the real-time pricing. In this market, an expected price cut of just $100 below the list price can make a real difference.

Surface Laptop Go 2: Specs and features

Microsoft’s Surface Laptop Go 2 remains relatively unchanged from its earlier iteration, the original Surface Laptop Go, with all but two major specifications receiving upgrades. The Go 2 now uses Intel’s 11th-gen Core processor inside, though with a single option: the Core i5-1135G7. That’s a generation behind most laptops, which use Intel’s 12th-gen Core chips or rival Ryzen processors from AMD. Microsoft also made a major change in the OS. It now uses Windows 11 Home, which eliminates all of the earlier app configuration issues surrounding the inclusion of Windows 10 in S Mode.

Consumers may choose from between 4GB and 8GB of RAM or 128GB and 256GB of SSD storage. We’d recommend that potential buyers avoid the $599 4GB RAM version, as the memory constraints can have an adverse effect on performance. Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage and potential third-party external storage options make either the 8GB/128GB and 8GB/256GB storage options viable, however, and a 64GB SSD option offered in the Surface Laptop Go has been removed. In fact, Microsoft encourages you to turn on OneDrive cloud backup during the setup process.

Overall, your Surface Laptop Go 2 options range from between $599 to $799 versus the $549 to $899 range of the earlier model. This doesn’t quite hit the budget price point of competing laptops, but arguably represents something of a price cut, too.

Otherwise, Microsoft has added a new color configuration, Sage. This is in addition to the existing Platinum, Ice Blue, and Sandstone color options. Businesses also have the choice of buying the Surface Laptop Go 2 for Business, which comes pre-loaded with Windows 11 Pro rather than the Windows 11 Home OS that accompanies the consumer models. The Business version can be configured with Windows 10 Pro as well.

  • Display: 12.45-inch (1536×1024, 148 PPI) 10-point multitouch PixelSense display
  • Processor: Core i5-1135G7
  • Graphics: Xe Graphics
  • Memory:  4GB-8GB LPDDR4x (8GB as tested)
  • Storage: 128GB-256GB SSD (256GB as tested)
  • Ports: 1 USB-C, 1 USB-A, Surface Connect, 3.5mm audio jack
  • Camera: 720p f2.0 (user-facing)
  • Battery: 39.7Wh (design capacity), 40.7Wh (measured full charge capacity)
  • Wireless: WiFi 6 (802.11ax), Bluetooth 5.1
  • Operating system: Windows 11 Home (consumer); Windows 11 Pro/Windows 10 Pro (business)
  • Dimensions (inches): 10.95 x 8.12 x 0.62 inches
  • Weight: 2.48 pounds
  • Chassis: Aluminum, with polycarbonate resin (30 percent post-consumer recycled content)
  • Colors: Ice Blue, Sandstone, Platinum, Sage
  • Price: Beginning at $599 ($799 as tested)
Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 table

Mark Hachman / IDG

Surface Laptop Go 2: Build quality and ports

The Surface Laptop Go 2 is essentially a refresh of the original Surface Laptop Go and we’d encourage you to re-read our original Surface Laptop Go review for additional detail. We’ll recap the important points here, but the most significant differences are in performance, which we summarize in the sections below.

Microsoft designed the Surface Laptop Go 2 as its answer to a Chromebook, a (relatively) inexpensive, compact clamshell laptop. In the past, the Surface Laptop Go was a showcase for Windows 11 in S Mode, a restricted version of the operating system that limited users to downloading pre-approved apps from the Microsoft Store. Microsoft hasn’t said why it made the change, but it offers the freedom to download whatever app you’d like without the need to switch out from Windows 11 in S Mode, as the laptop ships with Windows 11 Home instead.

Physically, the Surface Laptop Go 2 is a compact, lightweight laptop whose display folds back to about 45 degrees. Inside the box, Microsoft includes a 39W charger that powers the laptop via the Surface Connect connector on the right-hand side of the display. Alternatively, you’ll be able to charge the laptop via the USB-C port, provided you have a third-party USB charger that supplies enough power. Typing on the Surface Laptop Go 2 may look like it may be a bit cramped, given the smaller keyboard deck. However, Microsoft shaves off just half an inch of keyboard space compared to, say, the Surface Laptop Studio. It’s just fine.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 left side
A trio of a USB-A port, a 10Gbps USB-C port and a headphone jack adorn the left side of the Surface Laptop Go 2.

Mark Hachman / IDG

As we noted in our review of the Surface Laptop Go, the smaller dimensions also benefit the display. Though the 12.45-inch (148 PPI) display doesn’t quite reach the pixel density of a 1080p screen, the smaller display doesn’t negatively impact the smaller pixel count by that much. Images will still look a little grainy in places, and you’ll notice some text that isn’t as sharp as you’d expect on the laptop’s screen. But there’s also nothing stopping you from connecting it to an external, higher-resolution display as well. The purist in us wanted to reject its 1024p display from the get-go, but practically it really doesn’t matter. On the other hand, it’s a little weird that it has far less screen resolution than Microsoft’s $629.99 Surface Go 3 tablet.

On the left-hand side of the laptop you’ll find a conventional USB-A port, a USB-C port, and headphone jack, suitable for connecting both modern and legacy devices. On the right-hand side Microsoft includes the Surface Connect port, which has begun phasing out in its more expensive Surface devices. The Surface Connect allows you to expand the Surface Laptop Go 2’s I/O capabilities via the Surface Dock, including displays. In any event, the Surface Laptop Go 2 will support up to one additional 4K display and one 1080p display (or two 1080p displays), both at 60Hz. That’s probably perfectly fine for a budget laptop.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 right side
On the right-hand side of the Surface Laptop Go 2 is the Surface Connect port, which by default is used for charging.

Mark Hachman / IDG

The Surface Laptop Go 2 is not fanless. It appears to vent air in and out via the hinge. The default Windows 11 setting for power/performance is its lowest setting, when the fan will occasionally kick under a load. This usually doesn’t happen during Web browsing or office work, however. You can turn up the performance via the Windows 11 settings, where it will make a small difference (more on that in our performance section). While you’re almost sure to experience fan noise, it shouldn’t be an annoyance.

We’ll refer you to our original Surface Laptop Go review for more details on the sub-1080p display. The short answer is that no, the lower pixel density doesn’t seem to matter, though it is noticeable in certain cases. While that display was rated at about 330 nits of luminance, we measured the Surface Laptop Go 2’s display producing 358 nits of luminance. While it’s not really bright enough to work outside in direct sunlight, it should be fine for even well-lit rooms. The color gamut, however, is pretty poor. It’s 96 percent of the sRGB color gamut, but only 71 percent of AdobeRGB. This is not a creator’s laptop.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 keyboard
The new Sage color is subtle, and a little hard to capture via a camera. Otherwise, this Surface Laptop Go 2 keyboard doesn’t hold any surprises. The combination power button/fingerprint reader illuminates when the laptop is on but you haven’t logged in.

Mark Hachman / IDG

Surface keyboards have traditionally been among the best in the industry, though they’ve declined a bit in accurate years. The Surface Laptop Go 2 keyboard remains, as far as we can tell, unchanged from the Surface Laptop Go keyboard, with 1.3mm of key travel. That’s pretty comfortable in my book, with a keyboard deck that fills almost all of the width of the keyboard. Unfortunately, Microsoft chose to exclude keyboard backlighting on both generations of the Surface Laptop Go.

I can’t complain about the trackpad, either: it’s fairly large and fills the available palm rest. It’s clickable all the way to the top, though it requires some effort in the upper half. Gestures worked as expected.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 fingerprint reader
The Surface Laptop Go 2’s fingerprint reader is both dependable and convenient, but you’ll need to spend some time training it. It’s worth occasionally swiping it with a cloth to keep it free from gunk, too.

Mark Hachman / IDG

You’ll probably like the fingerprint reader that’s nestled under the power button. Windows asks you to extensively train it, resting and removing your finger many times before it’s satisfied, at various angles. This pays off; the Surface Laptop Go 2’s fingerprint reader was quick and responsive, and can log you in and power up the PC in one tap. And yes, a fingerprint reader doesn’t care whether you’re wearing a protective mask in a public place, either.

The Surface Laptop Go 2 contains a pair of upward-facing Omnisonic speakers, enhanced with Dolby Atmos. The audio is fairly middling. It’s nothing to complain about (where flat laptop audio is concerned), but nothing to write home about either. There are still better laptops where audio is concerned. HP’s use of its B&O speakers can provide decent sound on their budget laptops and Dell’s Latitude 9510 and accurate XPS notebooks provide undeniably richer, fuller sound.

Microsoft chose a standard 720p user-facing camera instead of a 1080p webcam for the Surface Laptop Go 2, which is in line with the competition, both budget laptops as well as more expensive competitors. Like its predecessor, the resulting image is somewhat soft, though with good color balance and exposure. A pair of far-field mics will help with Zoom and Teams calls, though they didn’t sound any worse or better than other devices when checked with Windows’ Voice Recorder app.

Surface Laptop Go 2 camera
The Surface Laptop Go 2’s camera doesn’t go above 720p, producing camera/video that’s soft but with good color balance.

Mark Hachman / IDG

The Surface Laptop Go 2 doesn’t seem to ship with bloatware, although this is somewhat configurable: during the setup process, Windows 11 will ask whether you want your laptop set up for gaming, productivity, a family environment, or some combination of the various choices. In general, it’s a relatively optimized machine.

Surface Laptop Go 2 performance

The processor upgrade adds a bit to the overall performance of the Surface Laptop Go 2, though it’s important to note that Microsoft released the Surface Laptop Go 2 (with an 11th-gen Core chip inside) during the period in which more and more laptops are shipping with a 12th-gen “Alder Lake” Core chip or AMD’s Ryzen equivalent. On the other hand, performance shouldn’t be your first priority with the Surface Laptop Go 2.

Real-world tests with the Surface Laptop Go 2 reinforced our impressions of its predecessor. Opt for 8GB of RAM and you should be fine. The laptop surfed the web using Microsoft Edge acceptably, and played back 4K video using streaming services just fine. That’s a bit of a misnomer, of course, since a 4K60 YouTube video was actually delivered to the laptop using sub-1080p resolution after the laptop’s capabilities were detected. With that said, it still performed nearly perfectly, dropping just 3 frames in a 10,000-frame test loop.

Naturally, this isn’t a gaming laptop, though you can certainly try out Game Pass Ultimate’s cloud gaming feature. We used an older Xbox 360 controller, connected via USB, and received what we would expect of a streamed cloud game. Our 3DMark benchmark below indicates that the Surface Laptop Go 2 really isn’t a gaming PC, otherwise.

We’ve compared the $799 Surface Laptop Go 2 to other budget PCs we’ve recently tested: the $860 Acer Swift 3 (SF316-51), the $849 Dell Inspiron 14 2-in-1, the $499 Acer Aspire 5, and the $1,000 Acer Swift X, which adds a discrete GPU for extra gaming oomph. We’ve also included the comparably priced $750 HP Pavilion Aero 13, the $799-$899 Acer Aspire Vero, and two Microsoft Surface devices, the Surface Laptop 4 (Ryzen) and the original Surface Laptop Go.

We use four standard tests: UL’s PCMark 10 and 3DMark to measure general office usage and 3D gameplay plus Cinebench R15 and the Handbrake video conversion tool.

PCMark 10 provides a bloc of tests, from Web browsing to office work, as well as light gaming and even some CAD work. It’s a good overall tool to test performance and the Surface Laptop Go 2 performs fairly well. This is a good test to determine simply how well the Surface Laptop Go 2 will perform on average.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 PCMark 10
Performance on this test looks middling, though just a bit under Microsoft’s mainstream laptop, the Surface Laptop 4.

Mark Hachman / IDG

For apps that don’t fall into the range of workloads that PCMark covers, we use Cinebench R15 to measure how well the laptop would perform. Intel’s Core i5-1135G7 is a quad-core chip with eight threads and we tap all of them to render an image as quickly as possible. This pushes the laptop’s processor to the limit for a short time.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 cinebench
In general, an 11th-gen Core i5 doesn’t really hold up to higher-end Core i7 processors and especially the latest Ryzen processors from AMD.

Mark Hachman / IDG

For a more prolonged test, we use Handbrake, a video conversion tool that transcodes video into other formats. Here, we take a Hollywood-quality video and transcode it into a length and format suitable for a tablet. While it simulates a real-world task, it also measures how well the laptop keeps itself cool under a heavy load. A thermally well-managed laptop can perform at higher clock speeds for a longer period of time, completing the task quickly.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 handbrake
In most cases, rival laptops would complete this task in half the time of the Surface Laptop Go 2.

Mark Hachman / IDG

We use 3DMark to assess how well the GPU performs. With the move to a “G7” graphics chip, we expect a bump in graphics performance, though nothing close to what a discrete GPU would deliver. The Surface Laptop Go 2 performs adequately for a laptop in its class.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 3DMark Time Spy
Here we find an interesting result: dialing up the performance in Windows 11 boosts 3D graphics capabilities substantially. Is the Surface Laptop Go 2 a gaming PC? No, though you may be able to play some older, less complex games.

Mark Hachman / IDG

Finally, we loop a 4K video over and over until the battery expires. The Surface Laptop Go 2 has a battery with identical capacity as its predecessor, so we’d expect about the same battery life, with some variation allowed for the new Windows 11 operating system and processor. The Go 2 falls a minute short of nine hours of battery life.

Microsoft Surface Laptop Go 2 battery life

Mark Hachman / IDG

Conclusion:

Part of the appeal of the Surface Laptop Go 2 is its price. But a smart buyer should start looking at the tradeoffs. Would paying $200 more for a laptop like the (currently unavailable) Lenovo IdeaPad Slim 7 Carbon and its gorgeous 2.8K OLED screen make more sense? For about $950 (at press time), you can buy the Acer Swift X, a full-fledged ultraportable gaming machine. What about the Acer Swift 3 (SF316-51), a perennial contender at the $800-ish range? Even the comparably priced HP Pavilion Aero 13 offers a lot more for the dollar. The competition is intense.

Certain Microsoft Surface devices are simply best in class, justifying their price premium: the Surface Pro 8 tablet, for example. The Surface Laptop Go 2 simply isn’t and budget buyers have to ask harder questions when it comes to paying more. While the Surface Laptop Go 2 is okay for what it offers, its problem is all too common. The competition can offer as much for less.

Thu, 14 Jul 2022 22:30:00 -0500 Author: Mark Hachman en-US text/html https://www.pcworld.com/article/796333/microsoft-surface-laptop-go-2-review.html
Killexams : Blenderbot 3, Meta's most accurate artificial intelligence chatbot, begins beta testing

Meta's AI research laboratories produced a new state-of-the-art chatbot and are letting the public test it.

BlenderBot 3 is released to the public users in the US. Meta believes BlenderBot 3 can participate in regular chitchat and answer digital assistant questions, such as identifying child-friendly places.

BlenderBot 3 chats and answers query like Google

Meta
 

The bot is a prototype based on Meta's previous work with large language models (LLMS). BlenderBot is trained on massive text datasets to find statistical patterns and produce language. Such algorithms have been used to generate code for programmers and to assist writers in sidestepping mental block. These models repeat biases in their training data and frequently create solutions to users' inquiries (a concern if they're to be effective as digital assistants).

Meta wants BlenderBot to test this problem. The chatbot may search the web for specified subjects. Users may click its answers to learn where it received their information. BlenderBot 3 uses citations.

Meta seeks to gather input on enormous language model difficulties by publishing a chatbot. BlenderBot users may report suspicious answers, and Meta has sought to "minimise the bots' use of filthy language, insults, and culturally incorrect remarks." If users opt-in, Meta will keep their discussions and comments for AI researchers.

Kurt Shuster, a Meta research engineer who helped design BlenderBot 3, told The Verge, "We're dedicated to openly disclosing all the demo data to advance conversational AI."

How the AI development over the years benefit BlenderBot 3

Meta
 

Tech firms have typically avoided releasing prototype AI chatbots to the public. Microsoft's Twitter chatbot Tay learned through public interactions in 2016. Twitter users trained Tay to make racist, antisemitic, and sexist things. Microsoft removed the bot 24 hours later.

Meta argues AI has evolved since Tay's malfunction and BlenderBot includes safety rails to prevent a repetition.

BlenderBot is a static model, explains Mary Williamson, a research engineering manager at Facebook AI Research (FAIR). It can remember what users say in a discussion (and will store this information through browser cookies if a user departs and returns), but this data will only be used to enhance the system afterward.

"It's just my perspective, but that [Tay] incident is bad because it caused this chatbot winter," Williamson tells The Verge.

Williamson thinks most chatbots are task-focused. Consider customer care bots, which offer consumers a preprogrammed conversation tree before passing them over to a human representative. Meta argues the only way to design a system that can have genuine, free-ranging discussions like humans is to let bots do so.

Williamson believes it's sad that bots can't say anything constructive. "We're releasing this responsibly to further research."

Meta also publishes BlenderBot 3's source, training dataset, and smaller model versions. Researchers may request the 175 billion-parameter model here.

For more technology newsproduct reviews, sci-tech features and updates, keep reading Digit.in

Sat, 06 Aug 2022 23:47:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.digit.in/news/machine-learning-and-ai/blenderbot-3-metas-most-recent-artificial-intelligence-chatbot-begins-beta-testing-64601.html
Killexams : Meta is putting its latest AI chatbot on the web for the public to talk to No result found, try new keyword!This latter issue is something Meta specifically wants to test with BlenderBot. A big feature of the chatbot is that it’s capable of searching the internet in order to talk about specific topics. Even ... Fri, 05 Aug 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/meta-is-putting-its-latest-ai-chatbot-on-the-web-for-anyone-to-talk-to/ar-AA10lKhc Killexams : Why Continuous Testing Is The Key To Unlocking Your ERP Transformation

Technology leader and co-founder of Opkey — a continuous testing platform redefining test automation for web, mobile and ERP applications.

Many business and technology leaders realize that their digital transformation initiatives can’t be utilized without modernizing their enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. Incorporating new technologies such as artificial intelligence and machine learning is essential to modernizing ERP solutions.

Through a 2019 study of ERP migration and transformation projects, McKinsey revealed that two-thirds of enterprises did not get the ROI they were looking for from their migration project. The common reasons for this dissatisfaction are delays in ERP implementations and misaligned project goals. Intelligent test automation, which powers a continuous testing approach, will help ERP transformation projects run on time and stay within budget.

Continuous testing for ERP applications: Why do you need it?

Next-gen ERPs and digital operations platforms require innovative software to be released rapidly, with minimal business risk. Leading analysts from Gartner, Forrester (paywall) and IDC (registration required) now recognize that software testing in its current form cannot handle the challenges posed by ERP applications. These analysts have concluded that software testing must be aligned with DevOps and AgileOps practices to handle giant ERP transformation projects.

The Agile/DevOps approach is incomplete, inefficient and ineffective without continuous testing. In ERP migration projects where platforms are extended to incorporate new features, functionalities and technologies, continuous testing helps you transparently validate the performance of critical business processes. This significantly reduces the risks associated with a new implementation, along with scheduled software updates. By catching bugs early in the development cycle, continuous testing ensures minimal time and budget overruns while providing advantages in risk reduction.

What are the testing challenges of ERP transformations?

According to a report by Bloor (registration required), more than 80% of migration projects ran over budget in 2007. While I have seen that statistic Excellerate over the years, I know migration projects regularly face issues of running over budget and over time. A 2019 ERP report from Panorama Consulting Group (registration required) shows that 45% of respondents had an average budget overrun of 30%.

Here are some specific testing challenges.

• Unclear Testing Scope: Determining what to test remains a major challenge for QA teams. The business risk grows every time too little testing is done. If you test too much, it wastes the time and resources of your business users.

• Inadequate Test Coverage: There are many moving parts in any ERP migration project. Functional and nonfunctional attributes get added, updated or removed with these migrations. Testing needs to pass various stages, from a unit test to a volume test, and eventually a mock go-live cutover.

• Change Frequency: In a accurate Deloitte CIO survey, almost 45% of respondents reported that managing changes in an ERP project scope is one of the top frustrations in planning their ERP journey (pg. 10).

• Testing Fatigue: ERP projects are long and tedious processes. Using a manual testing methodology for ERP transformations can be inefficient and error-prone. Ask yourself: “Can my business users deliver their full effort to testing?”

Continuous testing for ERP applications: How can I make it work?

To incorporate continuous testing for a digital transformation, leaders must utilize automation. Teams should now focus on next-generation automation platforms that allow them to quickly build test cases, automate them and build the infrastructure to run them in a continuous fashion. Let’s review the four pillars of a continuous testing strategy.

• Know your ideal coverage: Here are some questions to ask yourself: “What’s my current test coverage? Am I testing all of our critical processes? If something goes seriously wrong, is it because I didn’t test enough?”

If the test cases you are automating only cover 30% of your core business processes, the automation might not be good enough. Emphasize knowing your ideal coverage and leverage a process mining technology to validate your ideal coverage. Test mining techniques surface your existing test cases, business processes and configurations from your system process log to determine your existing testing baseline.

• Apply continuous test development: Test assets require considerable reworks to keep pace with the frequent ERP changes typical in an accelerated release cycle. This speed cannot be achieved with continuous testing.

• Monitor changes continually: Ask yourself: “What has changed in the most accurate ERP quarterly update? What business processes or test cases are going to be impacted?”

Emphasize the importance of knowing whether you are testing what is needed. Before the updates are pushed to production, use automation tools that deliver better change visibility to users by alerting them of processes that will be impacted.

• Test execution at scale: Prepare a scalable infrastructure to run thousands of tests on-demand with every change. Opt for a platform that can run your tests continuously on-premises, in the cloud and on mobile seamlessly.

What do you need from a test automation tool?

Three key capabilities must exist in a test automation tool to support an ERP transformation’s continuous testing paradigm.

• Autonomous Configuration Of Tests: Many changes happen at the configuration level for any ERP transformation. Leaders should leverage an automation tool that can autonomously create relevant data sets for test execution.

• Continual Impact Analysis: In the ERP world, updates are rolled out frequently. QA teams can find it difficult to decide the minimum number of test cases that need to be executed to ensure business continuity in post-application updates. AI-based impact analysis recommends a minimum number of test cases that need to be executed based on highlighted risks, keeping business application disruptions at bay.

• Autonomous Self-Healing Tests: QA teams often struggle to continuously maintain test scripts with each new release. Through leveraging AI-powered self-healing capabilities, changes can be identified automatically and test scripts can be fixed autonomously.

Continuous Test Automation: A Summary

The key to successful AgileOps is releasing updates as early and as often as possible.

With enterprise application vendors like Oracle, Microsoft and SAP rolling out updates on a weekly, monthly or quarterly basis, enterprises need to embrace those updates as early as possible. However, supporting your software testing initiatives will only be achieved with the right continuous testing strategy.


Forbes Technology Council is an invitation-only community for world-class CIOs, CTOs and technology executives. Do I qualify?


Wed, 20 Jul 2022 00:15:00 -0500 Pankaj Goel en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbestechcouncil/2022/07/20/why-continuous-testing-is-the-key-to-unlocking-your-erp-transformation/
Killexams : Competitive work environment: 2022 Microsoft Office Specialist World Championship names winners

A global competition to test one's skills with some of the most used names in word processing, spreadsheets and presentation has selected its winners after a list of contestants turned out to show off their competitive office skills for the challenge.

The Microsoft Office Specialist World Championships 2022 competition held in Anaheim, California, calls itself a "global competition" to test students' skills on software that many of us have on our resumes but might not necessarily be proficient enough to compete against masters. Well, these students are ready!

Students with high proficiency in the various pieces of software are invited to compete and represent their countries at the World Championship, with some students required to compete in National Championships first before being invited.

  • The first place winner this year for Microsoft Word, in Microsoft 365 and Office 2019 is Gabriel Stanciu of Romania.
  • Tristan Pesqueira of the United States took home the first place spot for competing with Microsoft PowerPoint.
  • The first place winner in Microsoft Excel is Duy Phong Nguyen of Vietnam
  • Rohan Matthias Vargas of Ireland took home first place for the version of Microsoft Word found in Office 2016
  • Cong Minh Bui of Vietnam took home first place for the version of Microsoft PowerPoint found in Office 2016
  • Ondrej Cach of Czech Republic won first place for the version of Microsoft Excel that is found in Office 2016

Ray Murray, Vice President and General Manager, Certiport said, “The pandemic put our live MOS Championship events on hold. We are so thrilled to be able to return to in-person competitions.”

Murray said, “It is inspiring to see students from 21 countries come together to ‘speak Microsoft’. The winners receive extra praise, but every single student who entered has earned a valuable workforce credential that will help them find success in college and in their career. The last two years have highlighted the importance of IT skills for tomorrow’s professionals and it’s incredible to see so many young people get introduced to IT certifications through the MOS World Championship.”

Copyright 2022 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 13:27:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.fox13now.com/news/national/competitive-work-environment-2022-microsoft-office-specialist-world-championship-names-winners
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