Get excellent grades in CCRN test with these bootcamp and Practice Test

Our Medical CCRN bootcamp with free pdf are precise of the CCRN actual test. A total pool of CCRN PDF Dumps is kept up with in an information base of inquiries. We add and update new Questions and Answers on the customary reasons for contenders to retain the most current substance.

Exam Code: CCRN Practice test 2022 by Killexams.com team
CCRN Critical Care Register Nurse

A criterion-referenced standard setting process, known as the modified Angoff, is used to establish the passing point/cut score for the exam. Each candidates performance on the test is measured against a predetermined standard.
The passing point/cut score for the test is established using a panel of subject matter experts, an test development committee (EDC), who carefully reviews each test question to determine the basic level of knowledge or skill that is expected. The passing point/cut score is based on the panels established difficulty ratings for each test question.
Under the guidance of a psychometrician, the panel develops and recommends the passing point/cut score, which is reviewed and approved by AACN Certification Corporation. The passing point/cut score for the test is established to identify individuals with an acceptable level of knowledge and skill. All individuals who pass the exam, regardless of their score, have demonstrated an acceptable level of knowledge.

I. CLINICAL JUDGMENT (80%)
A. Cardiovascular (17%)
1. Acute coronary syndrome:
a. NSTEMI
b. STEMI
c. Unstable angina
2. Acute peripheral vascular insufficiency:
a. Arterial/venous occlusion
b. Carotid artery stenosis
c. Endarterectomy
d. Fem-Pop bypass
3. Acute pulmonary edema
4. Aortic aneurysm
5. Aortic dissection
6. Aortic rupture
7. Cardiac surgery:
a. CABG
b. Valve replacement or repair
8. Cardiac tamponade
9. Cardiac trauma
10. Cardiac/vascular catheterization
11. Cardiogenic shock
12. Cardiomyopathies:
a. Dilated
b. Hypertrophic
c. Idiopathic
d. Restrictive
13. Dysrhythmias
14. Heart failure
15. Hypertensive crisis
16. Myocardial conduction system abnormalities
(e.g., prolonged QT interval, Wolff-ParkinsonWhite)
17. Papillary muscle rupture
18. Structural heart defects (acquired and congenital, including valvular disease)
19. TAVR

B. Respiratory (15%)
1. Acute pulmonary embolus
2. ARDS
3. Acute respiratory failure
4. Acute respiratory infection (e.g., pneumonia)
5. Aspiration
6. Chronic conditions (e.g., COPD, asthma, bronchitis, emphysema)
7. Failure to wean from mechanical ventilation
8. Pleural space abnormalities (e.g., pneumothorax, hemothorax, empyema, pleural effusions)
9. Pulmonary fibrosis
10. Pulmonary hypertension
11. Status asthmaticus
12. Thoracic surgery
13. Thoracic trauma (e.g., fractured rib, lung contusion, tracheal perforation)
14. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)

C. Endocrine/Hematology/Gastrointestinal/Renal/Integumentary (20%)
1. Endocrine
a. Adrenal insufficiency
b. Diabetes insipidus (DI)
c. Diabetes mellitus, types 1 and 2
d. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)
e. Hyperglycemia
f. Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS)
g. Hyperthyroidism
h. Hypoglycemia (acute)
i. Hypothyroidism
j. SIADH
2. Hematology and Immunology
a. Anemia
b. Coagulopathies (e.g., ITP, DIC, HIT)
c. Immune deficiencies
d. Leukopenia
e. Oncologic complications (e.g., tumor lysis syndrome, pericardial effusion)
f. Thrombocytopenia
g. Transfusion reactions
3. Gastrointestinal
a. Abdominal compartment syndrome
b. Acute abdominal trauma
c. Acute GI hemorrhage
d. Bowel infarction, obstruction, perforation (e.g., mesenteric ischemia, adhesions)
e. GI surgeries (e.g., Whipple, esophagectomy, resections)
f. Hepatic failure/coma (e.g., portal hypertension, cirrhosis, esophageal varices, fulminant hepatitis, biliary atresia, drug-induced)
g. Malnutrition and malabsorption
h. Pancreatitis
4. Renal and Genitourinary
a. Acute genitourinary trauma
b. Acute kidney injury (AKI)
c. Chronic kidney disease (CKD)
d. Infections (e.g., kidney, urosepsis)
e. Life-threatening electrolyte imbalances
5. Integumentary
a. Cellulitis
b. IV infiltration
c. Necrotizing fasciitis
d. Pressure injury
e. Wounds:
i. infectious
ii. surgical
iii. trauma
D. Musculoskeletal/Neurological/

Psychosocial (14%)
1. Musculoskeletal
a. Compartment syndrome
b. Fractures (e.g., femur, pelvic)
c. Functional issues (e.g., immobility, falls, gait disorders)
d. Osteomyelitis
e. Rhabdomyolysis
2. Neurological
a. Acute spinal cord injury
b. Brain death
c. Delirium (e.g., hyperactive, hypoactive, mixed)
d. Dementia
e. Encephalopathy
f. Hemorrhage:
i. intracranial (ICH)
ii. intraventricular (IVH)
iii. subarachnoid (traumatic or aneurysmal)
g. Increased intracranial pressure (e.g., hydrocephalus)
h. Neurologic infectious disease (e.g., viral, bacterial, fungal)
i. Neuromuscular disorders (e.g., muscular dystrophy, CP, Guillain-Barré, myasthenia)
j. Neurosurgery (e.g., craniotomy, Burr holes)
k. Seizure disorders
l. Space-occupying lesions (e.g., brain tumors)
m. Stroke:
i. hemorrhagic
ii. ischemic (embolic)
iii. TIA
n. Traumatic brain injury (TBI): epidural, subdural, concussion
3. Behavioral and Psychosocial
a. Abuse/neglect
b. Aggression
c. Agitation
d. Anxiety
e. Suicidal ideation and/or behaviors
f. Depression
g. Medical non-adherence
h. PTSD
i. Risk-taking behavior
j. Substance use disorders (e.g., withdrawal, chronic alcohol or drug dependence)
E. Multisystem (14%)
1. Acid-base imbalance
2. Bariatric complications
3. Comorbidity in patients with transplant history
4. End-of-life care
5. Healthcare-associated conditions (e.g., VAE, CAUTI, CLABSI)
6. Hypotension
7. Infectious diseases:
a. Influenza (e.g., pandemic or epidemic)
b. Multi-drug resistant organisms (e.g., MRSA, VRE, CRE)
8. Life-threatening maternal/fetal complications (e.g., eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, postpartum hemorrhage, amniotic embolism)
9. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS)
10. Multisystem trauma
11. Pain: acute, chronic
12. Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS)
13. Sepsis
14. Septic shock
15. Shock states:
a. Distributive (e.g., anaphylactic, neurogenic)
b. Hypovolemic
16. Sleep disruption (including sensory overload)
17. Thermoregulation
18. Toxic ingestion/inhalations (e.g., drug/alcohol overdose)
19. Toxin/drug exposure (including allergies)

II. PROFESSIONAL CARING 7 ETHICAL PRACTICE (20%)
A. Advocacy/Moral Agency
B. Caring Practices
C. Response to Diversity
D. Facilitation of Learning
E. Collaboration
F. Systems Thinking
G. Clinical Inquiry

CLINICAL JUDGMENT
General
• Recognize normal and abnormal:
o developmental assessment findings and provide developmentally appropriate care
o physical assessment findings
o psychosocial assessment findings
• Recognize signs and symptoms of emergencies, initiate interventions, and seek assistance as needed
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o capnography (EtCO2)
o central venous access
o medication reversal agents
o palliative care
o SvO2 monitoring
• Manage patients receiving:
o complementary/alternative medicine and/or nonpharmacologic interventions
o medications (e.g., safe administration, monitoring, polypharmacy)
• Monitor patients and follow protocols for pre- and postoperative care
• Assess pain
• Evaluate patients response to interventions
• Identify and monitor normal and abnormal diagnostic test results
• Manage fluid and electrolyte balance
• Manage monitor alarms based on protocols and changes in patient condition Cardiovascular
• Apply leads for cardiac monitoring
• Identify, interpret and monitor cardiac rhythms
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o 12-lead ECG
o arterial catheter
o cardiac catheterization
o cardioversion central venous pressure monitoring
o defibrillation
o IABP
o invasive hemodynamic monitoring
o pacing: epicardial, transcutaneous, transvenous
o pericardiocentesis
o QT interval monitoring
o ST segment monitoring
• Manage patients requiring:
o endovascular stenting
o PCI Respiratory
• Interpret blood gas results
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o modes of mechanical ventilation
o noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (e.g., BiPAP, CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula)
o oxygen therapy delivery devices
o prevention of complications related to mechanical ventilation (ventilator bundle)
o prone positioning
o pulmonary therapeutic interventions related to mechanical ventilation: airway clearance, extubation, intubation, weaning
o therapeutic gases (e.g., oxygen, nitric oxide, heliox, CO2 )
o thoracentesis
o tracheostomy Hematology and Immunology
• Manage patients receiving transfusion of blood products
• Monitor patients and follow protocols:
o pre-, intra-, post-intervention (e.g., plasmapheresis, exchange transfusion, leukocyte depletion)
o related to blood conservation Neurological
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring neurologic monitoring devices and drains (e.g., ICP, ventricular or lumbar drain)
• Use a swallow evaluation tool to assess dysphagia
• Manage patients requiring:
o neuroendovascular interventions (e.g., coiling, thrombectomy)
o neurosurgical procedures (e.g., pre-, intra-, post-procedure)
o spinal immobilization Integumentary
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring, therapeutic interventions (e.g. wound VACs, pressure reduction surfaces, fecal management devices, IV infiltrate treatment) Gastrointestinal
• Monitor patients and follow protocols for procedures pre-, intra-, post-procedure (e.g., EGD, PEG placement)
• Intervene to address barriers to nutritional/fluid adequacy (e.g., chewing/swallowing difficulties, alterations in hunger and thirst, inability to self-feed)
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o abdominal pressure monitoring
o GI drains
o enteral and parenteral nutrition Renal and Genitourinary
• Identify nephrotoxic agents
• Monitor patients and follow protocols pre-, intra-, and post-procedure (e.g., renal biopsy, ultrasound)
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring, renal therapeutic intervention (e.g., hemodialysis, CRRT, peritoneal dialysis)
Musculoskeletal
• Manage patients requiring progressive mobility
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring, compartment syndrome monitoring
Multisystem
• Manage continuous temperature monitoring
• Provide end-of-life and palliative care
• Recognize risk factors and manage malignant hyperthermia
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients undergoing:
o continuous sedation
o intermittent sedation
o neuromuscular blockade agents
o procedural sedation - minimal
o procedural sedation - moderate
o targeted temperature management (previously known as therapeutic hypothermia)
Behavioral and Psychosocial
• Respond to behavioral emergencies (e.g., nonviolent crisis intervention, de-escalation techniques)
• Use behavioral assessment tools (e.g., delirium, alcohol withdrawal, cognitive impairment)
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o behavioral therapeutic interventions
o medication management for agitation
o physical restraints

I. CLINICAL JUDGMENT (80%)
A. Cardiovascular (14%)
1. Cardiac infection and inflammatory diseases
2. Cardiac malformations
3. Cardiac surgery
4. Cardiogenic shock
5. Cardiomyopathies
6. Cardiovascular catheterization
7. Dysrhythmias
8. Heart failure
9. Hypertensive crisis
10. Myocardial conduction system defects
11. Obstructive shock
12. Vascular occlusion
B. Respiratory (18%)
1. Acute pulmonary edema
2. Acute pulmonary embolus
3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)
4. Acute respiratory failure
5. Acute respiratory infection
6. Air-leak syndromes
7. Apnea of prematurity
8. Aspiration
9. Chronic pulmonary conditions
10. Congenital airway malformations
11. Failure to wean from mechanical ventilation
12. Pulmonary hypertension
13. Status asthmaticus
14. Thoracic and airway trauma
15. Thoracic surgery

C. Endocrine/Hematology/Gastrointestinal/Renal/Integumentary (20%)
1. Endocrine
a. Adrenal insufficiency
b. Diabetes insipidus (DI)
c. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)
d. Diabetes mellitus, types 1 and 2
e. Hyperglycemia
f. Hypoglycemia
g. Inborn errors of metabolism
h. Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH)
2. Hematology and Immunology
a. Anemia
b. Coagulopathies (e.g., ITP, DIC)
c. Immune deficiencies
d. Myelosuppression (e.g., thrombocytopenia, neutropenia)
e. Oncologic complications
f. Sickle cell crisis
g. Transfusion reactions
3. Gastrointestinal
a. Abdominal compartment syndrome
b. Abdominal trauma
c. Bowel infarction, obstruction and perforation
d. Gastroesophageal reflux
e. GI hemorrhage
f. GI surgery
g. Liver disease and failure
h. Malnutrition and malabsorption
i. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)
j. Peritonitis
4. Renal and Genitourinary
a. AKI
b. Chronic kidney disease (CKD)
c. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)
d. Kidney transplant
e. Life-threatening electrolyte imbalances
f. Renal and genitourinary infections
g. Renal and genitourinary surgery
5. Integumentary
a. IV infiltration
b. Pressure injury
c. Skin failure (e.g., hypoperfusion)
d. Wounds

D. Musculoskeletal/Neurological/Psychosocial (15%)
1. Musculoskeletal
a. Compartment syndrome
b. Musculoskeletal surgery
c. Musculoskeletal trauma
d. Rhabdomyolysis
2. Neurological
a. Acute spinal cord injury
b. Agitation
c. Brain death
d. Congenital neurological abnormalities
e. Delirium
f. Encephalopathy
g. Head trauma
h. Hydrocephalus
i. Intracranial hemorrhage
j. Neurogenic shock
k. Neurologic infectious disease
l. Neuromuscular disorders
m. Neurosurgery
n. Pain: acute, chronic
o. Seizure disorders
p. Space-occupying lesions
q. Spinal fusion
r. Stroke
s. Traumatic brain injury (TBI)
3. Behavioral and Psychosocial
a. Abuse and neglect
b. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
c. Post-intensive care syndrome (PICS)
d. Self-harm
e. Suicidal ideation and behavior

E. Multisystem (13%)
1. Acid-base imbalance
2. Anaphylactic shock
3. Death and dying
4. Healthcare-associated conditions (e.g., VAE, CAUTI, CLABSI)
5. Hypovolemic shock
6. Post-transplant complications
7. Sepsis
8. Submersion injuries (i.e. near drowning)
9. Hyperthermia and hypothermia
10. Toxin and drug exposure

II. Professional Caring & Ethical Practice (20%)
A. Advocacy/Moral Agency
B. Caring Practices
C. Response to Diversity
D. Facilitation of Learning
E. Collaboration
F. Systems Thinking
G. Clinical Inquiry

CLINICAL JUDGMENT
General
• Manage patients receiving:
o continuous sedation
o extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)
o nonpharmacologic interventions
o pharmacologic interventions
o intra-procedural and post-procedural care
o post-operative care
o vascular access
• Conduct physical assessment of critically ill or injured patients
• Conduct psychosocial assessment of critically ill or injured patients
• Evaluate diagnostic test results and laboratory values
• Manage patients during intrahospital transport
• Manage patients undergoing procedural sedation
• Manage patients with temperature monitoring and regulation devices
• Provide family-centered care Cardiovascular
• Manage patients requiring:
o arterial catheterization (e.g., arterial line)
o cardiac catheterization
o cardioversion
o CVP monitoring
o defibrillation
o epicardial pacing
o near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)
o umbilical catheterization (e.g., UVC, UAC)
• Manage patients with:
• cardiac dysrhythmias
• hemodynamic instability Respiratory
• Manage patients requiring:
o artificial airways (e.g., endotracheal tubes, tracheotomy)
o assistance with airway clearance chest tubes
o high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV)
o mechanical ventilation
o noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (e.g., CPAP, nasal IMV, high-flow nasal cannula)
o prone positioning
o respiratory monitoring devices (e.g., SpO2, SVO2, EtCO2)
o therapeutic gases (e.g., oxygen, nitric oxide, heliox, CO2)
o thoracentesis
Hematology and Immunology
• Manage patients receiving:
o plasmapheresis, exchange transfusion or leukocyte depletion
o transfusion
Neurological
• Conduct pain assessment of critically ill or injured patients
• Manage patients with seizure activity
• Provide end-of-life and palliative care
• Manage patients requiring:
o neurologic monitoring devices and drains (e.g., ICP, ventricular drains, grids)
o spinal immobilization Integumentary
• Manage patients requiring wound prevention and/or treatment (e.g., wound VACs, pressure reduction surfaces, fecal management devices, IV infiltrate treatment)
Gastrointestinal
• Manage patients with inadequate nutrition and fluid intake (e.g., chewing and swallowing difficulties, alterations in hunger and thirst, inability to self-feed)
• Manage patients receiving:
o enteral and parenteral nutrition
o GI drains
o intra-abdominal pressure monitoring Renal and Genitourinary
• Manage patients requiring:
o electrolyte replacement
o renal replacement therapies (e.g., hemodialysis, CRRT, peritoneal dialysis)
Multisystem
• Manage patients requiring progressive mobility
Behavioral and Psychosocial
• Conduct behavioral assessment of critically ill or injured patients (e.g., delirium, withdrawal)
• Manage patients requiring behavioral and mental health interventions
• Respond to behavioral emergencies (e.g., nonviolent crisis intervention, de-escalation techniques)

I. CLINICAL JUDGMENT (80%)
A. Cardiovascular (5%)
1. Acute pulmonary edema
2. Cardiac surgery (e.g., congenital defects, patent ductus arteriosus)
3. Dysrhythmias
4. Heart failure
5. Hypovolemic shock
6. Structural heart defects (acquired and congenital, including valvular disease)

B. Respiratory (21%)
1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)
2. Acute respiratory failure
3. Acute respiratory infection (e.g., pneumonia)
4. Air-leak syndromes
5. Apnea of prematurity
6. Aspiration
7. Chronic conditions (e.g., chronic lung disease/bronchopulmonary dysplasia)
8. Congenital anomalies (e.g., diaphragmatic hernia, tracheoesophageal fistula, choanal atresia, tracheomalacia, tracheal stenosis)
9. Failure to wean from mechanical ventilation
10. Meconium aspiration syndrome
11. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN)
12. Pulmonary hemorrhage
13. Pulmonary hypertension
14. Respiratory distress (RDS)
15. Thoracic surgery
16. Transient tachypnea of the newborn

C. Endocrine/Hematology/Gastrointestinal/Renal/Integumentary (27%)
1. Endocrine
a. Adrenal insufficiency
b. Hyperbilirubinemia
c. Hyperglycemia
d. Hypoglycemia
e. Inborn errors of metabolism
2. Hematology and Immunology
a. Anemia
b. Coagulopathies (e.g., ITP, DIC)
c. Immune deficiencies
d. Leukopenia
e. Polycythemia
f. Rh incompatibilities, ABO incompatibilities, hydrops fetalis
g. Thrombocytopenia
3. Gastrointestinal
a. Bowel infarction/obstruction/perforation (e.g., mesenteric ischemia, adhesions)
b. Feeding intolerance
c. Gastroesophageal reflux
d. GI abnormalities (e.g., omphalocele, gastroschisis, volvulus, imperforate anus, Hirshsprung disease, malrotation, intussusception, hernias)
e. GI surgeries
f. Hepatic failure (e.g., biliary atresia, portal hypertension, esophageal varices)
g. Malnutrition and malabsorption
h. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)
i. Pyloric stenosis
4. Renal and Genitourinary
a. Acute kidney injury (AKI)
b. Chronic kidney disease
c. Congenital genitourinary conditions (e.g., hypospadias, polycystic kidney disease, hydronephrosis, bladder exstrophy)
d. Genitourinary surgery
e. Infections
f. Life-threatening electrolyte imbalances
5. Integumentary
a. Congenital abnormalities (e.g., epidermolysis bullosa, skin tags)
b. IV infiltration
c. Pressure injury/ulcer (e.g., device, incontinence, immobility)
d. Wounds:
i. non-surgical
ii. surgical

D. Musculoskeletal/Neurological/Psychosocial (13%)
1. Musculoskeletal
a. Congenital or acquired musculoskeletal conditions
b. Osteopenia
2. Neurological
a. Agitation
b. Congenital neurological abnormalities (e.g., AV malformation, myelomeningocele, encephalocele)
c. Encephalopathy
d. Head trauma (e.g., forceps and/or vacuum injury)
e. Hemorrhage:
i. intracranial (ICH)
ii. intraventricular (IVH)
f. Hydrocephalus
g. Ischemic insult (e.g., stroke, periventricular leukomalacia)
h. Neurologic infectious disease (e.g., viral, bacterial, fungal)
i. Neuromuscular disorders (e.g., spinal muscular atrophy)
j. Neurosurgery
k. Pain (acute, chronic)
l. Seizure disorders
m. Sensory impairment (e.g., retinopathy of prematurity, hearing impairment, visual impairment)
n. Stress (e.g., noise, overstimulation, sleep disturbances)
o. Traumatic brain injury (e.g., epidural, subdural, concussion, physical abuse)
3. Behavioral and Psychosocial
a. Abuse and neglect
b. Families in crisis (e.g., stress, grief, lack of coping)

E. Multisystem (14%)
1. Birth injuries (e.g., hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, brachial plexus injury, lacerations)
2. Developmental delays
3. Failure to thrive
4. Healthcare-associated conditions (e.g., VAE, CAUTI, CLABSI)
5. Hypotension
6. Infectious diseases (e.g., influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, multidrugresistant organisms)
7. Life-threatening maternal/fetal complications (e.g., eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, maternal-fetal transfusion, placental
abruption, placenta previa) 8. Low birth weight/prematurity
9. Sepsis
10. Terminal conditions (e.g., end-of-life, palliative care)
11. Thermoregulation
12. Toxin/drug exposure (e.g., neonatal abstinence syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal or iatrogenic).

II. Professional Caring & Ethical Practice (20%)
A. Advocacy/Moral Agency
B. Caring Practices
C. Response to Diversity
D. Facilitation of Learning
E. Collaboration
F. Systems Thinking
G. Clinical Inquiry

CLINICAL JUDGMENT
General
• Assess pain considering patients gestational age
• Follow protocol for newborn car seat testing, hearing and congenital heart disease screening
• Follow protocol for feeding and supplementation
• Identify and monitor normal and abnormal diagnostic test results
• Implement interventions to keep neonates safe (e.g., transponder use, safe sleep)
• Manage monitor alarms based on protocol and change in patient condition
• Manage patients receiving complementary alternative medicine and/or nonpharmacologic interventions
• Manage patients receiving medications (e.g., safe administration, monitoring, polypharmacy)
• Monitor patients and follow protocols for pre- and postoperative care
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring, central venous access
• Recognize normal and abnormal:
o developmental assessment findings and provide developmentally appropriate care
o family psychosocial assessment findings
o physical assessment findings
• Recognize signs and symptoms of emergencies, initiate interventions, and seek assistance as needed
Cardiovascular
• Apply leads for cardiac monitoring
• Identify, interpret and monitor cardiac rhythms
• Monitor hemodynamic status and recognize signs and symptoms of hemodynamic instability
• Recognize early signs of decreased cardiac output
• Recognize normal fetal circulation and transition to extra-uterine life
Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o 12-lead ECG
o arterial catheter
o cardioversion
o invasive hemodynamic monitoring Respiratory
• Interpret blood gas results
• Manage medications and monitor patients requiring rapid sequence intubation (RSI)
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients with, tracheostomy
• Recognize indications for, and manage patients requiring:
o assisted ventilation
o bronchoscopy
o chest tubes
o endotracheal tubes
o non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (e.g., bilevel positive airway pressure, CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula)
o oxygen therapy delivery device
o prone positioning (lateral rotation therapy)
o rescue airways (e.g., laryngeal mask airway [LMA])
o respiratory monitoring devices (e.g., SpO2, EtCO2) and report values
o therapeutic gases (e.g., oxygen, nitric oxide, heliox, CO2)
o thoracentesis
Hematology and Immunology
• Manage patients receiving transfusion of blood products
• Monitor and manage patients with bleeding disorders
• Monitor patients and follow protocols:
o pre-, intra-, post-intervention (e.g., exchange transfusion)
o related to blood conservation
Neurological
• Manage patients with congenital neurological abnormalities
Critical Care Register Nurse
Medical Critical learning
Killexams : Medical Critical learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CCRN Search results Killexams : Medical Critical learning - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/CCRN https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Association of American Medical Colleges slammed for pushing critical race theory on students

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

The group that sets the standards for medical education recently released standards that force students to study and apply ideology typically pushed by the far-left while integrating diversity, equity, and inclusion into formal curricula. 

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) published the New and Emerging Areas in Medicine series to help students benefit from "advancements in medical education over the past 20 years," and the third report from the collection "focuses on competencies for diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)."

The report notes that recent medical school graduates must demonstrate "knowledge about the role of explicit and implicit bias in delivering high-quality healthy care," "describe past and current examples of racism and oppression," identify "systems of power, privilege and oppression and their impacts on health outcomes" including "White privilege, racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, religious oppression" and "articulate race as a social construct that is a cause of health and health care inequities."

MAJORITY OF AMERICANS DON’T THINK LIBERAL IDEOLOGY INJECTED INTO MEDICAL INDUSTRY HELPS HEALTHCARE: POLL

Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, a board-certified kidney specialist, feels critical race theory will be an integral part of the education of medical students because of the AAMC’s agenda.  (Fox News Digital)

Dr. Stanley Goldfarb, a board-certified kidney specialist, is the Board Chair of Do No Harm, a group of medical professionals dedicated to eliminating political agendas from healthcare. He feels the AAMC is doing more harm than good with its new standards that he believes will irk the American people. 

"The AAMC agenda means that critical race theory will be an integral part of the education of medical students and this can only lead to discrimination against one racial group vs. another. One of the leaders of CRT, Dr. Ibrim Kendi, has declared that past discrimination can only be cured by future discrimination. I do not think the American people will like this kind of health care," Dr. Goldfarb told Fox News Digital. 

The group that sets the standards for medical education recently released standards that force students to study and apply ideology typically pushed by the far-left. (iStock)

BIDEN ADMINISTRATION GUIDANCE PRIORITIZES RACE IN ADMINISTERING COVID DRUGS

"The AAMC sets the standards for medical education," Dr. Goldfarb continued. "This latest set of expectations for the education of medical students and residents is nothing more than indoctrination in a political ideology and can only detract from achieving a health care system that treats all individual patients optimally."

In May, Legal Insurrection’s CriticalRace.org, which monitors CRT curricula and training in higher education, found that at least 39 of America’s 50 most prestigious medical colleges and universities have some form of mandatory student training or coursework on ideas related to critical race theory. 

"The national alarm should be sounding over the racialization of medical school education. The swiftness and depth to which race-focused social justice education has penetrated medical schools reflects the broader disturbing trends in higher education," Legal Insurrection founder William A. Jacobson told Fox News Digital at the time. 

A clinical professor of law at Cornell Law School, also found that 39 of the top 50 medical schools "have some form of mandatory student training or coursework" related to CRT. (iStock)

DO NO HARM AIMS TO KEEP LIBERAL IDEOLOGY OUT OF HEALTHCARE: ‘PHYSICIANS ARE BEING PUSHED TO DISCRIMINATE’

Jacobson, a clinical professor of law at Cornell Law School, also found that 39 of the top 50 medical schools "have some form of mandatory student training or coursework" related to CRT and 38 offered materials by authors Robin DiAngelo and Ibram Kendi, whose books he said explicitly call for discrimination. 

"Mandatory so-called 'anti-racism' training centers ideology, not patients, as the focus of medical education. This is a drastic change from focusing on the individual, rather than racial or ethnic stereotypes," Jacobson said. 

In 2021, the American Medical Association (AMA) committed to utilizing CRT in a variety of ways and criticized the idea that people of different backgrounds should be treated the same. All 50 schools examined by CriticalRace.org are accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, which sponsors the Association of American Medical Colleges, which has also taken steps to support anti-racist initiatives, and the AMA. 

Jacobson believes "Diversity, Equity and Inclusion entrenched bureaucracies promote, protect and relentlessly expand their administrative territory in medical schools," but the resources should instead be used "to expand medical knowledge and patient care, not to enforce an ideological viewpoint."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

The Association of American Medical Colleges sent Fox News Digital the following statement:

"Our goal, and the goal of every medical school, is to recruit a diverse class of talented medical students and educate them to Strengthen the health of their patients and the communities they serve in an evidence-based manner. Students must learn to consider all factors that affect health. As science advances and we understand more about what impacts health, medical schools will incorporate these discoveries into their curricula.

The AAMC’s responsibility is to work with our member institutions to disseminate effective new curricular approaches based on scientific evidence. With the common goal of achieving better health, we must recognize that changes to medical school curricula based on evolving evidence will ultimately help us achieve that.

The recently released competencies are grounded in the STEM disciplines that are taught in medical school and that future physicians need to care for their patients.  

We have evidence that supports that race is a social construct, and there is a growing body of evidence about what race is and isn’t, and its impact on health. These new insights are improving medical practice and allow us to shift our thinking in medical education to better prepare tomorrow’s doctors.

The medical profession is grounded in the human interaction between doctor and patient and the factors that affect a patient’s health. We have an obligation to address and mitigate the factors that drive racism and other biases in health care and prepare physicians who are culturally responsive and trained to address these issues. Ignoring these facts would be detrimental to being able to provide sensitive, individualized, and medically appropriate care to each patient. The next generation of physicians must have the comprehensive skills and knowledge needed to heal all those in their care."

The article was updated to include a statement from the AAMC. 

Wed, 27 Jul 2022 08:05:00 -0500 Fox News en text/html https://www.foxnews.com/media/association-american-medical-colleges-slammed-pushing-critical-race-theory-students
Killexams : Medical colleges group’s new curriculum addresses ‘racism, hate, and bias in health care’ No result found, try new keyword!We believe this syllabu deserves just as much attention from learners and educators at every stage of their careers as the latest scientific breakthroughs.' ... Mon, 08 Aug 2022 16:03:00 -0500 text/html https://www.thecollegefix.com/medical-colleges-groups-new-curriculum-addresses-racism-hate-and-bias-in-health-care/ Killexams : Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths

An automated process based on computer algorithms that can read text from medical examiners' death certificates can substantially speed up data collection of overdose deaths—which in turn can ensure a more rapid public health response time than the system currently used, new UCLA research finds.

The analysis, to be published Aug. 8 in the peer-reviewed JAMA Network Open, used tools from artificial intelligence to rapidly identify substances that caused overdose deaths.

"The overdose crisis in America is the number one cause of death in , but we don't know the genuine number of overdose deaths until months after the fact," said study lead Dr. David Goodman-Meza, assistant professor of medicine in the division of infectious diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. "We also don't know the number of overdoses in our communities, as rapidly released data is only available at the state level, at best. We need systems that get this data out fast and at a local level so public health can respond. Machine learning and can help bridge this gap."

As it now stands, overdose data recording involves several steps, beginning with and coroners, who determine a cause of death and record suspected on , including the drugs that caused the death. The certificates, which include unstructured text, are then sent to local jurisdictions or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) which code them according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Edition (ICD-10). This coding process is time consuming as it may be done manually. As a result, there is a substantial lag time between the date of death and the reporting of those deaths, which slows the release of surveillance data. This in turn slows the response.

Further complicating matters is that under this system, different drugs with different uses and effects are aggregated under the same code—for instance buprenorphine, a partial opioid used to treat , and the synthetic opioid fentanyl are listed under the same ICD-10 code.

For this study, the researchers used "natural language processing" (NLP) and machine learning to analyze nearly 35,500 death records for all of 2020 from Connecticut and from 9 U.S. counties: Cook (Illinois); Jefferson (Alabama); Johnson, Denton, Tarrant and Parker (Texas), Milwaukee (Wisconsin), and Los Angeles and San Diego. They examined how combining NLP, which uses to understand text, and can automate the deciphering of large amounts of data with precision and accuracy.

They found that of the 8,738 overdose deaths recorded that year the most common specific substances were fentanyl (4758, 54%), alcohol (2866, 33%), cocaine (2247, 26%), methamphetamine (1876, 21%), heroin (1613, 18%), prescription opioids (1197, 14%), and any benzodiazepine (1076, 12%). Of these, only the classification for benzodiazepines was suboptimal under this method and the others were perfect or near perfect.

Most recently the CDC released preliminary overdose data that was no sooner than four months after the deaths, Goodman-Meza said.

"If these algorithms are embedded within medical examiner's offices, the time could be reduced to as early as toxicology testing is completed, which could be about three weeks after the death," he said.

The rest of the were due to other substances such as amphetamines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antihistamines, anticonvulsants, barbiturates, muscle relaxants, and hallucinogensThe researchers note some limitations to the study, the main one being that the system was not tested on less common substances such as anticonvulsants or other designer drugs, so it is unknown if it would work for these. Also, given that the models need to be trained to rely on a large volume of data to make predictions, the system may be unable to detect emerging trends.

But rapid and are needed to develop and implement interventions to curb overdoses, the researchers write, and "NLP tools such as these should be integrated in data surveillance workflows to increase rapid dissemination of data to the public, researchers, and policy makers."

Study co-authors in addition to Goodman-Meza are Chelsea Shover, Dr. Jesus Medina, Dr. Amber Tang, Steven Shoptaw, and Alex Bui of UCLA.



More information: Development and validation of machine models using natural language processing to classify substances involved in overdose deaths, JAMA Network Open (2022). DOI: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2022.25593

Citation: Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to speed critical information on drug overdose deaths (2022, August 8) retrieved 10 August 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-08-artificial-intelligence-tools-critical-drug.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Mon, 08 Aug 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-08-artificial-intelligence-tools-critical-drug.html
Killexams : Pediatric Critical Care Colloquium set for Oct. 21-23

Physicians, nurses, advanced practice clinicians, respiratory therapists and other health care professionals are invited to attend the 27th annual Pediatric Critical Care Colloquium on Oct. 21-23, 2022.

Hosted by UC Davis Children’s Hospital, the in-person conference will be held at the Betty Irene Moore Hall, 2570 48th St., Sacramento. The event will be chaired by Jennifer Plant, chief of the Division of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine and professor of pediatrics and James Marcin, vice chair for pediatric clinical research, director of the UC Davis Center for Health and Technology and professor of pediatrics.  

The event will include poster sessions, pre-conference workshops (a pediatric emergency care and critical care telemedicine course, a pediatric advanced practice provider course, and a procedural sedation course for providers) and lectures on emerging therapies, case discussion and controversies in PICU care. View the agenda.

Continuing medical education credit will be available for attendees. Early bird registration fees are available until Aug. 31, 2022.

Register for the colloquium.


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 12:00:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/961031
Killexams : Medical professionals say proper response to monkeypox is critical

{ "banners": { "tv" : [ {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-23-22-wtiu-fye-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1655956800000", "endingDate" : "1656475140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-29-22-wfiu-cye-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656475200000", "endingDate" : "1656561540000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-30-22-wtiu-fye-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656561600000", "endingDate" : "1656647940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-6-22-to-6-8-22-wtiu-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1654488000000", "endingDate" : "1654747140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-9-22-to-6-10-22-wtiu-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1654747200000", "endingDate" : "1654919940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-11-22-wtiu-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1654920000000", "endingDate" : "1655006340000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-12-22-wtiu-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1655006400000", "endingDate" : "1655092740000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-20-22-and-4-24-22-sanditon-webbnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1647748800000", "endingDate" : "1647835140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-20-22-and-4-24-22-sanditon-webbnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1650772800000", "endingDate" : "1650859140000"} ], "radio" : [ {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-17-22-wfiu-fye-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1655438400000", "endingDate" : "1656129540000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-25-22-wfiu-fye-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656129600000", "endingDate" : "1656561540000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-30-22-wfiu-fye-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656561600000", "endingDate" : "1656647940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-25-22-wfiu-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648180800000", "endingDate" : "1648267140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-26-22-to-3-27-22-wfiu-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648267200000", "endingDate" : "1648439940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-28-22-wfiu-bnr-am.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648440000000", "endingDate" : "1648497540000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flgkr2wNtsqwhq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-28-22-wfiu-bnr-pm.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648497600000", "endingDate" : "1648508400000"} ] }}

{ "lightboxes": { "tv" : [ {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-23-22-wtiu-fye-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1655956800000", "endingDate" : "1656475140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-29-22-wtiu-fye-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656475200000", "endingDate" : "1656561540000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-30-22-wtiu-fye-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656561600000", "endingDate" : "1656647940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-6-22-to-6-8-22-wtiu-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1654488000000", "endingDate" : "1654747140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-9-22-to-6-10-22-wtiu-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1654747200000", "endingDate" : "1654919940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-11-22-wtiu-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1654920000000", "endingDate" : "1655006340000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-12-22-wtiu-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1655006400000", "endingDate" : "1655092740000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-20-22-and-4-24-22-sanditon-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1647748800000", "endingDate" : "1647835140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYtDgsQprWuZNm3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-20-22-and-4-24-22-sanditon-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1650772800000", "endingDate" : "1650859140000"} ], "radio" : [ {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-17-22-wfiu-fye-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1655438400000", "endingDate" : "1655524740000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-25-22-wfiu-fye-bnr.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656129600000", "endingDate" : "1656475140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/6-30-22-wfiu-fye-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1656561600000", "endingDate" : "1656647940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-25-22-wfiu-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648180800000", "endingDate" : "1648267140000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-26-22-to-3-27-22-wfiu-lightbox.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648267200000", "endingDate" : "1648439940000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-28-22-wfiu-lightbox-am.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648440000000", "endingDate" : "1648497540000"} , {"url" : "https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WFIUFDLB&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=tAXekcDG%2flizvLEFSbjC6m3L5BYddGq6PVAl6UEf65g%3d", "img" : "https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/3-28-22-wfiu-lightbox-pm.jpg", "startingDate" : "1648497600000", "endingDate" : "1648508400000"} ] }}

critical race theory or "anti-racism" training on future military leaders, according to CriticalRace.org, which monitors CRT curricula and training in higher education. 

CriticalRace.org had previously examined CRT curricula and training in higher education, elite private schools and medical schools. The project from Legal Insurrection Foundation, a nonprofit devoted to campus free speech and academic freedom, has since expanded its database to include military academies. 

"The good news is that CRT and related ideologies have not yet captured the military service academies the way they have overrun higher ed, professional schools, and increasingly K-12. The bad news is that these ideologies have established a beachhead at the military service academies and are likely to expand as part of a more general military wokeness campaign from the top down," Legal Insurrection founder William A. Jacobson told Fox News Digital. 

CRITICAL RACE THEORY TAUGHT AT MANY OF AMERICA’S 50 MOST ELITE PRIVATE K-12 SCHOOLS, ACCORDING TO NEW STUDY

United States military service academies have taught or introduced some form of critical race theory or "anti-racism" training to future military leaders, according to CriticalRace.org. (AP Photo/Chris Gardner, File)

Jacobson, a clinical professor of law at Cornell Law School, founded CriticalRace.org’s extensive database. The group’s latest venture explored the United States Air Force Academy, United States Coast Guard Academy, United States Naval Academy, United States Merchant Marine Academy and the United States Military Academy at West Point. 

"The purpose of the military service academies is to educate and train our future military leaders. The public has a strong interest in what happens there. Whether these students will graduate with the skills and motivation needed to defend the nation is a matter of national interest and security," Jacobson said. "The military leadership needs to consider whether training military officers in ideologies that separate Americans by race and other group characteristics, and that incessantly demonize the United States as systemically evil, serves a valid military or national security purpose."

CriticalRace.org found that all five federal service academies have some form of critical race, anti-racism, or related objectives, which sometimes fall under the umbrella of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion goals. 

WHAT IS CRITICAL RACE THEORY?

For example, the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs requires a course on "Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for Students," according to the database. "This course includes a video on the subject of Black Lives Matter," CriticalRace.org wrote. 

Four of the academies were found to offer materials by authors Robin DiAngelo and Ibram Kendi, whose books explicitly call for discrimination, according to Jacobson. 

Residents of Loudoun County, Virginia, helped make critical race theory a national conversation in 2021.  (REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein)

All five academies also have offered voluntary CRT-related trainings or activities to their students, faculty and staff, while two have mandatory trainings for faculty and staff, according to CriticalRace.org. 

"Do we really want our future military officers to view themselves and the troops they will command through an obsessive racial lens? Is military cohesion and effectiveness improved by putting people into racial and ethnic boxes? These are questions the military leadership will need to consider as it evaluates whether and how far it takes the teaching of CRT and related ideologies as part of a military service academy education," Jacobson said. "Because the education of military officers is so important to our nation, public and political scrutiny is justified."

WEBSITE LAUNCHED TO TRACK CRITICAL RACE THEORY TEACHING IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Graduating members of the U.S. Naval Academy celebrate at the end of the academy's graduation and commissioning ceremony, Friday, May 24, 2019, in Annapolis, Md.  ((AP Photo/Will Newton))

Jacobson noted critical race language and theory has been "espoused and praised even by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Mark Milley," who fired back at GOP lawmakers in 2021 who questioned the military’s interest in studying critical race theory. 

Milley had a tense exchange at a House Armed Services Committee hearing with Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., who asked top military officials to clarify the Defense Department’s approach to critical race theory. Gaetz and Rep. Michael Waltz, R-Fla., expressed concern about discussions regarding critical race theory and "white rage" at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

In response, Milley argued it was important for military cadets and officers "to be open-minded and be widely read" about concepts across the ideological spectrum. 

"Such top-down pressure contributes to the culture in which the military service academies operate," Jacobson said. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

According to the findings, the Air Force Academy, Coast Guard Academy, Military Academy at West Point and Naval Academy all have mandatory programs that are required of all cadets and students. "These trainings consist of modules, online orientations, orientation programs, and all other forms of training/curricula," CriticalRace.org said, noting that the Coast Guard Academy and Naval Academy mandate similar trainings for faculty or staff. 

"CriticalRace.org is a fully-sourced and documented resource. We make it easy for the public to understand the facts as to Critical Race training throughout all levels of education. You may like it or hate it, but the facts are the facts and that is what our unique databases provide," Jacobson said. 

Fox News’ Thomas Barrabi contributed to this report. 

Mon, 25 Jul 2022 08:27:00 -0500 Fox News en text/html https://www.foxnews.com/media/critical-race-theory-taught-future-military-leaders-us-military-academies-according-new-study Killexams : Woke math? How critical race theory found its way into math curriculum No result found, try new keyword!Schools across the country have made considerable efforts to incorporate aspects of critical race theory into math curricula, often by modifying achievement standards and student expectations. Sun, 07 Aug 2022 03:00:00 -0500 en-us text/html https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/woke-math-how-critical-race-theory-found-its-way-into-math-curriculum/ar-AA10oKBH Killexams : Grand Strand Medical Center faces nurse shortage head on with new nursing campus

Ten thousand nurses.

That’s how many nurses South Carolina is projected to be short under 10,000 the next ten years, according to a 2018 report by registerednurses.org.

The critical nursing shortage in South Carolina was also a major point brought up at the Galen College of Nursing’s opening ceremony held Wednesday night at the Grand Strand Medical Center.

The time of the program depends on your level of education and which program you are enrolling in. For an associates degree in nursing, it’ll take you two years. But if you come in with college credits that Galen College of Nursing accepts, you could graduate in a shorter amount of time.

The Galen College of Nursing campus, located at Myrtle Beach’s Grand Strand Medical Center, completed physical renovations this year and is ready to begin transitioning its students to in person learning.

While the first virtual classes began in March 2022, students will now be able to join classes in person, and use patient simulation labs and have their clinical sessions within walking distance.

A medical supply storage closet at the new Galen College of Nursing campus at the Grand Strand Medical Center in Myrtle Beach. Aug. 3rd 2022

Galen College of Nursing was bought by HCA Healthcare’s South Atlantic Division in 2020, which also owns the Grand Strand Medical Center.

“To be able to produce several hundred nurses that will join this community every year will be a part of correcting what is right now a terrible situation that faces every one of our hospitals, and faces every one of our communities,” Hugh Tappen, the president of HCA’s South Atlantic Division, said.

Audria Denker, the vice president of Galen College of Nursing, said the college tries to work with organizations to find out the areas with the greatest needs for nursing.

“There was a lot of pent up demand here, a lot of people that wanted to become nurses that just did not have the opportunity, for whatever reason,” Denker said.

According to Tiffany Keys, Grand Strand Health’s chief nurse, the first group of students will graduate in September of next year.

“It’s a sustainable plan that will keep us going over top,” Keys said. “[Galen College of Nursing] is only going to grow. We’ve already have talking about plans for expansion and growth.”

The campus itself is located on the grounds of the Grand Strand Medical Center and consists of two floors of the medical office building.

On the first floor of the Grand Strand Medical Office building, located on 920 Doug White Drive, is the student enrollment center. If someone was interested in the program, the first floor is where they would go first. On the third floor holds the classrooms, patient lab, and a student resource center.

Ronetta Grate, a new student at the college, said she decided to join Galen after a personal phone call with the dean of Galen College of Nursing.

“I actually love the way Galen makes you feel welcome,” Grate said.

Galen College of Nursing has rolling admission every three months, meaning rather than accepting new students at one single time, its able to accept students throughout the year, and hold graduation ceremonies about every three months as well according to Denker.

Several faculty, students and Myrtle Beach representatives attended the opening ceremony on Wednesday night, including Myrtle Beach Mayor Brenda Bethune.

“We want to keep our people here. And so that excites me, it’s great for our community, it’s great for economic development, and it’s great for our entire state,” Bethune said.

Thu, 04 Aug 2022 01:38:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.aol.com/news/grand-strand-medical-center-faces-133820416.html
Killexams : Cornell University: Teachers critical to detecting and reporting child maltreatment

School closures during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic may have resulted in at least 5,500 fewer reports of endangered children, according to a new study showing teachers’ essential role in the early detection and reporting of child maltreatment.

Time spent in school and the resulting contact with teachers and other school staff leads to increases in reports of child maltreatment – cases that would not have been discovered otherwise, the study found.

“Child maltreatment is a vexing problem in the U.S.,” said Maria Fitzpatrick, professor of economics and public policy in the Cornell Jeb E. Brooks School of Public Policy. “To protect children, we need to better understand why so many are maltreated – 13% according to one study and 4 in 10 according to another. Maltreatment has significant costs for society. Early detection is crucial because it leads to quicker intervention and that can result in providing a child with a safe, permanent home.”

The study, “Beyond Reading, Writing and Arithmetic: The Role of Teachers and Schools in Reporting Child Maltreatment,” was published July 11 in the Journal of Human Resources.

Maltreatment is not limited to child abuse. According to the New York State Office of Children and Family Services, maltreatment refers to “the quality of care a child is receiving from those responsible for the child. Maltreatment occurs when a parent or other person legally responsible for the care of a child harms a child or places a child in imminent danger of harm by failing to exercise the minimum degree of care in providing the child with any of the following: food, clothing, shelter, education or medical care when financially able to do so.”

Prior to the pandemic, the researchers sought to define educators’ contribution to identifying maltreated children. That long-term project took on new urgency when schools started to close in the spring of 2020. The number of maltreatment reports dropped, despite concerns that children were more at risk because of rising financial stress on families and more time at home, and even as injuries to children were becoming more frequent and more severe.

In the first two years of the pandemic, kindergarten enrollment plummeted, and older children missed three months of schooling during the spring of 2020 and many more days the following school year. Children were cut off from educators, who are often required by state law to report evidence of maltreatment.

“Our conservative calculations based on our results indicate that approximately 5,500 to 8,000 reports were missed during the pandemic because schools were closed or because children were not enrolled,” the researchers concluded.

Additional time in school leads to substantially more maltreatment investigations, they found.

For example, the number of investigated reports for 5-year-old children is 5% to 10% higher for those who are eligible to enroll in kindergarten at age 5 than for those who are not, the researchers said.

“Moreover,” they wrote, “the number of investigated child maltreatment reports is 30% to 65% higher at the beginning and end of the school year compared to the beginning and end of summer when children are not regularly interacting with teachers.”

The researchers said their findings have three major policy implications:

Discussions about the amount of time students spend in school, including the length of the school day and public preschool, should include estimates of the improvement of child well-being that would result.
The ramifications of the recent increase in homeschooling must be better understood. The surge in homeschooling may be resulting in fewer child maltreatment reports because children are not interacting with the mandated reporters in school systems.
Training of education professionals in identifying and reporting maltreatment is uneven. More consistent, higher-quality training will help teachers detect more endangered children.
“We ask so much of our teachers and so many of them have performed with great courage and perseverance during the pandemic,” said Fitzpatrick, who is also senior associate dean of academic affairs for the Cornell Brooks School and associate vice provost for social sciences in the Office of the Vice President for Research and Innovation. “As a society, we owe more to them so that they can do a difficult part of their job with skill and take the steps necessary to protect the children they see every day.”

The research team also includes Cassandra Benson of the U.S. Air Force Academy and Samuel Bondurant of the U.S. Census Bureau.

The researchers based their findings on several data sources, including the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System’s Child File and public school calendar start and end dates to examine how the number of investigated reports differs between the academic year and summer break.

Tue, 09 Aug 2022 21:26:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://indiaeducationdiary.in/cornell-university-teachers-critical-to-detecting-and-reporting-child-maltreatment/
CCRN exam dump and training guide direct download
Training Exams List