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Exam Code: AAMA-CMA Practice exam 2022 by Killexams.com team
AAMA-CMA AAMA Certified Medical Assistant

Follow a step-by-step guide to apply for the exam:
- Eligibility
- Documentation
- Policies
- Applying
- Scheduling
- Preparing
- Score Notification
- Certificate

Content Outline for the CMA (AAMA)® Certification Exam
I. A–G General
A. Psychology
1. Understanding Human Behavior
a. Behavioral theories
(1) Maslow
(2) Erikson
b. Defense mechanisms
(1) Common types
(2) Recognition and management

2. Human Growth and Development
a. Normal developmental patterns/milestones

3. Death and Dying Stages

B. Communication
1. Therapeutic/Adaptive Responses to Diverse Populations
a. Visually impaired
b. Hearing impaired
c. Age specific
(1) Geriatric
(2) Pediatric/adolescent
d. Seriously/terminally ill
e. Intellectual disability
f. Illiterate
g. Non-English speaking
h. Anxious/angry/distraught
i. Socially/culturally/ethnically diverse

2. Nonverbal Communication
a. Body language
(1) Posture
(2) Position
(3) Facial expression
(4) Territoriality/physical boundaries
(5) Gestures
(6) Touch
(7) Mannerisms
(8) Eye contact

3. Communication Cycle
a. Sender-message-receiver-feedback
b.Listening skills
(1) Active/therapeutic
c. Assess level of understanding
(1) Reflection
(2) Restatement
(3) Clarification
(4) Feedback
d. Barriers to communication
(1) Internal distractions
(a) Pain
(b) Hunger
(c) Anger
(2) External/environmental distractions
(a) Temperature
(b) Noise

4. Collection of Data
a. Types of questions
(1) Exploratory
(2) Open-ended
(3) Closed/Direct

5. Telephone Techniques
a. Call management
(1) Screening/gathering data
(2) Emergency/urgent situations
b. Messages
(1) Taking messages
(2) Leaving messages

6. Interpersonal Skills
a. Displaying impartial conduct without regard to race, religion, age, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, physical challenges, special needs, lifestyle choices
b. Recognizing stereotypes and biases
c. Demonstrating empathy/sympathy/compassion

C. Professionalism
1. Professional Behavior
a. Professional situations
(1) Displaying tact, diplomacy, courtesy, respect, dignity
(2) Demonstrating responsibility, integrity/honesty
(3) Responding to criticism
b. Professional image

2. Performing as a Team Member
a. Principles of health care team dynamics
(1) Cooperation for optimal outcomes
(2) Identification of the roles and credentials of health care team members
b. Time management principles
(1) Prioritizing responsibilities

D. Medical Law/Regulatory Guidelines
1. Advance Directives
a. Living will
b. Medical durable power of attorney
c. Patient Self-Determination Act (PSDA)

2. Uniform Anatomical Gift Act

3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

4. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

5. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA '88)

6. Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA)

7. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)
a. Health insurance portability access and renewal without preexisting conditions
b. Coordination of care to prevent duplication of services

8. Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act
a. Patient's right to inspect, amend, and restrict access to his/her medical record

9. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)
a. Controlled Substances Act of 1970

10. Medical Assistant Scope of Practice
a. Consequences of failing to operate within scope

11. Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA)

12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

13. Consumer Protection Acts
a. Fair Debt Collection Practices Act
b. Truth in Lending Act of 1968 (Regulation Z)

14. Public Health and Welfare Disclosure
a. Public health statutes
(1) Communicable diseases
(2) Vital statistics
(3) Abuse/neglect/exploitation against child/elder
(a) Domestic abuse
(4) Wounds of violence

15. Confidentiality
a. Electronic access audit/activity log
b. Use and disclosure of personal/protected health information (PHI)
(1) Consent/authorization to release
(2) Drug and alcohol treatment records
(3) HIV-related information
(4) Mental health

16. Health Care Rights and Responsibilities
a. Patients' Bill of Rights/Patient Care Partnership
b. Professional liability
(1) Current standard of care
(2) Standards of conduct
(3) Malpractice coverage
c. Consent to treat
(1) Informed consent
(2) Implied consent
(3) Expressed consent
(4) Patient incompetence
(5) Emancipated minor
(6) Mature minor

17. Medicolegal Terms and Doctrines
a. Subpoena duces tecum
b. Subpoena
c. Respondeat superior
d. Res ipsa loquitor
e. Locum tenens
f. Defendant-plaintiff
g. Deposition
h. Arbitration-mediation
i. Good Samaritan laws

18. Categories of Law
a. Criminal law
(1) Felony/misdemeanor
b. Civil law
(1) Contracts (physician-patient relationships)
(a) Legal obligations to the patient
(b) Consequences for patient noncompliance
(c) Termination of medical care
(i) Elements/behaviors for withdrawal of care
(ii) Patient notification and documentation
(d) Ownership of medical records
(2) Torts
(a) Invasion of privacy
(b) Negligence
(c) Intentional torts
(i) Battery
(ii) Assault
(iii) Slander
(iv) Libel
c. Statutory law
(1) Medical practice acts
d. Common law (Legal precedents)

E. Medical Ethics
1. Ethical Standards

2. Factors Affecting Ethical Decisions
a. Legal
b. Moral

F. Risk Management, Quality Assurance, and Safety
1. Workplace Accident Prevention
a. Slips/trips/falls

2. Safety Signs, Symbols, Labels

3. Environmental Safety
a. Ergonomics
b. Electrical safety
c. Fire prevention/extinguisher use/regulations

4. Compliance Reporting
a. Reporting unsafe activities and behaviors
b. Disclosing errors in patient care
c. Insurance fraud, waste, and abuse
d. Conflicts of interest
e. Incident reports

G. Medical Terminology
1. Word Parts
a. Basic structure
(1) Roots/combining forms
(2) Prefixes
(3) Suffixes

2. Definitions/Medical Terminology
a. Diseases and pathologies
b. Diagnostic procedures
c. Surgical procedures
d. Medical specialties

II. H-M Administrative
H. Medical Reception
1. Medical Record Preparation

2. Demographic Data Review
a. Identity theft prevention
b. Insurance eligibility verification

3. Handling Vendors/Business Associates

4. Reception Room Environment
a. Comfort
b. Safety
c. Sanitation

5. Practice Information Packet
a. Office policies
b. Patient financial responsibilities

I. Patient Navigator/Advocate
1. Resource Information
a. Provide information about community resources
b. Facilitate referrals to community resources
c. Referral follow-up

J. Medical Business Practices
1. Written Communication
a. Letters
b. Memos/interoffice communications
c. Reports

2. Business Equipment
a. Routine maintenance
b. Safety precautions

3. Office Supply Inventory
a. Inventory control/recordkeeping

4. Electronic Applications
a. Medical management systems
(1) Database reports
(2) Meaningful use regulations
b. Spreadsheets, graphs
c. Electronic mail
d. Security
(1) Password/screen saver
(2) Encryption
(3) Firewall
e. Transmission of information
(1) Facsimile/scanner
(2) Patient portal to health data
f. Social media

K. Establish Patient Medical Record
1. Recognize and Interpret Data
a. History and physical
b. Discharge summary
c. Operative note
d. Diagnostic test/lab report
e. Clinic progress note
f. Consultation report
g. Correspondence
h. Charts, graphs, tables
i. Flow sheet

2. Charting Systems
a. Problem-oriented medical record (POMR)
b. Source-oriented medical record (SOMR)

L. Scheduling Appointments
1. Scheduling Guidelines
a. Appointment matrix
b. New patient appointments
(1) Identify required information
c. Established patient appointments
(1) Routine
(2) Urgent/emergency
d. Patient flow
(1) Patient needs/preference
(2) Physician preference
(3) Facility/equipment requirements
e. Outside services (e.g., lab, X-ray, surgery, outpatient procedures, hospital admissions)

2. Appointment Protocols
a. Legal aspects
b. Physician referrals
c. Cancellations/no-shows
d. Physician delay/unavailability
e. Reminders/recall systems
(1) Appointment cards
(2) Phone calls/text messages/e-mail notifications
(3) Tickler file

M. Practice Finances
1. Financial Terminology
a. Accounts receivable
b. Accounts payable
c. Assets
d. Liabilities
e. Aging of accounts
f. Debits
g. Credits
h. Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs)
i. Relative Value Units (RVUs)

2. Financial Procedures
a. Payment receipts
(1) Co-pays
b. Data entry
(1) Post charges
(2) Post payments
(3) Post adjustments
c. Manage petty cash account
d. Financial calculations
e. Billing procedures
(1) Itemized statements
(2) Billing cycles
f. Collection procedures
(1) Aging of accounts
(2) Preplanned payment options
(3) Credit arrangements
(4) Use of collection agencies

3. Diagnostic and Procedural Coding Applications
a. Current Procedural Terminology (CPT)
(1) Modifiers
(2) Upcoding
(3) Bundling of charges
b. International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modifications (ICD-CM) (Current schedule)
c. Linking procedure and diagnosis codes
d. Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS Level II)

4. Third-Party Payers/Insurance
a. Types of plans
(1) Commercial plans
(2) Government plans
(a) Medicare
(i) Advance Beneficiary Notice (ABN)
(b) Medicaid
(c) TRICARE/CHAMPVA
(3) Managed care organizations (MCOs)
(a) Managed care requirements
(i) Care referrals
(ii) Precertification
[a] Diagnostic and surgical procedures
(iii) Prior authorization
[a] Medications
(4) Workers' compensation
b. Insurance claims
(1) Submission
(2) Appeals/denials
(3) Explanation of benefits (EOB)

III. N-V Clinical
N. Anatomy and Physiology
1. Body as a Whole
a. Structural units
b. Anatomical divisions, body cavities
c. Anatomical positions and directions
d. Body planes, quadrants

2. Body Systems Including Normal Structure, Function, and Interrelationships Across the Life Span
a. Integumentary
b. Musculoskeletal
c. Nervous
d. Cardiovascular, hematopoietic, and lymphatic
e. Respiratory
f. Digestive
g. Urinary
h. Reproductive
i. Endocrine
j. Sensory

3. Pathophysiology and Diseases of Body Systems
a. Integumentary
b. Musculoskeletal
c. Nervous
d. Cardiovascular, hemtopoietic, and lymphatic
e. Respiratory
f. Digestive
g. Urinary
h. Reproductive
i. Endocrine
j. Sensory

O. Infection Control
1. Infectious Agents
a. Bacteria
b. Viruses
c. Protozoa
d. Fungi
e. Parasites

2. Modes of Transmission
a. Direct
b. Indirect
c. Airborne
d. Droplet
e. Inhalation

3. Infection Cycle/Chain of Infection

4. Body's Natural Barriers

5. Medical Asepsis
a. Hand hygiene
(1) Hand washing
(2) Alcohol-based hand rub
b. Sanitization
c. Disinfection

6. Surgical Asepsis
a. Surgical scrub
b. Sterilization techniques/Autoclave
(1) Preparing items
(2) Wrapping
(3) Sterilization indicators

7. Standard Precautions/Blood-borne Pathogen Standards
a. Body fluids
b. Secretions
c. Excretions
d. Blood
(1) HIV-HBV-HCV
e. Mucous membranes
f. Personal protective equipment (PPE)
(1) Gowns
(2) Gloves
(3) Masks
(4) Caps
(5) Eye protection
g. Post-exposure plan

8. Biohazard Disposal/Regulated Waste
a. Sharps
b. Blood and body fluids
c. Safety data sheets (SDS)
d. Spill kit

P. Patient Intake and Documentation of Care
1. Medical Record Documentation
a. Subjective data
(1) Chief complaint
(2) Present illness
(3) Past medical history
(4) Family history
(5) Social and occupational history
(6) Review of systems
b. Objective data
c. Making corrections
d. Treatment/compliance

Q. Patient Preparation and Assisting the Provider
1. Vital Signs/Anthropometrics
a. Blood pressure
(1) Technique
(2) Equipment
(a) Stethoscope
(b) Sphygmomanometer
b. Pulse
(1) Technique
(a) Pulse points
(b) Rate and rhythm
c. Height/weight/BMI
(1) Technique
(2) Equipment
d. Body temperature
(1) Technique
(2) Equipment
e. Oxygen saturation/pulse oximetry
(1) Technique
(2) Equipment
f. Respiration rate
(1) Technique

2. Recognize and Report Age-Specific Normal and Abnormal Vital Signs

3. Examinations
a. Methods
(1) Auscultation
(2) Palpation
(3) Percussion
(4) Mensuration
(5) Manipulation
(6) Inspection
b. Body positions/draping
(1) Sims
(2) Fowlers
(3) Supine
(4) Knee-chest
(5) Prone
(6) Lithotomy
(7) Dorsal recumbent
c. Pediatric exam
(1) Growth chart
(a) Measurements
(i) Techniques
b. OB-GYN exam
(1) Pelvic exam/PAP smear
(2) Prenatal/postpartum exams

4. Procedures
a. Procedure explanation and patient instructions
b. Supplies, equipment, and techniques
(1) Eye irrigation
(2) Ear irrigation
(3) Dressing change
(4) Suture/staple removal
(5) Sterile procedures
(a) Surgical assisting
(b) Surgical tray prep
(c) Antiseptic skin prep
(d) Sterile field boundaries
(e) Surgical instruments
(i) Classifications
(ii) Instrument use

5. Patient Education/Health Coach
a. Health maintenance and disease prevention
(1) Diabetic teaching and home care
(a) Home blood sugar monitoring
(2) Instruct on use of patient mobility equipment and assistive devices
(3) Pre-/post-op care instructions
(4) Patient administered medications
(5) Home blood pressure monitoring and lifestyle controls
(6) Home anticoagulation monitoring
(7) Home cholesterol monitoring
b. Alternative medicine

6. Wellness/Preventive Care
a. Cancer screening
b. Sexually transmitted infections
c. Hygienic practices
(1) Hand washing
(2) Cough etiquette
d. Smoking risks and cessation
e. Recognition of substance abuse
f. Osteoporosis screening/bone density scan
g. Domestic violence screening and detection

R. Nutrition
1. Basic Principles
a. Food nutrients
(1) Carbohydrates
(2) Fats
(3) Proteins
(4) Minerals/electrolytes
(5) Vitamins
(6) Fiber
(7) Water
b. Dietary supplements

2. Special Dietary Needs
a. Weight control
b. Diabetes
c. Cardiovascular disease
d. Hypertension
e. Cancer
f. Lactose sensitivity/intolerance
g. Gluten free
h. Food allergies

3. Eating Disorders

S. Collecting and Processing Specimens
1. Methods of Collection
a. Blood
(1) Venipuncture
(a) Site selection
(b) Site prep
(c) Equipment
(i) Evacuated tubes
(ii) Tube additives
(iii) Needles
(2) Capillary/dermal puncture
b. Urine
(1) Random
(2) Midstream/clean catch
(3) Timed 24-hour collection
(4) Catheterization
(5) Pediatric urine collector
c. Fecal specimen
d. Sputum specimen
e. Swabs
(1) Throat
(2) Genital
(3) Wound
(4) Nasopharyngeal

2. Prepare, Process, and Examine Specimens
a. Proper labeling
b. Sources of contamination
c. Specimen preservation
(1) Refrigeration
(2) Fixative
d. Recordkeeping
e. Incubator
f. Centrifuge
g. Microscope
h. Inoculating a culture
i. Microbiologic slides
(1) Wet mount

3. Laboratory Quality Control/Quality Assurance
a. Testing protocols
b. Testing records and performance logs
c. Daily equipment maintenance
d. Calibration
e. Daily control testing
f. Monitor temperature controls
g. Reagent storage
h. CLIA-waived tests

4. Laboratory Panels and Performing Selected Tests
a. Urinalysis
(1) Physical
(2) Chemical
(3) Microscopic
(4) Culture
b. Hematology panel
(1) Hematocrit
(2) Hemoglobin
(3) Erythrocyte sedimentation rate
(4) Automated cell counts
(a) Red blood cell (RBC)
(b) White blood cell (WBC)
(c) Platelet
(5) Coagulation testing/INR
c. Chemistry/metabolic testing
(1) Glucose
(2) Kidney function tests
(3) Liver function tests
(4) Lipid profile
(5) Hemoglobin A1c
d. Immunology
(1) Mononucleosis test
(2) Rapid Group A Streptococcus test
(3) C-reactive protein (CRP)
(4) HCG pregnancy test
(5) H. pylori
(6) Influenza
e. Fecal occult blood/guaiac testing

T. Diagnostic Testing

1. Cardiovascular Tests
a. Electrocardiography (EKG/ECG)
(1) Perform standard 12-lead
(2) Lead placement
(3) Patient prep
(4) Recognize artifacts
(5) Recognize rhythms, arrhythmias
(6) Rhythm strips
b. Holter monitors
c. Cardiac stress test
2. Vision Tests
a. Color
b. Acuity/distance
(1) Snellen
(2) E chart
(3) Jaeger card
c. Ocular pressure
d. Visual fields

3. Audiometric/Hearing Tests
a. Pure tone audiometry
b. Speech and word recognition
c. Tympanometry

4. Allergy Tests
a. Scratch test
b. Intradermal skin testing

5. Respiratory Tests
a. Pulmonary function tests (PFT)
b. Spirometry
c. Peak flow rate
d. Tuberculosis tests/purified protein derivative (PPD) skin tests

6. Distinguish Between Normal/Abnormal Laboratory and Diagnostic Test Results

U. Pharmacology

1. Medications
a. Classes of drugs
b. Drug actions/desired effects
c. Adverse reactions
d. Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR)
e. Storage of drugs

2. Preparing and Administering Oral and Parenteral Medications
a. Dosage
(1) Metric conversion
(2) Units of measurements
(3) Calculations
b. Routes of administration
(1) Intramuscular
(a) Z-tract
(2) Subcutaneous
(3) Oral/sublingual/buccal
(4) Topical
(5) Inhalation
(6) Instillation (eye-ear-nose)
(7) Intradermal
(8) Transdermal
(9) Vaginal
(10) Rectal
c. Injection site
(1) Site selection
(2) Needle length and gauge
d. Medication packaging
(1) Multidose vials
(2) Ampules
(3) Unit dose
(4) Prefilled cartridge-needle units
(5) Powder for reconstitution
e. Six Rights of Medication Administration
(1) Right patient, right drug, right route, right time, right dose, right documentation

3. Prescriptions
a. E-prescribing
b. Controlled substance guidelines

4. Medication Recordkeeping
a. Reporting/documenting errors

5. Immunizations
a. Childhood
b. Adult
c. Recordkeeping
(1) Vaccine information statement (VIS)
d. Vaccine storage

V. Emergency Management/Basic First Aid
1. Assessment and Screening
a. Treatment algorithms/flow charts
b. Triage algorithms/flow charts

2. Identification and Response to Emergencies
a. Bleeding/pressure points
b. Burns
c. Cardiac and respiratory arrest
d. Foreign body obstruction
e. Choking
f. Diabetic ketoacidosis
g. Insulin shock
h. Bone fractures
i. Poisoning
j. Seizures
k. Shock
l. Cerebral vascular accident (CVA)
m. Syncope
n. Vertigo
o. Wounds
p. Cold exposure
q. Heat exposure
r. Joint dislocations/sprains/strains
s. Asthmatic attack
t. Hyperventilation
u. Animal bite
v. Insect bite
w. Concussion

3. Office Emergency Readiness
a. Equipment
(1) Crash cart supplies
(2) Automated external defibrillator
b. Emergency response plan
(1) Evacuation plan

AAMA Certified Medical Assistant
Medical Certified reality
Killexams : Medical Certified reality - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AAMA-CMA Search results Killexams : Medical Certified reality - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/AAMA-CMA https://killexams.com/exam_list/Medical Killexams : How technology has changed views on abortion
Huntington Beach 'Stork Bus'
The pro-life organization Save the Storks delivered a "Stork Bus" to Huntington Beach, California, May 19, 2021. The mobile medical unit provides women with no-cost pregnancy testing and ultrasounds. |

There’s no denying how quickly technology has changed over the last 50 years. Smartphones have been developed, space tourism is a reality, and everything is instantaneous in the United States when we click on apps for online shopping or car rides.

If all of these things are possible, why is there little belief shared widely that technology has a drastic impact on how we view abortions, too? 

As a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologic surgeon, I can tell you that the research available about abortion now far surpasses what was available when Roe v. Wade was ruled in 1973. For example, we now know that when an egg and sperm meet at the moment of conception, a brand new life's DNA is immediately formed; a unique life that has never existed before and will never exist again. We also have now collected 49 years of data on the significant risks of abortion to women, including breast cancer, chronic mental health disease, uterine damage, and risk of future preterm birth.  

In 1973, technology was not capable of keeping a child alive outside of the womb at 21 or 22 weeks as it is today, and 28 weeks gestation was considered the youngest viable gestational age. The medical treatments women now have access to for their unborn babies are notably advanced. Life-saving fetal surgery can be performed as early as 19 weeks gestation.  Furthermore, we can visualize a baby’s steady heartbeat via ultrasound just four weeks after conception!

We now know that at eight weeks of gestation, brain waves can be detected, at nine weeks the baby is kicking and swimming, and at 10 weeks every organ is in place and the baby can begin to hear. At weeks 11 and 12, teeth begin to form, fingernails develop, and the baby can turn his or her head and smile. At 13 weeks, babies start to feel pain and the baby can grasp objects in his or her hand and all organ systems are functioning! These are remarkable developments. Life begins at conception, and rapid, significant fetal development begins immediately thereafter with all of the aforementioned milestones occurring just in the first trimester. Many women who are considering abortion do not realize how developed their child is at the earliest stages of life. 

I’m the National Medical Director and a board member for Save the Storks, a national nonprofit organization dedicated to equipping, educating, and training pregnancy resource centers and churches across the U.S. to empower women to choose life—the healthiest decision not only for their unborn babies but also for themselves. I have studied the research of the short- and long-term harmful effects of abortion, treated tens of thousands of female patients, and know that the overturn of Roe v. Wade is a huge win for the health and lives of women and children.

Women and children are vulnerable to the billion-dollar abortion industry and need laws protecting them, giving them the right to know about the dangers of any abortion procedure as well as the remarkable development of their unborn child starting from the moment of conception. Instead of pitting mothers against their unborn children, I want to see mothers empowered to choose the healthiest decision for themselves and their unborn babies: Life.

When women succeed in carrying their pregnancy, not only are they physically and emotionally protected from the harms of abortion, but they are allowed to bring a new life into the world to be parented by themselves or a family of their choosing in adoption. I have treated countless women who were empowered to choose life in an unplanned pregnancy situation and are forever dynamically grateful for the experience and support they received through a local pregnancy resource center. 

Technology has also allowed us to innovate regarding how we serve and educate pregnant women. With the availability of Save the Stork buses, women have access to mobile pregnancy clinics and ultrasounds within miles of their homes. This gives women an opportunity to receive excellent care and compassionate support – all for free. Quality access to gold-standard healthcare can be available to women facing an unplanned pregnancy so they do not feel that the death of their child is their only option.

Americans are not pro-abortion. Repeated non-partisan national polls show that the majority of Americans are against abortion at any gestational age. A Marist poll conducted in 2021 revealed that 76% of Americans interviewed opposed abortion on demand and opted to limit abortion to the first three months of pregnancy. Now with our advancements in technology, educating the American public on the risks of abortion to women and the rapid fetal development beginning the moment of conception will help our nation to truly value women and children and end abortion. 

While there is still work to be done in many states, the opportunity has come to finally end abortion in this country as it has already been stopped in the majority of countries around the world. America needs a change to begin again to value women and children, and the overturning of Roe v Wade helps propel us forward with that change. 

Dr. Karysse Trandem is a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologic surgeon. She has completed distinguished research fellowships at both the National Institutes of Health in Washington, D.C. and the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland during her residency at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Trandem is the national medical director and a board member for Save the Storks. She is also medical director and a physician at the Pregnancy Resource Center of Southwest Florida clinics, and an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology for the University of Central Florida, College of Medicine. 

Wed, 03 Aug 2022 23:59:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.christianpost.com/voices/how-technology-has-changed-views-on-abortion.html
Killexams : Through 2022 and 2031, rising demand will drive the mobile augmented reality market’s revenue growth, according to Future Market Insight

The Mobile Augmented Reality Market is expected to witness moderate growth, registering a 23.3% CAGR during the forecast period (2022-2031) and projected to reach US$ 4.4 Bn in 2022 and US$ 29.3 Bn by 2031.

Mobile Augmented Reality Market Size (2022) US$ 4.4 Bn
Sales Forecast (2031) US$ 29.3 Bn
Global Market Growth Rate (2022 to 2031) 23.3%
Share of Top 5 Market Players 60%

The credit for the unstoppable pace of the mobile augmented reality (AR) market significantly goes to the creative industry. Inclusive of video games, live events, retail, and video entertainment, this side of the business has definitely challenged mobile augmented technology, pushing it to deliver better solutions. Designed to create immersive experiences, mobile augmented reality has won a special place for game makers. The launch of sophisticated, intricately designed multiplayer games has truly utilized the real potential of solutions presented by this market.

The explosive growth of mobile augmented reality is completely attributable to unprecedented use of smartphones and tablets. From remote places to urban landscapes, mobile AR has made an enormous contribution in changing the way experience museums, office spaces, and games. Since innovations such as Google Glass, the world of mobile AR has evolved to be a part of many other sectors, changing the game for military trainings, healthcare consultations, and learning experiences.

Request a demo of this Report @
https://www.futuremarketinsights.com/reports/sample/rep-gb-1990

Key Takeaways of Mobile Augmented Reality Market Study

  • East Asia to lead the race in the global mobile augmented reality market at a CAGR of 27.2% between the forecast years of 2020 and 2030
  • Gaming segment is anticipated to retain its leading position with a share of 28% by the end of 2030
  • Smartphones and tablets to revolutionize educational experiences with the integration of mobile AR
  • Services segment to leap ahead at a CAGR of 24.6% during the forecast period as AR design and development, integration and development, and support services find applications across verticals

COVID-19 Proves Positive for Mobile Augmented Reality Market

The COVID-19 pandemic has deepened the chasm of economic crisis, making the global population rethink education and entertainment in many ways. With no live events to attend, cancelled sporting events, and uncertainty looming over reopening of colleges and schools, mobile augmented reality found its opening to a plethora of opportunities.

The importance of AR has also surged in healthcare consultations as medical professionals and patients are seeking safety first. Furthermore, a quantum leap in online gaming, schooling, and entertainment as artists are taking gigs online, have collectively resulted in a special demand for mobile AR. Biggest chunk is definitely consumed by the online gaming industry, which has been the strongest pillar of the entertainment during the stringent lockdowns.

According to FMI, the mobile augmented reality market will grow 6%-8% by Q3 2020 in the given circumstances.

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E-commerce to Enhance Demand for Mobile Augmented Reality

The growing e-commerce industry has been identified as key contributor to the increasing adoption of mobile augmented reality. Integration of mobile augmented reality by retailers to make it more accessible for customers to purchase the right item. Augmented reality helps users to view their products in 3-D, life-like projections in real-time through smartphones and tablets.

Mobile augmented reality offers retailers the opportunity to Excellerate the consumer shopping with real-life experiences. With an augmented reality app, an e-commerce retailer can create a virtual table with a different range of products, projecting it on the customer’s living room. The growing number of purchases via mobile devices and shoppers using smartphones in-store is increasing the demand for mobile augmented reality.

Such enhancement of consumer engagement is projected to bode well of the market in the forecast period.

More Valuable Insights on Mobile Augmented Reality Market

Future Market Insights offers an unbiased analysis of the global mobile augmented reality market, providing historical data for 2015-2019 and forecast statistics from 2022-2031.

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Mobile Augmented Reality Industry Survey

Mobile Augmented Reality Market by Solution:

  • Mobile AR Software
    • Mobile AR Application Platforms
    • Mobile AR SDKs
  • Services
    • Integration & Deployment
    • AR Design & Development
    • Support Services

Mobile Augmented Reality Market by Application:

  • Military
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Gaming
  • Media & Entertainment
  • Travel & Tourism
  • Others

Mobile Augmented Reality Market by Region:

  • North America Mobile Augmented Reality Market
  • Latin America Mobile Augmented Reality Market
  • Europe Mobile Augmented Reality Market
  • East Asia Mobile Augmented Reality Market
  • Middle East & Africa Mobile Augmented Reality Market

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About FMI             

Future Market Insights (ESOMAR certified market research organization and a member of Greater New York Chamber of Commerce) provides in-depth insights into governing factors elevating the demand in the market. It discloses opportunities that will favor the market growth in various segments on the basis of Source, Application, Sales Channel and End Use over the next 10-years.

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Thu, 04 Aug 2022 08:05:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.fmiblog.com/2022/08/04/through-2022-and-2031-rising-demand-will-drive-the-mobile-augmented-reality-markets-revenue-growth-according-to-future-market-insight/
Killexams : Can My VR Game Be a Good Workout?

Can video games be a workout? Yes, experts say, and virtual reality (VR) technology is ushering in a whole new way to exercise.

Pop on a VR headset, load up the right game, and suddenly you’re in sparring in a boxing ring or skiing in the Swiss Alps, says Aaron Stanton, founder and director of the Virtual Reality Institute of Health and Exercise, an independent research organization launched in 2017 to study the effects of virtual and augmented reality technology on fitness. (Since its founding, the organization has partnered with San Francisco State University and the virtual reality platform VIVE.)

VR exercise isn’t different from other types of aerobic exercise, according to Stanton. You’re getting your heart rate up, working up a sweat, and burning calories — but it’s not as monotonous as logging miles on a treadmill.

“The best exercise is the one with the highest amount of painless minutes,” Stanton says. You’re going to keep doing the workouts that don’t feel like a chore and instead feel like something you actually enjoy, he says. “That is where VR comes in. It’s fun, so you forget you’re even exercising.”