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Program and Licensure Information

Miami University’s undergraduate program in social work leads to a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) and prepares students for generalist social work practice. Through classroom instruction and field-based classes, students gain the knowledge and skills to assess the needs and resources of people and their social environment; provide services to individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities; link people with needed resources; and Improve the resources available in the community.

Curriculum

To complete the BSW degree program, students need to successfully complete a variety of traditional courses, field-based classes, and a field practicum. Please note: requirements may be different depending on the year of your enrollment. Please contact your advisor for details.

Course Requirements

BSW Field Practicum

Social work majors are required to complete an internship consisting of 450 hours at one or more agencies over a two-semester period their senior year. Students choose from a variety of field placements.

For more information or questions, please email socialwork@MiamiOH.edu

Thu, 02 Dec 2021 07:25:00 -0600 en-US text/html https://miamioh.edu/ehs/academics/departments/fsw/academics/majors/social-work/index.html
Killexams : Master of Social Work student handbook

Academic integrity

The School of Social Work adheres to the University of Nevada, Reno Academic Standards Policy for Students concerning issues of academic integrity. Please see the UNR website for a complete description, definitions and policies regarding class conduct and academic dishonesty.

Accommodation for students with disabilities

Students who require additional support due to disabling conditions should discuss their needs with their instructors at the start of each semester. Accommodations for all reasonable requests will be made for documented disabling conditions. In addition, students are encouraged to contact the UNR Disability Resource Center at (775) 784-6000 to access a range of supportive services.

Attendance policy

The faculty of the School of Social Work believe that classroom attendance and participation are critical aspects of professional socialization. Students are responsible for assisting in the creation of a learning environment that promotes such socialization. To do so, students should assume responsibility for their own learning and be engaged within the course room. It is expected for students to log into the online classroom a minimum of three times a week to be successfully engaged. Attendance and participation will be part of grading, as determined by the course instructor. Opportunities for make-up assignments are determined at the discretion of individual instructors.

Confidentiality of case material outside of an agency

NASW Code of Ethics requirements regarding confidentiality of client information extend to the use of confidential information from field work in classes, seminars and in student assignments. Students may not divulge client, collateral or collegial information, disguising all names, demographic information and any case details that might identify a client or co-worker. Client files and records should never be removed from the agency for any purpose.

Nondiscrimination policy

The programs of the School of Social Work are conducted without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political orientation, or sexual orientation. This policy applies to the baccalaureate and master’s programs, the field education program, and all admission, employment, and financial aid decisions.

Retention

In its description of the Social Work major, the University of Nevada, Reno catalog states that:

“The admission and retention of students in the program is subject to the professional judgment of the social work faculty.”

Retention in the MSW Program is based on student performance in two general areas: academics and adherence to professional values and standards of behavior. Retention in the social work major requires students and maintain a 3.0 (B) overall grade point average—with a letter grade of “C” or higher in each of the graduate course, including the required 3 credits of electives. Additionally, students must adhere to the academic and professional standards outlined in UNR’s Student Handbook for Student Code of Conduct, the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and the State Board of Examiners for Social Workers, Nevada Legislature’s Standards of Practice.

Dismissal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the Dismissal Policy of the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Code, Title 2, Chapter 11.

Foundation competencies & associated practice behaviors

Competency 1: Demonstrate ethical and professional behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Make ethical decisions by applying the standards of the NASW Code of Ethics, relevant laws and regulations, models for ethical decision-making, ethical conduct of research, and additional codes of ethics as appropriate to context.
  • Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations.
  • Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communication.
  • Use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes.
  • Use supervision and consultation to guide professional judgment and behavior.

Competency 2: Engage diversity and difference in practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.
  • Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts of their own experiences.
  • Apply self-awareness and self-regulation to manage the influence of personal biases and values in working with diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 3: Advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights at the individual and system levels.
  • Engage in practices that advance social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 4: Engage in practice-informed research and research-informed practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multi- disciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Use practice experience and theory to inform scientific inquiry and research.
  • Apply critical thinking to engage in analysis of quantitative and qualitative research methods and research findings.
  • Use and translate research evidence to inform and Improve practice, policy, and service delivery.

Competency 5: Engage in policy practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Identify social policy at the local, state, and federal level that impacts well-being, service delivery, and access to social services.
  • Assess how social welfare and economic policies impact the delivery of and access to social services.
  • Apply critical thinking to analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies that advance human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice.

Competency 6: Engage with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks to engage with clients and constituencies.
  • Use empathy, reflection, and interpersonal skills to effectively engage diverse clients and constituencies.

Competency 7: Assess individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Collect and organize data, and apply critical thinking to interpret information from clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies.
  • Develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives based on the critical assessment of strengths, needs, and challenges within clients and constituencies.
  • Select appropriate intervention strategies based on the assessment, research knowledge, and values and preferences of clients and constituencies.

Competency 8: Intervene with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence-informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of interprofessional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, interprofessional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Critically choose and implement interventions to achieve practice goals and enhance capacities of clients and constituencies.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in interventions with clients and constituencies.
  • Use inter-professional collaboration as appropriate to achieve beneficial practice outcomes.
  • Negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of diverse clients and constituencies.
  • Facilitate effective transitions and endings that advance mutually agreed-on goals.

Competency 9: Evaluate practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

Foundation practice behaviors

  • Select and use appropriate methods for evaluation of outcomes.
  • Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the evaluation of outcomes.
  • Critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate intervention and program processes and outcomes.
  • Apply evaluation findings to Improve practice effectiveness at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels.

Grievance procedure

Under the remediation policy, there are 4 points at which a student can initiate a grievance: 

  1. If the student believes that the behavior cited in the original concern is unfounded; 
  2. If the student believes that the Remediation Committee's identification of a relevant competency, practice behavior, code of conduct, ethical standard is inaccurate;
  3. If the student believes that the remediation decision or Action Plan does not address the original concern; or
  4. If the student believes they are being held to a higher standard of performance than other students completing the same program of study.

The written grievance should be submitted to the Director of The School of Social Work no later than 10 working days following the decision point in question (see 1-4 above). The burden of proof during the grievance process rests with the student. If the Director determines that the student has provided adequate evidence to support his or her grievance, the Director may dismiss the issue with no further action required. Alternatively, if the Director determines that there is not adequate evidence to support the student’s grievance, he or she will redirect the student to the Remediation Team for further steps/action. The Director will provide his or her decision to the student and Remediation Team in writing within 10 working days of receipt of the student’s written grievance.

Grade appeal policy

The School of Social Work adheres to the University’s policy by which students may appeal a grade. This policy states “…a grade assigned by an instructor is only subject to the appeals procedure if:

  • There was a clerical/administrative error in the calculation and/or assignment of the grade;
  • The grade assignment was based on factors other than the student's performance in the course and/or completion of course requirements; or
  • The grade assignment meant that the student was held to more demanding standards than other students in the same section of the course.

The burden of proof of these conditions rests on the student.” The policy advises students to begin the process by consulting with the course Instructor. If the issue is not resolved at that level students may proceed with filing a Grade Appeal Form. The full policy and procedures for filing a Grade Appeal can be found at under section 3,510 of the University Administrative Manual.

Wed, 23 Dec 2020 09:15:00 -0600 en-us text/html https://www.unr.edu/social-work/degrees-and-programs/master-of-social-work/program-handbook
Killexams : provider Relationship Management: Supporting a new era for growth By ·

Editor’s note: The column below is from Len DeCandia, the former CPO at J&J. You can click here to read an interview with DeCandia.

The financial crisis of 2009 had two measurable outcomes on business strategy. First, it led companies to increase their focus on better P&L outcomes to satisfy a more demanding and conservative investor market. Second, it highlighted the need to meet the more immediate and customized needs of consumers, brought to the forefront through massive technological innovation.

These strategies converged to create an environment where business growth has been centered on the overall customer experience, beyond the product or service provided, particularly where the expansion of delivery channels with post-use influence are foundational contributors to competitive growth. This has resulted in significant investments in customer engagement such as customer relationship management (CRM) and other customer support tools over the past decade, often at the expense of investments in and for other critical people assets: Employees and suppliers.

It’s no surprise then that CRM practices and technology tools represent the biggest software market in the world, and its growth isn’t slowing down. CRM investments supported by the evolving cloud environment are now expected to reach more than $80 billion in revenues by the year 2025. The over index on CRM has created a business environment that has commoditized the other two critical business relationships: employee relationship management (ERM) and provider relationship management (SRM). It has taken a significant, disruptive crisis with severe impacts on critical business operations and outcomes to highlight the risky nature of this tradeoff.

As we navigate through the later phases of the COVID-19 pandemic and changing marketplace, it has become clear that the role of the Human Resources function will change; so too must the role of the Procurement function and our supply management practices. As supply has become the greatest risk to growth, we must also recognize that it represents the greatest opportunity for growth.

The company that can provide quality products and services that their competitors cannot will ultimately be the winner. The ability to do this relies on both employees (having enough, qualified talent) and suppliers (relationships where they are the partner of choice). Boards have come to recognize the immediate need to reshape and reframe their relationships with employees, as well as the greater need to run their supply chains differently to effectively compete and win in this evolving era (Figure1).

Figure 1

image
                         
Source: Len DeCandia

Achieving this organizational performance and growth will require advanced practices and a larger investment in both ERM and SRM, bringing them back into balance with CRM. Organizations that will win in this new era are advancing the people-management skills of their leaders, while also expanding their competencies in SRM, leading to a distinct competitive advantage.

Fundamentally, leaders are given two resources to execute their plans: people resources and budgetary resources. Procurement teams who can elevate the overall organization’s performance in SRM will represent a distinct competitive advantage for those enlightened organizations that have realized through experience that we are in a new era where supply is the greatest risk – or opportunity –for growth.

The historical perspective
This view of the post-pandemic era is one of great transformation. We expect the next decade to bring great social change through technological advances accelerated by the pandemic experience.  Organizations will need to be more thoughtful and purposeful in deciding which capabilities should be internal versus those that can be complemented through external relationships and provider capabilities, amid the influences of geopolitical dynamics and flexible work arrangements.

Investments in employee development and external tools and provider management capabilities should support those decisions. Over the past twenty-five years of my CSO and CPO experiences across four Fortune 100 companies, I have seen a significant shift from internal capability optimization to a broader and deeper investment in provider relationships for better execution across all functions. Customer driven needs for agility, speed and unique solutions have expanded the use of third-party capabilities for many organizations, elevating the importance of managing these relationships. Today, the reality is that increased external collaboration and investment for many organizations has expanded into other business-critical functions such as R&D, IT and Sales/Marketing.

Advanced organizations that are winning and thriving through the pandemic are those that have recognized the need to elevate the value of provider relationship practices throughout the enterprise and support those relationships with digital technology. The care and investment in their employee base require a strategic integration with the investments in provider relationships.

The supply or “supply chain” challenges discussed on every investor call these days validates its importance. This is true for all areas of organizational spend across the company, embracing a true end-to-end perspective that fully aligns the customer experience to the provider experience. Partnering and external collaboration excellence includes deeper provider engagement from the point of identifying an unmet customer need through design, development, commercialization, and ongoing execution of solutions. Procurement’s place in the organizational structure is of equal concern to the expansion of needed competencies to leverage these practices for business growth and competitive advantage.

Macro risk complexities
As the complexities of managing a global network of customers and suppliers have evolved along with ESG expectations, the influence and impact of the macro risk environment has expanded. The global pandemic and the challenges of coordinating activities in multiple markets experiencing unique wave cycles and government policies were a humbling education. Beyond the priority of protecting employees, the health and welfare of suppliers (as well as their employees and their suppliers) are foundational to achieving business objectives and goals.

Expanding ESG practices and investment in long term strategies is an absolute requirement in a business environment that is working to balance multiple stakeholders: customers, employees, communities and investors. For example, we must work faster to transition away from fossil fuels towards greener renewables. Ultimately, as we continue to invest in climate improvement, we are still at the mercy of the vast unpredictability of severe weather patterns that can be quite disruptive.

The further unpredictability of the geo-political environment is yet another layer of risk, leading many companies to actively investigate provider networks, locations and exposure. Procurement teams must shape a provider base that includes practices beyond monitoring sustainability activities, such as full transparency with defined and clear social responsibility standards in areas such as human rights and ethical business practices.

Practice made simple
The reality of any organization’s supply base is that only a small percentage of suppliers represent the majority of the overall spend profile. Managing overall supply requires an understanding of the entire provider base defining the unique differentiating value and risk contribution of each provider beyond the individual spend profiles. 

This complex network of relationships requires a structured approach to engagement practices, aligned with the total value and risk associated with each individual supplier. These might include the suppliers’ innovation, sustainability and social impact. Procurement plays a critical role in shaping the organization’s provider base through deep partnering with internal stakeholders who have responsibility for both the budget and the business outcomes associated with successful provider partnering.

Coming out of the pandemic, business leaders face a more difficult environment than ever, and those that rebalance their investments across customers, employees and their relationships with suppliers will be the winners. Procurement’s value today and in the future will be measured by their ability to create an external provider business environment supported by a real time digital infrastructure, enabling fast, easy access to the approved and vetted provider base for the internal budget owners.

Success is achieved by creating simplicity through well-defined and governed buying channels, where immediate internal employee needs can be satisfied with the optimal supplier. The real pivot is moving the procurement or buying function from a transactional partner (“Get me the best price!”) to a more strategic partner (“Help me build a network of suppliers that drive value”).  More importantly, procurement’s main role is to elevate overall organizational competencies in SRM throughout the entire engagement cycle, unleashing and fully leveraging the strategic value of the provider base across the entire enterprise.

Leadership perspectives
In pre-pandemic times, board level reviews of the supply chain and the provider environment were few and infrequent. Most organizations focused solely on cost management strategies, with additional ad-hoc activity in emergency disruption reviews.

The convergence of several significant disruptors - customer digital evolution, the global pandemic, the pivot towards greater ESG responsibilities and the unpredictability of the global macro environment - has elevated the importance of strong external management competencies in supply management at all levels of the organization. 

Successful leaders in supply management and procurement will need to deliver value in three dimensions, adding innovation and ESG to cost management. The best and most valued supply management leaders in this digital era will add the ability to drive strong organization-wide competencies and practices to source, and curate and execute innovation with excellence at speed and scale.

They will advance the organization’s digital literacy and will lead external, public efforts that protect and enhance the organization’s reputation through ESG strategies that are commensurate with customer, employee base and investor expectations. Board level knowledge and expertise in supply chain management is mandatory for future-ready organizations.

Perhaps most important, investors will require greater transparency for these practices and the board must ensure that exceptional leaders are in place that can deliver growth through excellence in provider collaboration and enterprise-wide execution.

About the author: Len DeCandia is the former chief procurement officer for Johnson & Johnson, where he spent 22 years in a variety of positions. In addition, he was CPO and a senior vice president at Estee Lauder from 2009 to 2014, and senior vice president, supply chain management at AmerisourceBergen from 2004 to 2008. DeCandia is also the founding chair of the Rutgers University Center for Supply Chain Management. 



Thu, 13 Oct 2022 10:59:00 -0500 text/html https://www.scmr.com/article/supplier_relationship_management_supporting_a_new_era_for_growth
Killexams : Social Work BA (Hons)

First Year

  • Preparation for Social Work Practice
  • Introduction to Law, Policy and Procedure
  • Understanding the Life Span (Human growth and development)
  • Introduction to Social Work Theories and Skills in practice

Second Year

  • Practice Placement (70 days)
  • Law for Social Work Practice
  • Research informed practice
  • Social Work Theories, Processes and Skills in Practice
  • Inter-Professional Education (IPE)

Third Year

  • Research Project
  • The Developing Professional Practitioner
  • Professional Judgement and Decision Making
  • Final Practice Placement (100 days)

Social work is a full-time programme and in the first year, you can expect to be in taught sessions on most days. In the second and third years, you will have one to two days of independent study each week.

Teaching and learning approaches include:

  • Individual and group work
  • Shadowing
  • Problem-based learning
  • Lectures
  • Tutorials

While on placements, you will work during the normal hours of your placement agency and may be required to attend placements 5 days per week. 

Assessment

To ensure students are ready to practice, they are assessed in their first year through a communication exercise with a service user or carer and a shadowing exercise where they will shadow a social worker in their practice with service users and reflect on this experience. In addition, you will be required to pass both the second and third year placements

Teaching Contact Hours

Contact hours in a typical week will vary from week to week. . However, typically you will have up to 23 contact hours of teaching and this will break down as:

Personal tutorial/small group teaching: approx. 1 hours of tutorials (or later, project supervision) some weeks.

Medium group teaching: approx. up to 5  hours of practical classes, workshops or seminars each week

Large group teaching: approx. up to 20  hours of lectures each week

Personal study: approx. up to 15 timetabled hours studying and revising in your own time each week, including some guided study using hand-outs, online activities, etc.

The timetable for each week varies and each week is made up of different activities. 

Our Social Work BA (Hons) programme is approved by Social Work England. Approval of the programme means that that on successful completion of the programme, students are eligible to apply to register with Social Work England as a qualified social worker. Social Work regulation transferred to Social Work England on December 2nd 2019.

Sun, 08 Nov 2015 09:10:00 -0600 en-GB text/html https://www.dmu.ac.uk/study/courses/undergraduate-courses/social-work-ba-hons-degree/social-work-ba-hons.aspx
Killexams : Berea school board gets social-emotional learning update

BEREA, Ohio – Social-emotional learning in public schools is nothing new, having been a state focus for more than 10 years.

That was one of many messages Berea City Schools Director of Pupil Services Lori Sancin conveyed on Sept. 19 to the Berea Board of Education about the district’s ongoing efforts.

SEL centers on positivity in behavior, emotions and interactions with others, she said. The five core competencies are self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and responsible decision making.

“Everything we do (in the BCSD) is basically focused on those five core competencies … which are the skills everyone needs in order to be successful in the trades, the careers, college or whatever you choose to do in life, and in your professions, after your K-12 education,” Sancin said.

The district uses a three-tier concept when teaching academics and also when evaluating behaviors.

She said PBIS – Positive Behavioral Intervention Support – is Tier 1, which focuses on what all district students need from a conceptual standpoint. That includes expectations about behavior in the classroom, hallways, etc.

“PBIS starts with making sure all of our kids know what those expectations are … because it’s about managing their behaviors and self-awareness of what they’re doing,” Sancin said.

For students needing extra support, Tier 2 involves small groups of instruction, with parental consent and check-ins, she said.

At the Tier 3 level, students may receive a more intense small-group intervention, individual counseling with parental consent or a referral to other community resources.

A new pilot program using universal screening tools DESSA and DAP will get under way soon.

“This has been something our team of school counselors, social workers, school psychologists and administrators has researched, with regional support from the Educational Service Center (of Northeast Ohio),” Sancin said, emphasizing the importance of “student voice” in the survey results.

Students will bring home information to their parents in advance of administering the surveys.

Parents will be consulted to obtain consent if screening results show their child would benefit from additional intervention.

The screeners will be administered to grades 1, 5 and 9 during the first two weeks of October. That information will be analyzed through the end of October, and interventions will begin in November.

After the pilot is completed this school year, the information collected will guide the district’s next steps.

“I read a quote this past week … that when kids can’t read, we don’t kick them out of school, but when they can’t behave themselves, there are often negative consequences,” board member Heather Zirke said.

“I see this as an opportunity to do something good for kids that need some help self-regulating.”

Read more stories from the News Sun.

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Fri, 23 Sep 2022 03:36:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.cleveland.com/community/2022/09/berea-school-board-gets-social-emotional-learning-update.html
Killexams : The Do's And Don'ts Of Social Media Etiquette At Work

In 1997, social media was born. You likely didn’t even know it, let alone use it. Back then, a mere 1.7% of the population used the internet, and with it the first recognized social media site, Six Degrees. At its peak, it had about 1 million members with profiles.

Fast forward 23 years. SixDegrees.com and its profiles are long gone. Facebook is the social media network king of the world, amassing almost 2.5 billion users, while nearly 3.7 billion people are active on some sort of social media platform.

The latest statistics reveal that in the United States alone, people spend an average of two hours and three minutes a day on social media. The majority of that time is spent on Facebook, with estimates ranging from 38 minutes to over an hour a day. According to Pew Research, 74% of U.S. adult Facebook users log in at least once a day, and more than half of its users visit several times a day.

What does this mean for employers? For starters, it means your employees are most likely spending time on social media at work, whether on company or personal devices. For a growing number, staying active on social media is part of their work. But as a medium that began as a way to connect socially with family and friends, the lines of propriety easily blur when personal and professional relationships co-mingle on social media. Add to that the permanence and speed with which digital (mis)information can be shared, and social media relationships and usage at work can be a minefield fraught with explosives — that is, if an employer and employee aren’t on the same page with what constitutes good social media etiquette.

Here are some things I suggest for companies and workers:

Do:

• Develop a social media policy. The importance of this cannot be overstated. This should cover not only use of your brand’s social channels, but also how employees portray the company on their personal pages. You can also address using personal social media on company time. Too much time on social media can definitely affect worker productivity, and many employers choose to block it or put up firewalls. However, research shows workers whose employers have at-work social media policies spend less work time on social media for personal reasons. View a trial policy here. 

• Use social media to build your brand and advance your career. Some people keep personal and professional accounts separate to minimize risk and maintain privacy. Just remember, anything that is posted is never really private, and even personal posts can get you into trouble at work. (Read the social media policy carefully.) Others will use just one account, and I think that is OK too, as long as you are intentional in how you portray yourself. Positive content about your company and insightful thoughts on your industry, alongside some fun personal posts, could help enhance your reputation and career. If you question whether it’s a good idea to comment or post a photo, it is probably best to skip it. If you are prone to oversharing, make separate accounts.

• Be familiar with how different social media platforms are used differently. While basic decency should be evident across the board, pay attention to how Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn are used, and follow suit. Different types of content work best on different platforms.

Don’t:

• Don’t overuse hashtags, type in all caps (unless you are trying to scream, and please don’t) or post the exact same thing on every platform. This isn’t a rule, but it is a best practice on all platforms. Your message and your brand will become diluted, and even your family will tire of incessant posting. No one wants to be spammed. Not to mention, if your co-workers or boss see a steady stream of posts while you are supposed to be working, it will negatively impact you at the office. 

• Be rude, divisive or combative. Research shows workers are more likely to discover information on social media that lowers their opinion of a colleague than improves it. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, think before you post or comment on another’s post in an inflammatory way. Besides, no argument is ever won on social media.

• Embarrass or take advantage of your employer. A workplace social media policy should clearly prohibit disclosing confidential company information. It is also not the place to vent about how much you hate your job, your boss or your co-workers. This is poor manners. Just like in real life, take your grievances to the source, not social media. And remember, social media can be the ultimate web of deceit. Expect that if your social activity shows you have been dishonest or disloyal, you are subject to termination.

To Friend Or Not To Friend?

Every CEO or colleague will have an opinion on whether they should “friend” one another on social media. After all, our work family often does become like real family — but not always. Personally, I like to connect with employees and colleagues on social media. I enjoy learning about their families and sharing mine with them and find it’s a great way to connect and build the relationship outside of the office. However, I respect that everyone may not feel the same way. So, while I accept every invitation from my staff, I don’t send them invitations because I don’t want them to feel pressured to “friend” the boss.

For me, it boils down to showing respect: respecting each other’s privacy, respecting the company that employs you and respecting one another’s viewpoints, even if you don’t agree. Basically, treat people online the way you would treat them in person. I feel like Emily Post would agree.

Wed, 17 Jun 2020 05:57:00 -0500 Clarissa Windham-Bradstock en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbeshumanresourcescouncil/2020/04/03/the-dos-and-donts-of-social-media-etiquette-at-work/
Killexams : Best Practices To Help Strengthen Your Company's Security Culture

Steve Durbin is Chief Executive of Information Security Forum. He is a frequent speaker on the Board’s role in cybersecurity and technology.

Most security incidents have less to do with technology and more to do with people. In 2021, 82% of security breaches involved a human element. Negligence, judgment errors, carelessness, misuse, misconfigurations and biases help cyber criminals walk through the front door of some of the most “security-savvy” organizations.

The threat landscape is also becoming riskier and more complex. Employees working from home are accessing sensitive resources from outside the corporate perimeter, making them more vulnerable to social engineering, fraud and phishing scams. New geo-political risks are emerging and critical infrastructure is increasingly getting connected to the internet.

Security is now everyone’s responsibility, not just IT security teams.

Difficult to harness and tame, human behavior is arguably one of the biggest challenges faced by security practitioners, leaders and cyber risk managers. That’s why the concept of security culture is increasingly important: Culture holds the power to influence employee behaviors, attitudes, perceptions, beliefs, norms and customs.

So, how can organizations strengthen their security culture? Here are six best practices that can help:

1. Measure things to create meaningful impact.

You can’t change what you can’t measure. To positively influence security culture, you must first analyze its current state. How often is security training conducted? What are the participation rates and engagement metrics like? How do employees perform in phishing simulations? What are employee attitudes, values and beliefs concerning the organization’s cybersecurity program? How frequently are employees reporting and flagging phishing emails? What are the top root causes of cyber attacks? Are relevant security controls already in place?

Once security teams have an understanding of the overall state of security controls and the underlying security culture, they can then embark on their plan to achieve desired behaviors.

2. Start from the top.

Any culture change must ideally start from the top. If the C-suite does not support the desired transformation, all efforts will likely fail. To secure leadership buy-in, explain the business case with clarity. What are the risks? What are the metrics? What is the proposed framework? Demonstrate the positive impact of lower risk, better efficiency, improved reputation, fewer human errors and fewer incidents. Ensure leadership empowers, articulates, communicates and demonstrates their own development and encourages even the most nuanced cultural shifts.

3. Keep it real and relevant.

When training employees, always cite real-world examples of cyberattacks making the headlines. Explain how cognitive biases are impacting day-to-day decisions. Sometimes users know what to do but not how. Sometimes cybersecurity teams tell them how to do it but fail to remind them why. Create programs that are customized and tailored to the target audience based on the work profile, level of risk, security maturity or competence. Try to offer high-value content. Many people undergo security awareness and compliance training because they have to, not because they want to.

4. Talk in a manner people understand.

Most technical people tend to get carried away with jargon. Try to keep it simple. Avoid using words that evoke negative connotations. For example, instead of using security concepts like “zero trust,” use simpler words such as “always verify.” Instead of using “security patching” or “life cycle management,” use phrases such as “always be up to date.” The idea is to be positive with communications so employees from various departments who might not be familiar with cybersecurity jargon find it meaningful, relevant and impactful.

5. Create a culture of accountability, not blame.

A positive security culture is one that gives people confidence that they can speak openly and see the organization improving as a result. Allowing workers to understand what is best for securing the organization will also protect their own personal data and privacy. If an employee finds something that's flawed or they discover a phishing attempt, they should feel free to report it without fear of reprimand.

6. Empower employees with the tools they need.

Make security policies and procedures clear to users (what they should be doing, why they should be doing it and how). Offer regular security awareness training that includes the latest trends and tactics used by cybercriminals to scam victims. Deploy security best practices such as anti-spam, endpoint detection and response, multi-factor authentication, intrusion detection system, etc., to ensure users are protected. Build a feedback loop or reporting process to gain a better understanding of evolving employee requirements and challenges.

To summarize, start with culture at the top and focus on behavior at the bottom. Empower employees, train regularly and run phishing simulation exercises, encourage reporting of suspicious activity or anomalies, and have metrics in place to help the organization deliver continuous improvement.


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Wed, 12 Oct 2022 23:15:00 -0500 Steve Durbin en text/html https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbesbusinesscouncil/2022/10/13/best-practices-to-help-strengthen-your-companys-security-culture/
Killexams : Killingly school board's public reminder: Social media posts can get employees fired

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Sat, 01 Oct 2022 02:19:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.norwichbulletin.com/story/news/local/2022/09/30/killingly-ct-boe-social-media-posts-can-get-school-employees-fired/69521874007/
Killexams : Advocating for a sustainable tomorrow

Bursa Malaysia has been among the forefront of those advocating for the adoption of sustainable practices among companies for 15 years – long before the term “environmental, social and governance (ESG)” gained widespread traction in the business community.

This hails back to 2007 when the regulator of the Malaysian capital market required public-listed companies (PLCs) to have a sustainability statement within their annual reports to disclose their efforts.

It has also launched the FTSE4Good Bursa Malaysia (F4GBM) Index in 2014 and the Sustainability Reporting Guideline in 2015, amongst many others, with the aim of driving the ESG agenda among listed companies.

As a strong proponent of businesses to be more sustainable, socially responsible and ethical, Bursa Malaysia chairman Tan Sri Abdul Wahid Omar speaks with StarESG on the progress the country’s PLCs have made along the ESG journey.Bursa Malaysia will be launching more environmentally-skewed indices in the near future, said Abdul Wahid.Bursa Malaysia will be launching more environmentally-skewed indices in the near future, said Abdul Wahid.

How much progress have listed companies made thus far, in terms of adherence to Bursa’s listing requirements pertaining to sustainability disclosures? What are some of the key areas where the exchange would like to see further improvements?Bursa Malaysia has been conducting annual sustainability disclosure review (SDR) exercises based on listed companies’ sustainability statements or reports since 2017. The primary aim is to monitor progress made as well as to facilitate feedback on potential gaps and improvement opportunities.

Our 2021 SDR, undertaken in collaboration with the Minority Shareholder Watch Group, covered all Main and ACE Market listed companies. More specifically, the exercise covered the Sustainability Statements/Reports of 869 listed companies (740 Main Market; 129 ACE Market) for financial year ended April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021. Listed companies that are classified under PN17 of the Main Market and GN3 of the ACE Market were excluded from our assessment.

I must say the overall progress is quite encouraging. The average compliance levels vis-à-vis our listing requirements are high, where the Top 100 listed companies recorded an average of 98%, while the score for all Main Market listed companies stood at 86%. Having said that, the overall quality of disclosures leaves considerable room for improvement where, against a stringent set of criteria, the Top 100 listed companies scored an average of 58%, while all Main Market listed companies scored 40%.

For ACE Market listed companies, their compliance level is at a full 100% as they are only required to include in their annual reports, a simple narrative statement of their management of material sustainability risks and opportunities. As for quality of disclosures, they are being assessed using the same stringent criteria utilised for their Main Market counterparts, and the resultant average score is 23%.

Based on our assessment of sustainability disclosures made, the key areas requiring further improvements include disclosures pertaining to:

> How the remuneration of directors and senior management is linked to sustainability-related key performance indicators.

> Reasoning for chosen scope of sustainability statement/report.

> The company’s materiality assessment process (e.g. stakeholders engaged for the prioritisation of the PLCs material sustainability matters).

> Board approval and/or endorsement of the outcome of the company’s materiality assessment process.

How does Bursa Malaysia plan to further elevate listed companies’ ESG disclosures and practices to be more aligned to international standards or best practices?As a frontline regulator and market operator, Bursa Malaysia provides ongoing guidance, advocacy and engagements in the marketplace to ensure inculcation of good ESG practices amongst listed companies.

One major initiative that the exchange is currently embarking on is undertaking a comprehensive review of our Sustainability Reporting Framework. The primary aim is to better address the evolving informational needs of key capital market stakeholders such as institutional investors. In particular, the exchange is placing a lot of emphasis on enhancing the availability, quality and comparability of our listed companies’ sustainability disclosures.

Following on from the above, our proposals include requiring all listed companies to provide disclosures on a set of common sustainability matters and indicators that are deemed material regardless of size or sector. In addition, we proposed to mandate climate change-related disclosures that are aligned with the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) recommendations. This would address the urgent need for listed companies to internalise and effectively manage climate change-related risks and opportunities in order to successfully transition to a low-carbon world. Combating the impacts of climate change will not only strengthen our listed issuers’ business resilience, but will also realise Malaysia’s aspiration of becoming a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions nation as early as 2050.

Apart from the above, other key proposals include:

1. Requiring disclosure of data for at least three financial years and performance targets, for each reported indicator.

2. Requiring a statement whether the sustainability disclosures have been assured and if so, the scope of such assurance.

Additionally, the exchange further proposes that, where appropriate, the sustainability practices and disclosures of the ACE Market listed corporations be strengthened to be broadly on par with those of the Main Market. Overall, Bursa Malaysia’s enhanced Sustainability Reporting Framework will serve as a springboard to propel listed issuers to adopt international best practices and realise our national aspiration of being the region’s leading capital market for sustainability.

The exchange has also made numerous resources available to assist PLCs in their journey toward sustainability. Among them is BursaSustain, a one-stop knowledge centre for corporate governance, responsible investment and sustainability, which contains a repository of information, publications, news articles and e-learning modules.

In 2021, we collaborated with the United Nations Global Compact Network Malaysia and Brunei in developing a Corporate Sustainability Practitioner (CSP) Competency Framework and a digital self-assessment tool. The CSP Competency Framework is designed to help guide sustainability practitioners develop core competencies, as well as enable companies to develop structured talent development programmes to drive corporate sustainability. Through this competency framework, we hope we can support corporate sustainability practitioners in building capacities to become effective change agents for a responsible and successful business.

More recently in June, we released the Guidebook 2 of our PLC Transformation Programme, titled Sustainable, Socially Responsible and Ethical PLCs. Among other things, the guidebook emphasises the need for PLCs to develop a well-defined ESG approach, which includes better governance, more effective management of environmental and social performance and embedding robust ESG practices across key functions of the organisation.

Since your announcement that Bursa Malaysia will be working closely with the Ministry of Environment and Water and other relevant ministries, as well as stakeholders to develop a Voluntary Carbon Market (VCM), what has been the progress?In our exact media release dated Aug 15, Bursa Malaysia announced that we will launch the VCM exchange later this year, which will allow businesses to purchase voluntary carbon credits from climate-friendly projects and solutions to offset their carbon footprint. The exchange is currently working with various stakeholders on the VCM exchange’s key building blocks, which include drafting the VCM rules to provide clarity to market participants, building a sustainable supply of high-quality carbon credits aligned with our product specifications and engaging corporates better to understand their future expectations and demands for carbon credits.

The coming months will see us ramping up our capacity-building initiatives to raise awareness of carbon credits and their potential uses, carbon credit origination process and project development, etc. We will also leverage on our MoU with Verra and work with relevant stakeholders to organise these sessions.

As a facilitator of carbon trading, Bursa Malaysia will ensure appropriate governance structure and robust mechanisms are put in place to support a vibrant and transparent VCM exchange.

The F4GBM Index has been in existence since 2014. Are there any plans to extend or to introduce more ESG-centred indices to better cater to the needs of different investors?In addition to the FTSE4Good Bursa Malaysia (F4GBM) index, Bursa Malaysia has launched the FTSE4Good Bursa Malaysia Shariah (F4GBMS) index in July 2021. The F4GBMS index caters to investor demand for ESG and Shariah-compliant investment needs. This new themed index is designed to track constituents in the F4GBM index that are shariah-compliant.

The F4GBMS Index currently comprises 65 constituents and serves as a basis for fund managers to develop new investment products comprising a portfolio of shariah-compliant equities guided by sustainable investing principles.

We plan to further build on this momentum with the launch of more environmentally skewed indices in the near future. How much progress have listed companies made thus far, in terms of adherence to Bursa’s listing requirements pertaining to sustainability disclosures? What are some of the key areas where the exchange would like to see further improvements?

Bursa Malaysia has been conducting annual sustainability disclosure review (SDR) exercises based on listed companies’ sustainability statements or reports since 2017. The primary aim is to monitor progress made as well as to facilitate feedback on potential gaps and improvement opportunities.

Our 2021 SDR, undertaken in collaboration with the Minority Shareholder Watch Group, covered all Main and ACE Market listed companies. More specifically, the exercise covered the Sustainability Statements/Reports of 869 listed companies (740 Main Market; 129 ACE Market) for financial year ended April 1, 2020 to March 31, 2021. Listed companies that are classified under PN17 of the Main Market and GN3 of the ACE Market were excluded from our assessment.

I must say the overall progress is quite encouraging. The average compliance levels vis-à-vis our listing requirements are high, where the Top 100 listed companies recorded an average of 98%, while the score for all Main Market listed companies stood at 86%. Having said that, the overall quality of disclosures leaves considerable room for improvement where, against a stringent set of criteria, the Top 100 listed companies scored an average of 58%, while all Main Market listed companies scored 40%.

For ACE Market listed companies, their compliance level is at a full 100% as they are only required to include in their annual reports, a simple narrative statement of their management of material sustainability risks and opportunities. As for quality of disclosures, they are being assessed using the same stringent criteria utilised for their Main Market counterparts, and the resultant average score is 23%.

Based on our assessment of sustainability disclosures made, the key areas requiring further improvements include disclosures pertaining to:

> How the remuneration of directors and senior management is linked to sustainability-related key performance indicators.

> Reasoning for chosen scope of sustainability statement/report.

> The company’s materiality assessment process (e.g. stakeholders engaged for the prioritisation of the PLCs material sustainability matters).

> Board approval and/or endorsement of the outcome of the company’s materiality assessment process.

How does Bursa Malaysia plan to further elevate listed companies’ ESG disclosures and practices to be more aligned to international standards or best practices?

As a frontline regulator and market operator, Bursa Malaysia provides ongoing guidance, advocacy and engagements in the marketplace to ensure inculcation of good ESG practices amongst listed companies.

One major initiative that the exchange is currently embarking on is undertaking a comprehensive review of our Sustainability Reporting Framework. The primary aim is to better address the evolving informational needs of key capital market stakeholders such as institutional investors. In particular, the exchange is placing a lot of emphasis on enhancing the availability, quality and comparability of our listed companies’ sustainability disclosures.

Following on from the above, our proposals include requiring all listed companies to provide disclosures on a set of common sustainability matters and indicators that are deemed material regardless of size or sector. In addition, we proposed to mandate climate change-related disclosures that are aligned with the Task Force on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) recommendations. This would address the urgent need for listed companies to internalise and effectively manage climate change-related risks and opportunities in order to successfully transition to a low-carbon world. Combating the impacts of climate change will not only strengthen our listed issuers’ business resilience, but will also realise Malaysia’s aspiration of becoming a net-zero greenhouse gas emissions nation as early as 2050.

Apart from the above, other key proposals include:

1. Requiring disclosure of data for at least three financial years and performance targets, for each reported indicator.

2. Requiring a statement whether the sustainability disclosures have been assured and if so, the scope of such assurance.

Additionally, the exchange further proposes that, where appropriate, the sustainability practices and disclosures of the ACE Market listed corporations be strengthened to be broadly on par with those of the Main Market. Overall, Bursa Malaysia’s enhanced Sustainability Reporting Framework will serve as a springboard to propel listed issuers to adopt international best practices and realise our national aspiration of being the region’s leading capital market for sustainability.

The exchange has also made numerous resources available to assist PLCs in their journey toward sustainability. Among them is BursaSustain, a one-stop knowledge centre for corporate governance, responsible investment and sustainability, which contains a repository of information, publications, news articles and e-learning modules.

In 2021, we collaborated with the United Nations Global Compact Network Malaysia and Brunei in developing a Corporate Sustainability Practitioner (CSP) Competency Framework and a digital self-assessment tool. The CSP Competency Framework is designed to help guide sustainability practitioners develop core competencies, as well as enable companies to develop structured talent development programmes to drive corporate sustainability. Through this competency framework, we hope we can support corporate sustainability practitioners in building capacities to become effective change agents for a responsible and successful business.

More recently in June, we released the Guidebook 2 of our PLC Transformation Programme, titled Sustainable, Socially Responsible and Ethical PLCs. Among other things, the guidebook emphasises the need for PLCs to develop a well-defined ESG approach, which includes better governance, more effective management of environmental and social performance and embedding robust ESG practices across key functions of the organisation.

Since your announcement that Bursa Malaysia will be working closely with the Ministry of Environment and Water and other relevant ministries, as well as stakeholders to develop a Voluntary Carbon Market (VCM), what has been the progress?

In our exact media release dated Aug 15, Bursa Malaysia announced that we will launch the VCM exchange later this year, which will allow businesses to purchase voluntary carbon credits from climate-friendly projects and solutions to offset their carbon footprint. The exchange is currently working with various stakeholders on the VCM exchange’s key building blocks, which include drafting the VCM rules to provide clarity to market participants, building a sustainable supply of high-quality carbon credits aligned with our product specifications and engaging corporates better to understand their future expectations and demands for carbon credits.

The coming months will see us ramping up our capacity-building initiatives to raise awareness of carbon credits and their potential uses, carbon credit origination process and project development, etc. We will also leverage on our MoU with Verra and work with relevant stakeholders to organise these sessions.

As a facilitator of carbon trading, Bursa Malaysia will ensure appropriate governance structure and robust mechanisms are put in place to support a vibrant and transparent VCM exchange.

The F4GBM Index has been in existence since 2014. Are there any plans to extend or to introduce more ESG-centred indices to better cater to the needs of different investors?

In addition to the FTSE4Good Bursa Malaysia (F4GBM) index, Bursa Malaysia has launched the FTSE4Good Bursa Malaysia Shariah (F4GBMS) index in July 2021. The F4GBMS index caters to investor demand for ESG and Shariah-compliant investment needs. This new themed index is designed to track constituents in the F4GBM index that are shariah-compliant.

The F4GBMS Index currently comprises 65 constituents and serves as a basis for fund managers to develop new investment products comprising a portfolio of shariah-compliant equities guided by sustainable investing principles.

We plan to further build on this momentum with the launch of more environmentally skewed indices in the near future.

Mon, 03 Oct 2022 13:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.thestar.com.my/business/business-news/2022/10/04/advocating-for-a-sustainable-tomorrow
Killexams : Social Work Workshops

9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (3 hours; 3 CEUs)
Workshop L: Engagement Strategies for Building Partnerships with Families Affected by Intergenerational Trauma
Instructor: Sarah A. Gardner, LCSW-C

For individuals and families, high stress and multiple traumatic exposures across generations erode help-seeking behavior and the belief in the possibility of improved conditions. This introductory workshop will deepen participants’ understanding of the importance of a strengths-based, shared power approach to engaging families affected by systemic conditions such as racism, discrimination, and poverty. The workshop will focus on building clinicians’ knowledge, skills, and resources to allow more effective intervention for families in their care. Clinical examples will be drawn from FamilyLive, a caregiver-focused clinical model developed in response to the needs of families exposed to significant adversities. Interactive exercises will offer participants the chance to reflect and expand on current practice strategies. This workshop will include lectures, clinical examples, group activities, and discussion. Please note: This workshop is eligible for Anti-discrimination CEUs - see General Information below.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will examine the negative effects of trauma exposures and various forms of social oppression on help-seeking behavior.
  2. Participants will recognize the integral role of caregivers in childhood mental health treatment.
  3. Participants will identify skills and tools to better engage and collaborate with caregivers.

2:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. (3 hours; 3 CEUs)
Workshop M: Suicide Intervention and Prevention for School Social Workers
Instructor: Kristan Bagley-Jones, MSW, LICSW

This workshop will focus on the skills, knowledge, and tools necessary to intervene with students presenting with suicidal ideation and behaviors. Although this workshop is geared towards individual interventions on the Tier 3 level, interventions for Tier 1 and Tier 2 will also be discussed.  

Based on best practices, examples of assessment of ideation, plan, and means of suicide will be provided for discussion. The effectiveness of safety planning will be discussed. Practical strategies, or  "what to do now" suggestions will be provided. Risk factors, baseline MSE, and protective factors will be explored as they pertain to suicidal ideation and behaviors. Accessing the systems of care outside of the school setting will be discussed. Outreach and psycho-education to offer parents/guardians will be presented.

Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will understand Evidence-Based Practice for the assessment of suicidal ideation and safety planning.
  2. Participants will learn effective delivery of suicide interventions with individual students at-risk in a school setting.
  3. Participants will be able to assess warning signs, risk factors, and protective factors.
  4. Participants will understand how to work with guardians and school staff, and provide school-wide interventions.

Fall Registration

GENERAL REGISTRATION:
3-hour program: $75

Fri, 23 Apr 2021 09:45:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/sites/continuing-ed/programs/workshops/Social-Work-Workshops.html
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