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Exam Code: WHNP Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
Women Health Nurse Practitioner
Medical Practitioner information hunger
Killexams : Medical Practitioner information hunger - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/WHNP Search results Killexams : Medical Practitioner information hunger - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/WHNP https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : Eating late increases hunger, decreases calories burned, and changes fat tissue

Obesity afflicts approximately 42 percent of the U.S. adult population and contributes to the onset of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and other conditions. While popular healthy diet mantras advise against midnight snacking, few studies have comprehensively investigated the simultaneous effects of late eating on the three main players in body weight regulation and thus obesity risk: regulation of calorie intake, the number of calories you burn, and molecular changes in fat tissue. A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, a founding member of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system, found that when we eat significantly impacts our energy expenditure, appetite, and molecular pathways in adipose tissue. Their results are published in Cell Metabolism.

"We wanted to test the mechanisms that may explain why late eating increases obesity risk," explained senior author Frank A. J. L. Scheer, Ph.D., Director of the Medical Chronobiology Program in the Brigham's Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders. "Previous research by us and others had shown that late eating is associated with increased obesity risk, increased , and impaired weight loss success. We wanted to understand why."

"In this study, we asked, 'Does the time that we eat matter when everything else is kept consistent?'" said first author Nina Vujović, Ph.D., a researcher in the Medical Chronobiology Program in the Brigham's Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders. "And we found that eating four hours later makes a significant difference for our hunger levels, the way we burn calories after we eat, and the way we store fat."

Vujović, Scheer and their team studied 16 patients with a (BMI) in the overweight or obese range. Each participant completed two laboratory protocols: one with a strictly scheduled early meal schedule, and the other with the exact same meals, each scheduled about four hours later in the day. In the last two to three weeks before starting each of the in-laboratory protocols, participants maintained fixed sleep and wake schedules, and in the final three days before entering the laboratory, they strictly followed identical diets and meal schedules at home. In the lab, participants regularly documented their hunger and appetite, provided frequent small blood samples throughout the day, and had their body temperature and measured. To measure how eating time affected molecular pathways involved in adipogenesis, or how the body stores fat, investigators collected biopsies of from a subset of participants during laboratory testing in both the early and late eating protocols, to enable comparison of gene expression patterns/levels between these two eating conditions.

Results revealed that eating later had profound effects on hunger and appetite-regulating hormones leptin and ghrelin, which influence our drive to eat. Specifically, levels of the hormone leptin, which signals satiety, were decreased across the 24 hours in the late eating condition compared to the early eating conditions. When participants ate later, they also burned calories at a slower rate and exhibited adipose tissue gene expression towards increased adipogenesis and decreased lipolysis, which promote fat growth. Notably, these findings convey converging physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between late eating and increased obesity risk.

Vujović explains that these findings are not only consistent with a large body of research suggesting that eating later may increase one's likelihood of developing obesity, but they shed new light on how this might occur. By using a randomized crossover study, and tightly controlling for behavioral and such as physical activity, posture, sleep, and light exposure, investigators were able to detect changes the different control systems involved in energy balance, a marker of how our bodies use the food we consume.

In future studies, Scheer's team aims to recruit more women to increase the generalizability of their findings to a broader population. While this study cohort included only five female participants, the study was set up to control for menstrual phase, reducing confounding but making recruiting women more difficult. Going forward, Scheer and Vujović are also interested in better understanding the effects of the relationship between meal time and bedtime on .

"This study shows the impact of late versus early eating. Here, we isolated these effects by controlling for confounding variables like caloric intake, , sleep, and light exposure, but in real life, many of these factors may themselves be influenced by meal timing," said Scheer. "In larger scale studies, where tight control of all these factors is not feasible, we must at least consider how other behavioral and environmental variables alter these biological pathways underlying ."



More information: Frank A.J.L. Scheer, Late isocaloric eating increases hunger, decreases energy expenditure, and modifies metabolic pathways in adults with overweight and obesity, Cell Metabolism (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2022.09.007. www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/f … 1550-4131(22)00397-7

Citation: Eating late increases hunger, decreases calories burned, and changes fat tissue (2022, October 4) retrieved 17 October 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-late-hunger-decreases-calories-fat.html

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Tue, 04 Oct 2022 03:01:00 -0500 en text/html https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-10-late-hunger-decreases-calories-fat.html
Killexams : Opinion: The specter of mass hunger is more real than ever

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Fri, 14 Oct 2022 01:38:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/opinion/columnists/iowa-view/2022/10/13/mass-hunger-specter-real-action-needed/69558881007/
Killexams : HealthFleet’s Chief Medical Officer Contributes to White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

HealthFleet’s Chief Medical Officer Contributes to White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

HealthFleet is proud to recognize many clients and partners among the key participants in the conference.

Dr. Cate Collings, MD, MS, FACC, Dip ABLM provided expertise, guidance and support to the Biden-Harris Administration’s White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health last week. The conference was focused on developing a transformational vision for ending hunger and reducing diet-related disease by 2030, while at the same time improving access and affordability to eliminate disparities among impacted communities.

“The conference initiatives and commitments will accelerate a long-needed focus on food as medicine and mitigation of the ever-rising diet-related chronic disease that burdens individuals, families, and our country. HealthFleet and its programs are an important part of the solution,” said Dr. Collings. “HealthFleet meets people where they are at regardless of their economic circumstances, educational level, or cultural and food customs.”

One of the many objectives of the conference was to create priorities and private-public partnerships to help solve nutritional insecurity and diet-related diseases of American citizens. HealthFleet and its programs help employers and health systems who are tasked with addressing diet-related diseases and developing food as medicine priorities.

“We are encouraged by the breadth and depth of participation by a diverse group of stakeholders at the conference,” added Cheryl Morrison Deutsch, CEO of HealthFleet. “In particular we are proud that many HealthFleet customers and partners participated in the conversation and have outlined key priorities over the coming weeks and months to bring the vision to life.”

HealthFleet continues to engage with customers, stakeholders and partners to further support the improvement of diet-related chronic diseases as well as more broadly improving individual health outcomes. The organization continues to support efforts such as the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.

Details about the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health can be found by visiting: https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/White-House-National-Strategy-on-Hunger-Nutrition-and-Health-FINAL.pdf

About HealthFleet:

HealthFleet is a leading health technology company, offering solutions that blend technology, people, and content to deliver impactful programs targeting the most pervasive chronic health conditions. We do so in two significant ways — our content-agnostic SaaS platform enables organizations to deliver their programs through a tailored technology and services solution, allowing them to reach their audience by increasing their digital footprint; and the Restore Product Suite, which includes personalized, actionable support for employees that address health issues before they escalate. We aim to help as many as possible by enabling others to help as many as possible.

To learn more about HealthFleet, visit us at www.healthfleet.com.

Erica Thompson
ethompson@healthfleet.com
Telephone: 617.648.2981

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221004006088/en/

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:37:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.morningstar.com/news/business-wire/20221004006088/healthfleets-chief-medical-officer-contributes-to-white-house-conference-on-hunger-nutrition-and-health
Killexams : Biden Unveils Plan to End Hunger, Even As Americans Face Rising Food Costs

The White House hopes to end hunger by the end of the decade and reduce the burden of disease-related health issues, President Biden said during a Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health—the first of its kind in more than 50 years.

The announcement comes in the wake of historic high prices that are making it challenging for Americans to access the nutritious foods needed to stay healthy—in August, food prices were 11.4% higher than they were in August 2021, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported.

“The national strategy recognizes the critical role that nutrition plays in our health and our healthcare system, and it acknowledges that…we have to give families the tools to keep them healthy,” Biden said at the conference. 

In 2021, about 13.5 million U.S. households faced food insecurity, meaning they weren’t able to get enough food or were unsure if they would be able to have access to the food they needed. Not only do these Americans face hunger as a health issue, but research has shown that lower food security is associated with a higher likelihood of some chronic diseases, including cancer, asthma, and diabetes.

Here’s what experts have to say about hunger and its connections to health, as well as who may be facing poor health as a result of limited access to nutritious foods, and in the face of inflated prices, whether Biden’s plan is enough to tackle the issue. 

Hunger and food insecurity are dangerous to our overall health, but the consequences of not eating a nutritious diet are much further reaching than an empty stomach. People who struggle to afford the food they need often end up purchasing food that’s less nutritious, either because it’s cheaper or because it’s generally more filling. 

“Filling your cart up with healthy foods, it typically does cost more than a cart full of highly processed foods,” Erica Kenney, ScD, MPH, assistant professor of public health nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told Health.

Not only are healthier foods more expensive in general, but fruits and vegetables are also more expensive per calorie, Kenney explained—meaning you have to buy and consume more of them to feel full. 

“If your goal is really to make sure that you're keeping yourself and your kids from feeling hungry, you might be opting for stuff that is cheaper per calorie,” she said. “You'd have to buy a lot more fruits and vegetables to get the same kind of caloric load.”

Because more nutritious foods are often unaffordable for many people—especially with heightened food prices due to inflation—it’s not unusual for consumers to make swaps for foods that are less nutritious in order to stretch their dollar a bit further. The result is poor nutrition that can lead to health risks, including high blood pressure or obesity. 

If a person is hungry or unsure whether they can feed themselves or their family, they may also experience high levels of stress which can create further health issues. 

“Psychologically, those stresses might lead us to binge on certain things when we're able to, or to stock up on things that are storable that might be more energy dense,” Sean Cash, PhD, Bergstrom Foundation professor of global nutrition at the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, told Health. “Physiologically, there's evidence to suggest that our bodies also react to these stresses and changes in ways that may be bad for our long term health.”

Because having access to healthy foods is much more difficult for people who experience food insecurity, large health disparities often pop up. One example of this may be in death rates of those with diabetes based on location, Sagar Dugani, MD, PhD, MPH, physician and assistant professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, explained. 

Dr. Dugani published a study in September, which found that between 1999 and 2018, the mortality rate for diabetes was much higher for people in rural areas than for people in urban areas. Furthermore, over the course of the last two decades, the rate of people dying from diabetes in rural areas has remained relatively unchanged, even though it has declined in urban areas. 

The study didn’t look at the causes behind this exactly, but Dr. Dugani said that nutrition and food insecurity likely plays a major role. 

“There are a lot of [rural] counties that have food deserts or are food deserts, they have lower access to fresh vegetables, fresh fruits, they have lower access to quality food,” Dr. Dugani told Health

A lack of access to healthy foods—whether it be because of price or physical distance—can make it harder for people to ward off obesity, which is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes

“There's been a focus on the phrase here—[to] talk about nutrition security, not just food security. To think beyond calories,” Cash said. 

Unlike other things that people can cut back on during times of economic hardship, food is not one of them, Cash explained. When wages don’t keep pace with the cost of food prices, it puts families in a situation where they have to buy cheaper, more filling food, in addition to possibly visiting charitable food organizations. But these organizations don’t always offer the most nutritious food either, Kenney said. 

With limited options for individuals, Biden announced a partnership with philanthropic organizations and private companies to address the issue of food insecurity and the chronic disease that often follows. Over 100 different organizations pledged a combined over $8 billion to fighting hunger with donations to charities or their own nutrition programs. 

There are other efforts that the White House has implemented in latest years that could address food insecurity too, Biden added. His child tax credit—included in the 2021 American Rescue Plan—somewhat eased the burden of buying groceries for families, and should be expanded, Biden argued. This could be doubly helpful, as many parents often skip out on meals themselves in order to provide for their kids, Cash explained. 

Biden also pointed to updated allowances for SNAP benefits (food stamps) which were meant to better reflect the cost of living in 2022. Those changes went into effect on Saturday. 

Additionally, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed a change to which foods can be labeled as healthy, in line with Biden’s conference and the larger goal of “helping consumers Boost nutrition and dietary patterns to help reduce the burden of chronic disease and advance health equity.”

Though Cash and Kenney say Biden’s plan is certainly a step in the right direction, the notion that we can end food insecurity and the chronic health disparities it causes by the end of the decade seems out of reach. 

“Every little bit is going to help. I do think that in the long term, food insecurity and hunger are sort of just one symptom of what happens when folks are in poverty,” Kenney said. “It’s not going to go away if folks can’t earn living wages.”

Even with the increase in SNAP benefits and the possibility of a child tax credit extension, inflation is still an immense burden on people’s budgets that may not be subsiding soon.

“If we are to promote a healthy lifestyle, which includes nutrition, high quality food, less processed foods, then inflation can be a major barrier for people being able to access all of these,” Dr. Dugani said. 

Yet another way inflation creates obstacles to accessing healthy food is by making gas prices higher—which means people may not be able to travel long distances to visit grocery stores, Dr. Dugani added. It may also make the cost of medicines more steep and both of these challenges could make chronic disease worse, especially if inflation continues to be an issue for months or years to come. 

Another important aspect of food insecurity and nutrition is changing public opinion, Cash explained. Federal programs will certainly help, but not if people can’t get into the habit of eating healthy. 

“Some of this [is] changes in norms, and what has been considered good food and how we've been talking about communicating what good food is—marketing drives a lot of that conversation,” Cash said. “That often sets norms in ways that make it harder for people to maybe make the best choices nutritionally.”

While many factors tied to eating healthy are beyond the individual’s control—because of issues surrounding price, physical access, marketing campaigns, or other factors—there are some things people can do in the meantime to try to eat as healthy as possible while on a tight budget. 

Canned or frozen fruits and vegetables are good options because they’re frequently less expensive than fresh options, Kenney explained, and beans can be a good substitute for meat, as they’re a good source of protein. But even these things may not be feasibly worked into people’s diets when they’re facing food insecurity, and that’s okay. 

“At the end of the day, folks who are experiencing food insecurity need to feed themselves and they need to feed their families,” Kenney said. “So these are all things that people can do, but it's still quite challenging to do in practice.” 

The government’s attempt at solving the problem—or at the very least, making concerted efforts to address it for the first time in decades—should bring a larger spotlight to the issue of food insecurity, and the millions of people that are affected by it. Framing the issue of hunger as a medical issue could take the conversation in a more productive direction, especially as officials reinforce the fact that food insecurity is more than just hunger, it’s also a matter of health and mortality. 

“I did really like the food as medicine focus of the conference as well,” Kenney said. “Getting people to think about it more directly in terms of how it can influence health and health care costs, and relating it back to what happens in the doctor's office, might be a solution to sort of get folks a little bit more invested in changing it.”

Wed, 05 Oct 2022 09:16:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.health.com/biden-plan-end-hunger-rising-food-costs-6747072
Killexams : Northern Kenya faces hunger crisis amid worst drought in 40 years

In a dry river bed in Kenya's arid northwest, pastoralists dig ever-deeper pits in an anxious search for water, as the region suffers its worst drought in 40 years, which has wiped out livestock and crops, deepening a hunger crisis.

For the last four rainy seasons the annual rains have failed across Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia and forced 1.5 million people to flee their homes in search of food and water elsewhere.

The impact of hunger is etched on the faces of children filling the "stabilization room" for serious health problems of the Lodwar County and Referral Hospital in northwest Kenya.

UGANDA’S LATEST OUTBREAK OF EBOLA KILLS ITS FIRST HEALTH WORKER

"I have three grand-children who have been affected by hunger," said Agnes Ekereru, sitting on a bed with her four-year-old grandson Ekai Ebei. "All my livestock have died because of the drought."

Almost two million children in the Horn of Africa require urgent treatment for life-threatening severe acute malnutrition, according to UNICEF estimates.

Millions of people across the Horn of Africa are facing severe hunger as the worst drought in 40 years devastates the region. Pictured: Kids drink from a tap in Loiyangalani, northern Kenya, on July 13, 2022.  (SIMON MAINA/AFP via Getty Images)

The hunger problem is compounded by the war in Ukraine and the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, which has pushed up the price of cooking oil, bread and wheat flour to record highs at local markets, UNICEF says.

Scientists at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) say the drought has been caused by climate change and the La Niña weather pattern in the Pacific Ocean.

Aid groups and authorities predict the next rains in the Horn of Africa are likely to fail too, hurting communities whom a UNICEF official in Kenya said are some of the least responsible for global carbon emissions.

OUTBREAK OF DEADLY CHILDHOOD DISEASES RISE IN ETHIOPIA'S TIGRAY, WAR BLAMED FOR SLOWING VACCINATIONS

"It's not the (countries) ironically that are contributing more to that global emission that are paying the heaviest price," said Mohamed Malick Fall, UNICEF regional director for eastern and southern Africa.

"And here comes the notion of equity and justice: why should I pay such a heavy price for something for which I have not contributed so greatly."

ETHIOPIA FORMS BODY TO NEGOTIATE WITH TIGRAY REBELS AMID DEADLY CIVIL WAR

With each passing season, the inhabitants of Turkana County, mostly nomadic herders famous for their colourful beadwork and cloth, have fewer resources to fall back on, pushing them closer to the brink.

Earlier this month Kenya's president declared the crisis a national disaster.

"I have lost so much," said Loudi Lokoriyen, a goat-herder searching for water outside the town of Lodwar.

"Close to three hundred (goats) have died, 50 camels have died, and they still continue to die."

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 14:07:00 -0500 Fox News en text/html https://www.foxnews.com/world/northern-kenya-faces-hunger-crisis-amid-worst-drought-40-years
Killexams : AS FAMINE LOOMS, ONLY 7% OF UN APPEALS FOR HUNGER RELIEF ARE FILLED, LEAVING AN ALARMING HUNGER FUNDING GAP OF 93%

Report Released Today by Action Against Hunger Shows Decade-Long Trend: Humanitarian Needs Up 500% As 42% Fewer UN Appeals Are Fulfilled 

NEW YORK, Oct. 12, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Only 7% of appeals for urgent hunger-related funding through the UN humanitarian system are filled, leaving a hunger funding gap of 93%, according to "The Hunger Funding Gap: How The World Is Failing to Stop the Crisis," an analysis released today by Action Against Hunger, a nonprofit leader in the global movement to end hunger. The assessment also found that while global funding has increased 233% over the past decade, overall humanitarian needs are up 500%, so 42% fewer UN appeals are being fulfilled.

Credit: Peter Catan for Action Against Hunger, East Africa

The analysis examined 13 countries that experienced "crisis" levels of hunger or worse in 2020, and how the global community responded with funding in 2021. Only 7.6% of Food Security appeals were fully funded and no appeals for support of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs were fully funded. The majority (61%) of hunger-related appeals were not even funded to the halfway point. Additionally, countries that experienced the greatest hunger crises actually received less hunger funding (by percentage of appeals filled) than countries with half the rate of hunger.

"It's alarming that people in desperate need saw only 7% of urgent hunger-related funding requests being met in 2021. While money isn't the only answer, it must be part of the solution. As a global community concerned about hunger, we all need to put our money where our mouths are," said Michelle Brown, Advocacy Director, Action Against Hunger USA.

The analysis found that greater hunger levels don't necessarily lead to greater levels of funding or media attention. In fact, countries where the hunger crisis was greatest actually received less hunger funding (by percentage of appeals filled) than countries experiencing half the rate of hunger. The report also overlays an analysis of global English-language media and found that coverage correlates to funding levels rather than levels of hunger or unmet need.

The Hunger Funding Gap comes as approximately 828 million people — one in ten worldwide — are undernourished and as many as 50 million people in 45 countries are on the verge of famine. The climate crisis, war, and soaring inflation are impacting farmers' ability to grow food and families' ability to afford what little is available. These factors also are driving up the costs for humanitarian organizations to secure and transport supplies, contributing to a growing hunger crisis in many parts of the world.

According to the report, 90% of Americans believe that global hunger remains a serious problem, up slightly from the 86% who held that view in 2021. While the American public significantly underestimates the severity of the hunger funding gap, the majority (75%) sees a lack of funding as a major barrier to addressing hunger – and they hold negative views of politicians who don't act in the face of a hunger crisis.

"It's encouraging to see that people care about this issue and both experts and the general public told us hunger is a problem they believe we can solve," said Brown. "We applaud major donors who have increased funding significantly over the past decade. The challenge is that even this increased funding hasn't been enough to keep pace with rising needs. We need to see far more giving from additional donor countries, particularly those that have the capacity, but haven't been as engaged to date."

The report is the result of Action Against Hunger's analysis of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Humanitarian Response Plan funding data, as well as an analysis of English-language global news via MuckRack and a public opinion survey conducted with The Harris Poll. The methodology and full results are available here.

About Action Against Hunger

Action Against Hunger is a nonprofit leader in a global movement to end hunger in our lifetimes. It innovates solutions, advocates for change, and reaches 25 million people every year with proven hunger prevention and treatment programs. As a nonprofit that works across 50 countries, its 8,300 dedicated staff members partner with communities to address the root causes of hunger, including climate change, conflict, inequity, and emergencies. It strives to create a world free from hunger, for everyone, for good.

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SOURCE Action Against Hunger

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Killexams : HealthFleet's Chief Medical Officer Contributes to White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

HealthFleet is proud to recognize many clients and partners among the key participants in the conference.

Dr. Cate Collings, MD, MS, FACC, Dip ABLM provided expertise, guidance and support to the Biden-Harris Administration's White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health last week. The conference was focused on developing a transformational vision for ending hunger and reducing diet-related disease by 2030, while at the same time improving access and affordability to eliminate disparities among impacted communities.

"The conference initiatives and commitments will accelerate a long-needed focus on food as medicine and mitigation of the ever-rising diet-related chronic disease that burdens individuals, families, and our country. HealthFleet and its programs are an important part of the solution," said Dr. Collings. "HealthFleet meets people where they are at regardless of their economic circumstances, educational level, or cultural and food customs."

One of the many objectives of the conference was to create priorities and private-public partnerships to help solve nutritional insecurity and diet-related diseases of American citizens. HealthFleet and its programs help employers and health systems who are tasked with addressing diet-related diseases and developing food as medicine priorities.

"We are encouraged by the breadth and depth of participation by a diverse group of stakeholders at the conference," added Cheryl Morrison Deutsch, CEO of HealthFleet. "In particular we are proud that many HealthFleet customers and partners participated in the conversation and have outlined key priorities over the coming weeks and months to bring the vision to life."

HealthFleet continues to engage with customers, stakeholders and partners to further support the improvement of diet-related chronic diseases as well as more broadly improving individual health outcomes. The organization continues to support efforts such as the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.

Details about the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health can be found by visiting: https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/White-House-National-Strategy-on-Hunger-Nutrition-and-Health-FINAL.pdf

About HealthFleet:

HealthFleet is a leading health technology company, offering solutions that blend technology, people, and content to deliver impactful programs targeting the most pervasive chronic health conditions. We do so in two significant ways — our content-agnostic SaaS platform enables organizations to deliver their programs through a tailored technology and services solution, allowing them to reach their audience by increasing their digital footprint; and the Restore Product Suite, which includes personalized, actionable support for employees that address health issues before they escalate. We aim to help as many as possible by enabling others to help as many as possible.

To learn more about HealthFleet, visit us at www.healthfleet.com.

© 2022 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:43:00 -0500 text/html https://www.benzinga.com/pressreleases/22/10/b29143380/healthfleets-chief-medical-officer-contributes-to-white-house-conference-on-hunger-nutrition-and-h
Killexams : Eating late increases hunger, decreases calories burned, and changes fat tissue

Obesity afflicts approximately 42 percent of the U.S. adult population and contributes to the onset of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and other conditions. While popular healthy diet mantras advise against midnight snacking, few studies have comprehensively investigated the simultaneous effects of late eating on the three main players in body weight regulation and thus obesity risk: regulation of calorie intake, the number of calories you burn, and molecular changes in fat tissue. A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital, a founding member of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system, found that when we eat significantly impacts our energy expenditure, appetite, and molecular pathways in adipose tissue. Their results are published in Cell Metabolism.

"We wanted to test the mechanisms that may explain why late eating increases obesity risk," explained senior author Frank A. J. L. Scheer, PhD, Director of the Medical Chronobiology Program in the Brigham's Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders. "Previous research by us and others had shown that late eating is associated with increased obesity risk, increased body fat, and impaired weight loss success. We wanted to understand why."

"In this study, we asked, 'Does the time that we eat matter when everything else is kept consistent?'" said first author Nina Vujovic, PhD, a researcher in the Medical Chronobiology Program in the Brigham's Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders. "And we found that eating four hours later makes a significant difference for our hunger levels, the way we burn calories after we eat, and the way we store fat."

Vujovic, Scheer and their team studied 16 patients with a body mass index (BMI) in the overweight or obese range. Each participant completed two laboratory protocols: one with a strictly scheduled early meal schedule, and the other with the exact same meals, each scheduled about four hours later in the day. In the last two to three weeks before starting each of the in-laboratory protocols, participants maintained fixed sleep and wake schedules, and in the final three days before entering the laboratory, they strictly followed identical diets and meal schedules at home. In the lab, participants regularly documented their hunger and appetite, provided frequent small blood samples throughout the day, and had their body temperature and energy expenditure measured. To measure how eating time affected molecular pathways involved in adipogenesis, or how the body stores fat, investigators collected biopsies of adipose tissue from a subset of participants during laboratory testing in both the early and late eating protocols, to enable comparison of gene expression patterns/levels between these two eating conditions.

Results revealed that eating later had profound effects on hunger and appetite-regulating hormones leptin and ghrelin, which influence our drive to eat. Specifically, levels of the hormone leptin, which signals satiety, were decreased across the 24 hours in the late eating condition compared to the early eating conditions. When participants ate later, they also burned calories at a slower rate and exhibited adipose tissue gene expression towards increased adipogenesis and decreased lipolysis, which promote fat growth. Notably, these findings convey converging physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying the correlation between late eating and increased obesity risk.

Vujovic explains that these findings are not only consistent with a large body of research suggesting that eating later may increase one's likelihood of developing obesity, but they shed new light on how this might occur. By using a randomized crossover study, and tightly controlling for behavioral and environmental factors such as physical activity, posture, sleep, and light exposure, investigators were able to detect changes the different control systems involved in energy balance, a marker of how our bodies use the food we consume.

In future studies, Scheer's team aims to recruit more women to increase the generalizability of their findings to a broader population. While this study cohort included only five female participants, the study was set up to control for menstrual phase, reducing confounding but making recruiting women more difficult. Going forward, Scheer and Vujovic are also interested in better understanding the effects of the relationship between meal time and bedtime on energy balance.

"This study shows the impact of late versus early eating. Here, we isolated these effects by controlling for confounding variables like caloric intake, physical activity, sleep, and light exposure, but in real life, many of these factors may themselves be influenced by meal timing," said Scheer. "In larger scale studies, where tight control of all these factors is not feasible, we must at least consider how other behavioral and environmental variables alter these biological pathways underlying obesity risk. "

Disclosures:

During the execution of this project, Scheer received lecture fees from Bayer HealthCare, Sentara HealthCare, Philips, Vanda Pharmaceuticals, and Pfizer Pharmaceuticals; received consulting fees from the University of Alabama at Birmingham; and served on the Board of Directors for the Sleep Research Society. Scheer's interests were reviewed and managed by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Partners HealthCare in accordance with their conflict of interest policies. None of these are related to the current work. Vujovic has been compensated for consulting services provided to the Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research, also unrelated to the current work.

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:44:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/10/221004121928.htm
Killexams : HealthFleet’s Chief Medical Officer Contributes to White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

HealthFleet is proud to recognize many clients and partners among the key participants in the conference.

NEEDHAM, Mass., October 04, 2022--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Dr. Cate Collings, MD, MS, FACC, Dip ABLM provided expertise, guidance and support to the Biden-Harris Administration’s White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health last week. The conference was focused on developing a transformational vision for ending hunger and reducing diet-related disease by 2030, while at the same time improving access and affordability to eliminate disparities among impacted communities.

"The conference initiatives and commitments will accelerate a long-needed focus on food as medicine and mitigation of the ever-rising diet-related chronic disease that burdens individuals, families, and our country. HealthFleet and its programs are an important part of the solution," said Dr. Collings. "HealthFleet meets people where they are at regardless of their economic circumstances, educational level, or cultural and food customs."

One of the many objectives of the conference was to create priorities and private-public partnerships to help solve nutritional insecurity and diet-related diseases of American citizens. HealthFleet and its programs help employers and health systems who are tasked with addressing diet-related diseases and developing food as medicine priorities.

"We are encouraged by the breadth and depth of participation by a diverse group of stakeholders at the conference," added Cheryl Morrison Deutsch, CEO of HealthFleet. "In particular we are proud that many HealthFleet customers and partners participated in the conversation and have outlined key priorities over the coming weeks and months to bring the vision to life."

HealthFleet continues to engage with customers, stakeholders and partners to further support the improvement of diet-related chronic diseases as well as more broadly improving individual health outcomes. The organization continues to support efforts such as the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.

Details about the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health can be found by visiting: https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/White-House-National-Strategy-on-Hunger-Nutrition-and-Health-FINAL.pdf

About HealthFleet:

HealthFleet is a leading health technology company, offering solutions that blend technology, people, and content to deliver impactful programs targeting the most pervasive chronic health conditions. We do so in two significant ways — our content-agnostic SaaS platform enables organizations to deliver their programs through a tailored technology and services solution, allowing them to reach their audience by increasing their digital footprint; and the Restore Product Suite, which includes personalized, actionable support for employees that address health issues before they escalate. We aim to help as many as possible by enabling others to help as many as possible.

To learn more about HealthFleet, visit us at www.healthfleet.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221004006088/en/

Contacts

Erica Thompson
ethompson@healthfleet.com
Telephone: 617.648.2981

Tue, 04 Oct 2022 07:36:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.yahoo.com/now/healthfleet-chief-medical-officer-contributes-193500702.html
Killexams : HealthFleet’s Chief Medical Officer Contributes to White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

NEEDHAM, Mass., (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Dr. Cate Collings, MD, MS, FACC, Dip ABLM provided expertise, guidance and support to the Biden-Harris Administration’s White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health last week. The conference was focused on developing a transformational vision for ending hunger and reducing diet-related disease by 2030, while at the same time improving access and affordability to eliminate disparities among impacted communities.

“The conference initiatives and commitments will accelerate a long-needed focus on food as medicine and mitigation of the ever-rising diet-related chronic disease that burdens individuals, families, and our country. HealthFleet and its programs are an important part of the solution,” said Dr. Collings. “HealthFleet meets people where they are at regardless of their economic circumstances, educational level, or cultural and food customs.”

One of the many objectives of the conference was to create priorities and private-public partnerships to help solve nutritional insecurity and diet-related diseases of American citizens. HealthFleet and its programs help employers and health systems who are tasked with addressing diet-related diseases and developing food as medicine priorities.

“We are encouraged by the breadth and depth of participation by a diverse group of stakeholders at the conference,” added Cheryl Morrison Deutsch, CEO of HealthFleet. “In particular we are proud that many HealthFleet customers and partners participated in the conversation and have outlined key priorities over the coming weeks and months to bring the vision to life.”

HealthFleet continues to engage with customers, stakeholders and partners to further support the improvement of diet-related chronic diseases as well as more broadly improving individual health outcomes. The organization continues to support efforts such as the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.

Details about the White House National Strategy on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health can be found by visiting: https://www.whitehouse.gov/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/White-House-National-Strategy-on-Hunger-Nutrition-and-Health-FINAL.pdf

About HealthFleet:

HealthFleet is a leading health technology company, offering solutions that blend technology, people, and content to deliver impactful programs targeting the most pervasive chronic health conditions. We do so in two significant ways — our content-agnostic SaaS platform enables organizations to deliver their programs through a tailored technology and services solution, allowing them to reach their audience by increasing their digital footprint; and the Restore Product Suite, which includes personalized, actionable support for employees that address health issues before they escalate. We aim to help as many as possible by enabling others to help as many as possible.

To learn more about HealthFleet, visit us at www.healthfleet.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20221004006088/en/

SOURCE: HealthFleet

Erica Thompson
ethompson@healthfleet.com
Telephone: 617.648.2981

COMTEX_415917671/2456/2022-10-04T15:35:24

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Tue, 04 Oct 2022 03:35:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/healthfleets-chief-medical-officer-contributes-to-white-house-conference-on-hunger-nutrition-and-health-2022-10-04
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