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CPP approach - Certified Protection Professional Updated: 2024

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Exam Code: CPP Certified Protection Professional approach January 2024 by Killexams.com team

CPP Certified Protection Professional

Exam : CPP

Exam Name : Certified Protection Professional (ASIS)

Quesitons : 225

Scored Questions : 200

Unscored : 25

Duration : 4 hrs



Security Fundamentals (35%)

TASK 1: Implement and coordinate the organizations security program(s) to protect the organizations assets Knowledge of

1. Security theory and terminology

2. Project management techniques

3. Security industry standards

4. Protection techniques and methods

5. Security program and procedures assessment

6. Security principles of planning, organization, and control

TASK 2: Implement methods to Strengthen the security program on a continuous basis through the use of auditing, review, and assessment Knowledge of

1. Data collection and intelligence analysis techniques

2. Continuous assessment and improvement processes

3. Audit and testing techniques

TASK 3: Develop and coordinate external relations programs with public sector law enforcement or other external organizations to achieve security objectives Knowledge of

1. Roles and responsibilities of external organizations and agencies

1. Local, national, and international public/private partnerships

2. Methods for creating effective working relationships

TASK 4: Develop, implement, and coordinate employee security awareness programs Knowledge of

1. The nature of verbal and non-verbal communication and cultural considerations

2. Security industry standards

3. Training methodologies

4. Communication strategies, techniques, and methods

5. Security awareness program objectives and metrics

TASK 5: Implement and/or coordinate an investigative program

Knowledge of

1. Report preparation for internal purposes and legal proceedings

2. Components of investigative processes

3. Types of investigations (e.g., incident, misconduct, compliance)

4. Internal and external resources to support investigative functions

TASK 6: Provide coordination, assistance, and evidence such as documentation and testimony to support legal proceedings

Knowledge of

1. Required components of effective documentation (e.g., legal, employee, procedural, policy, compliance)

2. Evidence collection and protection techniques

3. Relevant laws and regulations regarding records management, retention, legal holds, and destruction practices (Note: No countryspecific laws will be on the APP exam)

TASK 7: Conduct background investigations for hiring, promotion, and/or retention of individuals

Knowledge of

1. Background investigations and personnel screening techniques

2. Quality and types of information and data sources

3. Criminal, civil, and employment law and procedures

TASK 8: Develop, implement, coordinate, and evaluate policies, procedures, programs and methods to protect individuals in the workplace against human threats (e.g., harassment, violence)

Knowledge of

1. Principles and techniques of policy and procedure development

2. Protection personnel, technology, and processes

3. Regulations and standards governing or affecting the security industry and the protection of people, property, and information

4. Educational and awareness program design and implementation

TASK 9: Conduct and/or coordinate an executive/personnel protection program

Knowledge of

1. Travel security program components

2. Executive/personnel protection program components

3. Protection personnel, technology, and processes

TASK 10: Develop and/or maintain a physical security program for an organizational asset

Knowledge of

1. Resource management techniques

2. Preventive and corrective maintenance for systems

3. Physical security protection equipment, technology, and personnel

4. Security theory, techniques, and processes

5. Fundamentals of security system design

TASK 11: Recommend, implement, and coordinate physical security controls to mitigate security risks

Knowledge of

1. Risk mitigation techniques (e.g., technology, personnel, process, facility design, infrastructure)

2. Physical security protection equipment, technology, and personnel

3. Security survey techniques

TASK 12: Evaluate and integrate technology into security program to meet organizational goals

Knowledge of

1. Surveillance techniques and technology

2. Integration of technology and personnel

3. Plans, drawings, and schematics

4. Information security theory and systems methodology

TASK 13: Coordinate and implement security policies that contribute to an information security program

Knowledge of

1. Practices to protect proprietary information and intellectual property

2. Information protection technology, investigations, and procedures

3. Information security program components (e.g., asset protection, physical security, procedural security, information systems security, employee awareness, and information destruction and recovery capabilities)

4. Information security threats



DOMAIN TWO

Business Operations (22%)

TASK 1: Propose budgets and implement financial controls to ensure fiscal responsibility

Knowledge of

1. Data analysis techniques and cost-benefit analysis

2. Principles of business management accounting, control, and audits

3. Return on Investment (ROI) analysis

4. Fundamental business finance principles and financial reporting

5. Budget planning process

6. Required components of effective documentation (e.g., budget, balance sheet, vendor work order, contracts)

TASK 2: Implement security policies, procedures, plans, and directives to achieve organizational objectives

Knowledge of

1. Principles and techniques of policy/procedure development

2. Guidelines for individual and corporate behavior

3. Improvement techniques (e.g., pilot programs, education, and training)

TASK 3: Develop procedures/techniques to measure and Strengthen departmental productivity

Knowledge of

1. Communication strategies, methods, and techniques

2. Techniques for quantifying productivity/metrics/key performance indicators (KPI)

3. Project management fundamentals tools and techniques

4. Principles of performance evaluations, 360 reviews, and coaching

TASK 4: Develop, implement, and coordinate security staffing processes and personnel development programs in order to achieve organizational objectives

Knowledge of

1. Retention strategies and methodologies

2. Job analysis processes

3. Cross-functional collaboration

4. Training strategies, methods, and techniques

5. Talent management and succession planning

6. Selection, evaluation, and interview techniques for staffing

TASK 5: Monitor and ensure a sound ethical culture in accordance with regulatory requirements and organizational objectives

Knowledge of

1. Interpersonal communications and feedback techniques

2. Relevant laws and regulations

3. Governance and compliance standards

4. Generally accepted ethical principles

5. Guidelines for individual and corporate behavior

TASK 6: Provide advice and assistance in developing key performance indicators and negotiate contractual terms for security vendors/suppliers

Knowledge of

1. Confidential information protection techniques and methods

2. Relevant laws and regulations

3. Key concepts in the preparation of requests for proposals and bid reviews/evaluations

4. Service Level Agreements (SLA) definition, measurement and reporting

5. Contract law, indemnification, and liability insurance principles

6. Monitoring processes to ensure that organizational needs and contractual requirements are being met

7. Vendor qualification and selection process



DOMAIN THREE

Risk Management (25%)

TASK 1: Conduct initial and ongoing risk assessment processes

Knowledge of

1. Risk management strategies (e.g., avoid, assume/accept, transfer, mitigate)

2. Risk management and business impact analysis methodology

3. Risk management theory and terminology (e.g., threats, likelihood, vulnerability, impact)

TASK 2: Assess and prioritize threats to address potential consequences of incidents

Knowledge of

1. Potential threats to an organization

2. Holistic approach to assessing all-hazard threats

3. Techniques, tools, and resources related to internal and external threats

TASK 3: Prepare, plan, and communicate how the organization will identify, classify, and address risks

Knowledge of

1. Risk management compliance testing (e.g., program audit, internal controls, selfassessment)

2. Quantitative and qualitative risk assessments

3. Risk management standards

4. Vulnerability, threat, and impact assessments

TASK 4: Implement and/or coordinate recommended countermeasures for new risk treatment strategies

Knowledge of

1. Countermeasures

2. Mitigation techniques

3. Cost-benefit analysis methods for risk treatment strategies

TASK 5: Establish a business continuity or continuity of operations plan (COOP)

Knowledge of

1. Business continuity standards

2. Emergency planning techniques

3. Risk analysis

4. Gap analysis

TASK 6: Ensure pre-incident resource planning (e.g., mutual aid agreements, table-top exercises)

Knowledge of

1. Data collection and trend analysis techniques

2. Techniques, tools, and resources related to internal and external threats

3. Quality and types of information and data sources

4. Holistic approach to assessing all-hazard threats



DOMAIN FOUR

Response Management (18%)

TASK 1: Respond to and manage an incident using best practices

Knowledge of

1. Primary roles and duties in an incident command structure

2. Emergency operations center (EOC) management principles and practices

TASK 2: Coordinate the recovery and resumption of operations following an incident

Knowledge of

1. Recovery assistance resources

2. Mitigation opportunities during response and recovery processes

TASK 3: Conduct a post-incident review Knowledge of

1. Mitigation opportunities during response and recovery processes

2. Post-incident review techniques

TASK 4: Implement contingency plans for common types of incidents (e.g., bomb threat, active shooter, natural disasters)

Knowledge of

1. Short- and long-term recovery strategies

2. Incident management systems and protocols

TASK 5: Identify vulnerabilities and coordinate additional countermeasures for an asset in a degraded state following an incident

Knowledge of

1. Triage/prioritization and damage assessment techniques

2. Prevention, intervention, and response

tactics

TASK 6: Assess and prioritize threats to mitigate consequences of incidents

Knowledge of

1. Triage/prioritization and damage assessment techniques

2. Resource management techniques

TASK 7: Coordinate and assist with evidence

collection for post-incident review (e.g., documentation, testimony)

Knowledge of

1. Communication techniques and notification protocols

2. Communication techniques and protocols of liaison

TASK 8: Coordinate with emergency services during incident response

Knowledge of

1. Emergency operations center (EOC) concepts and design

2. Emergency operations center (EOC) management principles and practices

3. Communication techniques and protocols of liaison

TASK 9: Monitor the response effectiveness to incident(s)

Knowledge of

1. Post-incident review techniques

2. Incident management systems and protocols

TASK 10: Communicate regular status updates to leadership and other key stakeholders throughout incident

Knowledge of

1. Communication techniques and protocols of liaison

2. Communication techniques and notification protocols

TASK 11: Monitor and audit the plan of how the organization will respond to incidents

Knowledge of

1. Training and exercise techniques

2. Post-incident review techniques



Security Principles and Practices (21%)

TASK 1: Plan, develop, implement, and manage the organizations security program to protect the organizations assets.

Knowledge of

1. Principles of planning, organization, and control

2. Security theory, techniques, and processes

3. Security industry standards

4. Continuous assessment and improvement processes

5. Cross-functional organizational collaboration

TASK 2: Develop, manage, or conduct the security risk assessment process.

Knowledge of

1. Quantitative and qualitative risk assessments

2. Vulnerability, threat, and impact assessments

3. Potential security threats (e.g., all hazards, criminal activity)

TASK 3: Evaluate methods to Strengthen the security program on a continuous basis through the use of auditing, review, and assessment.

Knowledge of

1. Cost-benefit analysis methods

2. Risk management strategies (e.g., avoid, assume/accept, transfer, spread)

3. Risk mitigation techniques (e.g., technology, personnel, process, facility design)

4. Data collection and trend analysis techniques

TASK 4: Develop and manage external relations programs with public sector law enforcement or other external organizations to achieve security objectives.

Knowledge of

1. Roles and responsibilities of external organization and agencies

2. Methods for creating effective working relationships

3. Techniques and protocols of liaison

4. Local and national public/private partnerships

TASK 5: Develop, implement, and manage employee security awareness programs to achieve organizational goals and objectives.

Knowledge of

1. Training methodologies

2. Communication strategies, techniques, and methods

3. Awareness program objectives and program metrics

4. Elements of a security awareness program (e.g., roles and responsibilities, physical risk, communication risk, privacy)



DOMAIN TWO

Business Principles and Practices (13%)

TASK 1: Develop and manage budgets and financial controls to achieve fiscal responsibility.

Knowledge of

1. Principles of management accounting, control, and audits

2. Business finance principles and financial reporting

3. Return on Investment (ROI) analysis

4. The lifecycle for budget planning purposes

TASK 2: Develop, implement, and manage policies, procedures, plans, and directives to achieve organizational objectives.

Knowledge of

6. Principles and techniques of policy/procedures development

7. Communication strategies, methods, and techniques

8. Training strategies, methods, and techniques
9. Cross-functional collaboration

10. Relevant laws and regulations

TASK 3: Develop procedures/techniques to measure and Strengthen organizational productivity.

Knowledge of

1. Techniques for quantifying productivity/metrics/key performance indicators (KPI)

2. Data analysis techniques and cost-benefit analysis

3. Improvement techniques (e.g., pilot programs, education and training)

TASK 4: Develop, implement, and manage security staffing processes and personnel development programs in order to achieve organizational objectives.

Knowledge of

1. Interview techniques for staffing

2. Candidate selection and evaluation techniques

3. Job analysis processes

4. Pre-employment background screening

5. Principles of performance evaluations, 360 reviews, and coaching

6. Interpersonal and feedback techniques

7. Training strategies, methodologies, and resources

8. Retention strategies and methodologies

9. Talent management and succession planning

TASK 5: Monitor and ensure a sound ethical climate in accordance with regulatory requirements and the organizations directives and standards to support and promote proper business practices.

Knowledge of

1. Good governance standards

2. Guidelines for individual and corporate behavior

3. Generally accepted ethical principles

4. Confidential information protection techniques and methods

5. Legal and regulatory compliance

TASK 6: Provide advice and assistance to management and others in developing performance requirements and contractual terms for security vendors/suppliers.

Knowledge of

1. Key concepts in the preparation of requests for proposals and bid reviews/evaluations

2. Service Level Agreements (SLA) definition, measurement, and reporting

3. Contract law, indemnification, and liability insurance principles

4. Monitoring processes to ensure that organizational needs and contractual requirements are being met



DOMAIN THREE

Investigations (10%)

TASK 1: Identify, develop, implement, and manage investigative functions.

Knowledge of

1. Principles and techniques of policy and procedure development

2. Organizational objectives and crossfunctional collaboration

3. Types of investigations (e.g., incident, misconduct, compliance)

4. Internal and external resources to support investigative functions

5. Report preparation for internal purposes and legal proceedings

6. Laws pertaining to developing and managing investigative programs

TASK 2: Manage or conduct the collection and preservation of evidence to support investigation actions.

Knowledge of

1. Evidence collection techniques

2. Protection/preservation of crime scene

3. Requirements of chain of custody

4. Methods for preservation of evidence

5. Laws pertaining to the collection and preservation of evidence

TASK 3: Manage or conduct surveillance processes.

Knowledge of

1. Surveillance techniques

2. Technology/equipment and personnel to conduct surveillance

3. Laws pertaining to managing surveillance processes

TASK 4: Manage and conduct investigations requiring specialized tools, techniques, and resources.

Knowledge of

1. Financial and fraud related crimes

2. Intellectual property and industrial espionage crimes

3. Arson and property crimes

4. Cybercrimes

TASK 5: Manage or conduct investigative interviews.

Knowledge of

1. Methods and techniques of eliciting information

2. Techniques for detecting deception

3. The nature of non-verbal communication and cultural considerations

4. Rights of interviewees

5. Required components of written statements

6. Laws pertaining to managing investigative interviews

TASK 6: Provide coordination, assistance, and evidence such as documentation and testimony to support legal counsel in genuine or potential criminal and/or civil proceedings.

Knowledge of

1. Statutes, regulations, and case law governing or affecting the security industry and the protection of people, property, and information

2. Criminal law and procedures

3. Civil law and procedures

4. Employment law (e.g., wrongful termination, discrimination, and harassment)



DOMAIN FOUR

Personnel Security (12%)

TASK 1: Develop, implement, and manage background investigations for hiring, promotion, or retention of individuals.

Knowledge of

1. Background investigations and personnel screening techniques

2. Quality and types of information sources

3. Screening policies and guidelines

4. Laws and regulations pertaining to personnel screening

TASK 2: Develop, implement, manage, and evaluate policies, procedures, programs, and methods to protect individuals in the workplace against human threats (e.g., harassment, violence).

Knowledge of

1. Protection techniques and methods

2. Threat assessment

3. Prevention, intervention and response tactics

4. Educational and awareness program design and implementation

5. Travel security program

6. Laws, government, and labor regulations

7. Organizational efforts to reduce employee substance abuse

TASK 3: Develop, implement, and manage executive protection programs.

Knowledge of

1. Executive protection techniques and methods

2. Risk analysis

3. Liaison and resource management techniques

4. Selection, costs, and effectiveness of proprietary and contract executive protection personnel



DOMAIN FIVE

Physical Security (25%)

TASK 1: Conduct facility surveys to determine the current status of physical security.

Knowledge of

1. Security protection equipment and personnel

2. Survey techniques

3. Building plans, drawings, and schematics

4. Risk assessment techniques

5. Gap analysis

TASK 2: Select, implement, and manage physical security strategies to mitigate security risks.

Knowledge of

1. Fundamentals of security system design

2. Countermeasures

3. Budgetary projection development process

4. Bid package development and evaluation process

5. Vendor qualification and selection process

6. Final acceptance and testing procedures

7. Project management techniques

8. Cost-benefit analysis techniques

9. Labor-technology relationship

TASK 3: Assess the effectiveness of physical security measures by testing and monitoring.

Knowledge of

1. Protection personnel, technology, and processes

2. Audit and testing techniques

3. Preventive and corrective maintenance for systems



DOMAIN SIX

Information Security (9%)

TASK 1: Conduct surveys of information asset facilities, processes, systems, and services to evaluate current status of information security program.

Knowledge of

1. Elements of an information security program, including physical security, procedural security, information systems security, employee awareness, and information destruction and recovery capabilities

2. Survey techniques

3. Quantitative and qualitative risk assessments

4. Risk mitigation strategies (e.g., technology, personnel, process, facility design)

5. Cost-benefit analysis methods

6. Protection technology, equipment, and procedures

7. Information security threats

8. Building and system plans, drawings, and schematics

TASK 2: Develop and implement policies and procedures to ensure information is evaluated and protected against all forms of unauthorized/inadvertent access, use, disclosure, modification, destruction, or denial.

Knowledge of

1. Principles of management

2. Information security theory and terminology

3. Information security industry standards (e.g., ISO, PII, PCI)

4. Relevant laws and regulations regarding records management, retention, legal holds, and destruction practices

5. Practices to protect proprietary information and intellectual property

6. Protection measures, equipment, and techniques; including information security processes, systems for physical access, data control, management, and information destruction

TASK 3: Develop and manage a program of integrated security controls and safeguards to ensure information asset protection including confidentiality, integrity, and availability.

Knowledge of

1. Elements of information asset protection including confidentiality, integrity, and availability, authentication, accountability, and audit ability of sensitive information; and associated information technology resources, assets, and investigations

2. Information security theory and systems methodology

3. Multi-factor authentication techniques

4. Threats and vulnerabilities assessment and mitigation

5. Ethical hacking and penetration testing techniques and practices

6. Encryption and data masking techniques

7. Systems integration techniques

8. Cost-benefit analysis methodology

9. Project management techniques

10. Budget development process

11. Vendor evaluation and selection process

12. Final acceptance and testing procedures, information systems, assessment, and security program documentation

13. Protection technology, investigations, and procedures

14. Training and awareness methodologies and procedures



DOMAIN SEVEN

Crisis Management (10%)

TASK 1: Assess and prioritize threats to mitigate potential consequences of incidents.

Knowledge of

1. Threats by type, likelihood of occurrence, and consequences

2. “All hazards” approach to assessing threats

3. Cost-benefit analysis

4. Mitigation strategies

5. Risk management and business impact analysis methodology

6. Business continuity standards (e.g., ISO 22301)

TASK 2: Prepare and plan how the organization will respond to incidents.

Knowledge of

1. Resource management techniques

2. Emergency planning techniques

3. Triage and damage assessment techniques

4. Communication techniques and notification protocols

5. Training and exercise techniques

6. Emergency operations center (EOC) concepts and design

7. Primary roles and duties in an incident command structure

TASK 3: Respond to and manage an incident.

Knowledge of

1. Resource management techniques

2. EOC management principles and practices

3. Incident management systems and protocols

TASK 4: Recover from incidents by

Case Management (35%)

TASK 1: Analyze case for applicable ethical conflicts.

Knowledge of

1. Nature/types/categories of ethical issues related to cases (fiduciary, conflict of interest, attorney-client)

2. The role of laws, codes, regulations and organizational governance in conducting investigations

TASK 2: Analyze and assess case elements, strategies and risks.

Knowledge of

1. Case categories (computer, white collar, financial, criminal, workplace violence)

2. Qualitative and quantitative analytical methods and tools

3. Strategic/operational analysis

4. Criminal intelligence analysis

5. Risk identification and impact

6. ASIS Workplace Violence standard

TASK 3: Determine investigative goals and develop strategy by reviewing procedural options.

Knowledge of

1. Case flow

2. Negotiation process

3. Investigative methods

4. Cost-benefit analysis

TASK 4: Determine and manage investigative resources necessary to address case objectives.

Knowledge of

1. Quality assurance process

2. Chain of custody procedures

3. Resource requirements and allocation (e.g., personnel, equipment, time, budget)

TASK 5: Identify, evaluate and implement investigative process improvement opportunities.

Knowledge of

1. Internal review (e.g., management, legal, human resources)

2. External review (e.g., regulatory bodies, accreditation agency)

3. Liaison resources

4. Root cause analysis and process improvement techniques
Certified Protection Professional
ASIS Professional approach

Other ASIS exams

CPP Certified Protection Professional
PSP Physical Security Professional (PSP) - 2023
ASIS-APP Associate Protection Professional

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ASIS
CPP
Certified Protection Professional
https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CPP
A. $114 billion
B. $53 billion
C. $241 billion
D. $16 billion
Answer: A
Question: 254
A national crime survey for the years 1975-1988 reported that the percentage of
households touched by crime had:
A. Increased by 25 percent
B. Decreased by 23 percent
C. Increased by 7 percent
D. Decreased by 5 percent
Answer: B
Question: 255
For the past 20 years, the two major components of economic crime have been:
A. Employee theft and corporate bribery
B. Fraud and embezzlement
C. White-collar crime and ordinary crime
D. Computer crime and ordinary crime
Answer: C
Question: 256
According to the White House Conference for a Drug-Free America, approximately
how many Americans had used an illegal drug in 1987?
A. 1 in 20
B. 1 in 2
C. 1 in 7
D. 1 in 40
85
Answer: C
Question: 257
According to a 1989 Gallup Poll, what percentage of American' workers have
personal knowledge of co-workers using illegal drugs on the job?
A. 5 percent
B. 10 percent
C. 25 percent
D. 50 percent
Answer: C
Question: 258
The percentage of the world's production of illegal drugs consumed in the United States
is approximately:
A. 5 percent
B. 25 percent
C. 60 percent
D. 95 percent
Answer: C
Question: 259
The total annual cost to the United States for drug abuse due to resulting crime, lost
productivity, absenteeism, health care costs, and so forth is most closely represented by:
A. $50 million
B. $100 million
C. $100 billion
D. $400 billion
Answer: C
86
Question: 260
According to a 1989 Department of Labor study, the percentage of employees in
America working for a company that has a drug-testing program for employees or
plans to have a drug-testing program is:
A. 1 percent
B. 10 percent
C. 50 percent
D. 80 percent
Answer: B
Question: 261
To Strengthen cooperation and communications between private security and law
enforcement, the authors of Hallcrest II recommend that:
A. Cooperative programs be established in every metropolitan area
B. Cities and counties enact ordinances providing for the police to regulate security
C. Secondary employment of law enforcement officers in security work be prohibited
D. Police academies teach security officers more about police work
Answer: A
Question: 262
The percentage of computer security incidents resulting from "insider" attacks by
dishonest and disgruntled employees is approximately:
A. 10 percent
B. 35 percent
C. 50 percent
D. 80 percent
Answer: D
Question: 263
The percentage of computer security incidents that are annually believed to be attributed
to hackers is closest to:
87
A. 1 percent
B. 10 percent
C. 20 percent
D. 50 percent
Answer: A
Question: 264
A 1990 National Institute of Justice study indicated that what percentage of computer
crimes are not prosecuted?
A. 10 percent
B. 25 percent
C. 70 percent
D. 90 percent
Answer: D
Question: 265
The practice of preventing unauthorized persons from gammg intelligent information
by analyzing electromagnetic emanations from electronic equipment, such as
computers, is often termed:
A. Tempest
B. Veiling
C. Bugging
D. Hardening
Answer: A
Question: 266
According to Hallcrest II, North American incidents of terrorism represent what
percentage of worldwide incidents?
A. Less than 1 percent
B. About 10 percent
88
C. Almost 25 percent
D. 40 percent
Answer: A
Question: 267
Since 1985, the number of international terrorist incidents occurring each year is closest
to:
A. 1000
B. 5000
C. 10,000
D. 20,000
Answer: A
89
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ASIS Professional approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CPP Search results ASIS Professional approach - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CPP https://killexams.com/exam_list/ASIS How to Approach an Employee About Grooming

Based in the Midwest, Shelley Frost has been writing parenting and education articles since 2007. Her experience comes from teaching, tutoring and managing educational after school programs. Frost worked in insurance and software testing before becoming a writer. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in elementary education with a memorizing endorsement.

Thu, 19 Nov 2015 17:33:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://smallbusiness.chron.com/approach-employee-grooming-25389.html
Qatar Security Meetup Held

(MENAFN- Gulf Times) More than 60 security professionals attended Qatar Security Meetup 2023, hosted by Asis Doha in collaboration with Asis International, a statement said. The gathering included officials from the Ministry of Interior's (MoI) Security Systems Department (SSD).
Triple Crown certification recipients Vitthal Teli and Adepoju Nasiru were recognised on the occasion. The Triple Crown signifies mastery in three premier certifications: Certified Protection Professional (CPP), Physical Security Professional (PSP), and Professional Certified Investigator (PCI).
The panel, chaired by Asis Doha Chapter chair Ranjiv Abraham and featuring MoI's SSD director Major engineer Ali Abdallah A al-Suwaidi, Asis international CEO Peter J O'Neil, past president Malcolm Smith and global chief learning officer Christine Murphy Peck provided insights. MoI's SSD head of projects Capt Mohammed Ali al-Mulla was present.
The collaboration with over 10 top-notch security vendors provided a unique platform for knowledge exchange and showcased cutting-edge technologies shaping the industry's future.
The presence of national system integrators and software development companies, distributors, and security services companies further emphasised the importance of a unified approach in addressing security challenges across various sectors, the statement added.

MENAFN21122023000067011011ID1107643520


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Thu, 21 Dec 2023 05:07:00 -0600 Date text/html https://menafn.com/1107643520/Qatar-Security-Meetup-Held
Our Academic Approach

Our small classes put students face-to-face with leading faculty, where they can ask questions, delve deep, iterate, postulate, and collaborate. Through intensive project-based learning and research, students gain hands-on experience that can be put to use as soon as they graduate. Our students don’t just explore challenging problems—they prototype innovative solutions. And through internship opportunities across New York City, they get real-world experience, as well as the chance to expand their professional networks.

The integrated curriculum that is a hallmark of our university means students can immerse themselves in multiple disciplines. This approach puts rigorous intellectual and creative exploration at our core, and allows students to develop tools to solve problems creatively in a changing and complex world. 

The courageous intellectual spirit of The New School’s founders remains present in the academic rigor, creative exploration, and multidimensional study that define our university. 

Mon, 02 Aug 2021 06:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.newschool.edu/academics/excellence-rigor/
Alani Asis

About

Alani Asis is a freelance writer with three years of experience writing about auto, home, life, renters and pet insurance. Alani specializes in crafting explainer pieces and product guides, equipping readers with the knowledge they need to make informed insurance decisions. Her work has appeared in esteemed publications and company blogs, including Insider, Fortune, U.S. News, LendingTree, AARP and more.

About

Alani Asis is a freelance writer with three years of experience writing about auto, home, life, renters and pet insurance. Alani specializes in crafting explainer pieces and product guides, equipping readers with the knowledge they need to make informed insurance decisions. Her work has appeared in esteemed publications and company blogs, including Insider, Fortune, U.S. News, LendingTree, AARP and more.

Fri, 18 Aug 2023 08:27:00 -0500 text/html https://www.forbes.com/advisor/author/alani-asis/
Historical Information

The History of Mission Santa Clara

The Ohlone

Long before the arrival of the first Europeans, the South Bay was home to a large native population—numbering 10,000 people. They had occupied the Bay Area for thousands of years divided into as many as 40 independent tribes. One such community, called Thamien, was located where the SCU campus now stands.  Today, descendants call themselves “Ohlone”.

The Ohlone lifestyle can be described as “hunter-gatherer”.  Though they did not cultivate crops or herd domestic animals, they used sophisticated landscape management practices, including prescribed burns, to make a living in the fertile south bay region. They lived in numerous settlements of 200 to 500 persons spread throughout the broad "Valley of Oaks” enjoying a diet of fish, shellfish, water fowl, venison, acorns, rabbit, and wild berries. From the tule reeds found near water’s edge they made their houses and boats and they wove baskets from the native sedge grasses.   Ohlone religion revolved around elaborate ritual dances with dancers wearing colorful regalia and tribal members communing in the tribal sweat lodge—for ensuring good hunts, healing illness and expelling impurities.  

               This way of life had sustained the Ohlone for thousands of years, but the onset of Spanish colonization in 1769 introduced dramatic changes. Over the course of several generations, Ohlone society shifted from a traditional focus on hunting and gathering to agriculture; from holding strict tribal identities to having blended “mission” identities; from their native worldview to becoming, at least outwardly, Catholic Christian converts and citizens of the Spanish Empire. How could this happen?

         Franciscan conversion practices began largely through attraction rather than conquest: starting with strategic trade and outright gifts. Yet, once individuals joined the mission they were not allowed to leave. Sadly, historical accounts reveal harsh punishments (by modern standards) of withholding food, corporal punishments, and imprisonment for wayward converts. Yet, there was another motivator for joining the mission: namely, the increasing scarcity of native game and foods brought about by the herds of cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, and goats imported by the Spanish.  Over-grazing of the native grasses and growing displacement of the native game gave the mission an increasing monopoly over the local food supply.  Eventually, the new trade skills of ranching, farming, tanning, adobe brick and tile making came to be seen as necessary skills for survival.

         Considering the number of converts and productivity, the padres proclaimed Mission Santa Clara an early success. Yet, this success proved fleeting. Weakened by the clash of cultures and waves of epidemics: chiefly small pox and measles, the Ohlone population dwindled by 1830 to 2,500 people. Mexican independence from Spain in 1822 only hastened the collapse of the mission system and undermined the planned return of mission land ownership to the Ohlone. The California Gold Rush, brought waves of prospectors and pioneers--along with unscrupulous wheeler-dealers--pushing the remaining Ohlone to the margins of California society.

         However, the Ohlone people did not disappear.  Numerous family groups have reclaimed their heritage and are seeking Federal recognition in our time.

From Mission to University  

         The story now turns to Mission Santa Clara de Asis, the 8th mission in the chain of 21 Franciscan missions established by Padre Junipero Serra. It was first founded January 12, 1777 on the banks of the Guadalupe River (just north of Hwy 101, opposite the Mineta International Airport) and the first to bear the name of a woman, St. Claire of Assisi, an early companion of St. Francis. Flood, fire and earthquake forced five relocations until the Mission finally settled on this current site in 1822.

         From the start, Mission Santa Clara was meant to serve as the sister mission to Mission Dolores in San Francisco. Spanish Viceroy Bucareli’s grand design intended Mission Dolores (and its Presidio) to anchor the mouth of San Francisco Bay with Mission Santa Clara anchoring the South Bay--receiving goods and services meant for the new Pueblo of San Jose.

         Mission Santa Clara seemed to thrive at first: boasting the highest number of converts and recording record productivity made possible by the fertile, well-watered lands and temperate climate. But this was not to last.

         The always present clash of cultures, epidemics and growing rivalries with the nearby Pueblo of San Jose were only made worse by Mexico’s secession from the Spanish Empire in 1822, when royal funding completely dried up. At the secession, the fledgling Mexican government found few resources for supporting such distant missions. By the end of the 1830’s, the new government secularized all 21 missions (i.e. they reverted the mission lands to Ohlone ownership) and expelled the Spanish Franciscans loyal to the King of Spain and inadvertently abandoned the Ohlone to the pioneers and the profiteers.

         With insufficient funds to maintain the complex, and a single priest to operate the Mission as a parish church, the property fell into serious decay. In 1850, Bishop Joseph Alemany approached a Jesuit priest, Fr. John Nobili, S.J., to turn the parish and its adjacent lands into a college. This meant transferring the property from Franciscan ownership to Jesuit ownership. So on March 19, 1851, Mission Santa Clara became the first college of higher learning in the new state of California.

         Soon after, the new college president, Burchard Villager, S.J., began a rebuilding campaign to upgrade the campus’ decrepit buildings. Fr. Burchard also enlarged the Mission Church giving it a new facade. For a while, the building boasted an Italianate façade--with two bell towers-- all made of wood (similar in style to St. Joseph’s Cathedral in San Jose). A devastating fire in 1926 totally consumed this remodeled building.  It was decided to rebuild its replacement not in the style of the remodeled, Italianate building but in the idealized neo‑colonial style fashionable at the time. Drawing from genuine historical photographs, they resurrected more of the original 1825 single bell tower structure. This is the building you see today: similar in length but twice as wide as the 1825 Mission and more sophisticated in detail. Fortunately, the building was also built of steel reinforced concrete--rather than adobe brick--making it much more resistant to earthquakes and fire.

         Today Mission Santa Clara continues to serve as Santa Clara University’s student chapel while its image has become the icon for the local county, city, and university bearing its name.

To download this narrative and view other helpful materials, click here.

Mon, 15 Feb 2016 10:22:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.scu.edu/missionchurch/historical-information/
Multi-Tiered Approach to Trauma Graduate Certificate

 

Online Program

The Multi-Tiered Approach to Trauma Graduate Certificate is an online, five-course program designed to prepare you to implement trauma-informed practices and policies within your professional practice.

This certificate was designed with busy working professionals and students in mind, offering maximum flexibility to accommodate your demanding schedule. The online curriculum allows students the flexibility to work around their busy schedule, time zone, and professional demands.

Did You Know?

Trauma is a global public health crisis that has only increased since the COVID-19 pandemic. Adverse childhood experiences, or ACES, refers to specific traumatic experiences a person experiences in childhood. In the United States alone, over 60% of adults surveyed have at least one type of adverse childhood experience before the age of 18 and 1 in 6 adults report having experienced four or more types of ACES (CDC, 2022).

Illustration of a tree with deep roots, text superimposed: Multitiered Approach to Trauma Graduate Certificate.History Does Not Define The Future

Childhood trauma has lasting impacts that can permeate into adulthood, communities, and society at large. However, childhood trauma can be prevented, and the negative outcomes can be mitigated. A history of trauma does not have to define a person’s future. Healthy opportunities for people, families, and society occur when healthcare systems, education systems, community centers, child welfare organizations, family support organizations, mental health providers, and policy leaders adopt trauma-responsive and trauma-informed practices. This certificate is designed to equip professionals across a variety of settings to be a part of the positive change needed in our communities.

Who Should Apply?

Group of people including professionals, nurses, doctors of varying ages, genders, and ethnicities. This program is for anyone who wants to be an agent of positive change within their professional journey. This program’s innovative design allows student participants to customize their learning to meet their specific professional and learning needs.

All students receive the same foundational course during the first three semesters. The last two semesters, students focus their learning on applying core knowledge to their specific profession and setting.

This program is not limited to any specific field of study. It is highly recommended for anyone in any profession within a healthcare, education, public health, child welfare, mental health, or policy and leadership setting.

Curriculum

  • OTC 601 – Individual Impact of Trauma Across the Lifespan

    Course Description: Course focus is on the impact of trauma on neurological development and implications for health, education, and relationships across the lifespan.

    Course Overview: This course provides a foundation of concepts that the remainder of the certificate program will build upon. This course guides students through the process of understanding core evidence related to trauma’s impact on an individual and synthesizing that evidence to application relevant to the student’s area of practice.

  • OTC 603 – Trauma and Context Specific Considerations

    Course Description: Course focus is on the impact of trauma on family and communities.

    Course Overview: This course builds on the content of OT601 to consider how trauma impacts the systems that individuals interact with and reside in. Students in this course consider how trauma permeates beyond the individual and into families, local geographic communities, and communities of shared experiences. Specific communities of shared experiences addressed in this course include displaced populations, human trafficking, justice systems, houselessness, education systems, neurodiversity, health equity and accessibility.

  • OTC 605 – Historical Trauma

    Course Description: Course focus is on the impact of historical trauma on individual and community health and wellbeing.

    Course Overview: This course builds on foundational concepts in OTC 601 and OTC 603 and addresses issues of historical trauma and social systems of oppression that cause trauma. Students apply this content to their understanding of trauma at individual and community levels.

  • OTC 610 – Systems Assessment Using a Trauma Lens

    Course Description: Course focus is to apply multitiered approach to trauma when assessing a specific practice area and context.

    Course Overview: This course contextualizes the content of courses OTC 601, OTC 603, and OTC 605 to the student’s area of expertise and interest. In this course, students will apply summative concepts to complete an assessment of a practice area and local context chosen by the student. Emphasis is on application of multitiered approaches to trauma using evidence informed processes.

  • OTC 615 – Trauma Responsive Program Design

    Course Description: Course focus is on practical implementation of course concepts into the student’s professional setting.

    Course Overview: This is the final course in the certificate. Students will complete a project that is unique to their practice area and/or area of interest. The project outlines next steps for increasing trauma responsive practice within their setting and/or to promote their professional growth. The goal is for students to develop a project they can feasibly implement within 6 months of completing the certificate.

Application Process

Admission Timeline:

  • The program admits a fall cohort annually (August start)
  • Deadline to apply is August 1

Application Fees:

  • Domestic applicants and green card holders: $50
  • International applicants: $60

Instructions for Completing Application

  • The following must be submitted directly to the Multitiered Approach to Trauma program:

    UAB School of Health Professions
    Multitiered Approach to Trauma Graduate Certificate
    SHPB 371, 1720 2nd Avenue South
    Birmingham, AL 35294-1212

  • Final Steps:

    The program director will contact you regarding next steps in your application process.

    A non-refundable deposit of $300 dollars (U.S. currency) must be submitted with the letter to retain a slot in the upcoming class. The deposit will be applied to the student’s account after classes begin.

Tuition and Fees

UAB’s tuition and fees are competitively priced. Learners in the online Multi-Tiered Approach to Trauma Graduate Certificate program pay online fees. For general information, visit the UAB Tuition and Fees webpage and scroll down to the "Online Courses Offered" section - we are part of the School of Health Professions.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Do I have to be an occupational therapy practitioner to enroll?

    No! This certificate is provided through the UAB Department of Occupational Therapy, but it is applicable and open to many professions including teachers, education administration, early intervention and early childhood development providers, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, counselors, marriage and family therapists, social workers, family and criminal court judges, nutritionists and dietitians, physicians, psychologists, dentists, optometrists, policy leaders, health service administrators, and business leadership.

  • I have a history of trauma. Will program content be delivered in a way that is safe for me and reduce my own re-traumatization?

    Every effort is made in this course to teach trauma-responsive practices in a way that does not trigger re-traumatization. Some examples of this include:

    • You will not be asked to disclose any personal history during this program.
    • Trauma will be discussed during this program and, when possible, case studies will be presented with a choice of two options and content warnings so that students can choose the case most interesting and/or least triggering for them.
    • Students will create an individual safety plan for learning at the beginning of each course.
    • Each student must agree to the program’s rules to ensure students create a safe learning environment for each other.
    • The asynchronous design of this program allows students to engage in the content on their own schedule.
  • I am not in the United States. Can I still enroll in the program?

    Yes! The asynchronous design of this certificate accommodates varying time zones. International applicants must meet the English proficiency requirements for the UAB Graduate School. Click here for those guidelines.

  • How many credit hours is the certificate?

    Each course is three (3) semester hours. The entire certificate includes 15 credit hours.

Fri, 23 Jun 2023 16:06:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/shp/ot/post-professional/multitiered-approach-to-trauma
Professional Studies, Master of

As traditional fields and disciplines continue to overlap, there is a growing demand for a workforce with knowledge in more than one area of study. As part of Saint Louis University's Master of Professional Studies, you will use applied research skills, evidence-based problem solving and the integration of theory and practice across two or more disciplines. By choosing a primary area of study paired with a secondary area of focus, you can diversify your education and gain a unique combination of skills to meet today’s workplace demands.

Whether you’re looking to advance into a leadership role in your current organization or pursue a graduate degree before entering the workforce, SLU's Master of Professional Studies can be tailored to build the experience you need for your specific career path. 

Faculty

As a student in the School for Professional Studies at Saint Louis University, you’ll learn from exceptional faculty who are leading experts in their fields. They bring real-world knowledge to the classroom and are dedicated to your professional success. Learn more on our faculty page.

Curriculum Overview

Unlike traditional graduate programs that focus on a single discipline, SLU's multi-disciplinary Master of Professional Studies program allows you to choose from a range of professionally focused concentrations. You will choose a primary and secondary area of concentration in consultation with your academic coach. 

Examples of the Master of Professional Studies structure include (but are not limited to) concentrations in the following areas: 

The two standard courses include ORLD 5050 Ethical, Evidence-Based Decision Making and AA 5221 Applied Analytics & Methods I. The standard capstone includes a series of three one-credit master’s research project coursework, where you will be expected to demonstrate competencies from both your primary and secondary concentration.

Careers

SLU's multi-disciplinary Master of Professional Studies structure prioritizes applied research skills, ethical evidence-based problem solving, and the integration of theory and practice across two or more disciplines. By engaging a multi-disciplinary approach to problem-solving, students will develop their capacity to identify, delineate and research key problems, building an empowered learning approach to enhance their professional careers.

Tuition

Tuition Cost Per Credit
Graduate Degrees and Post-Baccalaureate Certificates $790

Additional charges may apply. Other resources are listed below:

Net Price Calculator

Information on Tuition and Fees

Miscellaneous Fees

Information on Summer Tuition

Scholarships and Financial Aid

For priority consideration for graduate assistantship, apply by Feb. 1. 

For more information, visit the student financial services office online at https://www.slu.edu/financial-aid/index.php.

Admission Requirements

  • Completed application​
  • Undergraduate degree (most successful applicants have an undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or better)
  • Official transcript from a degree-granting institution
  • Statement of purpose (about 500 words)
  • Resume or curriculum vitae
  • External reference recommendations (encouraged but not required)

Upon admission, a new online student* must successfully complete a virtual meeting with their academic coach to be enrolled in first term coursework.

Requirements for International Students

All admission policies and requirements for domestic students apply to international students along with the following:

  • Applicants must demonstrate English language proficiency. Some examples of demonstrated English language proficiency include minimum score requirements for the following standardized tests: 
    • Paper-based TOEFL: 550 
    • Internet-based TOEFL: 80 
    • IELTS: 6.5
    • PTE: 54

• Academic records, in English translation, of students who have undertaken postsecondary studies outside the United States must include the courses taken and/or lectures attended, practical laboratory work, the maximum and minimum grades attainable, the grades earned or the results of all end-of-term examinations, and any honors or degrees received. WES and ECE transcripts are accepted.

Apply Now

Program Requirements

ORLD 5050 Ethical, Evidence-Based Decision Making 3
AA 5221 Applied Analytics & Methods I 3
Total Credits 33

Continuation Standards

Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.00 in all graduate/professional courses.

Roadmaps are recommended semester-by-semester plans of study for programs and assume full-time enrollment unless otherwise noted.  

Courses and milestones designated as critical (marked with !) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation. Transfer credit may change the roadmap.

This roadmap should not be used in the place of regular academic advising appointments. All students are encouraged to meet with their advisor/mentor each semester. Requirements, course availability and sequencing are subject to change.

100% Online Roadmap 

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Fall
 
3
 
ORLD 5050 Ethical, Evidence-Based Decision Making 3
  Credits 6
Spring
 
3
 
3
  Credits 6
Year Two
Fall
 
3
 
3
1
  Credits 7
Spring
 
AA 5221 Applied Analytics & Methods I 3
 
3
1
  Credits 7
Year Three
Fall
 
3
 
3
1
  Credits 7
  Total Credits 33

Hybrid Roadmap - MPS Information Systems Leadership

Plan of Study Grid
Year One
Fall
 
IS 5000 Enterprise Architecture and Systems Infrastructure 3
 
IS 5100 Information Systems Strategy and Management 3
IS 5200 Software Development 3
  Credits 9
Spring
 
AA 5221 Applied Analytics & Methods I 3
IS 5400 Managing a Secure Enterprise 3
 
ORLD 5050 Ethical, Evidence-Based Decision Making 3
  Credits 9
Year Two
Fall
 
ORLD 5010 Contemporary Organizational Leadership 3
 
ORLD 5350 Team Leadership 3
IS 5961 Masters Research Project I 1
  Credits 7
Spring
 
ORLD 5100 Prof Leadership Development 3
IS 5962 Masters Research Project II 1
 
ORLD 5650 Future-Focused Leadership 3
IS 5963 Masters Research Project III 1
  Credits 8
  Total Credits 33
Fri, 27 Oct 2023 05:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.slu.edu/professional-studies/programs/professional-studies-mps.php
A science-based approach for LGUs No result found, try new keyword!The importance of transparency, integrity, and accountability in governance emphasizes the need for local government units (LGUs) to adopt a science-based and data-driven approach (SBDDA ... Wed, 20 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Our Approach

The role of education as a pathway to opportunity in our country has never been more critical, or more scrutinized. The evidence is clear: Poverty, and the chaos it often brings to a family’s daily life, severely constricts a child’s ability to engage and succeed in school. How can we make sure our schools are up to the challenge of providing a 21st-century education for all our children — not just some? And what will it take to get there?

Everyone is looking for policy solutions that work.

City Connects works.

In an era of scarce resources and rising need, it’s essential to ensure that existing programs and services are fully utilized and well deployed. City Connects delivers that assurance, creating a systematic approach to addressing the needs of all students.

Even in high-need districts, resources and enrichment opportunities for children are present, both in schools and in the larger community. The challenge is accessing them, amid what can be a cacophonous maze for overtaxed teachers, administrators, or families. At City Connects schools, the City Connects Coordinator is the connecting point, navigating the maze to identify and target the right student to the right service, creating an optimized system of student support.

In 2019-20, City Connects has linked more than 25,000 students to 220,000 services and enrichment opportunities across its sites, ranging from tutoring to athletic programs.

And what’s more, we have the evidence to show that these interventions are working — for students, teachers, schools, and families.

Wed, 19 Jan 2022 15:45:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/lynch-school/sites/city-connects/approach-impact.html
Alani Asis

Alani Asis is a Personal Finance Reviews Fellow who covers life, automotive, and homeowners insurance. Prior to Insider, Alani was a Mortgage Support Specialist and a personal finance freelance writer based in Hawai'i. You can reach her via email at aasis@insider.com or through Twitter @AlaniAsis. 

Sun, 16 Jan 2022 13:04:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://www.businessinsider.com/author/alani-asis




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