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PACE NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency Exam

Test Details:
- exam Name: Social-Work-Board PACE NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency Exam
- exam Format: Multiple-choice questions
- exam Duration: 3 hours
- Passing Score: Varies (set by the National Federation of Paralegal Associations)
- Prerequisites: Completion of a paralegal education program or equivalent work experience
- Certification Validity: Valid for a specified period, typically 2-3 years

Course Outline: Social-Work-Board PACE NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency Exam

I. Legal Research and Writing
A. Conducting legal research using various sources
B. Analyzing and synthesizing legal information
C. Drafting legal documents and correspondence

II. Substantive Legal Areas
A. Contract law
B. Tort law
C. Criminal law
D. Family law
E. Real estate law
F. Intellectual property law

III. Procedural Knowledge
A. Civil litigation procedures
B. Administrative law procedures
C. Appellate procedures
D. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods

IV. Ethics and Professional Responsibility
A. Understanding legal ethics and professional conduct rules
B. Maintaining client confidentiality
C. Recognizing conflicts of interest
D. Upholding professional standards

V. Technology and Legal Practice
A. Utilizing technology tools for legal research and document management
B. Electronic discovery (e-discovery) processes
C. Legal software and databases

Exam Objectives:
- Demonstrate proficiency in legal research techniques and effective writing skills
- Apply substantive legal knowledge in various areas of law
- Understand and navigate procedural rules and processes in legal practice
- Uphold ethical standards and professional responsibilities
- Utilize technology tools relevant to the paralegal profession

Syllabus:
The syllabus for the Social-Work-Board PACE NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency exam will cover the following topics:
- Legal Research and Writing
- Substantive Legal Areas
- Procedural Knowledge
- Ethics and Professional Responsibility
- Technology and Legal Practice
NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency Exam
Social-Work-Board Competency download

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NFPA Paralegal Advanced Competency Exam
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Question: 53
Homer is paralegal working for the Law Office of Marge Simpson. Ms. Simpson
is handling a real estate case that involves Lot A and Lot B, which are adjacent to
each other. The owner of Lot A began digging a hole on his lot as the basement
for the house he wanted to build. One edge of the hole was near the boundary line
with Lot B, and during the digging process the edge near Lot B collapsed and part
of Lot B fell into the hole on Lot A. As Ms. Simpson is drafting a motion, she
asks Homer to find cases with facts similar to the fact of this case. Which of the
following cases is most analogous to the case Ms. Simpson is handling?
A. A case in which a mining company operated an open-pit mining operation on
land that it owned and one area of the open-pit mine collapsed on a hauling
company"s truck.
B. A case in which two neighbors owned adjacent lots in a subdivision, and one
neighbor"s above-ground swimming pool sprung a leak and flooded the other
neighbor"s property.
C. A case in which a farmer owned the surface rights to farmland, and a mining
company owned the subsurface mining rights, and a mining operation caused the
surface to collapse.
D. A case in which a driver lost control of her vehicle on an icy, rural road, and
the vehicle left the road and ran through a landowner"s flower garden.
Answer: C
A case in which a farmer owned the surface rights to farmland, and a mining
company owned the subsurface mining rights, and a mining operation caused the
surface to collapse. Answer C is the most analogous answer choice because both
the basement-digging scenario and the subsurface-mining scenario involve
digging or an operation that causes a loss of support on adjacent property. Answer
A is not analogous because the open-pit-mining scenario does not involve two
owners of real estate. Answer B is not the most analogous because it involves a
material (water) on the negligent neighbor"s lot that enters the other neighbor"s lot
(rather than the other neighbor"s soil collapsing into the negligent owner"s land).
Answer D is not analogous because it involves a driver and a landowner, not two
landowners.
Question: 54
Which of the following sentences does NOT correctly capitalize the reference to a
government?
A. Seattle is a city in Washington State.
B. The state of Illinois prohibits texting while driving.
C. The district of Columbia is the capital of the United States.
D. The City of New Orleans was a train that ran between Chicago and New
Orleans.
Answer: C
The district of Columbia is the capital of the United States. The terms city,
county, state, and similar terms are capitalized if they follow the name of the
city, county, or state and are considered part of the name. Answer C is the correct
answer because District of Columbia (with district capitalized) is the proper,
full name for the U.S. capital. Neither Answer A nor Answer B are correct
choices because city and state are not capitalized. Answer D is not the correct
choice because City of New Orleans does not refer to a government.
Question: 55
A jurat is to a notary block as a(n) _________ is to a(n) _________.
A. trustee : beneficiary
B. affidavit : affiant
C. verdict : judgment
D. code law : statutory law
Answer: D
A jurat is to a notary block as a code law is to a statutory law. A jurat is another
term for a notary block, and code law is another term for statutory law. Answer A
is not correct because trustee and beneficiary are not synonymous terms. Answer
B is not correct because affidavit and affiant are not synonymous terms-an affiant
is a term that refers to the person who made the affidavit. Answer C is not correct
because a verdict reflects the findings and decision of the jury, and a judgment is
entered by the judge.
Question: 56
Peter Plaintiff was walking down the sidewalk next to Dagmar"s Microbrewery.
As he passed under an open window on the second floor of the brewery, Peter
was hit by a falling barrel that caused serious injury to his head and arm. Peter
filed a negligence action against Dagmar"s Microbrewery. At trial, Dagmar"s
Microbrewery admits that the barrel was from the microbrewery and that
Dagmar"s Microbrewery owed a duty of care to others under negligence law.
Peter also offers evidence of his injuries and medical expenses. Peter was unable
to offer any other evidence. From the answer choices below, what additional
evidence would be most helpful to completing Peter"s negligence claim?
A. That the barrel was under the control of Dagmar"s Microbrewery and that it
fell as a result of an employee"s carelessness.
B. That Dagmar"s Microbrewery is responsible for the acts of its employees under
the doctrine of respondeat superior.
C. That Dagmar"s Microbrewery is the manufacturer and owner of the barrel.
D. That Dagmar"s Microbrewery intended to use the barrel to store and transport
its product.
Answer: A
That the barrel was under the control of Dagmar"s Microbrewery and that it fell as
a result of a breach of the duty of care. Answer A would be the most helpful
because it would support the breach of duty element of a negligence claim.
Answer B is not the best answer because, even if established, respondeat superior
does not prove a breach of duty. Answer C is not the best response because it is
irrelevant whether Dagmar"s made the barrel. Answer D is not the best response
because how Dagmar"s intended to use the barrel is irrelevant.
Question: 57
Which of the following sentences correctly uses the present tense?
A. Carter will owe a duty of care to Peter because Carter will be driving on
Highway 5 and Peter will be riding his bicycle on Highway 5.
B. Amber owed a duty of care to Phil because Amber invited Phil onto her
property for the birthday party.
C. Miguel owes a duty of care to Anna because Miguel drives his car on the road
and Anna walks on the side the road.
D. George has owed a duty of care to Jerry because George has driven on a road
when Jerry was a pedestrian on the road.
Answer: C
Miguel owes a duty of care to Anna because Miguel drives his car on the road and
Anna walks on the side of the road. The present tense is formed by adding an s
to the end of the verb or by using the present tense of an irregular verb. Answer C
is the correct choice because it uses the present tense of the verb to owe, the
present tense of the irregular verb to drive, and the present tense of the verb to
walk. Answer A is not the correct choice because the verbs are stated in the
future tense. Answer B is not the correct choice because the verbs are stated in the
past tense. Answer D is not the correct choice because the verbs are stated in the
present perfect tense.
Question: 58
Camille is a paralegal who just started working for attorney John Baxter. John
practices mainly in personal injury and civil litigation, but Camille has never
worked in litigation before. In the Tran case, John filed a motion for summary
judgment about three months ago. The defendant filed a response to the motion,
and John then filed a reply. As such, the motion for summary judgment is fully
briefed. John has now asked Camille to call the judge"s office and find out if the
hearing date has been set-and if it has not been set, work out a hearing date with
the court and the defendant"s attorney. The rule on ex parte communications
prevents attorneys from speaking with the judge or the judge"s staff about a case
unless the opposing counsel is present. Can Camille call the court as requested?
A. No, because the rule prohibits any ex parte communication with the judge or
judge"s staff, including communications by an attorney"s employee.
B. No, unless Camille gets someone from the opposing counsel"s office on the
line in a conference call with the judge"s office.
C. Yes, because the rule on ex parte communications does not prohibit routine
communications by staff on procedural matters, such as scheduling.
D. Yes, because Camille"s employer has authorized her to call the judge"s staff.
Answer: C
Yes, because the rule on ex parte communications does not prohibit routine
communications by staff on procedural matters, such as scheduling. A paralegal
or a legal secretary can speak with the judge"s staff about non-substantive matters;
this is necessary on a practical level to facilitate court business. Answer A is not
correct because the ex parte rule is not an absolute prohibition. Answer B is not
correct for the same reason as Answer A, but sometimes such conference calls are
helpful in coordinating schedules. Answer D is not correct because an employer"s
authorization would not overcome the rule.
Question: 59
When a text includes a long quotation, the block quotation format is followed that
places the quotation after a colon and in a separate paragraph that is indented from
each margin, without quotation marks. What is the length of a quotation that
requires block quotation?
A. 25 words or more.
B. 40 words or more.
C. 50 words or more.
D. 75 words or more.
Answer: C
50 words or more. This is the length that requires block quotation under Rule 5.1
of The Bluebook.
Question: 60
Which of the following correctly uses a dash?
A. John saw his-red-car rolling down the hill.
B. The first ten amendments to the Constitution-the Bill of Rights-protects
citizens.
C. We must protect freedom of speech-it is our birthright.
D. All of the above.
Answer: B
The first ten amendments to the Constitution-the Bill of Rights-protects citizens.
Answer B is correct because it uses dashes to insert information parenthetically,
but also to emphasize the information. Answer A is not correct because it adds
parenthetical information that does not need emphasis. The sentence should read:
John saw his (red) car rolling down the hill; or John saw his red car rolling
down the hill. Answer C is not correct because it uses a dash to add a second
sentence that should stand on its own. To supply it is our birthright the emphasis it
deserves, Answer C should be revised to: We must protect freedom of speech. It
is our birthright. Alternatively, a semicolon could be used.
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Academic integrity

The School of Social Work adheres to the University of Nevada, Reno Academic Standards Policy for Students concerning issues of academic integrity. Please see the UNR website for a complete description, definitions and policies regarding class conduct and academic dishonesty.

Accommodation for students with disabilities

Students who require additional support due to disabling conditions should discuss their needs with their instructors at the start of each semester. Accommodations for all reasonable requests will be made for documented disabling conditions. In addition, students are encouraged to contact the UNR Disability Resource Center at (775) 784-6000 to access a range of supportive services.

Attendance policy

The faculty of the School of Social Work believe that classroom attendance and participation are critical aspects of professional socialization. Students are responsible for assisting in the creation of a learning environment that promotes such socialization. To do so, students should assume responsibility for their own learning and be engaged within the course room. It is expected for students to log into the online classroom a minimum of three times a week to be successfully engaged. Attendance and participation will be part of grading, as determined by the course instructor. Opportunities for make-up assignments are determined at the discretion of individual instructors.

Confidentiality of case material outside of an agency

NASW Code of Ethics requirements regarding confidentiality of client information extend to the use of confidential information from field work in classes, seminars and in student assignments. Students may not divulge client, collateral or collegial information, disguising all names, demographic information and any case details that might identify a client or co-worker. Client files and records should never be removed from the agency for any purpose.

Nondiscrimination policy

The programs of the School of Social Work are conducted without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political orientation, or sexual orientation. This policy applies to the baccalaureate and master’s programs, the field education program, and all admission, employment, and financial aid decisions.

Retention

In its description of the Social Work major, the University of Nevada, Reno catalog states that:

“The admission and retention of students in the program is subject to the professional judgment of the social work faculty.”

Retention in the MSW Program is based on student performance in two general areas: academics and adherence to professional values and standards of behavior. Retention in the social work major requires students and maintain a 3.0 (B) overall grade point average—with a letter grade of “C” or higher in each of the graduate course, including the required 3 credits of electives. Additionally, students must adhere to the academic and professional standards outlined in UNR’s Student Handbook for Student Code of Conduct, the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and the State Board of Examiners for Social Workers, Nevada Legislature’s Standards of Practice.

Dismissal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the Dismissal Policy of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11.

Academic standing and dismissal policy for master’s of social work graduate program

This policy is effective for the Spring 2024 Semester and beyond.

According to the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11, “a student may be dismissed from a program for academic reasons which may include but are not limited to inadequate grades or failure to remain in academic good standing as defined by the program, a lack of professionalism or unethical conduct, or failure to comply with other specific program requirements. Failure to comport with professional and/or ethical standards applicable to the particular discipline or program may be grounds for dismissal from a program.” The NSHE Code authorizes programs to establish their own written dismissal policies, procedures and sanctions for program dismissals. The School of Social Work (SSW) herein sets forth the Dismissal Policy for graduate students in SSW Graduate Social Work Program (MSW Program).

A. Definitions

The term “Academic Policies” is defined as those policies, procedures, and regulations of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), the University of Nevada, Reno, the University of Nevada, Reno Graduate School (“Graduate School”) and particular graduate departments or graduate programs.

The term “Recommending Party” shall refer to the person within the college or Interdisciplinary Graduate Program who shall make the recommendation to the Graduate School for a student to be placed on probation or be dismissed from the MSW Program. For purposes of this Policy, the Recommending Party shall be the dean of the SSW. 

The term “dismissed” shall mean removal from the student’s Graduate Program and removal from the Graduate School. If a student is dismissed, the student needs to reapply to the Graduate Program and the Graduate School. 

The term “discontinuation” shall mean the suspension of the student’s active status in the Graduate Program and Graduate School. If a student is discontinued, the student does not need to reapply to the Graduate Program and the Graduate School. A student can be reinstated at the discretion of the Graduate Program and the Graduate School.

B. General

A student may be placed on probation and/or dismissed from the MSW Program for numerous reasons, which may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Failure to maintain good academic standing as defined by this Dismissal Policy.
  2. Failure to make satisfactory progress as defined by the standards in this Dismissal Policy.
  3. Failure to meet the conditions of academic probation as described in the Academic Probation Notice.
  4. Unsatisfactory performance as a graduate teaching assistant, graduate research assistant, or graduate project assistant.
  5. Failure to comply with professional or ethical standards applicable to the MSW Program while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  6. Violations of University Student Code of Conduct or the Academic Standards Policy for academic dishonesty (UAM 6,502) where the disciplinary sanction is expulsion.

All probation and dismissal recommendations shall be submitted by the SSW to the Graduate School. Only the Graduate School may officially place students on probation or dismiss students. SSW and the MSW Program may not place students on probation, nor dismiss students from graduate programs unless authorized to do so by the Graduate School.

C. Academic Standards

  1. Academic Good Standing

A student may be placed on probation and dismissed from the MSW Program for failure to maintain academic good standing. To be considered in good academic standing, graduate students shall:

  1. Maintain a University graduate cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of at least 3.0.
  2. Complete each MSW course with a grade of “C” or higher.
  3. Maintain a passing grade in the clinical or practicum course.
  4. Have not been placed on probation by the Graduate School for academic deficiencies or practicum or professional fieldwork placement deficiencies.

2. Failure to Make Satisfactory Progress

A student may be placed on probation and dismissed from the MSW Program for failure to make satisfactory progress in their course of study. Failure to make progress is indicated by one or more of the following academic progress standards (“Academic Progress Standards”):

  1. Failure to complete three (3) graduate credits per semester toward MSW Program; if an exception has been issued allowing a student to enroll for fewer than three (3) graduate credits, failure to complete the agreed-on number of graduate credits.
  2. Unsatisfactory grades (including grades below C or its numerical equivalent
  3. Repeated withdrawals from courses.
  4. Failure to consult with their advisor when requested.
  5. Failure to develop an official, approved program of study.
  6. Failure to comply with other specific MSW Program requirements or policies as stated in the MSW Program’s student handbook and website.
  7. Failure to meet the SSW’s milestone or benchmark within the timeframe specified by the MSW Program.
  8. Failure to correct or remediate an “out-of-status” course per the student’s Program of Study or the MSW Program.
  9. Failure to perform at a level commiserate with the training received from either the MSW Program or the practicum or professional fieldwork site while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  10. Failure to maintain the standards of academic and professional integrity expected in for social workers, as described in the MSW Program’s student handbook and SSW website, while the student is in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting. 

The MSW Program competencies for the Academic Progress Standards are stated in the MSW Handbook and SSW website. The competencies or requirements for the Academic Progress Standards shall be consistent with MSW Program requirements, standards in the field and as specified in the MSW Program handbook and on the SSW website for the MSW Program. 

The MSW Program shall review the academic performance and progress of the graduate student at least once per year.

D. Probation and Dismissal.

A Recommending Party may request the Graduate School place the student on probation and/or dismissed for failure to maintain academic good standing as stated in Section (C)(1) and/or failure to make satisfactory progress as stated in Section (C)(2).

  1. Failure to Maintain Academic Good Standing.

If the student's cumulative grade-point total falls below a 3.0, the student shall be placed on probation following the process stated in Section (D)(2)(a). The student must then raise their cumulative graduate GPA to 3.0 by the end of the following semester during which the student is enrolled or the student shall be summarily dismissed from the Graduate School and the MSW Program with no further process or appeal. 

If the student receives a U grade of 83% or lower in a practicum or professional fieldwork course, the student shall not be placed on probation. The student shall be summarily dismissed from the MSW Program and the dismissal procedures described below in Section II(H), shall not apply.

GPA calculator

 The student’s only recourse to challenge a grade is to utilize the University’s grade appeal process. If the student’s grade appeal is successful, the student shall be reinstated in the MSW Program.

  1. Failure to Make Satisfactory Progress.

a. Probation

If the MSW Program determines that the student has failed to make satisfactory progress, the Recommending Party shall make a written request to the Director of Operations of the Graduate School (“Director of Operations”) to place the student on probation. In the request, the Recommending Party shall provide documentation of the student’s failure to meet the specific provisions(s) of this Dismissal Policy, where applicable, warranting probation. The Recommending Party also shall provide specific requirements and/or conditions, including deadlines, which the student shall complete in order for the Graduate School to remove the student from probation. If the student is placed on probation, the student shall not be allowed to participate in field work at a field or practicum setting or site while the student is on probation. 

If the Graduate School approves the request to place the student on probation, the Recommending Party shall notify the student in writing that the student has been placed on academic probation (the “Academic Probation Notice”). The Recommending Party shall forward the Academic Probation Notice to the Graduate School.

The Academic Probation Notice shall outline what the student must do and the dates by which the student must do so in order to return to good standing in the MSW Program. The Academic Probation Notice shall inform the student that while the student is on probation, they shall not be allowed to participate in field work at a field or practicum setting or site. The Academic Probation Notice also shall inform the student that if the student does not meet the conditions of probation, the student shall be dismissed from the MSW Program, contain information about the MSW Program dismissal appeal process that shall be used and provide the student with the contact information for the Director of Operations for any questions or concerns the student may have. The Academic Probation Notice also shall inform the student of the student’s right to participate in a review conference with MSW Program to discuss the terms and conditions of the probation and that the student must submit, within ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Academic Probation Notice, a written request to the SSW to have a review conference (“Review Conference Request”).

The student shall be afforded the opportunity for a review conference, which shall be administered by the Recommending Party or the Recommending Party’s designee who shall be a department chair, program director or associate dean (“Review Conference Administrator”). The student shall have ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Academic Probation Notice to submit a written request to the SSW for a review conference (“Review Conference Request”). The SSW shall direct the Review Conference Administrator to schedule the Review Conference to occur no later than ten (10) Working Days from receipt of the Review Conference Request.

b. Dismissal

If the student fails to meet the requirements and/or conditions of probation, violates the terms of the probation or is recommended for dismissal without probation under SectionE), the Recommending Party shall make a written request to the Graduate School to dismiss the student from the MSW Program and Graduate School. In the request, the Recommending Party shall provide documentation of the student’s failure to meet the terms of the probation, the student’s violation of the terms of the probation, or the grounds for dismissal without probation as stated in Section (E).

If the Graduate School approves the request to dismiss the student, the Recommending Party shall notify the student in writing that the student is being dismissed from the MSW Program and Graduate School (“Dismissal Notice”). The Dismissal Notice shall include a written statement of reasons for the dismissal action, information about the applicable appeal procedures and the time period by which the student shall file an appeal (set forth in Section (H) below).

E. Dismissal Without Prior Probation

In rare instances, a student may be recommended for dismissal from the Graduate School and the SSW without being placed on probation. These instances include the following circumstances:

  1. When a student receives a U grade of 83% or lower in a practicum or professional fieldwork course.
  2. When a student’s behaviors or actions while in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting endanger the life, health, well-being or safety of any person at the practicum or professional fieldwork setting.
  3. Failure to pass required courses in the number of attempts allowed by the MSW Program.
  4. Failure of comprehensive and/or qualifying exams in the allowable number of attempts specified by the MSW Program.
  5. Failure to pass the culminating experience in the allowable number of attempts specified by the MSW Program. The term culminating experience does not include: thesis, dissertation, comprehensive exam, clinical, practicum, fieldwork or internship.
  6. Failure to complete all degree requirements within a timeframe required by the MSW Program not shorter than 6 years for Masters students.
  7. When a sanction of expulsion is issued by the Office of Student Conduct resulting from a student conduct issue or a violation of the Academic Standards policy (UAM 6,502) for academic dishonesty.

For those instances involving a disciplinary sanction of expulsion by the Office of Student Conduct, the student is subject to the procedures as outlined in Section II(F).

For the other instances described above the student is subject to the same procedures as outlined in Section (D)(2) for MSW Program dismissal. The student shall be provided with a Dismissal Notice which shall include information about the appeal procedures, the appeal conference and the time period by which the student shall file an appeal (set forth in Section II(H) below).

F. Dismissal for Violation of UNR’s Student Code Conduct or University’s Academic Standards Policy (UAM 6,502)

All disciplinary issues relating to a student’s alleged violations of the Student Code of Conduct and the Academic Standards Policy are processed through the Office of Student Conduct and not the SSW or the Graduate School. The SSW and the Graduate School and the SSW do not dismiss students from the MSW Program or the Graduate School as a result of a finding of responsibility of violations of the Student Code of Conduct or the Academic Standards Policy. The Graduate School does dismiss a student from the student’s MSW Program and Graduate School upon direction from the Office of Student Conduct after all conduct hearings and appeals have been completed and the Office of Student Conduct notifies the Graduate School that the sanction imposed against the student is expulsion from the University and therefore, dismissal from the student’s MSW Program.

G. Probation or Dismissal/ for Lack of Professionalism or Professional Misconduct in a Practicum or Field Placement Setting

Probation and/or dismissal from the MSW Program for lack of professionalism or professional misconduct while in a practicum or professional fieldwork setting shall be allowed for the MSW Program. The SSW has established its own benchmarks or requirements for professionalism, consistent with its MSW Program requirements, licensing, accreditation and national standards. These benchmarks and requirements are stated in the MSW Program student handbook and the MSW Program website.

All probation and/or dismissal recommendations based upon lack of professionalism or professional misconduct in a practicum or professional fieldwork settling shall be submitted to the Graduate School and only the Graduate School may officially place students on probation or dismiss students. The SSW and the MSW Program may not place students on probation, nor dismiss students from the MSW Program unless authorized to do so by the Graduate School.

A recommendation for probation and/or dismissal due to lack of professionalism or professional misconduct shall follow the procedures stated in this Dismissal Policy for dismissals based upon failure to make adequate progress as stated in Section D(2) or dismissal without probation as stated in Section E, whichever section is applicable. 

H: Appeal Process

  1. Student’s Appeal Request.

The student shall have ten (10) Working Days from the date of the Dismissal Notice to submit an appeal to the SSW. The SSW then shall have ten (10) Working Days to submit the student’s appeal to the Graduate School. Within ten (10) Working Days of receipt of the student’s written request for appeal, the dean of the Graduate School (“Graduate Dean”) shall review the student’s appeal and provide the student with written notification of the opportunity for a review conference on the appeal (“Appeal Conference”). 

  1. Appeal Conference.

The Appeal Conference shall be administered by the Graduate Dean. The Appeal Conference is a meeting that is not intended to be adversarial in nature. The student may be accompanied by an advisor during the Appeal Conference, who may serve in a support role to the student during the Appeal Conference. In this process, the advisor has no right to speak during the Appeal Conference except to the student.

If a student, who has been given notice does not appear for the Appeal Conference with the Graduate Dean, then the review conference shall proceed in the absence of the student.

The Appeal Conference is the time for presentation of the information, documents or witnesses in support of the dismissal. The Appeal Conference is the time at which the student is afforded the opportunity to present information, documents or witnesses on the student’s behalf. Witnesses may present a statement to the Graduate Dean; however, only the Graduate Dean is allowed to ask questions of any witnesses. Furthermore, the Recommending Party has the opportunity to participate in the Appeal Conference and may present information, documents or witnesses in support of the dismissal recommendation. The Graduate Dean also may include representatives from the MSW Program in the Appeal Conference.

The Appeal Conference shall occur within thirty-five (35) Working Days but no earlier than ten (10) Working Days after the date the Dismissal Notice was sent to the student by email or by personal delivery. The student can make a written request to the Graduate Dean asking that the 10-day period be waived if the student wants the Appeal Conference to occur sooner. If necessary, the student can make a written request to the Graduate Dean for an extension of time for the Appeal Conference and the Graduate Dean in their sole discretion, may grant the extension with regard to the Appeal Conference. If an extension of time for the Appeal Conference has been granted by the Graduate Dean, the Appeal Conference shall take place no later than forty-five (45) Working Days from the date of the Dismissal Notice.

  1. Written Decision.

After a review of all the materials, statements and relevant circumstances, the Graduate Dean shall issue a written decision setting forth the reasons upon which the final decision is based. The Graduate Dean’s determination shall be made on the basis of whether it is more likely than not that the student engaged in behavior or actions related to the MSW Program that warrant dismissal.

If the Graduate Dean does not uphold the recommendation for dismissal, the student shall be reinstated in the MSW Program. The Graduate Dean shall provide the written decision to the student and the MSW Program within five (5) Working Days after the Appeal Conference.

  1. Decision Final.

The decision of the Graduate Dean is final and is not subject to appeal.

I: Discontinuation for Non-Enrollment

Pursuant to the Academic Policies of the Graduate School, a student is required to be enrolled in either: (1) three (3) graduate-level credits per semester; or (2) the minimum number of credits agreed to by the Graduate School and the student prior to the beginning of the semester (the “Continuous Enrollment Policy”). Any student in violation of the Continuous Enrollment Policy is subject to discontinuation from the MSW Program and the student’s academic record shall be closed.

The Graduate School shall notify a student prior to the beginning of the next semester if they are in danger of violating the Continuous Enrollment Policy (“Discontinuation Notice”). The Discontinuation Notice shall be issued by the Graduate School within 10 (ten) business days prior to the beginning of the semester. The Discontinuation Notice shall inform the student that failure to register for the minimum number of credits violates the Continuous Enrollment Policy and will result in their discontinuation. If thereafter, the student fails to register for the minimum number of required credits, the student is discontinued from the MSW Program.

If a student is unable to enroll in the minimum number of credits the next semester, the student shall submit a Leave of Absence Form signed by the MSW Program and the Graduate School prior to the start of that next semester. 

Failure to timely submit the Leave of Absence form or failure to return to the MSW Program after the leave of absence has expired shall result in discontinuation from the MSW Program and the student’s academic record shall be closed.

J: Reinstatement Following Discontinuation

Students who were discontinued due to non-enrollment and whose academic record was previously closed may request reinstatement to the MSW Program. A Notice of Reinstatement to Graduate Standing form must be received by the Graduate School no later than the last day of enrollment for the semester in which the reinstatement is to begin.

The decision to reinstate occurs at the discretion of the MSW Program and the Graduate School. The MSW Program may deny the request for reinstatement and require the student to reapply to the MSW Program.

Students whose request for reinstatement is approved by the MSW Program and the Graduate School must pay a reinstatement fee which is equivalent to the application fee.

In some instance, there will have been changes in the MSW Program’s curricular requirements between the time at which the student was enrolled last, and the time when the student is being reinstated. A reinstated student is required to follow the curriculum that was applicable when the student was last enrolled in the program unless the MSW Program agrees in writing to allow the student to follow the most latest curriculum.

A student who has been dismissed from the MSW Program is not permitted to request reinstatement to the MSW Program from which they were dismissed.

Professionalism and professional conduct in field practicum

This policy is effective for the Spring 2024 Semester and beyond.

Introduction about these policies set the tone for professionalism and professional conduct for the student while in practicum setting. These policies comprise the benchmarks or criteria for professionalism and professional conduct as stated in Section G of Article III (Dismissal Policy) and can form the basis for a recommendation for probation or dismissal.

A. Field Practicum Setting

  1. Absence Policy

In the event a student misses practicum for any reason, the Student must do the following: (1) Notify their field instructor and/or task supervisor prior to their absence; and (2) follow up with the faculty liaison regarding their absence within 24 hours.

Students are responsible to make up absences(s) with their field instructor and/or task supervisor before the semester deadline. Failure to complete 225 field hours by the end of the semester deadline may result in failing their field seminar course.

Students who falsify their recorded field hours in their time log may be charged with academic dishonesty and sanctioned pursuant to UAM 6,502 (Academic Standards).

  1. Dress Code

The University of Nevada, Reno, School of Social Work expects students to reflect professionalism and maintain standards of professional appearance and grooming in all field practicum settings. Students who do not adhere to this policy will not be permitted to participate in field practicum.

Standard Attire: Student’s attire must be neat, clean and odor-free for all field practicum activities. Students must adhere to practicum site’s dress code.

  1. Field Practicum Settings Requiring Professional Attire: Business casual is expected in most field practicum sites. This means dress slacks, khakis, dress shirt or blouse, open-collar or polo shirt, optional tie or seasonal sport coat, a dress or skirt at knee-length or below, a tailored blazer, knit shirt or sweater.

The following attire is not acceptable for a professional attire setting:

  • Jeans/western cut pants
  • Leggings, athletics pants (i.e. sweats, yoga pants)
  • Shirts and/or sweatshirts with logos
  • Sleeveless shirts (or shirts of underwear type)
  • See-through clothing
  • Clothing exposing a bare midriff, back, or chest
  • Clothing exposing undergarments

Shoes: Footwear must provide safe, secure footing and offer protection against hazards. Footwear should be closed toed, closed heel uniform or shoes with no openings, clean and in good repair.

  1. General Appearance Guidelines
  1. Hair
    1. Hair is to be clean and well groomed. Student should adhere to practicum site’s policy about hair grooming.
  2. Tattoos: 
    1. Visible tattoos are permitted, with the exception of those that may be prohibited by the practicum site or facility. The clinical placement site or facility may require students to cover their tattoos at all times while in the clinical setting.
  3. Other appearance
    1. Good hygiene is expected at all times.
  1. Technology
  1. Students must consider pedagogical theory and research on the use of technology, to make decisions about whether and how to use technology for educational purposes.
  2. Students must adhere to practicum site’s policies and procedures about technology use.
  3. Students must comply with relevant laws, regulations, and ethical standards to ensure protection of confidential information.
  4. Students must consider relevant needs, risks and challenges to use of technology at their practicum setting.
  5. Students must not utilize practicum site’s technology and/or database for personal purposes.
  1. Social Media

The School of Social Work adheres to NASW Standards for Technology in Social Work Practice. All students must comply with school policies and regulations related to academic and field/clinical performance.

The term social media defines activities that integrate technology, social interaction and construction of words, symbols and pictures. Internet-based electronic application and person website sites that allow the creation and exchange of user-generation content such as but not limited to: profiles, opinions, insights, pictures, videos, experiences, perspectives and media itself. All social media sites are trackable, traceable, and once posted on the internet things can live forever. The following is the School of Social Work, media guidelines for when the student is in a clinical setting:

  • The student shall abide the law and respect copy rights.
  • The student shall be compliant with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and will not use or disclose any patient identifiable information or any patient scenarios of any kind on any social media.
  • Logos from practicum sites may not be utilized by students without written consent from that site.
  • The student is obligated to report suspected violation of this policy to the Field Office.
  • Students utilizing approved video or audio recording through the University of Nevada, Reno, Disability Resource Center, will comply with the alternative media service agreement.
  • It is not appropriate to establish relationships on social media with clients, families, or any practicum site contacts.

Inappropriate use of the internet and social media may result in program probation and/or dismissal.

  1. Informed Consent, Dual Relationships and Conflict of Interest in Field Education
  • For the purpose of this policy, dual relationship is defined when a student relates to clients and/or supervisor in more than one relationship, whether personal, professional, social, or business. Dual or multiple relationships can occur simultaneously or consecutively. Students must comply to relevant laws, regulations and ethical standards related to , dual relationships and conflicts of interest.
  • Students shall adhere to practicum setting’s policies and procedures relating to professional standards and dual relationships.
  • Students shall not, under any circumstance engage in sexual activities, inappropriate sexual communication through the use of technology or in person, or sexual contact with current clients, whether such contact is consensual or forced.
  • Students should not provide services to individuals with whom they have a prior sexual relationship.
  • Students must notify practicum site of any dual relationship with a client to ensure there are no disruption of service delivery to client.
  • Students should not engage in any dual or multiple relationships with field instructors, task supervisors and/or off-site supervisors during field education to reduce potential harm to student and/or clients.
  • Students must disclose any dual relationship(s) with practicum setting and the Field Office.

Failure to notify practicum site and the Field Office may result in in program probation and/or dismissal.

  1. Unsafe Conduct or Practices

Any of the following behaviors by the student while in the field practicum are sufficient grounds for the Field Office to determine that a student is clinically unsafe and cannot continue in field practicum or not competent to continue in the field practicum, either of, which may lead to the student being removed from the field practicum, placed on probation and/or dismissed from the Program.

  • Failure to meet social work professional standards in field education.
  • Refusal/failure to follow School of Social Work regulations and agency protocols.
  • Violating federal, state and practicum confidentiality and privacy laws/policies.
  • Failure to execute critical elements of procedures/protocols/social work practice.
  • Inability to articulate rationale utilizing NASW Code of Ethics for not providing services to diverse and marginalized individuals, families, communities and/or organizations.
  • Failure to disclose dual relationships.
  • Failure to comply with Academic Probation Notice.

When a student’s behaviors or actions while in practicum setting endanger the life, health, well-being or safety or any person at the practicum setting, the student may be removed from the practicum and summarily dismissed from the Program, without probation.

Foundation competencies & associated practice behaviors

Competency 1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context.
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations.
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication.
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage diversity and difference in practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences.
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels.
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi- disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research.
  • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings.
  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and Strengthen practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in policy practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services.
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services.
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies.
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies.
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies.
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes.
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies.
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes.
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes.
  • Apply evaluation findings to Strengthen practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Grievance procedure

Under the remediation policy, there are 4 points at which a student can initiate a grievance: 

  1. If the student believes that the behavior cited in the original concern is unfounded; 
  2. If the student believes that the Remediation Committee's identification of a relevant competency, practice behavior, code of conduct, ethical standard is inaccurate;
  3. If the student believes that the remediation decision or Action Plan does not address the original concern; or
  4. If the student believes they are being held to a higher standard of performance than other students completing the same program of study.

The written grievance should be submitted to the Director of The School of Social Work no later than 10 working days following the decision point in question (see 1-4 above). The burden of proof during the grievance process rests with the student. If the Director determines that the student has provided adequate evidence to support his or her grievance, the Director may dismiss the issue with no further action required. Alternatively, if the Director determines that there is not adequate evidence to support the student’s grievance, he or she will redirect the student to the Remediation Team for further steps/action. The Director will provide his or her decision to the student and Remediation Team in writing within 10 working days of receipt of the student’s written grievance.

Grade appeal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the University’s policy by which students may appeal a grade. This policy states “…a grade assigned by an instructor is only subject to the appeals procedure if:

  • There was a clerical/administrative error in the calculation and/or assignment of the grade;
  • The grade assignment was based on factors other than the student's performance in the course and/or completion of course requirements; or
  • The grade assignment meant that the student was held to more demanding standards than other students in the same section of the course.

The burden of proof of these conditions rests on the student.” The policy advises students to begin the process by consulting with the course Instructor. If the issue is not resolved at that level students may proceed with filing a Grade Appeal Form. The full policy and procedures for filing a Grade Appeal can be found at under section 3,510 of the University Administrative Manual.

Wed, 23 Dec 2020 09:15:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/master-of-social-work/program-handbook
MSW Program Curriculum

Our Traditional Program pathway is open to all students with an undergraduate degree besides social work or students who have completed a BSW more than 5 years ago. Classes begin each fall, with rolling application and admission. Students complete a total of 57 credit hours over the course of two years (full-time) or three years (part-time). 

Field Placements

All competencies and practice behaviors are applied and practiced in the field placement. Students demonstrate mastery of the practice behaviors by working collaboratively with their course instructors, field instructor, and a Master's level social worker who acts as their field supervisor.

Students complete field placements over three semesters for a total of 900 hours.

The first field placement (spring; 300 hours) typically focuses on administrative, organizational, and policy social work practice while providing the student a foundational understanding of a client population and impacting systems.

The second and third semesters (fall and spring; 600 hours) are more intensive and students often work directly with clients or independently work on projects.

Wed, 26 Jul 2023 02:13:00 -0500 en text/html https://miamioh.edu/ehs/graduate-programs/social-work/curriculum.html
Major in Social Work

Overall employment of social workers is projected to grow 11 percent from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations, with the highest demand in healthcare, mental health and substance abuse areas. Majoring in social work provides students with many opportunities. Social workers provide the bulk of mental health services in the US.

BSW graduates are employed in family service agencies, child welfare organizations, nursing homes, criminal justice agencies, and schools to name just a few. Clients may consist of individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities.

Sat, 10 Jun 2023 05:49:00 -0500 en text/html https://miamioh.edu/ehs/departments/family-science-social-work/academics/social-work-major.html
Global Competence: Social Studies Performance Outcomes

Asia Society convened social studies and history faculty from across our International Studies Schools Network to chart innovative and effective ways in which students develop global perspectives. The outcome of this multiyear effort is a set of what we call performance outcomes, which are the enduring understandings, skills, and content that students should know about the social studies and history disciplines.

The goal of history and social studies courses in a globally focused school is to develop students who can investigate and act in the world socially, using distinct and disciplined methods from history and the various social sciences (including, but not limited to anthropology, civics, cultural studies, economics, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology).
 


A globally competent student can use social science skills to:

Investigate the World

  • Students situate and analyze social questions in the world beyond their own immediate environment or time.
  • Pose a researchable question related to members of a global community.
  • Select and document primary and secondary sources of evidence from multiple world cultures and a variety of print and digital media in response to the question.
  • Situate sources of evidence in contemporary or historical place(s), time(s), or idea(s) to analyze their credibility for use in an argument.

Recognize Perspectives

  • Students use sources of evidence from historical and contemporary contexts to consider their own and others’ perspectives.
  • Work with background knowledge and selected historical or contemporary sources of evidence to frame a perspective for an argument.
  • Identify and compare cultural perspectives and alternative explanations found in the sources of evidence as part of an argument.
  • Evaluate multiple perspectives from background knowledge and sources of evidence as part of an argument.

Communicate Ideas

  • Students advance and defend arguments that foster collaboration among diverse audiences.
  • Advance an argument that clearly addresses the research question in the context of the identified global community.
  • Defend that argument with specific and documented evidence from a variety of perspectives and media as applicable to the identified global community.
  • Identify and consider claims of the argument that could be used to foster collaboration among other relevant communities.

Take Action

  • Students compare and prioritize choices and their implications to engage in advocacy or action.
  • Compare and prioritize choices for innovative and responsible action.
  • Consider the local and global implications of the proposed choices and questions left unanswered in the context of the argument.
  • Engage in advocacy or action in a way that is responsive to context(s) of the argument.
     

“Our challenge as History and Social Studies educators is not merely to understand the world around them by investigating roots of tradition and conflict,” said one teacher, “It is also to empower them to Strengthen upon the human condition once they leave our classrooms.”

The History and Social Studies Framework for a global approach to the social studies does not offer a new set of content standards regarding the things students must know about the world. Instead, it indexes the ways in which students approach the world, socially and collaboratively,1 and asked how this approach develops as the student’s sense of that world becomes broader.2

This framework does not replace required curricula or scope and sequences. Instead, students and teachers are challenged to rethink their learning experiences about the world socially, in an increasingly collaborative and global context. As they do, students and their teachers will be able to identify those competencies with which a student best or most ably comprehends the world.

Yet the framework is not a rubric for attaining a global perspective. Global competence is not a singular developmental achievement of the ability to integrate vast amounts of information. Rather it is an expression of each student’s unique capacity to use some or all of these competencies in a way that allows them to understand the world better and to be an effective citizen.

Based on the performance outcomes, four levels of performance are described in the rubrics for each discipline and for global leadership. Taken in the context of an individual student’s development, students can shift the focus of their learning experiences from being subject to their lessons, to becoming the agent of their own education. Participation, backed by capacity, will allow them to participate in, or even shape, their ever-changing world.

......................

Notes

1. Robert C. Hanvey, “An Attainable Global Perspective,” Theory into Practice, Vol. 21, No. 3, Global Education (Summer 1982): pp. 162–167.

2. See also: Jean Piaget, The Construction of Reality in the Child (1954); Lawrence Kohlberg, Philosophy of Moral Development (1981) and Psychology of Moral Development (1984); Carol Gilligan, In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development (1982); Benjamin Bloom, Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (1956); Eleanor Duckworth, The Reality to Which Each Belongs (2005); and James Banks et. al., Principles and Concepts for Educating Citizens in a Global Age (2005).


Thu, 10 Nov 2022 13:38:00 -0600 en text/html https://asiasociety.org/education/global-competence-social-studies-performance-outcomes
Global Competence Outcomes and Rubrics

In Educating for Global Competence, 2nd edition, Veronica Boix-Mansilla and Anthony Jackson define global competence as “the capacity and disposition to understand and act on issues of global significance.” In this context, the word "global" refers not just to different places on the planet, but to the great variety of interconnected people, cultures, ideas, problems, and opportunities that constitute all human experience. The globally competent student learns how to synthesize information and ideas from many sources and perspectives, and makes well-informed decisions to acct on what is learned. It is this constellation of knowledge, disposition, and action that characterizes Global Leadership.

Global Leadership gives students many opportunities to transcend their local boundaries by developing global competence across disciplines of art, English language arts, history/social studies, mathematics, science, and world languages. A well-rounded global curriculum not only opens students' eyes, but sets the stage for them to act in ways that are inspired by their course of study and driven by a desire to make a difference locally, regionally, and globally.

The skills required for successful participation in the world—such as responsible citizenship, innovative entrepreneurship, and active leadership, among others—are not specific to any one course or classroom. A globally focused school fosters the development of these skills through service learning, internships, field trips, performances and exhibits, and other experiential projects, both during the school day and via afterschool and summer programs.

In the course of developing global competence, students investigate the world, learn more about where people come from and how they live, and come back to reflect on their own lives with honesty. Recognizing different perspectives, communicating and defending ideas with respect and empathy, and accounting for the thoughts and opinions of others are the roots of effective leadership and collaboration. The seeds of action—identifying a local, regional or global issue, researching questions about its causes and possible solutions, and taking responsibility for personal action in response—may be sown in a class or in an afterschool program, but in a globally-focused curriculum, those seeds germinate everywhere in school, at home, and in community life.

Students need to know they can have an impact and that they are not powerless in the face of large, complex, and often seemingly intractable global issues they study. Grounding a decision to act in Global Leadership allows them to demonstrate their knowledge of the world and teaches them how to be part of a global community.


Thu, 08 Sep 2022 02:42:00 -0500 en text/html https://asiasociety.org/education/leadership-global-competence
Perspective: How social work seems to be changing — for the worse

Pamela Paul recently wrote a column for The New York Times detailing virulent antisemitism on a New York City campus. The piece was entitled “What is Happening at the Columbia School of Social Work?” but it could just have easily been called “What is Happening in Social Work?” — especially since the Hamas attack on Israel Oct. 7.

Take the statement from upEnd, a group of social workers who aim to abolish the foster care system. Led by Alan Dettlaff of the University of Houston’s School of Social Work, the group released a statement criticizing Israel’s “state violence, imperialism, and settler colonialism, the very same conditions that oppress people all over the globe.” The group blamed the current tragedy on Israel’s “insistence upon dominance, power, and greed.”

As Tom Rawlings, former director of Georgia’s Department of Children and Families wrote recently, “You’d think that those concerned about the protection and well-being of children would offer productive solutions that condemn the Hamas attacks, demand the immediate release of hostages, call for the terrorists to be held accountable, and seek lasting peace. But among many of our self-proclaimed child welfare leaders … we’ve seen the exact opposite.”

Jodi Taub, a social worker who spent the first 15 years of her career working in child welfare and schools and now is in private practice in New York, told me she has noticed an uptick in antisemitism in the past four or five years, and especially in the past two. While there has been an increase in support for other communities like African Americans in latest years, Taub, who is Jewish, says, “We were completely ignored.”

Not only were Jews left out of all of the “diversity, equity and inclusion” courses at schools but many DEI programs devised for corporate America include no information on antisemitism. Thinking back to her time studying social work at Loyola Chicago, Taub says she can’t remember any information being offered about antisemitism there, either.

When Samantha Fried tried to organize a panel on antisemitism at Columbia earlier this fall, she was met with stonewalling from the administration. Fried, who is an alumna who was teaching classes there, told me that she had invited speakers and was all set to go when the administration told her they would move it to Zoom because they were worried about protesters.

Meanwhile, there was recently a “teach-in” sponsored by Columbia Social Workers 4 Palestine in the lobby of a campus building. In a video, a speaker is seen praising the “creativity and determination” of Palestinian “liberation fighters” on Oct. 7. The administration had at first approved the gathering, then canceled it, but appeared to do nothing to stop the students when it proceeded. The event simply moved from a classroom to the lobby.

Related

The level of antisemitism within the Bronx Defenders, a nonprofit that receives state funding for representing the indigent in criminal and family court cases, had reached such a fevered pitch before Oct. 7 that it was the subject of a lawsuit, and the settlement included training for its lawyers and social workers on the problems of antisemitism. After Oct. 7, its employees seemed emboldened, though. The organization’s union issued a statement calling for “Palestinian liberation and resistance under the occupation.” And one of the trainings on antisemitism was interrupted by employees chanting “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.”

To be sure, there are plenty of social workers who are skilled at their jobs and care immensely about the clients they serve. But many public and private agencies are having difficulty finding qualified employees, and the politicization of the field is making things even harder.

What is it about social work that seems to lend itself to this radicalism? Most social workers I speak to say they are attracted to the “social justice” movement. But that has become dominated by rhetoric separating people into the oppressor and the oppressed. And in this formulation, Jews are always the oppressor. But it is not just that.

Fried believes that many of the young people she sees going into social work don’t actually want to do the work but want to be “community organizers like AOC (Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez).” She reports that many of her students “don’t actually want to do home visits and meet with clients.” She says many don’t know how to write well, which gets in the way of communicating with supervisors, and that she knows a surprising number who have been fired from internships because they “are so disrespectful.”

In other words, for some, social work has become a destination for people who want to get paid to be protesters. This is a clear departure from the tradition of social work as embodied by Jane Addams, who is considered to be the progenitor of this profession in America.

Addams, whose Hull House in Chicago catered to poor immigrants of all ethnicities (including Jews), was interested in the theoretical as well as the practical. As Jean Bethke Elshtain wrote in her biography of Addams, “If you were a resident (of Hull House), it would not be at all unusual to move over the course of a day from memorizing George Eliot, to debating Karl Marx, to washing newborns, to readying the dead for burial, to nursing the sick, to minding the children.’’ It’s hard to imagine the same today.

Naomi Schaefer Riley is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a Deseret News contributor and the author of “No Way to Treat a Child: How the Foster Care System, Family Courts, and Racial Activists Are Wrecking Young Lives,” among other books.

Wed, 03 Jan 2024 14:00:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://news.yahoo.com/perspective-social-seems-changing-worse-040059243.html
Program Requirements


Fri, 01 Jul 2022 09:08:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.uab.edu/cas/socialwork/graduate/program-requirements
Bachelor of Social Work – BSW

If you study full-time, in your first year, you’ll take eight 15-credit courses, making a total of 120 credits.

If you wish to study over two semesters, you should aim for 60 credits per semester. Most courses are offered in a single semester each year. Make sure you include courses that are prerequisites for the next level of courses you wish to study.

The Bachelor of Social Work is a parts-based qualification. That means you must complete the first part, before moving to the second, etc.

Part One – Tumu (Foundation)

Part One provides an understanding of people and society, particularly in New Zealand. Tumu is the foundational year introducing core concepts and knowledge for social work as a profession.

Part Two – Taha (Framework)

Taha brings a deeper understanding of social work theories and practice, social policy and engagement with diverse communities.

Part Three – Tuanui (Roof)

Tuanui concentrates on decolonising theories and concepts in social and community work practice. An exciting feature is participation at a Noho Marae.

Part Four – Whare (House)

Whare consolidates learning and skills as an authentic and integrated beginning practitioner.

In Parts Three and Four, you will complete supervised placements in social service agencies.

Part-time study

If you work for more than 12-15 hours a week, we recommend you enrol for part-time study. This could be one to three courses per semester. Please contact us to plan out your part-time study.

Second semester start

If you are applying to begin the Bachelor of Social Work in the second semester (mid-year), please contact us to help you plan your degree.

Distance students

You'll study the BSW via distance learning. Some courses include compulsory in-person contact workshops (from Year One). Dates for contact workshops are on each course page. Students can choose to attend these workshops at either the Auckland or Manawatū campus.

Withdrawing from courses

Withdrawing from a course may impact on you being able to progress to the next part of your Bachelor of Social Work. Prior to withdrawing from a course we recommend you make contact with one of the Bachelor of Social Work Coordinators located within the School of Social Work.

Requirements while you are studying

  • You will complete supervised placements in social service agencies in your third year (field education). By this time you are required to have a full New Zealand driver’s licence.
  • During the course of your study, you will continue to meet our requirements under the Children Act 2014, and under the Social Workers Registration Board ‘Fit and Proper Person policy and Code of Conduct.

Supervised placements – field education

A critical part of the degree are two field education courses. These consist of 120 days (in total) of approved work placements supervised by a registered social worker. You must pass these courses to progress to the next part of the degree. Field education is assessed through both academic and practice requirements.

Re-applying after a break

If you are returning to the Bachelor of Social Work at Massey after a break of two years or more, you must apply for re-entry to the programme.

Typical pattern for the Bachelor of Social Work from 2024

Core courses These courses are a compulsory part of your qualification.

All courses are compulsory - 480 credits: 120 credits each year

Year one
176101 The Sociological Imagination
179110 Creating a Foundation for Social and Community Work
179121 Identity Development in Aotearoa New Zealand
279101 Social Policy: An Introduction
150103 Nau mai e noho: Engaging with Māori
179120 Environmental Sustainability in Social and Community Work
179155 A Foundation of Interpersonal Skills for the Helping Professions
275102 Human Development
Year two
150201 Te Kawenata o Waitangi: The Treaty of Waitangi in New Zealand Society
179210 A Relational Framework for Social Work Theory and Practice
179230 Tangata Moana Perspectives and Practices for Transformation
179255 Preparation for Field Education
150205 Kura Mai Tawhiti: Māori Knowledge
179202 An Introduction to Social Research for Social Work and Social Policy
179240 Ethics, Values and Law in Social Work and Social Policy
279203 Social Policy and Government
Year three
179310 Integrated Social Work Practice – Decolonising Social Work
179320 Community Development
179330 Māua ko Te Tiriti o Waitangi
279301 Social Policy: Political Theories and Approaches
179355 Field Education I (45 credits)
179340 Developing Practice
Year four
179430 Integrated Social Work Practice – Authentising Practice
179432 Ahurea ki uta, Ahurea ki tai
179433 Selected Study in Policy, Practice or Diverse Populations
179440 Management in the Social Services
179431 Consolidating Practice
179455 Field Education II (45 credits)
Mon, 21 Mar 2022 09:04:00 -0500 en-NZ text/html https://www.massey.ac.nz/study/all-qualifications-and-degrees/bachelor-of-social-work-UBSCW/
CBSE Class 10 Additional Questions 2024, obtain PDF for Board exam 2024 (By CBSE)

CBSE Class 10 Additional Practice Questions 2024: The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) is the national-level education board of India. This educational board is well known for its up-to-date curriculum and management. CBSE aims to build people with great and strong educational foundations to support the nation. It empowers students to explore career options in different fields. As the world is not diving into deeper domains of technology, CBSE wants its students to be ready to accept and get along with such advancements.

To support students development of critical thinking CBSE has now published the additional practice questions for CBSE Class 10. These CBSE additional practice papers for Class 10 2024 will guide students to know the language of questions they may face in the upcoming CBSE Class 10 Board exams in 2023–24.

In this article, we have provided subject-wise CBSE Class 10 competency questions and the marking scheme 2024 for Class 10. Students can check out and obtain the free PDFs to Strengthen their knowledge. Refer to the content below to get the CBSE additional practice questions for Class 10 in 2024.

Read:

>>>CBSE Class 10 Science, English, and Maths Competency Based Questions PDF<<<

CBSE Class 10 Additional Practice Questions 2024

CBSE has already released CBSE Class 10 sample papers for 2024. The sample papers helped students and teachers understand the exam pattern. Now, CBSE Class 10 additional practice questions for 2024 have been published. These additional practice questions follow the complex language and question design. This aims to develop critical and abstract thinking in students. Check out the CBSE Class 10 competency questions and marking scheme below.

Note: CBSE has published Class 10 additional practice questions only for the above-mentioned subjects.

Difference in CBSE Practice Papers and Additional Practice Questions

CBSE Practice Papers

CBSE Additional Practice Questions

These are the official resources from CBSE that are aligned with the syllabus. The CBSE practice papers are practice papers for students to understand the question paper pattern. The language of questions is straight to develop knowledge and confidence in students.

The CBSE additional practice question papers are similar to CBSE practice papers or CBSE sample papers in terms of paper structure. The only difference is the level of thinking they demand to solve the questions.

The CBSE additional practice questions are more complex and require students to use deep abstract and critical thinking to understand and solve the questions.

Teachers or students looking for additional practice questions for both CBSE Class 10 and Class 12 together may refer to the link below. The article will provide you with all the CBSE additional practice papers in one place.

Read: CBSE Class 10 sample Papers 2023-24 with Solutions

CBSE Board exam 2023-24 Pattern

Notably, CBSE has not introduced any major changes in the exam pattern for the 2023-24 academic session. The question paper pattern is almost similar to that followed in the 2022-23 session board exams. The types of questions suggested for the CBSE Class 10 Board exam 2024 are as follows:

  • Multiple Choice Questions
  • Assertion & Reason Type Questions
  • Short Answer Questions
  • Long Answer Questions
  • Case Study Based Questions

Also Read:

Sun, 26 Nov 2023 09:43:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/cbse-class-10-additional-practice-question-papers-marking-scheme-pdf-download-1694419676-1
Social Work

The master of social work at UW is an advanced generalist degree program with a focus on rural and frontier practice. The graduate program curriculum allows you to acquire the theoretical and practical foundations of social work, along with advanced competencies. Plus, your two-part practicum and capstone supply you the chance to customize your M.S.W. program to focus on an area meaningful to you.

Our student-centric social work master’s offers two tracks: the two-year Standard Program, which does not require a B.S.W. for admission, and the one-year Advanced Standing Program, which requires a bachelor’s degree from a Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) accredited school.

The UW master’s degree program in social work qualifies you for state license exams and clinical licensure and for social work jobs in government, agency, health care, nonprofit and other settings.

Application Requirements Overview

  • Pay application fee
  • Complete online graduate application 
  • Complete and upload necessary documents
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Background check

How to Apply
Please visit our program admission webpage for more details and necessary forms/documents.

The Standard M.S.W. program (for students who enter the program without a social work undergraduate degree) is a 66–68 credit hour program you can complete in two years.

The Advanced Standing M.S.W. program (for students with social work bachelor’s degrees from Council on Social Work Education accredited programs) complete 38–40 credit hours.

These are a sampling of master’s of social work classes you might take at the University of Wyoming:

  • Advanced Generalist Practice: Community and Rural Practice
  • Advanced Theories and Practice with Children and Families
  • Advanced Policy: Advocacy and Social Action
  • Advanced Social Justice Practice
  • Field Practicum
  • Social Work Leadership in Supervision and Administration

View the full master of social work degree program curriculum.

Graduates from our master’s program in social work find employment with public agencies, nonprofits, government agencies, community organizations and health care organizations. Some have also started their own practices.

Social Work Careers

UW social work graduates have gone on to work in the following roles:

  • Social Worker, Sioux Falls VA Medical Center
  • At-Risk Social Worker, Judson ISD
  • Renal Social Worker, Fresenius Medical Care
  • Licensed Clinic Social Worker, St. John's Living Center
  • Regional CLinical Coordinator, Missouri Division of Youth Services 
  • Associate Professor, Utah State University
  • Community Organizer, Powder Rivier Basin Resource Council
  • Co-Founder, Creekside Collaborative Therapy
  • UW Program Director, Native American Education, Research and Cultural Center
Alum posing in her office
mountain logo

 

 

University of Wyoming’s graduate social work program is listed as the top MSW program by Best Value Schools.

A degree grounded in social justice and anti-oppressive practice. With the advanced generalist social work training you’ll get from UW, you can take your career into the frontier, the urban core and almost any societal sector.

Why Wyoming? Here are some great reasons to choose UW for your M.S.W. degree:

Accreditation

UW’s social work master’s program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Concil on Social Work Education logo

Faculty

Work with faculty who have extensive social work practice experience in mental health, children, youth and families, child protection, gerontology, individual, group and family therapy, veterans, forensics, school social work, grief and loss, research, community practice, administration, policy and advocacy. Examples of faculty publication titles: Human trafficking in Wyoming regions: A mixed-methods, exploratory study of knowledge and practice amongst health care professionals,  Unpacking the worlds in our words: Critical discourse analysis and social work inquiry, Pedagogies of disability justice: Cognitive accessibility in college classrooms.

Research

Collaborate with faculty on social work research. Faculty research interests include grief and loss, individuals with disabilities, veterans, forensic social work, human trafficking, the impact of the pandemic, stress, international, qualitative inquiry,critical social work theory, feminist practice and social work education.

Field Practicum

Hone your skills through 900 practicum hours over two years (Standard Program) or 500 hours in one year (Advanced Standing Program). Students in the M.S.W. program have completed field practicums at Wyoming Children's Law Center, VA hospitals and clinics, Wyoming Behavior Health, and in schools across the state.

Thesis/Portfolio Options

Elect to do a research-based thesis (Plan A) or complete a professional portfolio (Plan B).  Example of a thesis title: Finding Where I Fit: An Autoethnography of a Daughter of Mexican Immigrants Living in White Spaces. 

Graduate Assistantships & Scholarships

My education in visual art (BFA ’11), social work and environment and natural resources (MSW Summer ’21) has informed my interests in working to creatively and collaboratively advance social, environmental and climate justice. To me, these movements are inextricable from one another, and I’m fortunate to make a living putting that idea into practice.

- Conor Mullen, M.S.W. candidate 2021

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