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Foundation Certificate in Business Analysis
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Killexams : ISEB Certificate study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ISEB-BA1 Search results Killexams : ISEB Certificate study help - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/ISEB-BA1 https://killexams.com/exam_list/ISEB Killexams : Building a Successful Certification Program at Your Institution

In a world where competition for jobs, pay increases, and academic success continues to increase, certifications offer hope to candidates and educators.

Certification helps to build a skilled workforce that meets the needs of local employers and government tech initiatives. Certification strikes the right balance of academic excellence and real-world skills, giving students the confidence and motivation they need to succeed both in school and in a profitable career.

“According to Pearson VUE’s 2021 Value of Certification study, 69% of IT managers believe certification significantly increases an employee’s productivity,” said Ray Murray, of Vice President and General Manager, Certiport. “Certifications are a great way to help candidates get their foot in the door and be more productive in their future careers.”

Defining certification

A certification is any credential that an individual can earn or achieve that validates a level of knowledge or a skillset related to a specific subject or discipline. Certifications are credentials that stand in addition to, in support of, or independently from degrees and diplomas.

Value of certification

Certifications, as defined above, are often created or supported by industry-recognized businesses or organizations and are administered in controlled environments by authorized and independent agents. Validating technical skill and knowledge has benefits in both academic and workplace settings.

Key benefits of certification in academia

Candidates who earn certifications while in school reap benefits early, including:

  • Validation of knowledge
  • Enhanced academic performance
  • Improved reputation
  • Enhanced credibility
  • Increased confidence
  • Respect from peers

Studies validate the specific benefits listed above, demonstrating the value of certifications for candidates as well as academic institutions. According to the Florida CAPE Performance Report, certification provides tangible improvements in academic performance, including:

  • Higher grade point average for certified high school students: 3.12 vs 2.78 (4.0 scale)
  • Higher graduation rates for certified high school students: 97.5% vs 78.4%
  • Increased post-secondary enrollment: 84% vs 82%
  • Reduced dropout rates: 0.2% vs 1.0%
Latest posts by eSchool Media Contributors (see all)
Thu, 06 Oct 2022 22:15:00 -0500 Content Provided by Certiport en-US text/html https://www.eschoolnews.com/2022/10/07/building-a-successful-certification-program/
Killexams : Tips and Tools to Help Students Study, Take Notes, and Focus

With a new academic year rolling around, students of all ages will be looking for help and guidance with their work—and there are a wealth of options on mobile app stores and the web to help you succeed.

Here we've picked out some of the best apps and services across multiple categories, including time management, homework help, note-taking, and more. Put them together and you've got a comprehensive toolkit for making sure that this year is a good one.

No matter what your requirements, courses, or study habits are, there should be something here for you (or for the young student in your life). You might be surprised at just how much difference the right app can make.

Trello

Trello can adapt itself to whatever purpose you have in mind.

Courtesy of Trello

The main appeal of Trello is its versatility: You can adapt the simple card-based interface in whichever way you want—whether to keep track of individual homework assignments or to log multiple research strands in an essay—and the software will adapt accordingly.

You can assign categories and deadlines to cards, attach files to them, and drop in to-do lists. However you decide to use Trello, you're going to find it straightforward to get around the app with easy drag-and-drop operations and a ton of options and features.

Trello (freemium for web, Android, iOS)

Socratic

Get help from Socratic with just about any topic.

Courtesy of Socratic

Powered by Google's artificial intelligence engines, Socratic is here to answer any question on any topic, whether you need step-by-step math explanations, a quick overview of a historical event or work of literature, or details of a particular set of biological processes.

Sun, 09 Oct 2022 23:10:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.wired.com/story/tips-apps-help-students-study-notes-homework-help/
Killexams : Graduate Certificate in Professional Study

Give Your Teaching Career a Boost with a Professional Study Graduate Certificate

If you would like to advance your professional career by pursuing additional coursework beyond your degree, a Graduate Certificate of Professional Study within the field of education from Southern New Hampshire University can provide you with the opportunity to engage with a broad range of topics. Earning your graduate certificate is a great way to add to your teaching résumé while enhancing your understanding of important educational concepts and strategies.

This field-based certificate program, available through the SNHU Vermont Campus, is ideal for practicing educators seeking applied learning and professional development opportunities within the syllabu areas of curriculum, assessment and evaluation, education technology, learning and development, and teacher leadership.

Although this program is currently available in a limited number of districts within the state of Vermont, we encourage you to reach out to the SNHU Vermont Campus at info@snhuvt.org if you are interested in participating or learning more.

See Yourself Succeed with a Professional Study Graduate Certificate from SNHU

The field-based Professional Study Graduate Certificate program in education at SNHU allows you to choose from the following five subject areas: Curriculum, Assessment and Evaluation, Education Technology, Learning and Development, and Teacher Leadership. This is a 15-credit program, and you will select five three-credit courses to complete in accordance with your chosen topic.

As a private, nonprofit university, SNHU has one mission - to help you see yourself succeed. The benefits of enrolling in a field-based graduate program at SNHU include:

  • Convenience. Pursue your graduate degree or certificate where you work, and complete international field studies around your teaching schedule.
  • Supportive community. We have a deep understanding of how adults learn best, and we know all of our students personally. Our cohort model allows you to learn with colleagues.
  • Relevance. All course material and assignments apply directly to your classroom practice.
  • Affordability. It’s our mission to make higher education more accessible. That’s why, SNHU is one of the most affordable private, nonprofit universities in New Hampshire. 
  • Constructivist classrooms. Our instructors design the classroom experience so that it begins with your experiences and builds toward exceptional practice in a collaborative manner.

Careers & Outcomes

The Professional Study program is designed to help educators advance their careers without committing to a full master’s degree program. The goal of this program is to produce teachers who are prepared to impact their schools and their students in meaningful ways, both inside and outside of the classroom. Whether your goal is to develop new curriculum, become familiar with new teaching technology, or learn new leadership skills, SNHU can help you take the next step in your career.

Professional Study (Post-Master's Graduate Certificate)

In addition to the standard Professional Study Graduate Certificate in education program, SNHU also offers a Professional Study Post-Master's Graduate Certificate option. This program is similar to the standard graduate certificate version, but is designed for educators who have already earned their Master of Education. This program also features Curriculum, Assessment and Evaluation, Education Technology, Learning and Development, and Teacher Leadership as subject areas; however, many of the courses within the post-master's program cover more advanced topics.

Curriculum

With multiple pathways to choose from, the program will help you develop a deeper understanding of responsive, responsible teaching methods. Participants will plan and deliver purposeful learning opportunities that incorporate current research and best practices to engage students in meaningful ways. SNHU will help you learn to create strengths-based, inclusive, and collaborative learning communities in classrooms and schools. The program will also help you understand the need for professional analysis, innovation, and continually evolving professional strategies while evaluating your own personal growth, teaching practice development, and personal leadership.

Mon, 10 Oct 2022 12:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.snhu.edu/campus-majors/certificates/graduate-professional-study
Killexams : Want to study for ethical hacking? You can with this $35 certification bundle
StackCommerce

The following content is brought to you by ZDNet partners. If you buy a product featured here, we may earn an affiliate commission or other compensation.

Cyber crimes continue to increase in frequency and severity, so the demand for cyber security skills will keep growing. And now, you can study for certified ethical hacking certifications, even with no tech background, with this 10-course cybersecurity training collection for $34.99.

You can access these courses on your computer, tablet, and phone. Total novices should start with "Learn Ethical Hacking: Beginner to Advanced," as it's designed specifically for those without IT experience. It even includes a crash course on Python and Linux essential system commands.

Amazon Web Services is the world's leading cloud-computing platform, and the "AWS Security Management & AWS Security Specialist Course" is a student favorite, with a rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars. It's offered by Oak Academy, founded by tech experts and specializing in the most in-demand skills such as coding, cybersecurity, mobile, game development, app monetization, and more. You'll learn about cloud computing, security, and much more required for well-paid jobs in this field.

You'll develop practical hacking skills in "Practical Wireless Networks Hacking from Scratch" and "Learn Practical Hacking Using Metasploit From Scratch." "Ethical Hacking & Penetration Testing Bootcamp with Linux" teaches you practical hacking skills, including how to set up your own lab. While "Ethical Hacking: Network Scan by Nmap & Nessus" demonstrates how to use Nmap to discover networks and check vulnerable devices.

A basic understanding of concepts related to ethical hacking is recommended for "The Complete Python Hacking Course: Beginner to Advanced." And if you're familiar with basic web technologies such as HTTP, HTML, Document Object Model, and the like, you can dive into the "Full Ethical Hacking & Penetration Testing Course."

You should know the information covered in the CompTIA Security+ and Network+ exams before taking "TOTAL: CompTIA PenTest+ (PT0-002)", but that certification would turbocharge your resume. If you've got basic IT skills and are into Raspberry Pi, then "Practical Hacking using Raspberry Pi" should be of particular interest to you.

Kickstart a new career fighting cybercrime with the 2023 Complete Cyber Security Ethical Hacking Certification Bundle, available for only $34.99.

Thu, 29 Sep 2022 17:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.zdnet.com/article/want-to-study-for-ethical-hacking-you-can-with-this-35-certification-bundle/
Killexams : Study hacks to help you ace your midterms

If you’re stuck on a problem or a concept discussed in class, ask for help. Ask a classmate, visit office hours or a help lab. Consider joining or starting a study group. And take advantage of other free resources. If you live on campus or are a first-year student, check out the Academic Success & Achievement Program (ASAP) for free tutoring support. If you need help writing a paper, visit The Writing Center. If you have a big research project, University Libraries offers consultations to help you get started. Review more academic resources for students. 

Sometimes the hardest part of studying is just getting started. Schedule out time in your week to study and do your best to get started right away. Find a favorite place that can become your study spot, like a coffee shop, library or community room in your residence hall. Establishing study routines and finding the right study spot can help you feel prepared for midterms.

Tue, 13 Sep 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.colorado.edu/studentaffairs/2022/09/14/study-hacks-help-you-ace-your-midterms
Killexams : Study could help recommend the best treatment for women with early-stage mucinous ovarian cancer

A global study into mucinous ovarian cancer could help oncologists recommend the best treatment for women who are diagnosed early with the condition.

By looking down a microscope for two different 'patterns of invasion' – the way that cancer cells invade ovarian tissue – oncologists can better predict which patients may have better or worse prognoses and can target treatment accordingly. The finding was reported in a paper published today in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

"Mucinous ovarian cancer is a rare type of ovarian cancer. It actually has more in common with gastrointestinal cancers, and can be hard to diagnose and hard to treat once it has spread beyond the ovaries," says lead author Nicki Meagher, who has just completed her PhD in the Molecular Oncology group, UNSW School of Clinical Medicine.

She says that observing which of the two types of invasion patterns that the cancer cells form could help certified decide on treatment strategies.

We've shown for the first time that women who have early-stage disease – meaning they have tumors that haven't spread beyond the ovary – have much poorer survival chances in the first two years from diagnosis if they have what we call an infiltrative pattern of invasion.

Knowing this in the early stage of the disease means we can identify patients who could benefit from additional chemotherapy following surgery to remove their ovaries."

Nicki Meagher, Lead Author

The two patterns of invasion are defined by the way the cancer cells organize themselves when viewed under a microscope. The infiltrative pattern of invasion associated with poorer health outcomes shows cancer cells spreading in an uneven, haphazard way through the ovarian tissue. The other pattern is known as expansile, where cells expand through tissue in a more orderly manner, and is associated with better prognoses.

Up until now, other studies had suggested that the infiltrative pattern of invasion was associated with poorer patient outcomes, but no study had large enough numbers of patients with early-stage cancer to reach statistical significance.

But the current study, that involved more than 100 researchers in Australia, UK, Canada, Asia, Europe and the US, was able to test this hypothesis in much larger numbers by examining the tissue of 604 patients. The researchers also looked for the expression of 19 genes including THBS2 and TAGLN in addition to the patterns of invasion.

Professor Susan Ramus who oversaw the global study and heads the Ovarian Tumour Tissue Analysis consortium says that guidelines on how to treat women with early-stage mucinous ovarian cancer have differed around the world due to limited data on infiltrative patterns of invasion associated with survival rates.

"For example, in some parts of the world, an infiltrative pattern was acknowledged as an important feature and determined what treatment those women receive," Professor Ramus says.

"Whereas in others, all patients are recommended for the same pathway of treatment. We hope that after this large study treatment guidelines can be aligned and that we can target treatment for women who may have these more serious indicators, even if they are diagnosed in early stages."

The researchers also noted that women with higher expression of two genes, THBS2 and TAGLN in their tumors, had poorer overall survival.

"We're hoping that this may be able to help explain some of the biology potentially down the track," says Ms Meagher.

"Another avenue could be that knowledge of expression of these genes could assist in developing targeted drugs."

The researchers are part of a wide network of experts who plan to carry out a validation study to further investigate these genomic markers as the basis for a targeted treatment strategy.

Source:

Journal reference:

Meagher, N.S., et al. (2022) Gene expression profiling of mucinous ovarian tumors and comparison with upper and lower gastrointestinal tumors identifies markers associated with adverse outcomes. Clinical Cancer Research. doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-22-1206.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.news-medical.net/news/20221012/Study-could-help-recommend-the-best-treatment-for-women-with-early-stage-mucinous-ovarian-cancer.aspx
Killexams : Folic Acid May Help Decrease Risk of Suicide, Study Finds
  • A accurate study investigated of taking folic acid was linked to a decrease in suicide attempts.
  • Over 12 million adults thought about suicide – with 1.2 million actually attempting to end their lives, in 2020 according to data from the CDC.
  • Researchers found people with a folic acid prescription experienced a 44% reduction in suicidal events.

New research published last week in JAMA Psychiatry investigated if taking the inexpensive vitamin folic acid may help reduce the risk of suicide.

“The importance of our study is that we have identified an inexpensive, widely available potential suicide prevention tool that has minimal if any side-effects,” lead author Robert Gibbons, PhD, Blum-Riese Professor of Biostatistics and Medicine at the University of Chicago, told Healthline.

In 2020, over 12 million adults thought about suicide – with 1.2 million actually attempting to end their lives, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“Folic acid is a type of B vitamin,” said Nicole Roach, a registered dietician at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York. “Many foods contain folate or will be enriched with folic acid.”

She added that this nutrient is naturally high in foods such as vegetables, especially dark green leafy vegetables such as spinach, mustard greens, and asparagus.

“Other foods which contain folate include nuts, beans, oranges and orange juice,” she continued.

According to Roach, while these foods are naturally high in folate, there are other foods that will be fortified with folate, which means that while not naturally a good source, the vitamin is added during the manufacturing process.

“These foods include enriched breads, flours, pastas, rice, and cornmeal,” she said.

Roach emphasized the importance of making sure you consume enough folic acid, because it plays an important role in cell functioning and growth.

She said we typically need about 400 micrograms of folate per day, while people who are pregnant should aim for 600 micrograms per day and those who are breastfeeding should aim for 500 micrograms per day.

Gibbons and team collected the data of almost 870,000 patients from a U.S. pharmacoepidemiologic database of medical claims for patients filling a folic acid (vitamin B9) prescription from 2012 to 2017.

This process was then repeated with a control supplement (vitamin B-12).

Over 80 percent of patients in this study were female, and a little over 10 percent were aged 60 years or older.

Researchers found the group that filled a folic acid prescription experienced a 44% reduction in suicidal events, which includes suicide attempts and intentional self-harm.

Researchers also found that the longer people took folic acid, the lower their risk tended to be. Each month of taking folic acid was associated with an extra five percent decrease in the risk of attempted suicide during a 24-month follow-up period.

“We were surprised by the strong association between reduction is suicide attempt risk with increased duration of folic acid treatment, said Gibbons. “We were also pleased to see that our negative control, vitamin B12 showed no association with suicide attempt.”

He said that a randomized clinical trial of folic acid is already in the works.

“If confirmed in a large-scale randomized clinical trial, which we are pursuing with one of our nation’s largest healthcare providers, it could have the potential to save thousands of lives,” said Gibbons

Naomi Torres-Mackie, PhD, a clinical psychologist at Lenox Hill Hospital said the impact of vitamin deficiency on mood has been previously studied, with B vitamins being the most commonly examined, particularly B12.

“There have also previously been studies on folate and depression, she said. “Being mindful not to conflate depression and suicide, this study only looked at the latter, which is an important contribution to separate out and examine suicide in particular.”

Experts stress that more study is needed and that people in mental health crisis or who have thoughts of suicide should immediately seek medical help.

Torres-Mackie noted that it’s important that people who have thoughts of suicide are seen by a mental health professional who has training in suicide and crisis management.

“The specific way in which suicidal ideation is treated depends on the underlying cause, as thoughts of suicide can be related to a mental health condition, commonly psychosis, or depression.”

This study seems to have promise,” said Torres-Mackie.

However, she cautioned that more study is needed before folic acid can be accepted as a new way to prevent suicide.

“There are some barriers for access to traditional forms of suicide treatment, but if folic acid can be helpful in reducing suicide attempts, it has the potential to provide help on a large-scale basis to individuals who very much need it,” she said.

Torres-Mackie cautioned that “much more” research is necessary before getting to that point.

“And as the authors point out, a large-scale randomized clinical trial is needed before a causal relationship can be determined or before treatment recommendations should include folic acid,” Torres-Mackie concluded.

Dr. Alex Dimitriu, double board-certified in Psychiatry and Sleep Medicine and founder of Menlo Park Psychiatry & Sleep Medicine and BrainfoodMD, said that people who have thoughts of suicide are typically treated with a combination of medication and therapy.

“Lithium, ketamine, and anti-depressants have been shown to reduce suicidal behavior,” he continued. “I believe that neuroplasticity – our ability to adapt and think differently, is essential, especially when someone is in a crisis-like state such as suicidal ideation.”

He explained that certain medications might Excellerate neuroplasticity.

“In the case of folic acid, it plays a key role in the formation of various neurotransmitters, serotonin, norepinephrine and even BDNF – brain derived neurotrophic factor, which is like ‘miracle grow’ for certain brain areas,” said Dimitriu.

He considered the study “impressive.”

“Given the low downside or side effect profile of using folic acid, I would certainly give it a go,” Dimitriu said.

“Always seek professional help with anyone having suicidal thoughts,” said Dimitriu. “If it is truly urgent, safety first, call 911 or get the person to an emergency room to assure safety.”

He added that in his years of experience work, he cannot underscore how many people, who considered suicide, were so happy to be alive months later.

“Time heals, and you have to be safe to allow the healing to occur,” Dimitriu pointed out. “We live in a time of treatment options, use them.”

New research finds that the B-vitamin called folic acid may reduce risk of self-harm or attempted suicide by up to 44 percent.

Experts say that this might be due to the vitamin’s crucial role in brain health.

They also say much more research is needed before folic acid can be considered a viable way to prevent suicide.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 10:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.healthline.com/health-news/folic-acid-may-help-decrease-risk-of-suicide-study-finds
Killexams : Why this Stanford researcher says you should ask your friends for more favors: 'We are a collaborative society'

Need a ride to the airport? Or help hanging your curtain rod? These pesky tasks are often made easier by asking a friend for help, but many of us are reluctant to do so.

People consistently underestimate others' willingness to lend them a hand, according to a new study published in the journal Psychological Science.

Help-seekers also overestimate how inconvenienced the person they are asking for a favor will feel.

"It can be nerve-wracking to ask a stranger for help," says Xuan Zhao, a social science research scholar at Stanford University who co-authored the study with Nicholas Epley, a social cognition professor at the University of Chicago.

"In our research we found people underestimate both strangers' and friends' [desire to help]."

'We are a pro-social and collaborative society'

Throughout history, there has been a debate about whether we live in a selfish society or a collaborative society, Zhao says.

 "Over the past few accurate decades, there has been more and more evidence that we are a pro-social and collaborative society," she says. "That's part of our winning strategy of evolution."

If you think about how you feel when you've helped out a friend, it might start to make sense.  

"Helping other people makes you feel good because it creates a moment of social connection," she says. "It makes you feel valued and needed by other people and if you are successful at helping them it makes you feel competent, and everyone likes feeling competent."

Helping other people makes you feel good because it creates a moment of social connection.

Xuan Zhao

Stanford Researcher

'People are taught to be self-sufficient'

Mon, 19 Sep 2022 02:30:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cnbc.com/2022/09/17/new-study-you-should-ask-your-friends-for-help-more-heres-why.html
Killexams : Study Shows Lifting Weights Can Help You Live Longer

Weightlifting is now linked to as much as a 47% decrease in early death, according to a new study. (Photo: Grace Cary via Getty Images)

Weightlifting is now linked to as much as a 47% decrease in early death, according to a new study. (Photo: Grace Cary via Getty Images)

The notion that working out is good for you certainly is not anything new — it’s been shown over and over that exercise cuts your risk of heart disease, can help maintain a healthy weight, reduces stress and more.

While the benefits of aerobic exercises like spinning, swimming and running are often what first come to mind, a new study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that weightlifting ― when combined with the recommended amount of aerobic exercise ― has serious health benefits, too.

For the study, the recommended amount of aerobic exercise was defined as the current fitness guidelines, which state adults should do at least two days of strength training each week and should participate in 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity (like gardening, brisk walking or dancing) or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity (like running, swimming or jumping rope). You can also do a combination of both moderate and vigorous activities.

The new study analyzed data from 99,713 adults over a 10-year period. At the beginning of the study, participants were asked how often they had lifted weights in the past 12 months. They were given the options of less than once a month, one to three times per month, one to two times per week, or three to seven times per week.

The study found that people who met the guidelines for aerobic activity and lifted weights one to two times each week were associated with a 41% to 47% reduction in all-cause mortality when compared with people who did not exercise, according to CNN. People who only met the guidelines for aerobic activity but did not lift weights had a 32% lower risk of all-cause mortality.

What’s more, those who lifted weights but did not do aerobic fitness saw as much as a 22% lower risk in all-cause mortality, CNN reported.

Additionally, those who lifted weights saw a 15% lower risk of dying from cancer, Medical News Today reported. While aerobic activity also resulted in a lower risk of death from cancer, that mortality risk was not reduced further when weightlifting was combined with aerobic activity.

A few caveats to keep in mind: Participants did not share how much weight they lifted or the number of sets or reps they did, so it’s unclear whether those factors played into the beneficial results. Also, the average age of study participants was 71, so it’s unclear whether weightlifting has a similar benefit on younger people.

Lifting weights one to two times a week is linked to a lower risk of early death in a new study. (Photo: Mireya Acierto via Getty Images)

Lifting weights one to two times a week is linked to a lower risk of early death in a new study. (Photo: Mireya Acierto via Getty Images)

Beyond a reduction in the risk of early death, weightlifting has other benefits, too

According to Katie Gould, a trainer andowner of KG Strong in Philadelphia, “strength training is one of the greatest tools for getting out of pain, as long as you’re doing it with good technique and alignment.”

By lifting weights, you’re strengthening muscles that were likely weak to begin with and may be the underlying cause of pain, she told HuffPost.

Another benefit of weightlifting may seem pretty straightforward but is actually a big deal: You’re getting stronger. Gould noted that many of her clients are excited to be able to properly and safely move things like the couch or the bed.

And with new strength comes increased confidence, Gould noted — and she has witnessed that confidence in her clients in and out of the gym.

Do weight training exercises that involve your full body

“It is important to work all the major muscle groups of the body — the legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms,” lead study author Jessica Gorzelitz, assistant professor in the department of health and human physiology at the University of Iowa, told HuffPost. This way, you’ll strengthen your body as a whole, not just a specific body part.

To get started, Gould recommended you commit to 30 minutes of weightlifting once a week with an eventual goal of two to three times a week. She stressed that your workout program should incorporate a range of exercises.

“A really good program is going to have a bilateral lower body push exercise — so think about a squat — [and] a bilateral lower body pull exercise like a deadlift. And, really, you want at least one exercise that is going to be unilateral, or one side dominant, like a lunge,” she said.

Gould said you should also be sure to focus on your upper body. Try incorporating an upper-body push like a pushup and an upper-body pull like a pullup. Lastly, make sure your workout targets your core. Gould noted that her favorite core exercises are Turkish get-ups or a classic plank.

“You’d do three sets for about eight to 12 reps depending on whether or not you’re using [weights],” Gould said. If you are doing bodyweight exercises (meaning, without weights), you can try to get closer to the 12-rep number.

Before you start weightlifting, seek some guidance

“People may be unfamiliar with weightlifting and not know how to get started. Our results suggest that some is better than none, and it’s OK to get started slowly and progress as strength and confidence increases,” Gorzelitz said.

But, improper weightlifting form can lead to injuries and intense soreness, which is why Gould encouraged folks to get help from a professional before lifting up some dumbbells.

“My favorite choice is you go to a studio and you either get some private training or semi-private training,” she said. But, if you can’t do that, she added that many gyms offer virtual training sessions where they’ll create a workout program that is ideal for you and your goals.

Additionally, there are people online who give weightlifting guidance. Gould recommended Girls Gone Strong, an online program that has free, downloadable fitness guides. The program also shares technique tips on its Instagram account.

Gould said Perform Better is a great resource for general movement tips and so is Katie St. Clair Fitness. She noted that her own gym’s Instagram account shares weightlifting advice, too.

Also on HuffPost

This article originally appeared on HuffPost and has been updated.

Related...

Wed, 12 Oct 2022 21:47:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/study-shows-lifting-weights-help-094503851.html
Killexams : Snacking on Walnuts May Help Add Years to Your Life: Study

Snacking on walnuts instead of biscuits or sweets may add years to your life, according to research. A handful of nuts a day reduces the risk of heart attacks, strokes, and other life-threatening conditions linked to obesity.

The superfood is packed with chemicals that protect DNA by destroying reactive molecules, or oxidants. The study was published in the Nutrition, Metabolism, & Cardiovascular Diseases journal.

A study found regular consumers were slimmer and fitter as they got older. They had fewer harmful fats, called triglycerides, and lower blood pressure.

A picture showing walnuts. Snacking on walnuts instead of biscuits or sweets may add years to your life, according to new research. Unsplash

"Walnut eaters seem to have a unique body phenotype that carries with it other positive impacts on health like better diet quality," said lead author Professor Lyn Steffen of the University of Minnesota.

"This is especially so when they start eating walnuts from young into middle adulthood—as the risk of chronic diseases like heart disease, obesity, and diabetes elevates," Steffen said.

The findings are based on more than 3,000 individuals across the U.S. who were tracked for three decades, into their fifties.

Among walnut eaters, average weight gain was less, there were fewer cases of obesity, and fasting blood glucose was lower. They also had lower bad cholesterol than eaters of other nuts.

A model of a human heart. Among walnut eaters, average weight gain was less, there were fewer cases of obesity, and fasting blood glucose was lower. Unsplash

Nut consumers showed an advantage in relation to diet quality, but walnut consumers appear to have a better heart disease risk factor profile than other groups, even after accounting for overall diet quality.

"The surprising, healthy shifts in the overall dietary pattern of walnut consumers suggests walnuts may act as a bridge or 'carrier' food," Steffen said.

Walnuts are rich in healthy plant chemicals including polyunsaturated fat and omega fatty acids which combat bad cholesterol. They dampen inflammation that can lead to a clotted vessel—and trigger a heart attack or stroke.

A picture showing walnuts. Walnuts are rich in healthy plant chemicals including polyunsaturated fat and omega fatty acids which combat bad cholesterol. Unsplash

The study says walnuts might be an easy and accessible food choice to boost the heart when eaten up to middle age. It could be due to the "unique combination of nutrients" and their effect on health, Steffen said.

About an ounce a day—equivalent to seven whole walnuts—has four grams of protein and two grams of fiber. It is also a good source of magnesium which is important for the muscles and nerves and increases energy.

The study—backed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute in the U.S.—was also partly funded by the California Walnut Commission.

It took into account other heart disease risk factors including overall diet, smoking, and body composition.

Produced in association with SWNS Talker.

This story was provided to Newsweek by Zenger News.

Tue, 20 Sep 2022 09:14:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.newsweek.com/snacking-walnuts-help-years-your-life-study-1744388
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