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DELL-EMC Implementation availability
Killexams : DELL-EMC Implementation availability - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DES-DD23 Search results Killexams : DELL-EMC Implementation availability - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/DES-DD23 https://killexams.com/exam_list/DELL-EMC Killexams : Dell Plans To Buy EMC For $67 Billion: Coverage Of The Biggest Tech Deal Ever

Dell's announcement to buy storage giant EMC $67 billion solidifies the largest deal in the history of the IT business, creating in its wake a channel behemoth set to dominate the enterprise IT market.

Dell-EMC

Dell's announcement to buy storage giant EMC for $67 billion solidifies the largest deal in the history of the IT business, creating a channel behemoth set to dominate the enterprise IT market. The landmark deal transforms the onetime PC maker, created in Dell founder and CEO Michael Dell's dorm room, into a $90 billion computing force. The deal will enable Dell, the No. 2 server maker, to leverage EMC's dominance in the storage market, setting up the Round Rock, Texas-based company to take on rivals Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Cisco and Oracle as well as upstarts such as Nutanix.

The deal, in which Dell will offer EMC shareholders $33.15 per share, includes EMC subsidiary VMware as a tracking stock that amounts to about $9 per share. Partners are calling the EMC acquisition by Dell a "dream deal," with the belief that it will energize sales for partners, up data center IQs and boost bottom lines.

CRN is covering the deal from all sides. Check here for the latest news surrounding this blockbuster, as well as analysis and exclusive takes from Dell and EMC's biggest competitors.

News & Analysis

Dell-EMC

The Competition

Sun, 25 Jul 2021 12:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/news/dell-buys-emc-for-67-billion.htm
Killexams : CRN's Coverage Of Dell EMC World 2016

Power At Every Position: Dell Fills Exec Lineup With Seasoned Channel, Sales Veterans
The new Dell Technologies intends to lean heavily on EMC's channel experts. Here's a rundown of the executives leading Dell Technologies' sales and channel operations.

Dell Adds Systems Integrators To Its IoT Solutions Partner Program
Systems integrators have a 'unique vertical experience,' says a Dell IoT executive, and have expertise in manufacturing, utilities and industrial automation.

Dell EMC Launches First Midmarket-Focused VMAX Solution At Sub-$100K Price Point
The new 250F is 'VMAX for everyone,' says Dell EMC Vice President of Marketing Peter Smails, delivering enterprise capabilities to a new market of midsize customers.

Partners: Cisco And Dell EMC Will 'Inevitably' Hit VCE Architecture And Sales Crossroads
Although Cisco and Dell are playing nice around VCE for now, partners say architectural differences and sales incentives will inevitably lead to a break up.

6 Fun Facts About Dell Technologies You Might Not Know
Ahead of the first Dell EMC World, here are six fun facts about Dell Technologies, including its environmental efforts, sports sponsorships and its high profile in television and movies.

Mon, 17 Oct 2016 02:22:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.crn.com/channel-programs/dell-emc-world-2016.htm
Killexams : Critical vulnerability in server management solution MegaRAC BMC

A critical vulnerability in MegaRAC BMC allows unauthorized attackers to execute code on servers. MegaRAC BMC is one of the world’s most popular server management solutions.

On-premises datacenter operators and cloud providers use MegaRAC BMC to remotely manage servers. The technology is incorporated into systems from manufacturers such as Dell EMC, HPE, Lenovo and AMD.

In August 2022, security firm Eclypsium discovered three vulnerabilities in the firmware of MegaRAC BMC. The vulnerabilities were recently disclosed.

Critical vulnerability

The most severe issue (CVE-2022-40259) received a CVSS score of 9.9. The vulnerability allows attackers to execute code by sending a Redfish API call to systems running MegaRAC BMC firmware.

Redfish is an API standard for server management. Most infrastructure vendors support the standard. The firmware of MegaRAC BMC contains an implementation of Redfish. A flaw in the implementation allows attackers to send and execute code on a system through a Redfish API call.

Redfish API calls aren’t accepted by every sender. An attacker needs an account with low-level privileges to exploit the vulnerability.

Vulnerabilities with such a condition rarely receive CVSS scores of 9.9, but this is an exceptional case. MegaRAC BMC is an industry standard for server management. The firmware is incorporated into a huge number of hardware systems.

No simple patch

MegaRAC BMC is developed by American Megatrends. Over the past few months, the organization collaborated with Eclypsium to mitigate the impact of the vulnerability.

As MegaRAC BMC is incorporated into various hardware systems and software solutions, it’s difficult to resolve the vulnerability with a single patch.

According to Eclypsium, it’s currently unknown whether the vulnerability is being actively exploited by cybercriminals. The security company advised organizations to take several precautions.

Admin accounts and usernames

In addition to the problem in Redfish, Eclypsium discovered two vulnerabilities with lower CVSS scores. First, MegaRAC BMC uses a default admin account with a default password, allowing attackers to gain access to high privileges (CVE-2022-40242).

Second, a flaw in MegaRAC BMC’s password recovery process allows attackers to check whether a username is in use, which can help deduct the usernames of accounts (CVE-2022-2827).

Tip: OT data center security should be much higher on the agenda

Mon, 05 Dec 2022 04:55:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.techzine.eu/news/security/96298/critical-vulnerability-in-server-management-solution-megarac-bmc/
Killexams : Dell’s existing PowerEdge servers make HPC, AI and quantum computing available to companies of all sizes

Dell Technologies Inc. said today it’s expanding its portfolio of high-performance computing server lineup with a range of new systems that combine the latest silicon hardware from Nvidia Corp. and Intel Corp.

The new Dell PowerEdge servers were designed in collaboration with those chipmakers and will enable businesses of any size to perform workloads such as artificial intelligence model training, HPC modeling and simulations, core-to-edge inferencing and data visualization, the company said.

They’re led by the PowerEdge XE9680, which Dell said is its first-ever high-performance server fitted with eight graphics processing units. Customers can choose from Nvidia’s H100 Tensor Core GPUs or A100 Tensor Core GPUs, combined with two upcoming 4th generation Intel Xeon Scalable central processing units and Dell’s new Smart Cooling technology to deliver unrivaled performance for AI workloads, Dell says.

One step down is the PowerEdge XE9640, a 2U performance optimized server equipped with four of Intel’s new Data Center GPU Max Series processors and two Intel Xeon Scalable CPUs. According to Dell, the PowerEdge XE9640 employs fully direct liquid cooling to reduce energy costs by up to 3.1 times, while achieving greater rack density.

Finally, there’s the PowerEdge XE8640, which boasts air-cooled 4U performance with four of Nvidia’s H100 or A100 GPUs, two Intel Xeon Scalable processors and Nvidia NVLink technology. All three servers are set to become globally available in the first half of 2023.

Today’s launch is all about making HPC and AI more accessible, Dell said. To that end, its HPC PowerEdge servers are being made available today in the U.S. through Dell Apex, a pay-as-you-go infrastructure offering that combines on-premises, pay-per-use infrastructure servers and storage with cloud-based managed resources.

The company reckons this could well prove to be a game changer, enabling organizations of any size to run large-scale, compute-intensive HPC workloads on an as-a-service basis through a fully managed subscription-based experience. Under the Apex High Performance Computing offering, Dell says, customers can access everything they need to run HPC workloads, including an HPC cluster manager, container orchestrator, workload manager and the underlying hardware, optimized for specific workloads such as life sciences or manufacturing. Customers also benefit from flexible capacity options too, with one-, three- and five-year subscriptions available.

Rajesh Pohani, vice president of portfolio and product management for PowerEdge, HPC and Core Compute at Dell, predicted that there will be a lot of demand for the Apex High Performance Computing service.

“As compute innovation accelerates to keep pace with demand, customers are looking to upgrade their IT environments and harness advanced computing capabilities to speed discovery and insights,” said Rajesh Pohani, vice president of portfolio and product management for PowerEdge, HPC and Core Compute at Dell Technologies. “New Dell Technologies servers and solutions supply businesses of all sizes access to technologies once only accessible for the world’s largest research institutions and government agencies, allowing them to tackle HPC, ease AI adoption and propel their businesses forward.”

In addition, Dell is looking to support accelerated compute that takes advantage of quantum technology. The new Dell Quantum Computing Solution, also available today in the U.S. and Canada, is aimed at complex workloads such as chemistry and materials simulation, natural language processing and machine learning. It’s based on Dell’s classic quantum simulator built on PowerEdge servers, which integrates with cloud-based quantum computing services from IonQ Inc., making it possible for companies to run quantum workloads either on-premises or in the cloud.

Peter Rutten, an analyst as International Data Corp., said accelerated compute technology is essential to help businesses get more value from the massive amounts of data they generate each day. “Dell Technologies is seizing the opportunity with new accelerated Dell PowerEdge servers and solutions, serving customer’s needs for tackling demanding workloads.”

Image: Rawpixel/Freepik

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Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:14:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://siliconangle.com/2022/11/14/dells-newest-poweredge-servers-make-hpc-ai-quantum-computing-available-companies-sizes/
Killexams : Dell EMC division

Campaign to Create Tomorrow

Learn more about The Ottawa Hospital's $500-million fundraising campaign, the largest in our city’s history, which will transform the future of healthcare in Ottawa.

Tue, 22 Nov 2022 06:49:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://obj.ca/company/dell-emc-division/
Killexams : Xiaomi Surprises With New Phone And Router Launch Featuring Qualcomm Wi-Fi 7 Chipsets

It looks like the Wi-Fi 7 race of 2023 is starting a little earlier than initially anticipated with Xiaomi’s latest smartphone and router launch. Over the weekend, Xiaomi announced the new Xiaomi Mi13 series of phones, featuring the 13, 13 Limited Edition, and 13 Pro. In addition to those phones, Xiaomi also launched its 10 Gigabit Router, designed to be paired with the latest Xiaomi phones to deliver the best connectivity experience. Because Xiaomi is launching these devices in China only, there hasn’t been much fanfare from Xiaomi’s English-language social accounts, so all the information comes from Xiaomi’s own Chinese-language pages.

Chinese OEMs have habitually launched their flagship phones for the next year in December and January to get as many devices produced and into the channel before the Lunar New Year, which usually begins at the end of January or early February. This year, it kicks off on January 22, after which factories will be closed for weeks for the holiday, and that’s why we’re seeing so many Chinese OEMs launching products this month.

The Xiaomi 13 Pro

Looking in more detail at the Xiaomi 13 series, both the base model and 13 Limited Edition devices embody Xiaomi’s new design and feature Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 platform, which Qualcomm announced only last month at the Snapdragon Tech Summit. But Chinese OEMs move fast and have had access to the Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 for a while, so we’ve already seen three different OEMs launch including Xiaomi, Oppo and iQoo.

The Pro model is always one that Xiaomi likes to pack with the latest technologies. This year was no different, because the Pro boasts the most advanced camera, display, processing, and connectivity in the lineup. The Xiaomi 13 Pro features a 6.73” 521 PPI display (3200 x 1440) vs. the 13’s 2400 x 1080 resolution, which explains the $150 price difference (converted from yuan). The larger frame of the 13 Pro also enables a larger battery capacity of 4820 mAh vs. the base 13’s capacity of 4500, which also lends to a faster wired charging speed of 120 watts.

Naturally, the 13 Pro also has better cameras: It uses a Sony IMX989 1-inch camera sensor, while the standard Xiaomi 13 has a Sony IMX800 sensor; these differences also show across the optical zoom and wide-angle lenses, which all have higher-resolution sensors on the Pro. Both camera systems leverage Xiaomi’s partnership with Leica to tune and optimize the camera’s performance (and carry Leica branding).

Both devices support 5G, but one notable connectivity difference is that the Xiaomi 13 Pro features Qualcomm’s latest Wi-Fi 7 chipset, the FastConnect 7800. This makes it the first smartphone on the market with Wi-Fi 7. Remember that Wi-Fi 7 hasn’t officially been ratified as a standard yet, so this is not yet officially a Wi-Fi 7 implementation even though the chipset is expected to be conformant to the Wi-Fi Alliance standard. Xiaomi was thoughtful about this feature and planned a router with a Wi-Fi 7 chipset to pair with the Pro 13 phone. The Xiaomi 13 Pro is available on Xiaomi’s website for $750 (converted from yuan).

Xiaomi 10 Gigabit Router

The Xiaomi 10 Gigabit router does exactly what the name says: It delivers 10 Gbps of total aggregate throughput across 2.4, 5.2, and 5.8 GHz bands. That’s different from other countries, where you’d see 2.4, 5.8, and 6 GHz. However, China plans to use the 6 GHz band for 5G cellular applications, so the anticipated 1200 MHz spectrum won’t be available in China for Wi-Fi 7. As such, the 5.2 GHz band can deliver high throughput, offering 5.7 Gbps of the total 10 Gbps in that band.

The Xiaomi 10 Gigabit router features a 4x4 antenna configuration across all three spectrum bands. For wired networking, it has four 2.5 Gbps Ethernet ports and a single 10 Gbps adaptive port, which are all powered by Qualcomm’s latest Networking Pro Series 1220 platform. This also delivers Wi-Fi 7 capabilities, albeit unofficially given that this is a Wi-Fi 7 draft device. As I’ve covered in previous posts, the complete Wi-Fi Alliance standard for Wi-Fi 7 is expected to be certified later next year.

The Xiaomi 10 Gigabit router is available for sale on Xiaomi’s website for roughly $250 when converted to US dollars from yuan, which makes it very competitively priced against high-end Wi-Fi 6 devices.

Wrapping up

Xiaomi has a reputation for building devices that take advantage of the latest chipsets, sensors, and display technologies. The Chinese smartphone market is cutthroat, so it seems clear that Xiaomi is looking to get a leg up on its competitors with the new Xiaomi 13 and 13 Pro smartphones and the 10 Gigabit router.

What is also interesting is that these new devices from Xiaomi are the first to launch both Qualcomm’s new Wi-Fi 7 chipset for routers and smartphones—the first end-to-end Wi-Fi 7 implementation we’ve seen. Xiaomi seems to be holding back announcing the Wi-Fi 7 leadership here, even though many of its customers will notice considerable performance improvements by pairing the new 13 Pro phone with the 10 Gigabit router. While it is unfortunate that neither of these devices will ever reach the US market, I am hopeful that consumers in Europe and Asia can get their hands on these devices reasonably soon after the Chinese market.

Moor Insights & Strategy, like all research and tech industry analyst firms, provides or has provided paid services to technology companies. These services include research, analysis, advising, consulting, benchmarking, acquisition matchmaking, and speaking sponsorships. The company has had or currently has paid business relationships with 8×8, Accenture, A10 Networks, Advanced Micro Devices, Amazon, Amazon Web Services, Ambient Scientific, Anuta Networks, Applied Brain Research, Applied Micro, Apstra, Arm, Aruba Networks (now HPE), Atom Computing, AT&T, Aura, Automation Anywhere, AWS, A-10 Strategies, Bitfusion, Blaize, Box, Broadcom, , C3.AI, Calix, Campfire, Cisco Systems, Clear Software, Cloudera, Clumio, Cognitive Systems, CompuCom, Cradlepoint, CyberArk, Dell, Dell EMC, Dell Technologies, Diablo Technologies, Dialogue Group, Digital Optics, Dreamium Labs, D-Wave, Echelon, Ericsson, Extreme Networks, Five9, Flex, Foundries.io, Foxconn, Frame (now VMware), Fujitsu, Gen Z Consortium, Glue Networks, GlobalFoundries, Revolve (now Google), Google Cloud, Graphcore, Groq, Hiregenics, Hotwire Global, HP Inc., Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Honeywell, Huawei Technologies, IBM, Infinidat, Infosys, Inseego, IonQ, IonVR, Inseego, Infosys, Infiot, Intel, Interdigital, Jabil Circuit, Keysight, Konica Minolta, Lattice Semiconductor, Lenovo, Linux Foundation, Lightbits Labs, LogicMonitor, Luminar, MapBox, Marvell Technology, Mavenir, Marseille Inc, Mayfair Equity, Meraki (Cisco), Merck KGaA, Mesophere, Micron Technology, Microsoft, MiTEL, Mojo Networks, MongoDB, National Instruments, Neat, NetApp, Nightwatch, NOKIA (Alcatel-Lucent), Nortek, Novumind, NVIDIA, Nutanix, Nuvia (now Qualcomm), onsemi, ONUG, OpenStack Foundation, Oracle, Palo Alto Networks, Panasas, Peraso, Pexip, Pixelworks, Plume Design, PlusAI, Poly (formerly Plantronics), Portworx, Pure Storage, Qualcomm, Quantinuum, Rackspace, Rambus, Rayvolt E-Bikes, Red Hat, Renesas, Residio, Samsung Electronics, Samsung Semi, SAP, SAS, Scale Computing, Schneider Electric, SiFive, Silver Peak (now Aruba-HPE), SkyWorks, SONY Optical Storage, Splunk, Springpath (now Cisco), Spirent, Splunk, Sprint (now T-Mobile), Stratus Technologies, Symantec, Synaptics, Syniverse, Synopsys, Tanium, Telesign,TE Connectivity, TensTorrent, Tobii Technology, Teradata,T-Mobile, Treasure Data, Twitter, Unity Technologies, UiPath, Verizon Communications, VAST Data, Ventana Micro Systems, Vidyo, VMware, Wave Computing, Wellsmith, Xilinx, Zayo, Zebra, Zededa, Zendesk, Zoho, Zoom, and Zscaler. Moor Insights & Strategy founder, CEO, and Chief Analyst Patrick Moorhead is an investor in dMY Technology Group Inc. VI, Dreamium Labs, Groq, Luminar Technologies, MemryX, and Movandi.

Tue, 13 Dec 2022 05:12:00 -0600 Anshel Sag en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/moorinsights/2022/12/13/xiaomi-surprises-with-new-phone-and-router-launch-featuring-qualcomm-wi-fi-7-chipsets/
Killexams : The best laptop deals in December 2022

There are considerably fewer laptop deals available this week following the barrage of bargains during Black Friday. That said, some of these offers are still available - and new savings are found all time - so you can find all the latest ones right here. We've just added some new additions found in many end-of-year sales at major retailers and manufacturers.

Whether you've got $100 or $1,000 to spend on a cheap Chromebook, a budget-friendly mid-range machine or a powerful ultrabook, you can find a bargain just below.

Many of the laptops listed here also come fully recommended by TechRadar's expert reviewers who assembled our best laptops guide, too, so know you're getting a quality device.

If you take a look at this week's best laptop deals and find you need a few more specific options, you can check out more Chromebook deals for cheap devices running the Chrome OS. 

We've also got an eye on all the latest MacBook deals for those after a discounted Apple device. 

And for the gamers, you'd be better suited over on our guide to this week's cheap gaming laptop deals as the models on this page are built with browsing, work and general use in mind - not gaming.

Laptop deal of the week

Laptop deals under $200

Laptop deals from $200 to $400

Laptop deals from $400 to $600

Laptop deals from $600 to $800

Laptop deals over $800

This week's best store-wide laptop sales

Laptop deals: our buying advice

When you start looking for laptop deals it can be overwhelming if you're not sure where to start. You may have an idea of how much you want to spend, what you need the device for or what key features you want included. But what else should you consider before hitting that buy button to be sure you've got the best deal possible?

Here's a few words of advice from us based on our experience hunting down the best laptop deals.

How much should I spend on a laptop?

The answer to this really comes down to what you need the laptop to do. 

If you just need a very basic device to check your emails, do a bit of light admin and generally browse the internet, then you should be find to spend anywhere less than $300 on a laptop. Devices in this price range usually come with lower-end components, but they will handle these light tasks without issue and have a good amount of in-built storage for all your key files and applications.

If it's a device for a youngster for their school work, you can go even cheaper at $200 or less. Look out for a Chromebook in particular. These run the Chrome OS which is less demanding that Windows, plus, they often boast the best battery life so are good if you need a device that lasts all day without the need for charging.

For those after a general all-purpose device with a bit more power behind it, you're looking at spending around $400 - $600. Laptops in this range come with more powerful processors and more RAM to supply you a considerable performance boost over cheaper models that run faster and load programs quicker. Look for at least an Intel i5 / AMD Ryzen 5 and 8GB of RAM, here. If you're at the upper end of that bracket, it's worth paying extra to get 16GB RAM if you can to dramatically Boost the device's multitasking capabilities and overall performance.

Next, is the high-end devices of $600 or more. Here is where you can find premium laptops from the likes of HP, Dell and Apple. These are good for users with more demanding workloads, including video and photo editing, as well as more intensive tasks. Machines like the MacBook Air and XPS 13 are big investments, but will usually last you a long time compared to cheaper devices so could work out as better value for money in the end, too.

Our weekly guide to the best laptop deals features a range of devices to suit every budget from $100 to $1,000, so you should be able to find something that fits your specific needs while also sticking to your chosen price range.

How do you decide what's a good laptop deal?

That comes down to what's included in the price. As we've been tracking all the best laptop deals for a number of years now, we have a solid idea of what level of performance and components you can get for your money. Using that as a baseline, we can pick out the treasures from the trash.

We also take into consideration what you might need a laptop for based on the money you have to spend. So, if it's just a basic device for some light work, general browsing and media streaming, there's no point recommending a $1,000 laptop for that as it would be completely unnecessary. Instead, we look at devices between $100 - $300 that could handle those tasks and recommend some laptop deals accordingly.

However, if there's a particularly good reason to spend a little extra money (maybe for some extra performance-boosting RAM or a healthy storage upgrade) then we'll mention that too for your consideration. Sometimes it's worth that investment to better future-proof yourself and end up with a noticeably better device.

Thu, 08 Dec 2022 03:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.techradar.com/news/the-best-laptop-deals
Killexams : Almost a week after Black Friday, the Dell XPS 13 laptop is still $250 off
The Dell XPS 13, open on a table in front of a window.

It’s almost a week since Black Friday, but Dell is still selling the Dell XPS 13 with a $250 discount that lowers the massively popular laptop’s price to a more affordable $749 from its original price of $999. It’s one of the best offers from the Dell laptop deals during the shopping event, so don’t miss this chance to grab it. Once the Dell XPS 13 returns to its normal price, we’re not sure when’s the next opportunity to buy it for cheaper than usual, so hurry up and take advantage of this limited-quantity deal.

If you’re going to invest in a laptop, the Dell XPS 13 should be one of your top options because it’s been a mainstay in Digital Trends’ list of the best laptops. One of the primary reasons is because of its sleek design, including virtually no bezels surrounding its 13.4-inch Full HD+ screen with a 60Hz refresh rate. The laptop is just 0.55 inches thick and weighs only 2.59 pounds, so you won’t have any trouble bringing it with you as you move around the house, switch desks in the office, or commute to different places.

The Dell XPS 13 doesn’t just look good — it performs well, too, with its 12th-generation Intel Core i5 processor and integrated Intel Iris Xe Graphics. The laptop also features 8GB of RAM, which our laptop buying guide says is the sweet spot for most users. With these specifications, you’ll be able to multitask between several apps without worrying about crashes. The Dell XPS 13 also comes with Windows 11 Home pre-installed in its 512GB SSD, so it’s ready to roll as soon as you unbox it.

Don’t tell Dell, but it looks like the computer manufacturer forgot to turn off its laptop deals for Black Friday because the Dell XPS 13 is still available for $749. That’s $250 in savings from its original price of $999, but you need to act fast because the offer may disappear at any moment. The deal’s availability is limited, so we don’t expect it to still be around tomorrow — if you like this price for the Dell XPS 13, and you want to get the laptop before the chaos of the holiday season, now’s the time to buy it.

Editors' Recommendations

Wed, 30 Nov 2022 03:03:00 -0600 Aaron Mamiit en text/html https://www.digitaltrends.com/dtdeals/dell-xps-13-laptop-deal-dell-november-2022-still-available/
Killexams : IBM On Track To Achieve Quantum Advantage By 2026 Using Error Mitigation

Noise is currently quantum computing’s biggest challenge as well as its most significant limitation. IBM is working to reduce that noise in the next few years through various types of quantum error management until true quantum error correction (QEC) is attained.

Here is why reducing noise is so important. A quantum bit (qubit) is the basic unit of information for quantum computers, and the longer a qubit can maintain its quantum state, the more computational operations it can perform. Unfortunately, qubits are very sensitive to environmental noise, which can come from a quantum computer’s control electronics, wiring, cryogenics, other qubits, heat, and even external factors such as cosmic radiation. Noise is problematic because it can cause a qubit’s quantum state to collapse (a condition called decoherence) and thus create errors. An uncorrected error can cascade into an avalanche of errors and destroy an entire computation.

This type of noise originates at the atomic level, and even though it can't be completely eliminated, it can be managed.

Quantum advantage and noise

Despite media hype, there is no documented evidence that current quantum computers are more powerful than classical supercomputers. Even so, there is no question that quantum computers have an indisputable advantage. Most experts believe it's only a matter of time before quantum computing demonstrates its superiority compared to classical supercomputers. When that occurs, quantum computing will have achieved what is commonly referred to as “quantum advantage.”

IBM defines quantum advantage as a significant improvement in quantum algorithm runtime for practical cases over the best classical algorithm. Its blog further states that the algorithm needed to prove quantum advantage must have an efficient representation as quantum circuits, and there should be no classical algorithm capable of simulating those circuits efficiently.

But here’s the dilemma: For quantum computers to achieve quantum advantage, besides improving qubit coherence, gate fidelities, and speed of circuit execution, we must also significantly increase computational qubit counts. But upping the number of qubits also increases noise and qubit errors. Therefore, managing noise and qubit errors is critical to the long-term success of quantum computing.

Although error correction is common in classical computers and in certain types of memory hardware, we can’t use the same techniques in quantum computers because the laws of quantum mechanics make it impossible to clone unknown quantum states.

Quantum error correction (QEC) is a complex engineering and physics problem. And despite its importance and the number of years that have been invested thus far in the search for a solution, quantum error correction remains elusive and still appears to be many years away. Until full error correction becomes available, IBM is researching other error management solutions.

Quantum error management

The above IBM chart compares the exponential scaling of error-mitigated quantum circuits to the exponential scaling of classical computers. The crossover point is where quantum error mitigation becomes competitive with classical solutions.

IBM has a long history of error correction research, beginning with David DiVincenzo’s investigations in 1996. In 2015, it developed the first system to detect quantum bit flip and phase flip errors. Today, almost every corporate and academic quantum computing program has some form of error correction research in progress because of the importance of quantum error correction.

IBM currently looks at quantum error management through the lens of three methods: error suppression, error mitigation, and error correction. Setting aside error correction for the moment, let’s consider the other two approaches.

Error suppression is one of the earliest and most basic methods of handling errors. It typically modifies a circuit, uses pulses of energy to keep a qubit in its quantum state longer, or directs pulses at idle qubits to undo any unwanted effects caused by neighboring qubits. These types of error suppression are known as dynamic decoupling.

Error mitigation is the method that IBM believes will bridge the gap between today’s error-prone hardware and tomorrow’s fault-tolerant quantum computers. Error mitigation’s interim purpose is to enable early achievement of quantum advantage.

IBM has done more continuous error mitigation research than any other institution. Through that work, IBM has developed multiple approaches to error mitigation, including probabilistic error cancellation (PEC) and zero-noise extrapolation (ZNE).

  • PEC functions much like noise-canceling headsets where noise is extracted and analyzed, then inverted before being mixed with the original noise signal to cancel it out. One significant difference for PEC is that, rather than using single samples as in audio noise-canceling algorithms, PEC uses averages calculated from a collection of circuits.
  • ZNE reduces noise in a quantum circuit by running the quantum program at different noise levels, then extrapolating the computation to determine an estimated value at a zero-noise level.

Effective quantum error correction would eliminate almost all noise-related errors. It is worth noting that QEC exponentially suppresses errors with increasing code size. At any finite code size, errors will always be present. For optimum results, it will be important to pick a code size that suppresses errors just enough for the target application.

But until QEC becomes available, it appears that quantum error mitigation provides the fastest path to quantum advantage.

Dialable error reduction

IBM recently announced the integration of error suppression and error mitigation into Qiskit Runtime primitives Sampler and Estimator. As beta features, these allow a user to trade speed for fewer errors. IBM's roadmap projects the final release of these features in 2025.

There is overhead associated with compiling, executing, and classical post-processing of error mitigation techniques. The amount of overhead varies depending on the type of error mitigation used. IBM introduced a new simplified option for the primitives called a “resilience level” that allows users to dial in the cost/accuracy tradeoff needed for their work. Sampler and Estimator will automatically apply dynamical decoupling error suppression to circuits at optimization levels 1 through 3. Resilience 0 offers no error mitigation, Resilience 1 is measurement error mitigation, Resilience 2 provides biased error mitigation (via ZNE), and Resilience 3 enables unbiased estimators (via PEC).

Error mitigation will be available on all cloud-accessible IBM systems. As the resilience number increases, so does the cost. Resilience 3 produces the fewest errors but could require 100,000X more computation time.

Dr. Blake Johnson, IBM Quantum Platform Lead, explained the rationale for IBM’s implementation of this option for error mitigation services.

“We have some very advanced users that want to do everything themselves,” Dr. Johnson said. “They don't want us touching their circuits. That’s fine with us, so we make that possible. But we are seeing more and more users who look at a quantum computer like you would look at a toaster. They don’t understand how it works. They just want to push a button and make the right thing happen. So, we decided to enable certain things as defaults if it doesn’t have a sampling overhead and if there isn’t an additional cost to run it.”

Quantum error correction

Thanks to error correction research conducted by the entire quantum computing community, significant progress has been made on QEC over the past decade. Even so, it is likely that years of more research will be required to find a workable solution.

One of the early challenges of quantum error correction was determining if an error had been made without destroying a qubit's quantum state by measuring it. In 1995, Peter Shor developed a breakthrough solution to circumvent the problem. Rather than storing the quantum state in a single qubit, Shor’s system encoded quantum information in a logical qubit distributed across nine physical qubits. The scheme enabled errors to be detected by monitoring the system's parity rather than destroying the quantum state with direct measurements.

IBM is currently investigating many approaches to quantum error correction, including some similar to Shor’s code. This class of error correction code is called quantum Low-Density Parity Check (qLDPC). LDPC is not new. It is used in many classical error correction applications, such as Wi-Fi and 5G.

According to IBM, qLDPC offers the following advantages:

  • Only a few physical qubits are needed for each logical qubit, rather than the hundreds that are needed for 2-D surface code.
  • Only a limited number of qubits are exposed if a faulty operation occurs.

The research opportunities and diverse methods for quantum error correction are too numerous to cover here, but having many options is a good problem to have. If a fault-tolerant quantum computer is ever to be realized, we must find a solution for error correction, and the more options we have, the better our chances.

IBM’s quantum roadmap reflects the complexity of the problem. It shows an error correction solution becoming available sometime beyond 2026. Indeed, it will likely take several years beyond that.

Wrapping up

As quantum hardware continues to improve, there is a high probability that quantum error mitigation, as implemented by IBM's roadmap, will facilitate the early achievement of quantum advantage. Presently, error mitigation has an exponential runtime influenced by how many qubits are needed and the circuit depth. But improvements in speed, qubit fidelity, and error mitigation methods are expected to considerably reduce that overhead.

It is IBM's goal for error mitigation to provide a continuous development path to error-correction. Once QEC is attained, it will enable us to build fault-tolerant quantum machines running millions of qubits in a quantum-centric supercomputing environment. These machines will have the ability to simulate large many-body systems, optimize complex supply chain logistics, create new drugs and materials, model and react to sophisticated financial market behavior, and much more.

Fault-tolerant quantum computers will signal that a new era of quantum-centric scientific investigation has arrived. And with that new capability will come the potential to responsibly change the world.

Analyst notes

  1. Despite media hype about the power of quantum computers, it has yet to be demonstrated that quantum has a clear computational superiority over classical supercomputers.
  2. Quantinuum recently published two important QEC proofs-of-concept. Its researchers developed a logical entangling circuit with higher fidelity than its physical counterparts. Researchers also entangled two logical qubit gates in a fully fault-tolerant manner.
  3. IBM announced that dynamic circuits will also be available its systems along with error mitigation. Dynamic circuits are expected to play an important role in quantum Low-Density Parity Check (qLDPC) error correction codes.
  4. In preparation for quantum advantage, IBM began scaling up its processors with the recently announced 433 Osprey qubit processor. The Osprey has 3X more qubits than the current 127-qubit Eagle processor.
  5. In addition to IBM’s error suppression and error mitigation initiatives, these are the major highlights in IBM's quantum roadmap that provide a path to quantum advantage:
  • 2023 — Further scaling occurs with the release of the Condor processor, with 1121 qubits. Work also continues on initiatives to Boost system-wide speed and quality.
  • 2024 — IBM will begin to integrate and test key technologies that enable future scaling such as classical parallelization, couplers, multi-chip quantum processors, and quantum parallelization.
  • 2025 — Implementation of modular quantum hardware, new control electronics, and cryogenic infrastructure are the final near-term hardware pieces needed for attaining quantum advantage.
  • 2026 — IBM will have the capability of scaling up future systems to 10K–100K qubits. By then, it should also have significantly increased the system speed and quality. A mature implementation of quantum error mitigation will make it possible to attain quantum advantage. Significant advances in quantum error correction will also have been made.

Follow Paul Smith-Goodson on Twitter for current information and insights about Quantum, AI, Electromagnetics, and Space

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Moor Insights & Strategy founder, CEO, and Chief Analyst Patrick Moorhead is an investor in dMY Technology Group Inc. VI, Dreamium Labs, Groq, Luminar Technologies, MemryX, and Movand

Note: Moor Insights & Strategy writers and editors may have contributed to this article.

Wed, 07 Dec 2022 03:21:00 -0600 Paul Smith-Goodson en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/moorinsights/2022/12/07/ibm-on-track-to-achieve-quantum-advantage-by-2026-using-error-mitigation/
Killexams : The Best Dell Laptops for 2022

The Best Dell Laptop Deals This Week*

*Deals are selected by our commerce team

If you're shopping for a laptop, you have torrent of options to choose among, be it a thin mobile companion or a hefty, rugged notebook, with a vast range of options in between. Where even to start? Sometimes the easiest thing to do is to narrow down your options based on what you know. And sometimes that's a brand you've long used and trusted.

If you're familiar with Dell, you probably have some opinion regarding how reliable the company's products are, how its customer service works, and the general quality of the user experience that those products and services deliver. If you're brand-loyal, it's a reasonable way to whittle down your options, while still helping you zero in on a great product. Picking a brand you trust does half the deciding for you.

Whether you're after a fast laptop for crunching numbers at work, or a laptop for staying productive at home or on the go, there's a good chance that Dell has a model you've considered buying. The company has solid machines at all levels of the market. Read on for a breakdown of our current top tested Dell laptops in a variety of user categories, followed by a guide to Dell's various laptop lines. (There's a bunch!)

Dell Inspiron 16 Plus (7620)

Best Overall Mainstream Dell Laptop

Bottom Line:

Dell's latest Inspiron 16 Plus isn't a perfect desktop replacement, but it offers robust features at a reasonable price, with solid performance from its 12th Generation Intel H-series CPU and Nvidia RTX graphics.

PROS

  • Strong all-around performance for the price
  • GeForce RTX 3050 Ti GPU can handle routine graphics tasks
  • 1080p webcam
  • Long battery life

CONS

  • Dull design compared to more premium-feeling competitors
  • Middling display quality
  • No touch screen or OLED option
Read Our Dell Inspiron 16 Plus (7620) Review

Dell Inspiron 15 3000 (3511)

Best Dell Laptop for the Very Tightest Budgets

Bottom Line:

The Dell Inspiron 15 3000 (3511) excels as a budget laptop that can handle day-to-day tasks and some very light gaming, and it even comes with Windows 11—all for under $400.

PROS

  • Comes with Windows 11
  • Large 15-inch full HD display
  • Solid build
  • Affordable

CONS

  • No USB Type-C ports
  • Low maximum screen brightness
  • Weak speakers
Read Our Dell Inspiron 15 3000 (3511) Review

Dell XPS 13 (9315)

Best High-End Dell Ultraportable

Bottom Line:

The latest Dell XPS 13 maintains its classy ultraportable design, but going ever thinner brings some significant drawbacks, leaving this edition short of our typically lofty expectations.

PROS

  • Super-thin and light design with premium metal build
  • Efficient and quiet new "Alder Lake" CPUs
  • Sharp edge-to-edge 13.4-inch display

CONS

  • Unimpressive performance
  • No headphone jack (adapter included)
  • Mediocre 720p webcam
  • No OLED screen option
Read Our Dell XPS 13 (9315) Review

Dell Latitude 9430 2-in-1

Best High-End Dell Convertible

Bottom Line:

It's over three pounds and nearly 3,000 bucks, but Dell's Latitude 9430 2-in-1 is a first-class business convertible.

PROS

  • Bright, colorful touch screen
  • Solid array of ports
  • Available 4G or 5G LTE cellular connectivity
  • Long battery life
  • Above-average webcam and sound

CONS

  • Rather expensive
  • No OLED screen choice
  • A few ounces overweight
Read Our Dell Latitude 9430 2-in-1 Review

Dell XPS 15 OLED (9520)

Best High-End Dell Desktop Replacement

Bottom Line:

With the latest Intel processors and a stunning OLED touch screen, the latest Dell XPS 15 is as good as desktop replacement laptops get.

PROS

  • Lightning performance with Intel 12th Gen CPUs
  • Gorgeous 3.5K OLED touch display
  • All-day battery life
  • Comfortable keyboard and spacious touchpad
  • SD card slot

CONS

  • USB-C ports require adapters for many uses
  • GeForce RTX 3050 Ti GPU isn't a powerhouse
  • 720p webcam is a little disappointing
Read Our Dell XPS 15 OLED (9520) Review

Alienware x14

Best Thin Dell Gaming Laptop

Bottom Line:

The brand-new Alienware x14 joins the upper echelon of 14-inch gaming laptops, delivering a sound gaming experience and fast overall performance in a super-portable design.

PROS

  • Impressively fast Core i7 “Alder Lake” processor
  • RTX 3060 unit delivers a consistent 60fps-plus gaming experience
  • Compact design
  • Long-lasting battery
  • Wide range of connectivity, including three USB-C ports

CONS

  • Expensive
  • 14-inch screen size may be too small for some hardcore gamers
Read Our Alienware x14 Review

Dell XPS 17 (9720)

Best High-End Dell Desktop Replacement With a Giant Display

Bottom Line:

The updated 2022 Dell XPS 17 adds Intel’s latest 12th Gen "Alder Lake" CPUs to its winning design, amping up this already impressive laptop. It remains one of our top picks among 17-inchers.

PROS

  • Maintains earlier version's slim, classy design
  • Beautiful 4K touch-display option
  • Strong overall performance with new 12th Gen Intel CPU
  • Graphics options up to GeForce RTX 3060
  • Four Thunderbolt 4 ports

CONS

  • Pricey as configured
  • No OLED screen option
  • Subpar 720p webcam is disappointing for the price
  • USB-C ports only
Read Our Dell XPS 17 (9720) Review

Alienware m17 R5

Best Hardcore Dell Gaming Laptop

Bottom Line:

The Alienware m17 R5 is a powerhouse gaming laptop with the latest and greatest components and configuration options, keeping the brand's unique aesthetic while hitting new performance highs.

PROS

  • Standout style
  • Sky-high frame rates from our all-AMD test unit
  • Display options include 480Hz full HD and 120Hz 4K panels
  • Many configuration choices including Nvidia GPUs and satisfying Cherry MX mechanical keyboard
  • Impressive battery life

CONS

  • Bulky and heavy
  • Intel 12th Gen CPUs outpace our Ryzen chip in processing tasks
  • Full Speed mode is awfully loud with little performance gain
Read Our Alienware m17 R5 Review

Dell Chromebook 11 (3100)

Best Dell Laptop for Young Children

Bottom Line:

Designed to withstand the rigors of daily life in the classroom, at home, and in between, the Dell Chromebook 11 hits a trifecta: rugged, affordable, and great for kids.

PROS

  • Compact
  • Sturdy, kid-friendly design
  • Spill-resistant keyboard
  • Optional LTE
  • Plenty of USB ports
  • Reasonably priced accidental damage coverage

CONS

  • Poor Wi-Fi signal reception
  • Display limited to 1,366 by 768 resolution
  • No SD card reader
  • Clumsy touchpad
Read Our Dell Chromebook 11 (3100) Review

Dell Latitude 7420

Best Dell Enterprise Fleet Laptop

Bottom Line:

Highly customizable and sporting an attractive carbon-fiber chassis, the Dell Latitude 7420 is our new favorite ultraportable for businesses.

PROS

  • Excellent performance from 11th Generation Intel Core i7
  • Long battery life
  • Eminently configurable
  • Corporate chic styling with aluminum or carbon fiber
  • Optional LTE
  • Three-year warranty

CONS

  • Expensive as configured
  • Heavier and pricier than Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon
  • Occasional fan noise
Read Our Dell Latitude 7420 Review

Dell Precision 5560

Best Dell Mobile Workstation

Bottom Line:

The workstation sibling of the celebrated Dell XPS 15, the Precision 5560 is a slim, splendid-screened laptop that can handle all but the toughest professional apps.

PROS

  • Quite thin and light for a mobile workstation
  • Handsome high-res 16:10 touch screen
  • Stiff aluminum and magnesium build
  • Thunderbolt 4 ports, SD card slot included
  • Excellent multithreaded performance for a thin workstation

CONS

  • Expensive
  • Short on ports (USB-A and HDMI dongle included)
  • No OLED screen option
Read Our Dell Precision 5560 Review

Dell Latitude 7220 Rugged Extreme Tablet

Best Rugged Dell Laptop/Tablet

Bottom Line:

Dell's Latitude 7220 Rugged Extreme Tablet lives up to its name by laughing at drops, splashes, and temperatures that would blow the average slate to smithereens. It's ideal for first responders and factory floors.

PROS

  • Supremely sturdy construction.
  • Extra-bright display.
  • Comfortable keyboard cover.
  • Hot-swappable, long-life batteries.

CONS

  • Expensive and heavy.
  • No HDMI or Thunderbolt 3 port.
  • Glove-compatible touch screen and touchpad require extra pressure compared to civilian systems.
Read Our Dell Latitude 7220 Rugged Extreme Tablet Review

Buying Guide: The Best Dell Laptops for 2022

When you're looking at Dell's laptop product line, you'll want to concentrate on which of its six main families of laptop best meets your needs. The ones to familiarize yourself with are Inspiron, XPS, Alienware, G Series, Latitude, and Precision. You'll find both clamshell and 2-in-1 convertible entries in all of these families apart from the two gaming-oriented ones.

Inspiron: The Mainstream Choice

For use in home or school, Dell's Inspiron brand comprises consumer laptops of every stripe: power machines, inexpensive "just enough" machines, big displays, ultracompacts. Whether you're editing photos or managing your home finances, Inspiron's copious options fit both screen-size and budget needs for most buyers. These machines are mostly Windows models; if you want something a little less expensive for simple tasks and browsing online, consider Dell's Chromebooks, which put basic functionality into an affordable package that works great for kids and students.

Dell Inspiron 16 (2021)

(Credit: Molly Flores)

Dell breaks its Inspiron line into three gradations or levels: 3000, 5000, and 7000 series. As you go up that stack, you tend to see more premium features, and higher relative pricing. The number between the word "Inspiron" and the series number is typically the screen size of the laptop; an Inspiron 13 5000, for example, would be a 13-inch-screened laptop with middle-field characteristics.

XPS: The Power-User Class

The various guises of the Dell XPS 13 have been our "near-perfect" mainstream and power laptops for some time now. Refresh after refresh, Dell keeps tuning to keep this hardy machine on top. XPS signifies, on both the desktop and laptop side of the fence, a premium-design, fully decked-out machine that bridges demanding consumers and business users. It's Dell's line of power tools that are equally at home in a home office, a coffee shop, a conference room, or a high-stakes business meeting.

Dell XPS 13

(Credit: Zlata Ivleva)

XPS-class laptops also sometimes serve as guinea pigs for introducing futuristic features, such as the new XPS 13 Plus, which ditches a physical touchpad in favor of a haptic feedback mechanism integrated into the palm rest. These experiments aside, you won't find a lot of variety in the XPS laptop line in terms of screen size or stratification, just configurable versions of the 13-inch-screened XPS 13 and 15-inch XPS 15 as both clamshells and swiveling-screen 2-in-1s. The XPS 17, the biggest model, has a 17-inch screen and is only available in a clamshell form factor.

Alienware and G Series: Full-Spectrum Gaming

If gaming is more your style, Dell's Alienware brand delivers, if you're on the market for a serious, blinged-out gaming cruiser. The latest components combine with premium construction and design, earning Alienware a well-deserved reputation as an aspirational brand among PC gamers. The Alienware machines tend to be big, brawny models with heavy graphics firepower and prices to match, though the brand known for its classic Area-51m bruiser has made forays into some leaner machines with its m15 and m17 series models and the even leaner Alienware X-Series.

Alienware X15

(Credit: Molly Flores)

Dell also sells gaming laptops under its G Series brand, introduced in 2018. Before this new sub-brand's introduction, this aggressively priced, lower-end line was part of the Inspiron family. Dell split it out as its own animal, and now the G Series is aimed at mainstream and budget-constrained gamers, with more modest designs than the Alienwares and component loadouts that are humbler but still workable for the latest games.

Dell G Series Gaming Laptop

(Credit: Zlata Ivleva)

The G Series models hover above and below the $1,000 mark, while the Alienwares start north of that. Models in the G Series are gradated like the Inspirons, into G3, G5, and G7 classes, with the higher numbers indicating higher-grade builds and feature sets.

Latitude: The Umbrella for Business Machines

Then there's business. Dell's Latitude brand is the mainstay for its business laptops, competing with options from Lenovo (the ThinkPad T series) and HP (the various EliteBook lines). Latitude offers options for workers in the office or in the field, with a mix of thin-yet-powerful laptops and durable systems that can take a beating.

Like the Inspirons and the G Series, the Latitudes make use of the same 3000, 5000, and 7000 nomenclature, with the addition of a top-of-the-line 9000 series. The second number in the four-digit model number signifies the screen size. So a Dell Latitude 7390 is in the second-from-the-top of the four lines, with a 13.3-inch screen; a Latitude 9500 would be a top-grade machine with a 15.6-inch screen.

Dell Latitude 9420 2-in-1

(Credit: Molly Flores)

Beyond the "simply" durable units, the Latitude line is also home to a few costly, highly ruggedized models that are designed to be used in hostile environments: doused in water, clipped onto an ATV, exposed to cold and wind, and the like. These are branded under the Latitude Rugged Extreme moniker.

Precision: Workstation Laptops for Demanding Professionals

Mobile workstations are a breed of machines that share some traits with business models, but they stand apart for their Independent Software Vendor (ISV) certifications and, in some cases, specialized CPU and GPU options and support for highly precise error-correcting-code (ECC) memory. ISV certifications supply users of demanding professional business apps (in areas such as scientific computing, architecture, and engineering) assurances that the workstation will run up to snuff with a given application. Companies such as Adobe, Autodesk, Avid, Dassault Systemés, and Siemens tend to be the ISVs involved.  

Dell Precision 5560

(Credit: Molly Flores)

Dell's line of mobile workstations is its Precision line, which comprises both laptop and desktop models. On the laptop side, Precision makes use of the same 3000, 5000, and 7000 series lingo as the other lines, with the screen size indicated within the model number.

A workstation might make use of consumer- or business-grade Intel CPUs, but the mark of a high-end workstation is the presence of a mobile Intel Xeon CPU and a dedicated workstation-grade graphics processor from Nvidia (RTX A-series, formerly Quadro) or AMD (Radeon Pro, much less common). The latter are in contrast to their consumer-GPU counterparts (GeForce GTX/RTX and Radeon RX, respectively) and are designed specifically for the kind of heavy-duty calculations that ISV-class applications require. Dell also offers a few 2-in-1 models in the Precision line; convertible workstations are far less common than their consumer counterparts.


So, What Is the Best Dell Laptop to Buy?

There are plenty of solid Dell systems to choose from, but don't be overwhelmed by the options. We've combed through our many reviews and singled out the best Dell systems in multiple categories. For more (Dell and non-Dell) options, check out our favorite laptops overall (updated constantly), as well as our lists of the best Chromebooks, the best budget laptops, and the best gaming laptops.

Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:05:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.pcmag.com/picks/the-best-dell-laptops
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