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701-100 LPIC-OT exam 701: DevOps Tools Engineer

Topic 701: Software Engineering

701.1 Modern Software Development (weight: 6)

Weight: 6



Description: Candidates should be able to design software solutions suitable for modern runtime environments. Candidates should understand how services handle data persistence, sessions, status information, transactions, concurrency, security, performance, availability, scaling, load balancing, messaging, monitoring and APIs. Furthermore, candidates should understand the implications of agile and DevOps on software development.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand and design service based applications

Understand common API concepts and standards

Understand aspects of data storage, service status and session handling

Design software to be run in containers

Design software to be deployed to cloud services

Awareness of risks in the migration and integration of monolithic legacy software

Understand common application security risks and ways to mitigate them

Understand the concept of agile software development

Understand the concept of DevOps and its implications to software developers and operators

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



REST, JSON

Service Orientated Architectures (SOA)

Microservices

Immutable servers

Loose coupling

Cross site scripting, SQL injections, verbose error reports, API authentication, consistent enforcement of transport encryption

CORS headers and CSRF tokens

ACID properties and CAP theorem



701.2 Standard Components and Platforms for Software (weight: 2)

Weight: 2



Description: Candidates should understand services offered by common cloud platforms. They should be able to include these services in their application architectures and deployment toolchains and understand the required service configurations. OpenStack service components are used as a reference implementation.


Key Knowledge Areas:



Features and concepts of object storage

Features and concepts of relational and NoSQL databases

Features and concepts of message brokers and message queues

Features and concepts of big data services

Features and concepts of application runtimes / PaaS

Features and concepts of content delivery networks

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



OpenStack Swift

OpenStack Trove

OpenStack Zaqar

CloudFoundry

OpenShift





701.3 Source Code Management (weight: 5)

Weight: 5



Description: Candidates should be able to use Git to manage and share source code. This includes creating and contributing to a repository as well as the usage of tags, branches and remote repositories. Furthermore, the candidate should be able to merge files and resolve merging conflicts.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand Git concepts and repository structure

Manage files within a Git repository

Manage branches and tags

Work with remote repositories and branches as well as submodules

Merge files and branches

Awareness of SVN and CVS, including concepts of centralized and distributed SCM solutions

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



git

.gitignore





701.4 Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (weight: 5)

Weight: 5



Description: Candidates should understand the principles and components of a continuous integration and continuous delivery pipeline. Candidates should be able to implement a CI/CD pipeline using Jenkins, including triggering the CI/CD pipeline, running unit, integration and acceptance tests, packaging software and handling the deployment of tested software artifacts. This objective covers the feature set of Jenkins version 2.0 or later.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand the concepts of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery

Understand the components of a CI/CD pipeline, including builds, unit, integration and acceptance tests, artifact management, delivery and deployment

Understand deployment best practices

Understand the architecture and features of Jenkins, including Jenkins Plugins, Jenkins API, notifications and distributed builds

Define and run jobs in Jenkins, including parameter handling

Fingerprinting, artifacts and artifact repositories

Understand how Jenkins models continuous delivery pipelines and implement a declarative continuous delivery pipeline in Jenkins

Awareness of possible authentication and authorization models

Understanding of the Pipeline Plugin

Understand the features of important Jenkins modules such as Copy Artifact Plugin, Fingerprint Plugin, Docker Pipeline, Docker Build and Publish plugin, Git Plugin, Credentials Plugin

Awareness of Artifactory and Nexus

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



Step, Node, Stage

Jenkins SDL

Jenkinsfile

Declarative Pipeline

Blue-green and canary deployment

Topic 702: Container Management

702.1 Container Usage (weight: 7)

Weight: 7



Description: Candidates should be able to build, share and operate Docker containers. This includes creating Dockerfiles, using a Docker registry, creating and interacting with containers as well as connecting containers to networks and storage volumes. This objective covers the feature set of Docker version 17.06 or later.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand the Docker architecture

Use existing Docker images from a Docker registry

Create Dockerfiles and build images from Dockerfiles

Upload images to a Docker registry

Operate and access Docker containers

Connect container to Docker networks

Use Docker volumes for shared and persistent container storage

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



docker

Dockerfile

.dockerignore





702.2 Container Deployment and Orchestration (weight: 5)

Weight: 5



Description: Candidates should be able to run and manage multiple containers that work together to provide a service. This includes the orchestration of Docker containers using Docker Compose in conjunction with an existing Docker Swarm cluster as well as using an existing Kubernetes cluster. This objective covers the feature sets of Docker Compose version 1.14 or later, Docker Swarm included in Docker 17.06 or later and Kubernetes 1.6 or later.


Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand the application model of Docker Compose

Create and run Docker Compose Files (version 3 or later)

Understand the architecture and functionality of Docker Swarm mode

Run containers in a Docker Swarm, including the definition of services, stacks and the usage of secrets

Understand the architecture and application model Kubernetes

Define and manage a container-based application for Kubernetes, including the definition of Deployments, Services, ReplicaSets and Pods

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



docker-compose

docker

kubectl





702.3 Container Infrastructure (weight: 4)

Weight: 4



Description: Candidates should be able to set up a runtime environment for containers. This includes running containers on a local workstation as well as setting up a dedicated container host. Furthermore, candidates should be aware of other container infrastructures, storage, networking and container specific security aspects. This objective covers the feature set of Docker version 17.06 or later and Docker Machine 0.12 or later.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Use Docker Machine to setup a Docker host

Understand Docker networking concepts, including overlay networks

Create and manage Docker networks

Understand Docker storage concepts

Create and manage Docker volumes

Awareness of Flocker and flannel

Understand the concepts of service discovery

Basic feature knowledge of CoreOS Container Linux, rkt and etcd

Understand security risks of container virtualization and container images and how to mitigate them
The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



docker-machine

Topic 703: Machine Deployment

703.1 Virtual Machine Deployment (weight: 4)

Weight: 4



Description: Candidates should be able to automate the deployment of a virtual machine with an operating system and a specific set of configuration files and software.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand Vagrant architecture and concepts, including storage and networking

Retrieve and use boxes from Atlas

Create and run Vagrantfiles

Access Vagrant virtual machines

Share and synchronize folder between a Vagrant virtual machine and the host system

Understand Vagrant provisioning, including File, Shell, Ansible and Docker

Understand multi-machine setup

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



vagrant

Vagrantfile





703.2 Cloud Deployment (weight: 2)

Weight: 2



Description: Candidates should be able to configure IaaS cloud instances and adjust them to match their available hardware resources, specifically, disk space and volumes. Additinally, candidates should be able to configure instances to allow secure SSH logins and prepare the instances to be ready for a configuration management tool such as Ansible.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understanding the features and concepts of cloud-init, including user-data and initializing and configuring cloud-init
Use cloud-init to create, resize and mount file systems, configure user accounts, including login credentials such as SSH keys and install software packages from the distribution’s repository
Understand the features and implications of IaaS clouds and virtualization for a computing instance, such as snapshotting, pausing, cloning and resource limits.



703.3 System Image Creation (weight: 2)

Weight: 2



Description: Candidates should be able to create images for containers, virtual machines and IaaS cloud instances.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand the functionality and features of Packer

Create and maintain template files

Build images from template files using different builders

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



packer

Topic 704: Configuration Management

704.1 Ansible (weight: 8)

Weight: 8



Description: Candidates should be able to use Ansible to ensure a target server is in a specific state regarding its configuration and installed software. This objective covers the feature set of Ansible version 2.2 or later.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand the principles of automated system configuration and software installation

Create and maintain inventory files

Understand how Ansible interacts with remote systems

Manage SSH login credentials for Ansible, including using unprivileged login accounts

Create, maintain and run Ansible playbooks, including tasks, handlers, conditionals, loops and registers

Set and use variables

Maintain secrets using Ansible vaults

Write Jinja2 templates, including using common filters, loops and conditionals

Understand and use Ansible roles and install Ansible roles from Ansible Galaxy

Understand and use important Ansible tasks, including file, copy, template, ini_file, lineinfile, patch, replace, user, group, command, shell, service, systemd, cron, apt, debconf, yum, git, and debug

Awareness of dynamic inventory

Awareness of Ansibles features for non-Linux systems

Awareness of Ansible containers

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



ansible.cfg

ansible-playbook

ansible-vault

ansible-galaxy

ansible-doc





704.2 Other Configuration Management Tools (weight: 2)

Weight: 2



Description: Candidates should understand the main features and principles of important configuration management tools other than Ansible.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Basic feature and architecture knowledge of Puppet.

Basic feature and architecture knowledge of Chef.

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



Manifest, Class, Recipe, Cookbook

puppet

chef

chef-solo

chef-client

chef-server-ctl

knife

Topic 705: Service Operations

705.1 IT Operations and Monitoring (weight: 4)

Weight: 4



Description: Candidates should understand how IT infrastructure is involved in delivering a service. This includes knowledge about the major goals of IT operations, understanding functional and nonfunctional properties of an IT services and ways to monitor and measure them using Prometheus. Furthermore candidates should understand major security risks in IT infrastructure. This objective covers the feature set of Prometheus 1.7 or later.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand goals of IT operations and service provisioning, including nonfunctional properties such as availability, latency, responsiveness

Understand and identify metrics and indicators to monitor and measure the technical functionality of a service

Understand and identify metrics and indicators to monitor and measure the logical functionality of a service

Understand the architecture of Prometheus, including Exporters, Pushgateway, Alertmanager and Grafana

Monitor containers and microservices using Prometheus

Understand the principles of IT attacks against IT infrastructure

Understand the principles of the most important ways to protect IT infrastructure

Understand core IT infrastructure components and their the role in deployment

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



Prometheus, Node exporter, Pushgateway, Alertmanager, Grafana

Service exploits, brute force attacks, and denial of service attacks

Security updates, packet filtering and application gateways

Virtualization hosts, DNS and load balancers





705.2 Log Management and Analysis (weight: 4)

Weight: 4



Description: Candidates should understand the role of log files in operations and troubleshooting. They should be able to set up centralized logging infrastructure based on Logstash to collect and normalize log data. Furthermore, candidates should understand how Elasticsearch and Kibana help to store and access log data.



Key Knowledge Areas:



Understand how application and system logging works

Understand the architecture and functionality of Logstash, including the lifecycle of a log message and Logstash plugins

Understand the architecture and functionality of Elasticsearch and Kibana in the context of log data management (Elastic Stack)

Configure Logstash to collect, normalize, transform and store log data

Configure syslog and Filebeat to send log data to Logstash

Configure Logstash to send email alerts

Understand application support for log management

The following is a partial list of the used files, terms and utilities:



logstash

input, filter, output

grok filter

Log files, metrics

syslog.conf

/etc/logstash/logstash.yml

/etc/filebeat/filebeat.yml
LPIC-OT exam 701: DevOps Tools Engineer
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Question #53 Section 1
Which of the following statements describes the principal concept behind test driven development?
A. Tests may not be written by the same development team that wrote the tested code.
B. All tests are generated automatically from the tested source code.
C. Tests are written before the function / method is implemented.
D. The only acceptable reason to write a test is to prevent fixed bugs from occurring again.
E. Instead of testing software automatically, manual tests are performed and logged daily.
Answer: C
Reference https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Test-driven_development
Question #54 Section 1
Which of the following goals are favored by agile software development methodologies? (Choose two correct
answers.)
A. Self-organization of teams.
B. Central governance and control.
C. Flexibility of processes.
D. Absolute planning adherence.
E. Long-term release and feature management.
Answer: CE
Question #55 Section 1
Which of the following properties apply to a content delivery network? (Choose three correct answers.)
A. CDNs require all elements of a web site to be served by the same CDN.
B. CDNs can stream large media files such as movies or music to clients.
C. CDNs are present in multiple locations to serve content close to clients.
D. CDNs serve huge numbers of clients with high bandwidth and low latency.
E. CDNs forward all requests to a backend server and never store content locally.
Answer: CDE
Question #56 Section 1
Which of the following kinds of data are suitable as artifacts in a continuous delivery pipeline? (Choose three
correct answers.)
A. Executable applications such as .exe files or .jar packages.
B. Copies of the contents of source code repositories.
C. Build configuration files such as Makefiles or Maven configurations.
D. Compiled packages to be installed by a Linux package manager.
E. Docker container images which contain an application.
Answer: BCD
Question #57 Section 1
Which of the following conditionals exist in an Ansible playbook? (Choose three correct answers.)
A. with_nodes
B. with_playbook
C. with_sequence
D. with_items
E. with_nested
Answer: CDE
Reference https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/2.4/playbooks_loops.html
Question #58 Section 1
Which of the following tasks can Logstash fulfill without using other components of the Elastic Stack? (Choose
three.)
A. Receive log data from remote systems.
B. Store log data persistently.
C. Aggregate log data over a period of time.
D. Process log data to extract information.
E. Forward log data to other services.
Answer: CDE
Question #59 Section 1
What is tested by unit tests?
A. The syntactical correctness of the source code of a software component.
B. The formal validity of a service's external REST API.
C. The integration of multiple component of the same software.
D. The correctness of a specific function of a software component.
E. The throughput, load capacity and latency of a service.
Answer: D
Question #60 Section 1
An online shop needs to store information about clients and orders. A list of fixed properties for clients and orders
exists. The data storage should enforce specific data types on these properties and ensure that each order is
associated with an existing client. Which of the following cloud services is capable of fulfilling these requirements?
A. An in-memory database like memcached.
B. An object store like OpenStack Swift.
C. A messaging service like OpenStack Zaqar.
D. A NoSQL database like MongoDB.
E. A relational database like MariaDB.
Answer: E
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LPI Engineer questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/701-100 Search results LPI Engineer questions - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/701-100 https://killexams.com/exam_list/LPI Five Questions

Problem-solving. Engineers like puzzles, taking things apart and putting them back together. When I Interviewed at UAB I asked a room full of faculty how many of them had played with Legos as a kid, and something like 90% of them raised their hands.

Engineers work on problems where you usually don’t know where you will end up when you start. It’s a process, and it takes creativity, persistence, trial and error, and teamwork. I find that many non-engineers underestimate the importance of both creativity and teamwork in engineering. Have you seen the movie The Martian, where Matt Damon gets stranded on Mars? The whole movie is about lots of people coming up with little inventions and improvements to keep him alive a few days longer, get a rescue ship back to Mars a few days sooner, and do all kinds of other things that together add up to a solution to what seemed like an intractable problem. At the very end of the movie he is talking to a group of trainees about how you never deliver up, you just keep chipping away, “working the problem,” and I think that’s a pretty good description of engineering.

Sat, 08 Aug 2020 17:01:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/engineering/home/5-questions
The Big Payback: Engineering Salaries Rank Among Highest for Graduates

The path to the highest paying job evolves from multiple factors. But if salary is the goal right off the bat, one data analysis positions graduates from engineering at the top of its rankings. 

QR code generator analyzed data for industries in which graduates can earn the most. Their research revealed that engineering comes out tops with a median salary of $97K per year.   

Methodology Matters

The study’s source information is based on data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and analyzed median salary, the percentage of workers with an advanced degree and the percentage of graduates with a specific major. These criteria were sourced for 36 fields of degree in the U.S. Serving as comparable figures, the average annual median wage and the average percentage of employees with an advanced degree were also included. 

READ MORE: Engineers Bring Pride, Experience to Their Craft—and it Pays

Data Sparks Conversation

Insights from the ASME’s (The American Society of Mechanical Engineers) review of salaries for mechanical engineers provide a useful comparison. Their latest report revealed the median annual wage estimates for mechanical engineers to be $96,310, a figure that is well above the national average ($61,990). The top 10 percentile makes an average annual wage of $151,260 in this research.

ASME’s figures are based on 277,000 mechanical engineers currently employed in the U.S. and are drawn from National Occupation Employment and Wage Estimates published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Astute readers will bear in mind that the use of data involves an interpretive process and that data is underpinned by underlying conditions and contexts.  

Presented below is a duplicate of the QR code generator findings. By no means an end-in-itself, consider the information a conversation starter when compared with other engineering surveys.

1. Engineering Takes the Lead

With the highest median salary of $97K, engineering graduates working in the industry have the most lucrative degrees. The average median wage across all industries is $63K for graduates, meaning that those with engineering degrees are earning 54% more. The data revealed that 42% of people working in the industry have an advanced degree, and one of the most popular engineering majors is electrical engineering, with a total of 22% majoring in this discipline. 

2. Computer and IT 

Computer and IT graduates are the second-highest earners, with a median annual salary of $90K. Individuals working in this sector are earning 43% more than the average graduate, and 30% of these workers hold an advanced degree. An overwhelming majority of graduates majored in computer science, 61% to be exact. 

3. Transportation Sciences and Technologies

The third highest-earning industry for graduates is transportation, with the median salary at $82K. Those with transportation degrees are earning 30% more than the average graduate, and all of these graduates majored in transportation sciences and technologies. 21% of workers in the field have an advanced degree. 

4. Engineering Technologies 

Engineering technologies graduates are the fourth-highest earners with a median salary of $80K. Graduates working in this industry are earning 27% more than the average degree holder and 25% hold an advanced degree. Electrical engineering technology majors make up 27% of engineering technologies graduates. 

5. Mathematics

Taking the fifth spot is the mathematics sector. With a median salary of $78K, math grads are earning 24% more than the average graduate. 51% of workers in the industry have an advanced degree. 

READ MORE: Annual Salary Survey eBook from Machine Design

6. Construction Industry

Closely following in sixth place is the construction industry, with graduates earning a median salary of $77K; this is 22% above the average. All graduates majored in construction services, and 11% hold an advanced degree.  

7. Physical Science

Physical science is the seventh most lucrative industry for graduates with a median salary of $74K, which is 17% more than the average. Chemistry majors hold the largest share of the physical science majors, with 35%. The industry proves itself as scholarly, with 53% holding an advanced degree.  

8. Science Technologies

In eighth place is science technologies. Graduates in this industry earn a median salary of $72K, which is 14% more than an average graduate wage. Approximately 100% of science technologies graduates majored in nuclear, industrial radiology and biological technologies. 24% have earned an advanced degree. 

9. Architecture, Biology, Military

In the penultimate spot is architecture, biology and the military in joint ninth place. The graduates of these industries earn a median salary of $70K and are above the average percentage of employees with an advanced degree, which is 38%.  

10. Business

Rounding off the rankings is business. Graduates in this industry are earning a median salary of $69K. The data showed that 27% of business graduates major in business management and administration and 26% of workers hold an advanced degree. 

READ MORE: Survey of Engineers: Pushing Roles to the Edge of Possibility

What’s the Upshot?

QRFY has this to say about the findings: “With the majority of the top ten industries in the rankings being math-based and science-based, it shows how it is most profitable for students to major in these subjects. Since last year, university tuition rates have risen by up to 5%, so it will be interesting to see if demand for these well-paying degree fields rises in line with increasing tuition costs.

Also notable, according to the company, there appears to be little correlation between having an advanced degree and earning a large salary. “Four of the least well-paid industries are also four of the industries with the highest percentage of workers with an advanced degree,” noted the company’s release. “At 67%, library science is the sector with the highest percentage of workers with an advanced degree, but it ranks in the bottom ten for pay, with a median salary of $49K.”    

Fri, 05 Jan 2024 01:11:00 -0600 text/html https://www.machinedesign.com/community/article/21280222/the-big-payback-engineering-salaries-rank-among-highest-for-graduates
Frequently Asked Questions

You've got questions, and we've got answers! Below is a list of our most frequently-asked questions related to Purdue Engineering. If you still have questions, feel free to contact us for help!

 

How do I apply to Purdue Engineering?

We're so exited that you want to apply! We've put together a page dedicated to this very topic. Check out our Applying to Purdue Engineering page for all the details.

What does it take to have a competitive application for Purdue Engineering?

This is obviously our most frequently-asked question, and it's a good one! The challenge is that there is no one, perfect answer to this question, as there are a variety of factors at play in the admission process that are both inside and outside your control.

Here is what we recommend for putting your best foot forward when applying to Purdue Engineering:

Apply Early Action

When you apply is an extremely important part of the application process. To maximize consideration of your application, you will need to apply by Purdue's Early Action Deadline of November 1. November 1 is also the priority deadline for First-Year Engineering (listed as "Engineering (First-Year)" on the Common App), meaning that the highest likelihood for admission is for those who apply by the priority deadline.

Prepare Yourself for College

Get good grades and challenge yourself in your coursework! Make sure you are on track to meet or exceed Purdue's Freshman Admission Criteria.

Follow Your Passions In and Out of Class

Get involved in clubs, organizations, and activities you are passionate about! It helps build time management skills, provides you with great opportunities and experiences, and allows you to blow off steam and get away from academics every now and then.

Bottom Line: Apply!

If you want to be a Purdue Engineer, don't be afraid to apply! And when you do, be sure to tell us everything about why you want to be here and what makes you a great candidate for our programs. Your college application is one of the few times in your life that it is perfectly acceptable to brag about yourself and your accomplishments!

Have more questions about applying?

Reach out to the Office of Admissions for any specific questions you have about the application and admission process, including any special circumstances. They are the ones that review all applications to Purdue's undergraduate programs and make admission decisions. Visit their Admissions website, call them at (765) 494-1776, or email them at admissions@purdue.edu.

What is the acceptance rate for Purdue Engineering?

The acceptance rate for new-beginner First-Year Engineering students for Fall 2022 was approximately 37%. The average acceptance rate over the last 5 years was approximately 47%.

What are average grades and test scores of students admitted to Purdue Engineering?

Here is the academic profile for students admitted to our First-Year Engineering program in Fall 2022: 

Fall 2022 Admitted Student Academic Profile
Average Middle 50% Range
GPA (unweighted) 3.91 3.88 - 3.99
ACT Composite 32 31 - 35
SAT Composite 1443 1380 - 1520

Grades and test scores are only a part of the equation when the Office of Admissions is reviewing applications. Other admissions considerations include academic trends and achievements, extracurricular involvement, and personal essays, among other factors.

All beginning Purdue West Lafayette undergraduate students complete a core first-year curriculum through the First-Year Engineering Program before transitioning to their engineering major in their sophomore year. This allows students time to explore engineering careers, start to learn engineering design, and get strong foundations in math, science, English, and computer skills. .

For more details about First-Year Engineering, check out the "What is First-Year Engineering" Topic further down, as well as our Applying to Purdue Engineering page.

Students applying to engineering at Purdue University in Indianapolis, an extension of Purdue University West Lafayette, are directly admitted to their major. Those students will follow a core first year curriculum similar to that of our First-Year Engineering students in West Lafayette. 

Are there any engineering programs or summer camps I can attend?

There are several camps and programs offered across Purdue's campus. Our Women in Engineering Program and Minority Engineering Program both offer a variety of camps and experiential programs for all age groups that are open to all students of all backgrounds. There are also several engineering courses available through Purdue's Summer College for High School Students program. For other campus-wide outreach programs and campus, visit Purdue's Summer Camps page.

What's the difference between an engineering degree and an engineering technology degree?

Engineering and engineering technology represent different depths and scopes within the overall field of engineering.

The short version: Engineering degrees provide students with all of the math, science, and theory behind the concepts and principles they are learning about in order to be able to create new things and solve complex challenges, whereas engineering technology degrees focus less on the math and science and more on existing products and technologies to prepare students to innovate within existing systems.

At Purdue, all engineering degrees are housed in the College of Engineering, and all engineering technology degrees are housed in the Polytechnic Institute (formerly called the College of Technology). All of our engineering and engineering technology degrees are accredited by the same organization, ABET, but to differing sets of guidelines. Both the College of Engineering and the Polytechnic Institute offer excellent degrees, strong job placement, and high starting salaries, which can make the decision of which one to apply to a difficult one.

Curriculum in the College of Engineering focuses on the conceptual stages of solving societal challenges and early stages of creating products that do not exist and therefore requires more in-depth study in math and science. Engineering students participate in hands-on labs and many experiential opportunities to design products and process. Engineering graduates (called engineers) are capable of doing computer modeling to predict performance prior to the build stage as well as working through all phases of the production process. Essentially, engineering degrees provide students with all of the math, science, and theory behind the concepts and principles they are learning about in order to be able to create new things and solve complex challenges.

Engineering technology degrees through Purdue Polytechnic Institute (which is an academic unit here at the West Lafayette campus, not a separate institution) specialize in bringing products to life and to the consumer. Engineering technology students have fewer theoretical classes, such as math and science, and focus more on the hands-on lab components with each class. Engineering technology graduates are involved in product design later in the production process and help to determine the best way to manufacture products.

Both the College of Engineering and the Purdue Polytechnic Institute emphasize teamwork, problem solving, and communication. These skills can lead to similar job functions across areas of design, manufacturing, and management depending on students' interest and experience.

It is important to note that some professions, like Civil Engineering, require a Professional Engineering (PE) license. The College of Engineering provides students in all majors (with the exception of Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies) the opportunity to work towards their PE as part of their plan of study, while engineering technology students will have to take additional coursework before or after they graduate to qualify to take the PE exam.

Which AP classes do you recognize for college credit?

Generally speaking, 4s and 5s on the AP tests will earn you credit here at Purdue. For more specific details, check out the Purdue credit for AP Tests page on the Office of Admissions' website for the ultimate guide to earning AP credit.

To see how that credit would apply to a Purdue Engineering degree, check out the First-Year Engineering plan of study for freshman year courses and the plan of study for your desired engineering major for classes sophomore year and beyond.

What is First-Year Engineering?

First-Year Engineering (FYE) is the launchpad for all undergraduate students at Purdue. It's what all students are applying to when applying to Purdue Engineering and where all incoming engineering students start for their freshman year.

The primary goals of our First-Year Engineering program are to provide a solid foundation for our students and to provide them with numerous opportunities to explore all 17 engineering majors at Purdue to determine which one is truly the best fit for them.

In addition to coursework in math, science, and communications, FYE students also take specialized engineering courses that provide them with team-working, problem solving, critical analysis, and programming skills. FYE students are also provided with numerous opportunities for major and career exploration, both inside and outside of their FYE courses, where they can learn about coursework, research, internship, and post-graduate opportunities for the various majors.

We find that many students applying to Purdue Engineering are undecided about which specific engineering major they want to pursue. Of those FYE students that came to Purdue with a specific engineering major in mind, roughly half of them will end up changing their mind every year based on what they've learned over the course of their freshman year. Having opportunities to meet with upperclassmen and professors and attend seminars hosted by the majors allow our students to make a much more informed decision about their desired major.

Click here to learn more about the First-Year Engineering program at Purdue

What are the requirements to transition to my major of choice after First-Year Engineering?

The process for students to select their major is simple and straightforward: Beginning in their second semester on campus, students will fill out on an online form to select their first and second choice engineering majors. That's it! No tests or extra application steps needed.

As long as a student completes all of the First-Year Engineering requirements, they are guaranteed to be placed into their major of choice as long as space is available. For a few of our engineering majors that are at or above enrollment capacity*, admission may be competitive and will be evaluated based on GPA, Engineering Admissions Index (EAI), and other factors.

Complete details about the process can be found on First-Year Engineering's Transition to Major page. There is also a way for students to be guaranteed their first choice major regardless of the major's capacity, as outlined in the Enrollment Management Policy for First-Year Engineering Students.

For students transitioning to their major in Fall 2022, 96.7% of FYE students received their first choice major. Over 90% of FYE students have received their first choice major in each of the last five years.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding the Transition to Major process, don't hesitate to contact us!

*Currently, majors that are near or above capacity limitations are Aeronautical & Astronautical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Multidisciplinary Engineering. Even still, these majors were still able to accept 85-100% of students who requested them as their first choice in the Spring 2022 Transition to Major cycle.

What are the class sizes like in engineering?

The College of Engineering has a student-to-faculty ratio of 22.8:1 and an average class size of around 45 students.

As a large university, your class sizes will vary from 10 students to 400 students. Generally, class sizes will get smaller as you progress deeper into your major over the years.

Faculty-led lectures in science and math range in size from approximately 150-350 students but are complemented by mandatory recitation sessions that meet once or twice a week. These small-group recitation sessions divide students into classes of 20-30 and are led by teaching assistants to go back over the class material from the week, do group practice problems, and allow a smaller environment for students to ask questions.

Engineering-specific courses will typically be much smaller than the general math and science courses, and exact sizes will also be determined by the overall size of your engineering major.

It's important to note that, while we can't avoid some of the larger class sizes due to the size of our university, we do provide a variety of free resources for our students to get one-on-one support regardless of the class. Those mandatory recitation sections for the large-lecture courses are just one of the ways we try to provide a small-school setting for our students.

Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions are optional sessions in the evenings that cover many of the more challenging freshman and sophomore level courses and are led by undergraduate students that performed well in the courses.

There are also help rooms for many of the courses and subjects taught on campus (math, physics, thermodynamics, etc.) that are open on weekdays for students to get one-on-one support for homework problems, exam prep, and lecture-related questions. These help rooms are staffed by undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants (TAs).

Faculty and teaching assistants are also easily accessible through regular office hours, e-mail, and phone to answer any questions you may have, too!

There are also plenty of paid tutors available, though it's typically a last resort after trying all of the above options.

Can I double major as an engineering student?

A student who is doing well academically can typically double major in engineering; however, we see it done infrequently due to the extra time to degree. We do have many engineering students that do a variety of value-added minors.

Adding a second degree in physics, math, or liberal arts is typically more efficient. The Degree+ program through the College of Liberal Arts allows engineering students to pick up an additional liberal arts major in a more streamlined fashion, waiving the College of Liberal Arts core requirements and instead only requiring the major-required courses.

We may also encourage students to consider a master's degree rather than two bachelor's depending on their goals. Purdue's College of Engineering does have some 5-year combined BS+MS degree programs.

Pursuing a double-major or a dual-degree program almost always extends graduation times to 4.5 to 5 years, whereas adding on a minor usually does not extend time to degree.

Can I get an engineering degree in four years?

Yes! All undergraduate engineering degrees are designed as four-year programs, including First-Year Engineering. Each major requires 124-132 credit hours, which is a full course load (at least 15 hours per semester) for each of the eight semesters. Many students, for a variety of reasons, elect to take a lighter load and graduate in 4 1/2 - 5 years. The average time to degree is 4.2 years. Being successful and taking advantage of all of the opportunities afforded to you at the University is an important part of your college experience. Keep this in mind as you determine the time it will take you to complete your education. 

What is the honors program for engineering students?

The Goss Scholars Program is the honors version of our First-Year Engineering (FYE) program. Similar in format to our standard FYE plan of study, the Goss Scholars program adds extra depth and rigor to the first-year curriculum. Team projects will be more challenging and incorporate more programming and robotics experiences than the standard FYE curriculum. It's also not just about the classes! Goss Scholars also participate in fun extra-curricular programs and activities and have peer mentors to help them navigate their first year on campus.

Head over to the Goss Scholars Program website for more information about the program.

Students join the Goss Scholars Program in one of two ways: 1) By applying and being admitted to the John Martinson Honors College, or 2) by applying directly to the Goss Scholars Learning Community as an admitted, incoming freshman. If you applied to are an admitted to the Honors College, you will automatically be placed into the Goss Scholars Learning Community.

It's important to note that the Goss Scholars program is only for your freshman year. After that, aside from the opportunity to be a Goss Scholars Mentor, the remainder of your engineering plan of study will be the same as everyone else. If you are in the Purdue Honors College and wish to graduate with honors, you will also pursue the Honors College requirements. The only way to graduate with an honors diploma from Purdue is through the Honors College.

How do I pay for an engineering degree?

Great question! There are a lot of facts to consider, so we've created an entire page dedicated to this topic: Check out our How Do I Pay for a Purdue Engineering Degree page.

How do I apply for scholarships?

All students who submit their application to Purdue by the November 1 Early Application deadline will automatically for University-wide merit scholarships, no separate application required! Those who wish to also be considered for need-based scholarships should fill out the FAFSA by December 15.

There are also many more scholarship opportunities that open up beginning sophomore year when students transition to their engineering major. More information on departmental scholarships and overall college affordability resources can be found on the Engineering Scholarships for Current Students page.

What are the placement rates and starting salaries for Purdue Engineers?

The average starting salary across engineering disciplines for Purdue Engineering graduates for 2022 was approximately $79,000. 97% of engineering students were successfully placed into a job in their field or another chosen plan (graduate school, Peace Corps, military, etc.) within 6 months of graduation. Visit Purdue's Center for Career Opportunities Data Dashboard for more detailed starting salary information.

An engineering degree provides an excellent return on investment (ROI) for its graduates due to reliably strong placement rates and starting salaries. It's a large reason behind why Purdue Engineering attracts students from across the country and around the world - they know that the experiences and opportunities that they will have as students, combined with the high placement rates and starting salaries make it worth the investment for them!

Do engineering students have free time?

YES! Purdue Engineers are some of the most involved on campus. Our students find themselves involved with professional organizations, community service, bands and orchestras, Greek Life, club and even varsity sports. There is always something going on at Purdue: concerts, sporting events, festivals, speakers, movies, gaming, and fundraisers (i.e. Dance Marathon, Relay for Life). There are cool places to eat right near campus or just a walk down the hill to Historic Downtown Lafayette.

There is so much to do in the surrounding area. Hike along the Wabash Heritage Trail or even howl with the wolves (Really!) at Wolf Park. We even have the largest corn maze in Northwest Indiana (can you believe we pay to get lost in cornfields?). The entire Lafayette community has Boilermaker spirit and enjoys having students here.

What kinds of engineering clubs and organizations are there at Purdue?

Getting involved on campus is one of the best ways to find your community at Purdue and meet new people. Student organizations and clubs offer a way for you to pursue your passions, develop yourself professionally, gain leadership experience, or just find a group of friends with similar interests as you!

With over 1,000 student organizations and clubs on campus, you will find at least one or two organizations that you want to get more involved in, and likely many, many more that pique your interest. Many students choose to be involved in both a professional organization (think Purdue Student Government, National Society of Black Engineers, Engineers Without Borders, etc.) and a "fun" organization or club (like Latin Ballroom Dance Club, Pet-A-Puppy Club, residence halls clubs, Grand Prix Foundation, various sports clubs, or the Purdue Intercollegiate Quidditch Association). We also have Purdue Greek life, and volunteer clubs such as Habitat for Humanity.  You can view all active student organizations here: https://boilerlink.purdue.edu/

Do I need my own computer at Purdue? What kind should I get?

It's not necessary for you to bring your own computer, but it certainly helps. Purdue maintains 20 open computer labs that are available to students at various times. This does not include the open labs that are available in each residence hall for residents. However, most students like to have their own computer for organization and convenience. Either laptop or desktop computers will work depending on a student's preference.

The next big question is Mac or PC. If you’re deeply embedded in the Apple ecosystem and already have a Mac laptop, it will probably be fine but there will likely be some specialized software that’s not compatible. Computer labs with Windows machines are available, and some software is able to be streamed via Software Remote. If you’re looking to buy a new laptop, we’d highly recommend buying a Windows machine.

For more information on hardware and software guidelines, check out the Student PC minimum requirements article from the Engineering IT department. The majority of Purdue's campus has Wi-Fi coverage available for students to use.

Discounts on hardware and software are available for students through Information Technology at Purdue (ITaP), Purdue's IT department. Current and incoming students should hold off on major hardware and software purchases until they have activated their Purdue student account to gain access to a variety of free and heavily-reduced software and hardware discounts.

Do engineering students live in the same residence halls?

There are no engineering-specific residence halls on campus. However, because the College of Engineering is the largest academic college on campus, you will find fellow engineering students on your floor regardless of which residence hall you live in. And since the majority of students on campus take our English, communications, chemistry, and math classes, it won't be hard to find help with homework and exams from your floormates!

There are also several Learning Communities that have live-in components, meaning all students in the same Learning Community will live in the same floor(s) of a residence hall. For more information, visit Engineering Learning Communities. Learning Communities are optional but highly recommended for incoming freshman if any of them sound of interest!

Wed, 19 Apr 2023 08:06:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.purdue.edu/futureengineers/info/faqs.php
A software engineer ranks his top 10 hardest interviews after landing 18 offers from tech companies like Apple, Palantir, and Meta No result found, try new keyword!A software engineer who received 18 job offers from tech companies like Apple, Meta, and Palantir ranks the most difficult interviews. Tue, 02 Jan 2024 20:13:01 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ Plastics Engineering

Plastics are said to be the most versatile materials on Earth

UMass Lowell offers the first and largest ABET* accredited Plastics Engineering program in the U.S. and a research-oriented graduate program.

The Plastics Engineering Department is an internationally recognized leader in plastics engineering education. Founded in 1954, we offer the first and largest ABET* accredited Plastics Engineering program in the U.S. More than 3,000 graduates are working in the plastics industry, some with their own entrepreneurial businesses (see video), in leadership positions worldwide. Learn more.

Molly Tecce

Plastics Engineering

Plastics Engineering major Molly Tecce and partners from the 3D Club leapt into action to make PPE when the pandemic struck.

Chris & Paula White

Engineering

The founders of what has become a multimillion dollar premium, all-natural cookie dough and ice cream sandwich company hold degrees in engineering.

Yrvanie Joseph

Plastics Engineering

Yrvanie Joseph is grateful for alumni scholarships because they confirm the value of her hard work and academic achievements.

Patrick McCallum

Plastics Engineering

Patrick McCallum got a leg up on his plastics engineering career with an internship at Wittmann Battenfeld, where he worked alongside the company's president, alum David Preusse '85.

Cheryl and Paul Katen

Plastics Technology; Physics

Cheryl and Paul Katen are funding a scholarship to deliver diverse students “a leg up.”

Madison Reed

Plastics Engineering

Madison Reed works as a research assistant with Plastics Engineering Prof. Ramaswamy Nagarajan in the UML Fabric Discovery Center.

Mark Saab

Plastics Engineering

Alumni donor Mark Saab's UMass Lowell education provided the foundation for a successful career. His gratitude to the plastics engineering program is expressed through the generous donations he's bestowed upon the University.

Kraig Scharn

Plastics Engineering

Thanks to his internship and co-op experiences, plastics engineering major Kraig Scharn ’20 discovered that sales was the right career path for him. He is now a junior technical service engineer for Entec Polymers in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Evan Yu

Plastics Engineering

Evan Yu didn’t know much about plastics engineering coming into college. He graduates with a deep appreciation for its role in helping the planet.

Leo Montagna

Plastics Engineering

Plastics Engineering alumnus Leo Montagna Jr. '70, '76 says he wouldn't be where is is today with the University. He is a devoted UMass Lowell donor and supporter of the Plastics Engineering Department.

Abby Mastromonaco

Plastics Engineering

Abby Mastromonaco’s passion for sustainability led to a Rist Institute for Sustainability and Energy fellowship and research experience in a plastics engineering lab.

Greg Reimonn

Plastics Engineering

Greg Reimonn found a faculty mentor to help him research microplastics in waterways, thanks to an honors fellowship.

Sid Iyer

Plastics Engineering

Sid Iyer has taken advantage of internships, research opportunities, the DifferenceMaker program and more to pursue his goal: a career in biomedical research and development.

Brianna Atwood

Plastics Engineering

Brianna Atwood came to UMass Lowell to study plastics engineering – but she’s done so much more. The honors student started a volunteer program that connects UML students with a local school. She has also participated in the professional co-op program, working on fire-resistant seals for airplanes.

Joey Mead

Plastics Engineering

For most of her professional life, Prof. Joey Mead has been interested in plastics.

Tue, 05 Dec 2023 10:00:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.uml.edu/engineering/plastics/
Architectural Engineering Frequently Asked Questions

Architectural engineering students tour the High Bay construction site.Architectural Engineering is a relatively specialized field of study; UW is one of only 18 institutions nationwide to offer an accredited degree in this discipline.

Architectural Engineers are trained with a rigorous technical knowledge about building systems, but also with a holistic view of how those building systems are integrated within the overall building design.  They are trained to collaborate with architects and others in the building industry.

Architectural engineering students tour the High Bay construction site.No. In terms of education, they are different degrees. A B.S. degree in Architectural Engineering (which UW offers) will prepare you to become a professional engineer. A B.Arch. or M.Arch. degree (which UW does not offer) will prepare you to become a professional architect.

In the professions, architects are responsible for the overall design of a building and design to meet the needs of a client. They hire engineers to help them design and developing the details of the building systems, including: structural, heating/air conditioning, plumbing, fire protection and electrical. Engineers have technical expertise which architects do not.

Absolutely! This is an excellent strategy because you will develop a multitude of interrelated skills and have many possible career paths. UW has relationships with a number of regional architecture programs to make the transition as seamless as possible.

There are many excellent reasons.

The Architectural Engineering Institute (AEI) is the professional society for Architectural Engineers. Click here to visit.

Architectural Engineering is a relatively specialized field of study; UW is one of only 18 institutions nationwide to offer an accredited degree in this discipline.

Architectural Engineers are trained with a rigorous technical knowledge about building systems, but also with a holistic view of how those building systems are integrated within the overall building design.  They are trained to collaborate with architects and others in the building industry.

There are three areas of specialization within Architectural Engineering:

Structural Systems

A Structural engineer is responsible for the strength and stability of the building.  Structural engineers are charged with understanding how much weight a building must support and what other forces it must resist.  They design foundations, beams, girders, trusses, columns, floors, walls, and roofs, and they work with architects to make sure those elements are coordinated with the building plan.

MEP (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) Systems

An MEP engineer is responsible for the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, as well as Plumbing, Fire Protection, Electrical and Lighting systems.  MEP engineers work with architects to make sure the building is comfortable and that it is using energy efficiently.

Construction

A construction engineer is responsible for the building being built properly and safely.  Construction engineers may schedule and manage excavations, heavy equipment, deliveries of materials, and workers.

No. 

In terms of education, they are different degrees.  A B.S. degree in Architectural Engineering (which UW offers) will prepare you to become a professional engineer.  A B.Arch. or M.Arch. degree (which UW does not offer) will prepare you to become a professional architect.

In the professions, architects are responsible for the overall design of a building and design to meet the needs of a client.  They hire engineers to help them design and developing the details of the building systems, including: structural, heating/air conditioning, plumbing, fire protection, and electrical. Engineers have technical expertise which architects do not. 

Absolutely!  This is an excellent strategy because you will develop a multitude of interrelated skills and have many possible career paths.  UW has relationships with a number of regional architecture programs to make the transition as seamless as possible.

There are many excellent reasons.

UW’s Architectural Engineering program has strong relationships with major employers, and we have a great track record in internship and job placement.

Our faculty is dedicated to excellent teaching and research in leading-edge syllabus within the discipline.  The building industry has changed dramatically in the past decade, and we are proud of our dedication to staying current.

If you prefer a hands-on education, Architectural Engineering is for you.  You’ll find yourself building a brick wall in class, or going to visit a construction site.  Bring your gloves and work boots!

If you enjoy computer models and simulations, Architectural Engineering is for you.  In fact, UW is known for being at the forefront of computing.  We have received national recognition three times for leadership in Building Information Modeling (BIM).  We’ve found that UW graduates get more job offers and higher salaries because they can use the latest computing tools.

Finally, as an architectural engineer, you can make a difference in helping to solve the world’s social problems.  For example, buildings generally use too much energy.  This is a waste of capital and a problem for the climate and environment.  We train students to understand how buildings can be designed to use less energy, and to keep the occupants healthy and happy.

The Architectural Engineering Institute (AEI) is the professional society for Architectural Engineers.  Visit http://www.asce.org/AEI/

Architectural Engineering is a relatively specialized field of study; UW is one of only 18 institutions nationwide to offer an accredited degree in this discipline.

Architectural Engineers are trained with a rigorous technical knowledge about building systems, but also with a holistic view of how those building systems are integrated within the overall building design.  They are trained to collaborate with architects and others in the building industry.

There are three areas of specialization within Architectural Engineering:

Structural Systems

A Structural engineer is responsible for the strength and stability of the building.  Structural engineers are charged with understanding how much weight a building must support and what other forces it must resist.  They design foundations, beams, girders, trusses, columns, floors, walls, and roofs, and they work with architects to make sure those elements are coordinated with the building plan.

MEP (Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing) Systems

An MEP engineer is responsible for the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, as well as Plumbing, Fire Protection, Electrical and Lighting systems.  MEP engineers work with architects to make sure the building is comfortable and that it is using energy efficiently.

Construction

A construction engineer is responsible for the building being built properly and safely.  Construction engineers may schedule and manage excavations, heavy equipment, deliveries of materials, and workers.

No. 

In terms of education, they are different degrees.  A B.S. degree in Architectural Engineering (which UW offers) will prepare you to become a professional engineer.  A B.Arch. or M.Arch. degree (which UW does not offer) will prepare you to become a professional architect.

In the professions, architects are responsible for the overall design of a building and design to meet the needs of a client.  They hire engineers to help them design and developing the details of the building systems, including: structural, heating/air conditioning, plumbing, fire protection, and electrical. Engineers have technical expertise which architects do not. 

Absolutely!  This is an excellent strategy because you will develop a multitude of interrelated skills and have many possible career paths.  UW has relationships with a number of regional architecture programs to make the transition as seamless as possible.

There are many excellent reasons.

UW’s Architectural Engineering program has strong relationships with major employers, and we have a great track record in internship and job placement.

Our faculty is dedicated to excellent teaching and research in leading-edge syllabus within the discipline.  The building industry has changed dramatically in the past decade, and we are proud of our dedication to staying current.

If you prefer a hands-on education, Architectural Engineering is for you.  You’ll find yourself building a brick wall in class, or going to visit a construction site.  Bring your gloves and work boots!

If you enjoy computer models and simulations, Architectural Engineering is for you.  In fact, UW is known for being at the forefront of computing.  We have received national recognition three times for leadership in Building Information Modeling (BIM).  We’ve found that UW graduates get more job offers and higher salaries because they can use the latest computing tools.

Finally, as an architectural engineer, you can make a difference in helping to solve the world’s social problems.  For example, buildings generally use too much energy.  This is a waste of capital and a problem for the climate and environment.  We train students to understand how buildings can be designed to use less energy, and to keep the occupants healthy and happy.

The Architectural Engineering Institute (AEI) is the professional society for Architectural Engineers.  Visit http://www.asce.org/AEI/

Mon, 04 Apr 2022 06:19:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.uwyo.edu/civil/undergrad/arefaq.html
Monumental engineering mistakes from history No result found, try new keyword!Mistakes are an inherent part of human behavior, and engineers are no exception to this reality. Major concern arises when these mistakes lead to dire consequences, a reality that sadly characterizes ... Wed, 03 Jan 2024 10:00:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQS)

What is mechanical engineering?

Engineering combines the fields of maths and science to build and Improve the world around us. Put simply, if Mother Nature didn’t create it, an engineer did!

Mechanical engineering is the most popular and wide-ranging engineering discipline. It specifically deals with the design, development and improvement of the mechanical components and systems that make our world and lives function – everything from major infrastructure projects, to high-speed trains, artificial hearts and processing chocolate bars.

What do mechanical engineers do?

While the working day of a mechanical engineer is as varied as the industries they work in, they typically apply a mix of analytics and technical expertise to solve problems, develop new products and technologies, and Improve processes.

What are the career prospects like for mechanical engineers?

Employment prospects for mechanical engineers are very good because engineering graduates and apprentices are in high demand. By 2020, engineering companies are expected to have 2.74 million job openings, of which, 1.86 million will be roles requiring engineering skills.

How much do mechanical engineers earn?

The average salary for an engineering graduate is £26,536, which is almost £5,000 more than the average for university leavers. Apprentices who become Engineering Technicians earn on average £26,836. With experience and professional qualifications, average basic salaries grow to around £70,000 for Chartered Engineers.

Am I suited to a career in mechanical engineering?

If you enjoy creating practical solutions to problems and like turning your ideas into reality, then a career in mechanical engineering could be for you. 

While having a passion for maths and science is important, the diverse nature of mechanical engineering means it’s a good fit for creative people with all sorts of interests. 

What is an apprenticeship?

Apprenticeships offer an alternative route into mechanical engineering from academic study. They are well suited to people who want to learn and earn at the same time. It typically takes between one and four years to gain a qualification this way.

Should I go to university or become an apprentice?

It depends what you’re looking for. Although many university courses have become more vocational, the main emphasis for most continues to be on education, learning and research. Apprenticeships offer more experience of the workplace and tend to be primarily focused on vocational training.

What subjects and qualifications do I need to become a mechanical engineer?

For most university courses in engineering, maths and physics A-levels are required. For apprenticeships, good GCSEs in maths and science are needed.

Further resources to learn more

There are lots of resources to help you learn more about careers in mechanical engineering, and plan your next steps.

Thu, 28 Jan 2016 07:25:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.imeche.org/careers-education/careers-information/what-is-mechanical-engineering/frequently-asked-questions-faqs
Frequently Asked Questions

Do prospective undergraduates apply for a specific major?

No. Undergraduates are admitted by Undergraduate Admissions of Northwestern University, not by individual departments. Prospective undergraduates do indicate that they are applying to the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science but may select either "undecided engineering and applied science major" or a specific major.

Entering students who indicate a specific major are assigned a professor from that department as their freshman adviser, but they are free to choose a different field when they officially designate their major, typically at the end of their first year.

Can engineering students take courses from other Northwestern Schools?

Yes, subject to prerequisites or enrollment limitations of the departments offering those classes, engineering students can and do take many courses outside of the McCormick School of Engineering. In fact, engineering students are required to take seven courses to fulfill a social sciences and humanities requirement and have an additional five unrestricted electives that can be used to take either engineering or other classes.

Northwestern engineering students are encouraged to become whole-brain engineers™ by developing many kinds of skills and knowledge.

Get answers to additional FAQs through the Undergraduate Admissions Office

Combined Degree Programs

There is also a Combined Music and Engineering Program, which enables students to earn degrees in both music and engineering simultaneously. This allows Northwestern engineering students the opportunity to get a much more well-rounded education than is possible at many other engineering schools.

Learn more about McCormick's combined degree programs

Wed, 26 Nov 2014 20:47:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.mccormick.northwestern.edu/mechanical/academics/undergraduate/prospective/faq.html
Frequently Asked Questions

Undergraduate Programs

Graduate Programs

Undergraduate

Do I apply specifically to the School of Engineering?
Students apply to the School of Engineering, School of Business or College of Arts & Sciences. Students applying to the Engineering School may either declare a major on their application or apply as undeclared in Engineering.

What is the ratio of male to female students?
Currently 24% percent of our students are female which is well above the national average. One of the reasons for this is our national ranking in regard to the percentage of female faculty members (approximately 33%; 3rd highest in the U.S.).

When do I have to decide on a major?
Students may choose to declare (or change) a major at any time, though declaration (or change) requires the approval of the department chair. It is advisable to have at least informally decided on a major by the middle of your sophomore year to make sure you can still graduate in four years. We suggest that you declare a major on your application even if you are wavering between two or three different major choices. You will be assigned an advisor in that department who will help you determine if that field of engineering is right for you.

Can I transfer into the School of Engineering once at Santa Clara University?
Yes, it is possible to transfer into the School of Engineering from the College of Arts & Sciences or the School of Business. Interested students are allowed to apply for transfer in the spring quarter of their first year by submitting an Internal Transfer Application to the School of Engineering. Applications are evaluated by the Faculty Chair of the department of interest based on space available (which changes from year to year) and the student’s academic performance in their prior quarters at Santa Clara University. With interest in several engineering departments on the rise, it is becoming increasingly difficult to gain approval for transfer into certain majors from outside of Engineering. It is impossible to forecast how many internal transfers a particular department will be able to accept for the upcoming year before the deposit deadline.

Do engineering students graduate in four years?
At the entire university, around 78% of students graduate in four years. In the School of Engineering, our students have a comparable rate of graduation. Proper course planning through adherence to department four-year plans and academic success ensure graduating within four years. Students who begin in the School of Engineering are more likely to graduate on time.

Can engineering students study abroad?
Engineering students can study abroad and, with proper planning, still graduate in four years. The best time to study abroad is normally during the SCU fall term of the junior year. This allows students to go abroad for either a quarter or a semester term overseas. Students will then return to SCU for the beginning of winter term. To stay on track in critical course sequences, students need to work with their academic advisors to select an appropriate institution and SCU-equivalent courses. SCU is a member of the Global Engineering Education Exchange (GE3), a consortium of universities around the world who offer engineering courses in English. The Study Abroad Office provides major-specific guidelines to many opportunities abroad. Studying abroad provides engineering students with an excellent global perspective on the profession.

Are there opportunities to do research as an Undergraduate?
While each department differs, SCU undergraduate engineering students have numerous opportunities to be involved with faculty research projects. Many faculty members actually depend heavily on undergraduate students to help conduct their research. Interested students should consult faculty members conducting research in a particular area of interest to learn more about such opportunities. In addition to several University resources available to undergraduate students, the School of Engineering supports 10-15 students to do paid summer research with a faculty member each year through an endowed fund. For additional information, check out
Kuehler Undergraduate Research page.

Do you accept transfer students?
Yes, contact the SCU Admissions Office to learn more about transfer requirements and guidelines for each major.

How about international students?
International students are also welcome. Contact the SCU Admissions Office to learn more about international student requirements.

What is the average salary of a SCU engineering student after they graduate?
Median starting salary for engineering graduates in 2014 was $65,500.

Do I need a computer? Apple or PC?
Students need not have their own personal computer although having a computer will offer many conveniences. The University, School of Engineering, and many of the departments all provide computing facilities for student use. These computing labs allow students to access the technical software packages needed for course assignments, laboratory write-ups, and special projects. Since personal computers now serve so many functions, most students do own either a desktop or a laptop system. Most student use PCs, but since students can utilize computer labs for any PC required software, many students also use Apple computers and laptops.

Can I double major or have a minor?
While Computer Science and Engineering is the most popular second major, we have students who double major or minor in many different fields from music, dance, and history to business, physics, and Spanish.

What is the difference between engineering disciplines?
Bioengineering is the application of electrical, chemical, mechanical, and other engineering principles to understand, modify, or control biological systems. Examples of bioengineering advances include: artificial knee and hip joints, cardiac pacemakers, kidney dialysis machines, arthroscopic surgical tools, MRI and CAT Scanning systems, inhaleable insulin systems, automated defibrillators, genomics and proteomics.

Civil Engineers plan, design, build, and maintain the facilities essential to our civilization: bridges, dams, highways, transit systems, airports, tunnels, irrigation systems, water supply, and industrial and commercial buildings.

Computer Engineers are concerned with all aspects of computer hardware and software as well as the mathematical foundations of computation.

Electrical Engineers are concerned with information representation and transmission, advancing integrated circuit design for digital, analog and mixed systems, new devices and architectures, and all the areas of circuits and systems that have traditionally supported these efforts. This includes all phases of the digital or analog transmission of information such as radio, television, telephone systems, fiber optics, wireless communication, and satellite communications, as well as control and robotics, electric power, information processing and storage.

Mechanical Engineers are concerned with all aspects of design, development, control, and manufacture of mechanical systems and energy conversion systems.

Can I participate in athletics and still study engineering?
We have had many successful students in engineering and athletics. It requires dedication and a demanding schedule. (Athletes are often familiar with managing a tightly constrained schedule.)

What internship opportunities are available for engineering students?
Internships are becoming increasingly important in helping prepare engineering students for their professional careers. Internships allow students to see first-hand how companies and their employees function on a day-to-day basis. Intern positions frequently serve as a bridge between the problem-solving skills learned at school and the skills needed for professional practice. Employers often check a student’s resume to see if such experience has been obtained prior to graduation. With our Silicon Valley location, our students are in a prime position to find numerous internship opportunities. Students as early as the summer following their freshman year find internships in the area. The University Career Center collects lists of internship opportunities and works with engineering students to find companies in their area of interest. Many students receive full-time, post-graduation employment offers from the companies they have worked for as interns.

Graduate

Is Santa Clara University nationally ranked?
Yes, most definitely. For more than 18 years, SCU has been ranked by U.S. News and World Report as 2nd best in the West among predominately master degree granting universities. In addition, according to the
2016 U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges rankings, SCU’s first-year retention rate of 95% ranks the highest of any master’s university in the country, and the 85% graduation rate is the highest in the West. Santa Clara University’s School of Engineering jumped two spots from 2015 to No. 12 in the top engineering programs offered by master’s universities across the country.

How many times a year do you accept students?
We review and accept students for the fall, winter, and spring quarters. For the summer quarter, we accept students to our Open University program only.

Are you on a quarter or semester system?
The Engineering Graduate Programs are on a quarter system.

I last attended graduate classes five years ago; may I come back?
Yes, you may. You will need to submit another online application, after which we will work with you to recreate your file. Applications for admissions are completed on-line.

When are your classes held?
Classes meet at the following convenient times Monday through Friday: 7:10 - 9 A.M.; 5:10 - 7 P.M.; 7:10 - 9 P.M. Some classes are also scheduled on Saturdays and Sundays.

How long does the program take to complete?
Full-time students (enrolling in 8 or more units each Quarter) generally take 1.5 to 2 years to complete the M.S. Program. Students enrolling part-time take 2.5 to 6 years on average to complete their M.S.

Do you accept all formats of the TOEFL tests and IELTS?
Yes, we accept both TOEFL and IELTS. We accept computer-based, paper-based, and Internet-based (iBT) TOEFL tests. Santa Clara University's TOEFL code is 4851 and scores should be sent directly to us by testing agencies. While waiting for the official scores to be sent to us, students are encouraged to send us a photocopy of the test results as a place holder. Exceptions: TOEFL is not required of international students who received a degree (undergraduate or graduate) from an English-speaking country (e.g. India, Singapore, Canada). TOEFL can also be waived for students who have been in the U.S. with strong English ability. To request a waiver and an interview, please contact the Engineering Graduate Services by email,
GradEngineer@scu.edu, or call 408-554-4748.

How long are my scores good?
Scores will be accepted as long as they are no more than five years old.

Do you require a translation of my transcripts?
Yes! Students with non-U.S. degrees must submit one English translation of their transcript and diploma.

What goes on during an admissions information session?
On-campus information sessions are held almost every month. During the 45-minute program, an admissions representative will provide a detailed overview of the School's distinctive features, discuss the degree and non-degree programs, and offer tips on admissions procedures. After the presentation, you will have an opportunity to ask questions.

What if I can't make it to campus? Can you come to my company to do an information session?
Yes, we can. We will be happy to meet with you at a location and time that is convenient for you. We do, however, require a minimum of five people for us to host an off-campus session. Please contact us to set this up, at 408-554-7839, or email
GradEngineer@scu.edu.

What if I can't afford the application fee?
If the application fee poses a financial hardship on you, please let us know by sending us an email to
GradEngineer@scu.edu, stating your inability to pay this fee and explaining the circumstances.

Is a Statement of Purpose required if I'm applying to the M.S. Program?
No, it is not required. A Statement of Purpose is only required for Ph.D. applicants.

What is required to enter your master's degree program?
A four-year technical bachelor's degree from an ABET accredited program, one official transcript from the undergraduate college attended, General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for international applicants. There are exceptions, however. The Software Engineering master's degree program would also require the Computer Science GRE Subject Test if the applicant does not have a computer science or computer engineering background. If this proves problematic, you may wish to consider applying to the M.S. in Computer Engineering, which does not have such a requirement and does have an emphasis in software engineering. The Engineering Management and Leadership master's degree also does not require the GRE, and the Computer Engineering Department is receptive in accepting qualified master's degree candidates who have a non-ABET accredited relevant four-year bachelor's degree and have taken one year of calculus.

I've heard you can earn an undergraduate degree and a graduate degree from Santa Clara in five years. How does that work?
Yes, we do offer such a program, but it is only available to current Santa Clara University undergraduate students. Students first complete their undergraduate degrees. They then start taking graduate level courses as early as in the spring of their junior year and complete a master's degree in only one year, as opposed to two. Students in the Five-Year Program are also exempted from the application fees and taking the GRE. Having both a B.S. and M.S. degrees can be valuable when progressing in a professional career.

How do I check the status of my application?
You can send us an email,
GradEngineer@scu.edu, or call at (408) 554-4313.

How long does it take for the committee to reach a decision?
Please allow approximately two weeks for the review of M.S. applications. The review for Ph.D. applicants takes approximately two to three weeks. Open University and Certificate Programs take approximately one week.

Can I defer my application?
Yes, if you are unable to furnish all of the required materials by an application deadline, please send an email to
GradEngineer@scu.edu and specify for which quarter you are seeking admission instead.

How big are the graduate engineering classes? Are they all taught by professors or are some taught by teaching assistants?
On average, there are 15 students in a class. All courses are taught by full-time professors or part-time lecturers who are from industry.

I've taken some graduate courses outside SCU. Can I transfer those credits?
Graduate level courses that you took in an accredited university may be considered for transfer credit to SCU if they have not been applied to any other graduate degrees. You must have a grade of C or better in those courses. M.S. students may transfer a maximum of 6 semester or 9 quarter units toward the required 45 units to graduate from SCU, and Ph.D. students can transfer a maximum of 18 quarter units or 12 semester units toward the required 72 units. Ph.D. students usually take 36 units of courses and 36 units for dissertation.

Sat, 12 Mar 2016 16:46:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.scu.edu/engineering/academic-programs/frequently-asked-questions/




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