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Avaya Oceana Solution Integration
Avaya Integration course outline
Killexams : Avaya Integration course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/7495X Search results Killexams : Avaya Integration course outline - BingNews https://killexams.com/pass4sure/exam-detail/7495X https://killexams.com/exam_list/Avaya Killexams : SCADA Systems Integration IC30M (Online)
 

Details

Price:  Full Course $815 List/Non-member; $650 Member
               Individual Modules $120 List/Non-members; $95 Member
CEU: 0.5
Length: 7 Modules   Access available for one year
Certification of Completion: A Certificate of Completion indicating the total number of CEUs earned will be provided upon successful completion of the course.


Try First Module Free!

Description:

This is a self-paced, online course consisting of 7 modules which take a detailed look at an introduction to Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. Participants will learn how remote sensing and actuation are combined with modern communication techniques to effectively monitor and control very large industrial processes, like oil fields, pipelines, and electrical power systems.  This course will cover most major SCADA applications, SCADA system components and architecture.

You will be able to:

  • Determine how SCADA developed from its source technologies and recognize the factors that make SCADA different from other process control systems
  • Evaluate the principles of SCADA and explain how the basic building blocks are integrated to form a working system
  • Visualize and evaluate the applications of SCADA
  • Explain where SCADA may benefit the project and where not to apply SCADA
  • Apply information and procedures for:
    • Design and Specification of a SCADA system
    • SCADA system integration
    • SCADA system testing and commissioning
    • SCADA system migrations
 

Modules Descriptions:

•         Module 1: Introduction to SCADA (20 min)

This module introduces the basic concepts of SCADA and SCADA architecture. subjects include process commands, data gathering requirements, control and monitoring technologies, and some widely used applications for SCADA.

•            Module 2: SCADA Communications (25 min)

This module covers SCADA Communications including communication concepts and media, communication system standards and protocols, and network infrastructure.

•            Module 3: Remote Terminal Units (RTU) (25 min)

This module builds on the foundations of concepts and communications and expands into the primary elements of SCADA systems. Characteristics of RTUs, communication modes, and RTU configuration are discussed.

•            Module 4: Field Devices (30 min)

In this module you will learn about some of the Field Devices that RTUs communicate with in SCADA systems including Sensors and Actuators as well as other considerations.

•            Module 5: Master Terminal Unit (45 min)

In this module you will learn about the Master Terminal Unit (MTU) and review concepts, communication, functions, scan periods, configuration and applications. By the conclusion of this module, you should have a solid understanding of MTU application including functions, hardware, configuration, and RTU and data scanning periods.

•            Module 6: subjects of SCADA Project Execution (20 min)

In this module you will learn about major subjects for executing a SCADA project including conceptual design, system design, functional description, test plans, detail design, software development. A review of a few samples of phased project life cycles is also included.

•            Module 7: trial SCADA Projects (20 min)

The last module is designed to provide you with experience in making decisions about SCADA system integrations using trial projects. You will apply what you have learned in some scenarios, label some diagrams, and take the course completion quiz

 

Purchase Options:

Full Course

Module 1: Introduction to SCADA

Module 2: SCADA Communications

Module 3: Remote Terminal Units (RTU)

Module 4: Field Devices

Module 5: Master Terminal Unit

Module 6: subjects of SCADA Project Execution

Module 7: trial SCADA Projects

 


If you wish to register offline, obtain the Training Registration Form, complete, and return to ISA with your payment.

Not sure this particular course is for you?
pre-instructional survey is available for you to evaluate your level of understanding of the course material and to show you the types of questions you'll be able to answer after completing the course.

For more information:
Contact us at +1 919-549-8411 or info@isa.org to start your company on the path to well-trained employees.

Thu, 23 Jul 2020 09:39:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.isa.org/training-and-certification/isa-training/instructor-led/course-descriptions/scada-systems-integration-ic30m-online
Killexams : Course offerings and outlines

Fall 2022 (1227) term

Course units: 100, 200, and 300 levels: 3 units each; 400 level: 4 units each. 

REPEATS: the following courses can be repeated for additional credit provided that the subject is different: PHIL 131, 302, 314, 321, 326, 331, 332, 333, 342, 343, 344, 346, 357, 421W, 435, 451W, 455W, 467W. Any of the other PHIL courses, when taken a second time, will be considered a repeat, even if the subject is different from a previous offering. 

Elective grade policy : P/CR/NC. In place from Spring 2021 to Summer 2023. See List of exclusions for the elective grade policy. Specifically for Philosophy: 

  • Students can use a P or CR to satisfy any requirement for a major, joint major, honours, or minor in Philosophy (exception: PHIL 477 and 478).
  • Students can use a P or CR to satisfy any prerequisite requirement for any PHIL course.
  • Students can use a P (but not a CR) to satisfy any requirement for the Ethics Certificate, or the Philosophy and Methodology of Science Certificate.
  • Philosophy Majors and Honours students can use a P (but not a CR) to satisfy any WQB requirement.

Philosophy Courses with Writing, Quantitative or Breadth designations:

PHIL 100W (Knowledge and Reality) W/B-Hum  
PHIL 105 (Critical Thinking) - formerly PHIL XX1 Q/B-Soc/Sci  
PHIL 110 (Introduction to Logic and Reasoning) Q  
PHIL 120W (Moral Problems) W/B-Hum  
PHIL 121 (Global Justice) B-Hum/Soc  
PHIL 131 (Selected Topics) B-Hum  
PHIL 144 (Introduction to Philosophy of Science) B-Hum/Sci  
PHIL 150 (Great Works in the History of Philosophy) B-Hum  
PHIL 300 (Introduction to Philosophy) B-Hum  
PHIL 310 (Logic, Proofs and Set Theory) Q
 
PHIL 345W, 421W, 451W, 455W, 467W W  

Upper Division Electives

If you are looking for upper division courses outside of Philosophy, click here for an updated list of electives with the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. 

Breadth Courses

If you are a Philosophy Major, you will also need Breadth courses from OUTSIDE of Philosophy. You can find a full list of Breadth designated courses here. Search gosfu for current offerings.   

Sun, 20 Dec 2015 07:16:00 -0600 text/html https://www.sfu.ca/philosophy/courses/courses_current.html
Killexams : Business Vertical Integration & Business Expansion

Risks in Vertical Integration

Established distribution channels may be adversely affected

Let's assume you manufacture handbags and your established sales have been through independently owned gift shops. You are considering vertically integrating by selling direct to consumers on your website. Your plans for going into online sales must take into account potential loss of sales through your present avenues of distribution. Will you lose already established sales to gift shops?

Unprofitable outcome

Your new operation may not live up to your earnings forecast. And too often an acquisition mistake cannot be made profitable by working harder. As Warren Buffett has said, "Should you find yourself in a chronically leaking boat, energy devoted to changing vessels is likely to be more productive than energy devoted to patching leaks."

Obsolescence due to new technologies

Vertical integration could potentially hurt a company when new technologies evolve quickly and become available. The company is then forced to reinvest in the new technologies in order to stay competitive.

Higher cost due to lower volume

If you go into manufacturing you may not achieve the economies of scale or efficiencies of competing independent suppliers who may gain economies of scale by selling to many other customers. For example, when an auto manufacturer owns its own tire manufacturing, its production of tires is most likely limited to the needs of the parent firm, whereas a stand-alone tire company can sell to numerous auto manufacturers.

Unforeseen labor issues

If a union firm vertically integrates with either a supplier or a distributor that is non-union, it could face a greater risk of the acquired firm also becoming an unionized unit. Or if a non-union firm vertically integrates with a union supplier or distributor, the chances of itself becoming unionized is increased.

In any case, where a parent company is vertically integrated with a union supplier, there could be a strong cost-reduction incentive to close down the supplier and outsource the service. This, in fact, has been the trend in the airline industry where outsourcing maintenance to lower cost overseas shops has soared.

Loss of continuing focus on the originating business

Through specialization, some companies are so good at what they do they almost remove themselves from the competition. A vertical merger could upset the chemistry of a special operating focus. Here are some overall risks to look out for from the Starting a Business course.

If you are acquiring a commodity type product, not having lowest costs

If you acquire a commodity business, you will need to be assured that you will have the lowest cost among all competitors. Otherwise, you will be competing in a market where price is everything and you'll be "only as smart as your dumbest competitor."

Unsatisfactory return on invested capital

Remember that vertical integration is one of a number of investment possibilities. Any deployment of your retained earnings will require scrutiny as to the anticipated return of the money invested. Other options include:

  • Buying a company at your own level in the supply-demand chain, such as Albertson's acquiring American Stores.
  • Reinvest in your own business.
  • Build up retained earnings by not spending and save for future acquisitions.
  • Pay in dividends.
  • Buy back stock and make your shareholders happy. (Their remaining shares will be more valuable.)
Tue, 24 Apr 2012 22:59:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.scu.edu/mobi/business-courses/business-expansion/session-9-vertical-integration/
Killexams : Lifespan Integration
'Lifespan Integration

Year Founded: 2002

Model of Therapy: Lifespan Integration

Available training types: In Person

Lifespan Integration, a body-based form of therapy, heals without causing additional trauma. Although Lifespan Integration therapy (LI) was developed out of Pace’s extensive work with adult clients who have survived childhood neglect or abuse, LI was quickly found to be equally effective in facilitating rapid healing for a broad spectrum of mental health conditions and can be used successfully with people at various stages of life.

LI focuses on the body-mind’s extraordinary capacity for self-healing. LI utilizes active client imagination, the placing of ego states in time in juxtaposition, and a visual representative of a time line of memories to boost neural integration and facilitate healing. In the course of the integrating portion of LI, the client recalls a memory as an image for every year of his/her life. Through the practice of LI, memories surface spontaneously and because people hold memories neurologically in a particular way, each memory is related in some way to either the emotional theme or a specific issue being worked on. As a result a vivid panoramic view of the client's life emerges and gives new insights around lifelong patterns resulting from past trauma.

LI can also be very effective in the healing process of various attachment disorders. This is accomplished through using imagination to 're-write' and 're-live' the early conditions, while integrating new and positive feeling states generated through the client-therapist dyad. Post LI therapy, clients experience themselves reacting to life’s stressors in more age appropriate ways. Even for people who begin LI therapy with memory gaps, the therapeutic process allows them to connect the memories or pieces of their lives into a cohesive whole. Clients who complete LI therapy report that they feel better about their lives in general, exhibit more self acceptance, and enjoy their intimate relationships more.

About the Founder(s)

  • 'Peggy Pace

    Peggy Pace

    Peggy Pace is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in private practice in Washington State. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from the University of Washington in 1969, and a Master of Arts degree in Counseling Psychology from Antioch University in 1985.

    After graduation from Antioch in 1985, Pace worked with adults who were traumatized as children. This led her to create a revolutionary technique for integrating the split off feeling states and ego states of her clients. Since the development of Lifespan Integration, in 2002, Pace has presented LI at national conferences, and has given training workshops throughout the US, Canada, and Europe. In 2007, the 4th edition of Pace’s book, Lifespan Integration: Connecting Ego States through Time was published and made available to the public.

Contact Lifespan Integration

Your message has been sent successfully.

Sat, 15 Aug 2020 08:44:00 -0500 en text/html https://www.goodtherapy.org/training-courses/lifespan-integration.html
Killexams : Best Cryptocurrency Trading Courses

Udemy’s Complete Cryptocurrency Investment Course covers all of the fundamentals of cryptocurrency investing in an affordable, self-paced, mobile-friendly format, making it the best overall cryptocurrency trading course on our list.

Originally created as a simple virtual classroom software in 2012, Udemy has since grown to become one of the largest online learning platforms offering over 185,000 courses taught by more than 64,000 instructors in 75 languages. Its Complete Cryptocurrency Investment Course introduces students to the basics of cryptocurrencies and advances them quickly into investing techniques featuring live examples. As a result, it’s our clear choice as the best course overall.  

The Complete Cryptocurrency Investment Course is led by Mohsen Hassan, a programmer, trader, and financial risk manager who has taught investing to more than 300,000 Udemy students. The course consists of over 12.5 hours of on-demand video, one article, and one downloadable resource and can be accessed on the Udemy mobile app.

The Complete Cryptocurrency Investment Course walks beginners through the fundamentals of cryptocurrency and quickly moves to live examples of buying, transferring, and using wallets as well as portfolio management techniques for both passive and active investing. Through this course, Hassan buys, transfers, secures, and builds a portfolio with real money so students can see exactly how it’s done.

The Complete Cryptocurrency Investment Course costs just $84.99 and includes full lifetime access, a certificate of completion at the end of the course, and a 30-day money-back guarantee. Udemy runs specials all the time, so you may be able to purchase the course for a much lower price.

Tue, 16 Feb 2021 04:28:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.investopedia.com/best-cryptocurrency-trading-courses-5111984
Killexams : Supply Chain Integration

Course planning information

Course notes

To pass the course students must attend the block course.

240260 or 240261 or 240263

You need to complete the above course or courses before moving onto this one.

240360, 240361

The courses listed above have similar content to this one meaning you can only enrol in this course or one of the listed courses. Only one of the courses can be credited towards your qualification.

General progression requirements

You must complete at least 45 credits from 200-level before enrolling in 300-level courses.

  • 1 Identify the bullwhip effect and the need for supply chain coordination.
  • 2 Describe supply chain planning and control and analyse lean and agile strategies.
  • 3 Apply supply chain mapping and project management to design a solution to a practical problem.
  • 4 Analyse risk management in supply chains.
  • 5 Explain people management in supply chains.
  • 6 Conduct assessments of supply chain performance.

Learning outcomes can change before the start of the semester you are studying the course in.

Assessments

Assessment weightings can change up to the start of the semester the course is delivered in.

You may need to take more assessments depending on where, how, and when you choose to take this course.

Explanation of assessment types

Computer programmes
Computer animation and screening, design, programming, models and other computer work.
Creative compositions
Animations, films, models, textiles, websites, and other compositions.
Exam College or GRS-based (not centrally scheduled)
An exam scheduled by a college or the Graduate Research School (GRS). The exam could be online, oral, field, practical skills, written exams or another format.
Exam (centrally scheduled)
An exam scheduled by Assessment Services (centrally) – you’ll usually be told when and where the exam is through the student portal.
Oral or performance or presentation
Debates, demonstrations, exhibitions, interviews, oral proposals, role play, speech and other performances or presentations.
Participation
You may be assessed on your participation in activities such as online fora, laboratories, debates, tutorials, exercises, seminars, and so on.
Portfolio
Creative, learning, online, narrative, photographic, written, and other portfolios.
Practical or placement
Field trips, field work, placements, seminars, workshops, voluntary work, and other activities.
Simulation
Technology-based or experience-based simulations.
Test
Laboratory, online, multi-choice, short answer, spoken, and other tests – arranged by the school.
Written assignment
Essays, group or individual projects, proposals, reports, reviews, writing exercises, and other written assignments.
Mon, 21 Mar 2022 09:02:00 -0500 en-NZ text/html https://www.massey.ac.nz/study/courses/supply-chain-integration-240363/
Killexams : Restrictions and Considerations

The following describes the different types of course sections that are available at SFU. A course section broadly refers to the delivery mode of a course, i.e., how a course is offered. When you are searching for classes in goSFU, you may see that a single course can have multiple course sections/offerings that you may choose from. Certain types of courses, offered in various disciplines, may be restricted to exchange/study abroad students, or require additional steps to access.

Course Section Types

Day Courses ("D" courses) All course components (lectures, labs, tutorials, etc) are in person, on one of our three campuses. Departments may restrict access to some of these courses. See the "Restrictions by Subject' section below.
Evening Courses ("E" courses) All course components (lectures, labs, tutorials, etc) are in person, on one of our three campuses. Departments may restrict access to some of these courses. See the "Restrictions by Subject' section below.
SFU NOW Courses ("J" courses) SFU's Nights or Weekends (NOW) program was developed to allow students to complete their degrees by taking only evening and weekend classes. Exchange and study abroad students do not have priority access to SFU NOW courses. Students may access these courses during the 4th week of the enrollment period (during "open enrollment") if space is available. During the priority enrollment period, exchange students may be added to the wait list for a maximum of 2 courses. 
French Course Sections ("F" courses) The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences offers a B.A. in Public and International Affairs, taught primarily in French. This is a specialized program also known as the French Cohort Program, which may accept incoming exchange / study abroad students on an individual basis. Courses within this program in Political Science, History and French are instructed in French. Additionally, elective courses taught in French may be offered in other departments or faculties from time-to-time, denoted by F100. For more information, please contact fcpmgr@sfu.ca and cc exchange@sfu.ca
Distance Education Courses ("C" or "OL" courses) Exchange and study abroad students are not normally permitted to access courses offered by distance education. When viewing class schedules in the Student Information System, such courses will have a section number beginning with the letter "C" or "OL", instead of the usual "D" (eg "C100" or "OL01" instead of "D100"). Further, Distance Education courses also carry supplementary charges that are not covered by the exchange tuition waiver.
Blended Courses ("B" courses) B courses have a combination of in-person and online components, with the online components being asynchronous. We recommend exchange and study abroad students to consult with their home universities about being allowed to take these courses while on exchange.

Writing, Quantitative and Breadth Courses (WQB courses)

Some courses at SFU are designated as Writing, Quantitative, or Breadth. Degree-seeking students at SFU require a certain number of "WQB" courses in order to complete their degree. 

Writing Intensive Courses ("W" courses) Courses that have a "W" in their number (eg CMNS 253W) are considered "writing intensive" courses. Exchange and study abroad students may have access to "W" courses, but need to demonstrate proof of prior academic English work (above and beyond the basic English language requirements for admission to SFU). For more information please contact exchange@sfu.ca.
Quantitative Courses ("Q" courses) Some courses at SFU are designated as Quantitative ("Q" courses); they will have the "Quantative"/"Q" notation in the course descripton and in the course catalog. Exchange and study abroad students may have access to "Q" courses, but need to demonstrate prior academic quantitative work. For more information please contact exchange@sfu.ca. 
Breadth Courses (E.g., B-Hum/Soc/Sci) The significance of Breadth courses mostly apply to degree-seeking students at SFU as students are required to complete a certain number of Breadth courses taken outside the student's major to complete their degree. If a course is designated as a Breadth course, it will be indicated in the course description and in the course catalog. Departmental restrictions may apply to exchange and study abroad students; see the "Restrictions by Subject" section below.

Other Restrictions

Auditing Courses Students admitted as undergraduate exchange students to SFU are not permitted to audit courses during their exchange terms.
First Year Programs Some academic departments offer specialized programs for first year university students. These programs are not open to exchange and study abroad students.

Due to demand and space restrictions, some courses and academic programs are restricted or have limited access for exchange/study abroad students. 

Definitions:

Restricted: Exchange/study abroad students will not have access to courses denoted as restricted.

Limited Access: Exchange/study abroad students will not receive priority enrollment for courses with limited access. Students may access these courses during the 4th week of the enrollment period (during "open enrollment") if space is available. Many courses at SFU fill up quickly and classes will likely be full when exchange / study abroad students are permitted to access these course during open enrollment. As such, students should also select additional back-up courses as alternatives when requesting courses with limited access. During the priority enrollment period, students may be added to the wait list for a maximum of 2 courses. 

The following restrictions are subject to change.

Actuarial Mathematics (ACMA)

[ Faculty of Science ]

Exchange / study abroad students cannot be admitted to SFU as graduate level ACMA students.

Restricted (No Access)

300 and 400 level ACMA courses*

*unless students are Actuarial majors at their home university.

Asia-Canada (ASC)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access
ASC 401 400-level ASC courses

Biology (BISC) 

[ Faculty of Science ]

Limited Access
All BISC courses

Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology (BPK)

[ Faculty of Science ]

Certain courses within the Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology require students to obtain (and pay for) a Criminal Records Check in order to access the course. Please see the list of affected courses, and if you wish to take one of these courses, email <exchange@sfu.ca> as early as possible for information: sfu.ca/students/criminalrecords/check.html

If you wish to request access to BPK courses with pre-requisites, please follow these steps:

  • First, look at the pre-requisites for the courses you will be requesting listed in the calendar web site:http://www.sfu.ca/bpk/undergrad_program/courses.html
  • Second, look up the pre-requisite course descriptions and identify from your home university transcript which course or courses you have taken and feel could be used to meet those pre-requisites. Please send us a list that relates the transcript to the pre-requisites. If the course has a minimum number of units required, you must also show you meet the equivalent at your home university.
  • Third, you must provide a course outline for each of those pre-requisite courses.  This should not be just a 3 line course description but an actual course outline of the subjects covered.  If necessary this should be translated in English.  A link to the original university website course page for that specific course containing the course outline may be used for this.

These courses outlines will be evaluated to make certain the student's background is sufficient for them to be well prepared for the course. Please contact International Services for Students exchange@sfu.ca in regards to access to BPK courses. Please include your full name, email address and SFU student number so your email can be linked to your exchange/study abroad application.

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

BPK 301

BPK 304W

BPK 326

BPK 407

All 200-400 level BPK courses

Business (BUS)

[ Faculty of Business ]

Due to demand and space restrictions, courses offered through the Beedie School of Business at SFU, (BUS courses), are only open to exchange / study abroad students who are from institutions with specific business exchange / study abroad agreements with SFU, and who are completing a major in business at their home institution. To find out if your home institution has an exchange / study abroad agreement with the SFU Beedie School of Business at SFU, please check the SFU Beedie School of Business Partners list.

Exchange / study abroad students who are from institutions with specific business exchange / study abroad agreements and who are completing a major in business at their home institution are required to take a minimum of 3 courses from the SFU Beedie School of Business. 

Exchange / study abroad students (not from SFU Beedie School of Business Partners) may access the below courses if space is available. 

  • BUS 221 - Personal Finance
  • BUS 233 - Introduction to Commercial Law & Business Ethics
  • BUS 237 - Introduction to Business Technology Management
  • BUS 238 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship and Innovation
  • BUS 240 - Introduction to Innovation
  • BUS 251 - Financial Accounting I
  • BUS 272 - Behaviour in Organizations
  • BUS 275 - Business in a Sustainable Society

Exchange/study abroad from non SFU Beedie School of Business Partners may access select 300 and 400 division business administration courses contingent upon:

  • space available on the day before the term of classes begins
  • meeting the prerequisites for the requested course

Exchange / study abroad students who are in their final year of study should be warned that enrollment in courses is NOT guaranteed.

If you are interested in courses in the Department of Economics, please click here to view ECON course restrictions. 

All exchange / study abroad students (including Business students from SFU Beedie School of Business Partners) cannot access graduate level BUS courses. This restriction includes courses in the MSc Finance , the full and part time MBA, the MOT MBA, Executive MBA programs and GDBA.

Restricted Access (Applies to all students, including Business students from SFU Beedie School of Business Partners) 

BUS 100

BUS 200

BUS 201

BUS 202

BUS 216

BUS 217W

BUS 300

BUS 360W

BUS 478 - Access and enrollment to BUS 478 - Strategy will be considered on a case by case basis. Students wishing to access BUS 478 may be required to provide supporting documents to ensure all necessary pre-requisites are met before their enrolment date. BUS 478 is intended for students in their final semester of study or masters level students and due to high demand enrollment may be limited. Enrolment in any of SFU Beedie’s courses are not guaranteed, please contact your Study Abroad Advisor at studyabroad_bsb@sfu.ca for questions.

BUS 496

The following Accounting courses. The Accounting Concentration is a specialized program.

BUS 320

BUS 321

BUS 322

BUS 329

BUS 420

BUS 421

BUS 424

BUS 426

BUS 427

BUS 428

The following Business Minor courses. The Business Minor is a specialized program.*

BUS 311

BUS 340

BUS 341

BUS 401

*The SFU Beedie School of Business has an unique agreement with the Indian Institutes of Technology for access to Business Minor courses. If you are an IIT student, please contact studyabroad_bsb@sfu.ca for more information. 

Communication (CMNS) 

[ Faculty of Communication, Art, and Technology ]

Restricted Access (No Access)

CMNS 201

For the Fall term only, D100 Lecture and associated Tutorial sections for CMNS 110 and CMNS 130.

Computing Science (CMPT) 

[ Faculty of Applied Sciences ]

CMPT courses are only accessible to exchange / study abroad students who are Computing Science majors at their home university, and who will be taking the CMPT courses to work towards their home degree requirements. This must be demonstrated by a letter from their home institution.

Students who are admitted to SFU as graduate students will not be eligible to take undergraduate CMPT courses.  

Course access is limited and subject to availability. If you wish to take other CMPT courses (including MACM 101) not included in the list above, please contact exchange@sfu.ca as soon as possible for further instructions.

Exchange/ study abroad students will only be able to request access to a maximum of 5 CMPT courses. It is very important that you complete the necessary forms and submit documents on time. These instructions are outlined briefly below:

You will be enrolled in a maximum of 3 courses depending on availability and home university requirements.

  1. You MUST provide a letter from your home University that demonstrates you are studying a CMPT major at your home university and that the courses you are requesting apply towards your home degree requirements.
  2. Check that you are eligible to take your requested CMPT course(s). Have you completed a course at your home university that satisfies the SFU course prerequisites? Please check the prerequisite/enrollment requirements here
  3. Check the description of the SFU prerequisite course(s). Are the subjects covered equivalent to a course you have completed? Take a look at the course outline here.
  4. Find your relevant home course outlines. The appropriate home course outlines should be a detailed outline/syllabus of the subjects covered in course(s) you have completed at your home university (shown on your transcript). A short 3 line course description is not sufficient. If applicable, please translate the course outline(s) into English. A link to the original university website course page containing the course outline may be submitted. Please include any textbooks that you may have studied in the course(s).

Contemporary Arts (CA) 

[ Faculty of Communication, Art, and Technology ]

Due to demand and space restrictions, exchange / study abroad students may only access the following courses:

  • CA 104
  • CA 117 
  • CA 118 
  • CA 120 
  • CA 135
  • CA 136
  • CA 137
  • CA 140
  • CA 142
  • CA 149Q*
  • CA 216*
  • CA 217* 
  • CA 316* 
  • CA 341* 
  • CA 386

*please note some courses have pre-requisite requirements.  

Criminology (CRIM) 

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

 Restricted (No Access)

CRIM 485

CRIM 486

CRIM 487

CRIM 488

CRIM 489

CRIM 490

CRIM 491

CRIM 499

Earth Sciences (EASC)

[ Faculty of Science ]

Please note there are mandatory supplemental course fees for select EASC courses. These fees are only refundable up until the last day of the first week of classes. All field trips are mandatory. It is your responsibility to ensure you have proper immigration documents to travel for mandatory field trips. 

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

EASC 491

EASC 492

EASC 493  

EASC 206

EASC 306

EASC 308

Please note the field school/camp days for these 3 courses may not fall within the regular SFU term dates. 

Economics (ECON)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

If you wish to request access to Economics courses, with pre-requisites, please follow these steps:

First, look at the pre-requisites for the courses you will be requesting listed in the calendar web site: http://www.sfu.ca/economics/undergraduate/degrees-and-programs.html

Second, look up the pre-requisite course descriptions and identify from your home university transcript which course or courses you have taken and feel could be used to meet those pre-requisites. Please send us a list that relates the transcript to the pre-requisites. If the course has a minimum number of units required, you must also show you meet the equivalent at your home university.

Third, you must provide a course outline for each of those pre-requisite courses.  This should not be just a 3 line course description but an actual course outline of the subjects covered.  If necessary this should be translated in English.  A link to the original university website course page for that specific course containing the course outline may be used for this.

These courses outlines will be evaluated to make certain the student's background is sufficient for them to be well prepared for the course.

Please contact International Services for Students exchange@sfu.ca in regards to access to ECON courses. Please include your full name, email address and SFU student number so your email can be linked to your exchange/study abroad application.

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

ECON 220W
ECON 402
ECON 403
ECON 435
ECON 494
ECON 499

Exceptions are possible, but require special permission from the course instructors or the Economics Undergraduate Chair to make certain the student's background is sufficient for them to be well prepared.

All 300-400 level ECON courses.

Education (EDUC) 

[ Faculty of Education ]

Certain courses within the Faculty of Education require students to obtain (and pay for) a Criminal Records Check in order to access the course. Please see the list of affected courses, and if you wish to take one of these courses, email exchange@sfu.ca as early as possible for information: students.sfu.ca/criminalrecords/check.html

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access
All Professional Development Program (PDP) courses.

EDUC 323 

EDUC 324  

EDUC 328  

EDUC 423

EDUC 424

EDUC 452

English (ENGL) 

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Limited Access
400-level ENGL courses

Engineering Science (ENSC) 

[ Faculty of Applied Sciences ]

If you wish to take ENSC courses, please contact exchange@sfu.ca as soon as possible for further instructions. It is very important that you complete the necessary forms and submit documents on time. These instructions are outlined briefly below:

  1. Check that you are eligible to take your requested ENSC course(s). Have you completed a course at your home university that satisfies the SFU course prerequisites? Please check the prerequisite/enrollment requirements here. Please note some courses are linked so that taking one course requires co-registration in a second course.  A typical example is ENSC 100W which is linked to ENSC 105W where both courses must be taken at the same time.
  2. Check the description of the SFU prerequisite course(s). Are the subjects covered equivalent to a course you have completed? Take a look at the course outline here.
  3. Find your relevant home course outlines. The appropriate home course outlines should be a detailed outline/syllabus of the subjects covered in course(s) you have completed at your home university (shown on your transcript). A short 3 line course description is not sufficient. If applicable, please translate the course outline(s) into English. A link to the original university website course page containing the course outline may be submitted. Please include any textbooks that you may have studied in the course(s).
Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

ENSC 370

ENSC 405W

ENSC 440

ENSC 225

ENSC 251

ENSC 252

ENSC 254

ENSC 324

ENSC 452

ENSC 461

ENSC 470

ENSC 475

ENSC 481

ENSC 489

ENSC 495

Environment (ENV) 

[ Faculty of Environment ]

Restricted Access (No Access)

ENV 197

ENV 198

ENV 319

ENV 391

ENV 491

ENV 495

Environmental Science (EVSC) 

[ Faculty of Environment ]

Limited Access

EVSC 201W

EVSC 300

EVSC 305

EVSC 400

Explorations (EXPL) 

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

This is a specialized program where only one course, EXPL 235, is open to incoming exchange/study abroad students. All other Explorations (EXPL) courses are restricted.

Foundations Courses: FAL X99 and FAN X99

These two courses are not open to exchange and study abroad students.

Health Sciences (HSCI) 

[ Faculty of Health Sciences ]

Exchange / study abroad students may not receive enrollment priority for HSCI courses.

History (HIST)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Restricted Access (No Access) Limited Access

HIST 400

HIST 494

HIST 300

Humanities (HUM)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Restricted Access (No Access) Limited Access
HUM 390 All 400-level HUM courses. 

Interactive Arts and Technology (IAT)

[ Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology ]

If you wish to request access to IAT courses with pre-requisites, please follow these steps:

First, look at the pre-requisites for the courses you will be requesting listed in the calendar web site: https://www.sfu.ca/siat/undergraduate/course-planning.html

Second, look up the pre-requisite course descriptions and identify from your home university transcript which course or courses you have taken and feel could be used to meet those pre-requisites. Please send us a list that relates the transcript to the pre-requisites. If the course has a minimum number of units required, you must also show you meet the equivalent at your home university.

Third, you must provide a course outline for each of those pre-requisite courses.  This should not be just a 3 line course description but an actual course outline of the subjects covered.  If necessary this should be translated in English.  A link to the original university website course page for that specific course containing the course outline may be used for this.

Limited Access
All 300-400 level IAT courses.

International Studies (IS) 

[ School for International Studies ]

Restricted (No Access)

IS 300

IS 302

IS 350W

IS 451

Labour Studies (LBST)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Linguistics (LING) 

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

To request access to LING courses:

First, look at the pre-requisites for the courses you will be requesting listed in the calendar web site: http://www.sfu.ca/calendar

Second, look up the pre-requisite course descriptions and identify from your home university transcript which course or courses you have taken and feel could be used to meet those pre-requisites. Please send us a list that relates the transcript to the pre-requisites. If the course has a minimum number of units required, you must also show you meet the equivalent at your home university.

Third, you must provide a course outline for each of those pre-requisite courses.  This should not be just a 3 line course description but an actual course outline of the subjects covered.  If necessary this should be translated in English.  A link to the original university website course page for that specific course containing the course outline may be used for this.

These courses outlines will be evaluated to make certain the student's background is sufficient for them to be well prepared for the course.

Please contact International Services for Students exchange@sfu.ca in regards to access to LING courses. Please include your full name, email address and SFU student number so your email can be linked to your exchange/study abroad application.

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access
LING 363 LING 362

Mathematics (MATH)

[ Faculty of Science ]

For information about MACM 101, please check the Computing Science (CMPT) section of this page. 

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

MATH 498

MATH 499W

MATH 260

MATH 301

MATH 302

MATH 303

MATH 304

MACM 316

Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (MBB) 

[Faculty of Science]

Limited Access

MBB 308

MBB 309W

MBB 432

Mechatronic Systems Engineering (MSE) 

[ Faculty of Applied Sciences ]

Due to demand and space restrictions, access and space for MSE courses is limited for exchange / study abroad students.

If you wish to take MSE courses, please contact exchange@sfu.ca as soon as possible for further instructions. It is very important that you complete the necessary forms and submit documents on time. These instructions are outlined briefly below:

  1. Check that you are eligible to take your requested course(s). Have you completed a course at your home university that satisfies the SFU course prerequisites? Please check the prerequisite/enrollment requirements for MSE courses.
  2. Check the description of the SFU prerequisite course(s). Are the subjects covered equivalent to a course you have completed? Take a look at the course outlines for MSE courses.
  3. Find your relevant home course outlines. The appropriate home course outlines should be a detailed outline/syllabus of the subjects covered in course(s) you have completed at your home university (shown on your transcript). A short 3 line course description is not sufficient. If applicable, please translate the course outline(s) into English. A link to the original university website course page containing the course outline may be submitted. Please include any textbooks that you may have studied in the course(s).

Philosophy

 [Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Limited Access

PHIL 150

All 200-300 level courses

Physics (PHYS) 

[ Faculty of Science ]

Limited Access

PHYS 140

PHYS 141

PHYS 231

PHYS 233

PHYS 326

PHYS 332

PHYS 431

Planning (PLAN)

[ Faculty of Environment ]

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

PLAN 302

PLAN 402

PLAN 495

PLAN 300

PLAN 400

PLAN 443

Political Science (POL)

 [Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences] 

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

POL 490

POL 496

POL 498

POL 499

All 300-400 level POL courses

Psychology (PSYC)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Exchange / study abroad students cannot be admitted to SFU as graduate level PSYC students.

Restricted Access (No Access) Limited Access

PSYC 457

PSYC 459

PSYC 490

PSYC 499

All 300-400 level PSYC courses, unless students are Psychology majors at their home university. 

Publishing (PUB)

[ Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology ]

Restricted Access (No Access)

PUB 350

PUB 355W

PUB 450

PUB 477

Resource and Environmental Management (REM)

[ Faculty of Environment ]

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access
Undergraduate Students:

REM 391

REM 452

REM 491

REM 495

REM 499

REM 211

REM 202W

REM 221

REM 225

REM 311

REM 431

Graduate Students:

REM 602

REM 611

REM 621

REM 664

REM 665

REM 690

REM 691

REM 697

REM 698

REM 699

REM 801

REM 898

REM 899

REM 601

REM 631

REM 641

REM 642

REM 643

REM 644

Students must obtain permission from the instructor to access REM 650 and REM 658.

Sociology and Anthropology (SA)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Certain courses in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology require students to obtain (and pay for) a Criminal Records Check in order to access the course. For a list of all these courses and more information, click here. If you wish to access one of these courses, email exchange@sfu.ca as early as possible. 

Limited Access

SA 301

SA 350

SA 355

SA 356W

Statistics and Actuarial Science (STAT)

[ Faculty of Science ]

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

STAT 180, unless students are Statistics majors at their home university.

Students with academic backgrounds in Applied Science, Science and/or Computing Science cannot access STAT 310 or STAT 311.

STAT 300W                    

Sustainable Development (SD)

[ Faculty of Environment ]

Restricted (No Access) Limited Access

SD 491

SD 494

SD 381

SD 401

SD 481

Sustainable Energy Engineering (SEE)

[ Faculty of Applied Sciences ]

Due to demand and space restrictions, access and space for MSE courses is limited for exchange / study abroad students.

If you wish to take SEE courses, please contact exchange@sfu.ca as soon as possible for further instructions. It is very important that you complete the necessary forms and submit documents on time. These instructions are outlined briefly below:

  1. Check that you are eligible to take your requested course(s). Have you completed a course at your home university that satisfies the SFU course prerequisites? Please check the prerequisite/enrollment requirements for SEE courses.
  2. Check the description of the SFU prerequisite course(s). Are the subjects covered equivalent to a course you have completed? Take a look at the course outlines for SEE courses.
  3. Find your relevant home course outlines. The appropriate home course outlines should be a detailed outline/syllabus of the subjects covered in course(s) you have completed at your home university (shown on your transcript). A short 3 line course description is not sufficient. If applicable, please translate the course outline(s) into English. A link to the original university website course page containing the course outline may be submitted. Please include any textbooks that you may have studied in the course(s).

Urban Studies, Masters Program (URB)

[ Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences ]

Restricted (No Access)

URB 670

URB 693

URB 694

URB 696

URB 697

URB 699

Fri, 22 May 2015 10:10:00 -0500 text/html https://www.sfu.ca/students/exchange/academic-information/restricted-subjects-and-courses.html
Killexams : New online Dutch integration course sets learners up for B1

Inburgering Online now helps you through the reading, writing, speaking and listening exams for level B1. Photo: Inburgering Online

With the government planning to up its Dutch language requirements for integration, Inburgering Online is extending its popular online exam preparation courses to include B1. We find out more.

A good grasp of Dutch, believe the Dutch government, is key to successfully integrating in the Netherlands and increasing your chance of finding work. They therefore intend to increase from A2 to B1 the language level tested in the Inburgering (integration) exams. For more information about what applies to your personal situation, it is recommended to get in touch with DUO or IND.

Fortunately, for all those registering for the B1 exam – be it an immigration requirement, for a university application, or simply to boost their CV – a new self-access course with Inburgering Online has their study schedule mapped out for them.

The B1 course, which prepares students for the reading, writing, listening and speaking exams, builds on the success of Inburgering Online’s courses for the KNM (Knowledge of Dutch Society) exam and the A2 language exams. Like all the courses on the site, it features helpful videos, grammar explanations, practice exercises and mock exams.

Course founder Bart Nawijn brings a more personal touch to online learning. Photo: Inburgering Online

Reassuring

Learning a language can feel daunting, but the course has a very focused approach. It starts with practical information about the exam so you know what you are going to do and what you are working towards. The minimum requirements are outlined and learners are reassured that their Dutch does not have to be perfect to pass the exam. Also reassuring, are the videos created by the site’s designer, Dutch language teacher Bart Nawijn, in which he explains each question type and offers tips.

‘You see my face on the screen and it makes it more personal,’ Bart explains. ‘I realise that studying for an exam is not something you do for fun, and I try to make it positive and to encourage people.’ He adds: ‘I think that schools are often too focused on mistakes and what you did wrong. This leads to a negative learning experience and that’s not my approach at all. I try to guide people so that if they study in the way I tell them, they should easily be able to pass.’ 

Despite being online, the course offers support via email. Students with questions − on a point of grammar, for example − can email Bart, who responds quickly and in detail. This is a personal touch which students particularly appreciate, and is one of the parts Barts enjoys most. ‘I love languages and I put a lot of energy and passion into this project,’ he says.

The online course for B1 gives student feedback on their answers. Photo: Inburgering Online

Easy to use

Inburgering Online’s B1 course, like the A2 and the KNM, is intended to make life as easy as possible for students preparing for the integration exams. ‘The goal of the course is to create a guided self-study course where people don’t need books or fixed classes, and where every student does every exam really well,’ explains Bart.

‘Inburgering Online makes the learning process so much fun,’ says Tamara Zajačková, a Slovakian vet based in Leiden who has been trying out the new B1 programme. ‘The course is easy to use,’ she told DutchNews.nl. ‘Videos are created in a clear way and the emphasis is put on the specific vocabulary and grammar which you need for passing the exam. You get plenty of space to practise the explained content, and after each completed part you can test yourself to track your progress.’

Tamara also appreciates the flexibility of the programme, which lets her work at her own pace. ‘What I find the most convenient is the access to your course through a mobile phone. This way, you can practise any time, anywhere,’ she says. ‘Another plus point is the possibility of adjusting the playing speed of the videos. This is very helpful. I use a slightly slower speed to better understand the explanation of the grammar rules.’

Inburgering Online’s low price and clear structure makes it easy for students. Photo: Inburgering Online

Getting the most out of life in the Netherlands

The B1 is not a new exam, nor is it restricted to applicants sitting it as part of the immigration process. Some people take the exam to demonstrate they have achieved a certain level in Dutch. This may be to impress employers or because it is a requirement of their studies here. For others, it is simply something they want to do as part of their own personal development.

‘B1 really helps you get the most out of society,’ Bart explains. ‘A2 level is very basic. With B1 level, you can do so much more. You are actually able to express a lot of things and have conversations.’ Having B1 in the bag is about more than securing residency rights, he explains, but helps all newcomers get the most out of their time in the Netherlands.

‘In any social environment, this level will help you participate a lot more,’ says Bart. ‘It just makes living here a lot more interesting.’

The B1 course with Inburgering Online starts at €8.95 a month. To find out more about the subscriptions offered by Inburgering Online, visit their website.

Thank you for donating to DutchNews.nl

The DutchNews.nl team would like to thank all the generous readers who have made a donation in latest weeks. Your financial support has helped us to expand our coverage of the coronavirus crisis into the evenings and weekends and make sure you are kept up to date with the latest developments.

DutchNews.nl has been free for 14 years, but without the financial backing of our readers, we would not be able to provide you with fair and accurate news and features about all things Dutch. Your contributions make this possible.

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Sun, 02 Oct 2022 19:30:00 -0500 en-GB text/html https://www.dutchnews.nl/features/2022/10/new-online-dutch-integration-course-sets-learners-up-for-b1/
Killexams : MSc Advanced Process Integration and Design / Course details

A specialised master's in Chemical Engineering, the MSc Advanced Process Integration and Design started in the Department of Chemical Engineering (UMIST) over twenty years ago. The programme was a result of emerging research from the Centre for Process Integration, initially focused on energy efficiency, but expanded to include efficient use of raw materials and emissions reduction. Much of the content of the course stems from research related to energy production, including oil and gas processing.

The MSc Advanced Process Integration and Design aims to enable students with a prior qualification in chemical engineering to acquire a deep and systematic conceptual understanding of the principles of process design and integration in relation to the petroleum, gas and chemicals sectors of the process industries.

Overview of course structure and content

In the first trimester, all students take course units on energy systems, utility systems and computer-aided process design. Energy Systems develops systematic methods for designing heat recovery systems, while Utility Systems focuses on provision of heat and power in the process industries. Computer Aided Process Design develops skills for modelling and optimisation of chemical processes.

In the second trimester, the students choose three elective units from a range covering reaction systems, distillation systems, distributed and renewable energy systems, biorefining, and oil and gas processing. These units focus on design, optimisation and integration of process technologies and their associated heat and power supply systems.

In two research-related units, students develop their research skills and prepare a proposal for their research project. These units develop students skills in critical assessment of research literature, group work, written and oral communication, time management and research planning.

Students then carry out the research project during the third trimester. In these projects, students apply their knowledge and skills in process design and integration to investigate a wide range of process technologies and design methodologies. latest projects have addressed modelling, assessment and optimisation of petroleum refinery hydrotreating processes, crude oil distillation systems, power plants, waste heat recovery systems, refrigeration cycles with mixed refrigerants, heat recovery steam generators, biorefining and biocatalytic processes and waste-to-energy technologies.

The course also aims to develop students' skills in implementing engineering models, optimisation and process simulation, in the context of chemical processes, using bespoke and commercially available software.

Industrial relevance of the course

A key feature of the course is the applicability and relevance of the learning to the process industries. The programme is underpinned by research activities in the Centre for Process Integration within the School. This research focuses on energy efficiency, the efficient use of raw materials, the reduction of emissions reduction and operability in the process industries. Much of this research has been supported financially by the Process Integration Research Consortium for over 30 years. Course units are updated regularly to reflect emerging research and design technologies developed at the University of Manchester and also from other research groups worldwide contributing to the field.

The research results have been transferred to industry via research communications, training and software leading to successful industrial application of the new methodologies. The Research Consortium continues to support research in process integration and design in Manchester, identifying industrial needs and challenges requiring further research and investigation and providing valuable feedback on practical application of the methodologies. In addition, the Centre for Process Integration has a long history of delivering material in the form of continuing professional development courses, for example in Japan, China, Malaysia, Australia, India, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Europe, the United States, Brazil and Colombia.

Mon, 08 Dec 2014 10:41:00 -0600 en text/html https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/list/09760/msc-advanced-process-integration-and-design/course-details/
Killexams : Battista outlines NFL's integration of full contact practices Mon, 17 Aug 2020 02:55:00 -0500 en-US text/html https://www.nfl.com/videos/judy-battista-details-nfl-s-integration-of-full-contact-practices
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